35 Burst results for "Madagascar"

"madagascar" Discussed on CLEANING UP THE MENTAL MESS with Dr. Caroline Leaf

CLEANING UP THE MENTAL MESS with Dr. Caroline Leaf

07:36 min | 7 months ago

"madagascar" Discussed on CLEANING UP THE MENTAL MESS with Dr. Caroline Leaf

"The future. Oh my goodness. Okay, I need to talk to you a whole lot more. I just need to be selfish a little bit and be like, how can I, how can I get more of more of this? Because that makes so much sense. That's to what I have been feeling. Wow, so you just gave so much language to what I've been experiencing. We all need protein. It's important for so many biological functions, including bone health, satiety, or ability to think in both memory and our mental well-being. And as we go through life, protein needs change, so it's important to choose a mix for different life stages and seasons. This is one of the big fan of rituals essential protein. It is delicious. Plant based protein offering three premium formulations for distinct life stages and unique nutrient needs. And made with the same high standards and approach and commitment to traceability that ritual is known for. I add their essential protein for 50 plus to water every day for a quick smoothie and post workout recovery. I also love adding some cold brew to make it a morning pick me up. It's so delicious with a flexible and easy to use subscription service. I never have to worry about not getting enough protein. I especially love that ritual's essential protein at the calcium I need to my dad, helping me to build and maintain muscle mess for healthy active aging. With which was one of a kind visible supply chain, you also know what how and why of every labeled ingredient they use delicious handcrafted vanilla flavor from sustainably harvested, Madagascar vanilla bean extract, as well as other sustainably sourced ingredients that sustainably grow in peace from right here in the USA, made with the complete amino acid profile for daily support. Rich is packed with 20 grams of protein per serving with no added sugar or sugar alcohols. Indeed, all the protein particles also soy free gluten free and non GMO. Are you ready to shake up your protein ritual? My listeners get 10% off during the first three months at ritual dot com slash doctor leaf, which will even offers a money back guarantee if you're not 100% indulgent. Just visit ritual dot com forward slash doctor Lee today for 10% off your first three months. The link in details will be in the show notes. Will you just gave so much language to a concept that's going to help so many people. So we do have to talk more. I've decided to write up front that this needs to be a regular check, not just an hour and then when a book comes out. Because these are very important concepts and I would love to just because I know I want to respect your time and I know that you don't have a huge amount of time left. But I wanted to continue maybe take this concept a little deeper because I think this is so significant in terms of what's happening now with COVID and in a pre-pandemic there was issues and not years three of COVID and the pandemic and all that and how the whole how we've got to be shaken up and you know people always go and it's terrible what's happened and it is terrible what's happened, but it has forced us as humanity to look at the now in our language that we both been saying. Look at the now and you have to look at the past and you have to look at the future we can't just focus on the now and say this is the end of whatever we have to use this moment that we now and understand how we got here and how far we've come and how what we can learn what not to do and move forward into seeing how we want the future to play out. Yes. In terms of your art and your work and just who you are as a person and what you believe in. Oh my goodness, yes. So I have been realizing lately again kind of like I've just been like, why do I keep painting? I literally I'm like, okay, my son's taking a nap. I just go and I started making, yeah, I started making abstract paintings and I'm just so I'm so curious about that, you know, because it's not something that's always been in my life. I haven't, this is I've been doing this for 5 years now, so a while, but it hasn't been my whole life. So it's like, why? Why, why? And I've realized something recently, particularly about abstract painting. And this is why my very, very limited knowledge of quantum physics. I'm just so fascinated by this concept. I'm so interested in making abstract painting because what that does for my mind, it forces me out of this kind of like linear pattern of like do this, do that, do this, do that, do that, do that. Now, I can do that. I can paint very literal illustrations and there's steps in that I have to follow. But for me, making abstract paintings, it almost kind of becomes like a spiritual experience because I enter into it not really knowing where it's going to go. I have a little bit of knowledge of like, okay, these blues, these yellows, the texture. But it's not in this sort of like linear mode that so many other things in my life are that way. So I've started to really honestly truly find peace in realizing wait a second. Maybe I don't have to think of life in this little linear way all the time. I noticed that even when I tell stories about my life, a lot of times there's this tendency to go this happened and this happened and this happened and this happened and this happened. And it's like, yeah, but there were all these other happenings that were connecting to one another that I don't even have the language to explain. So I've just been really for myself just really trying to one, I worry about the future all the time. I find myself just worrying. I'm like, oh, what's going to happen? What's going to happen? And a lot of times I start drawing conclusions based on what I know. But I had to remind myself, I don't know. I don't know that much. Even with my own story, I had an experience not too long ago. And I want to not share the names because it's not fully my story, my story to tell. But I had someone in my life that I had some maybe resentment about how they treated me and how they didn't really, I felt like they didn't see me. I felt like they didn't really honor who I was as a person. And it's not someone that I talk to, it's not like a hard stop speaking. I'm just like, oh, when I was a kid, I felt like you could have been there for me for. And it's not like it wasn't my parents. It was someone do I just saw, that was close to, but I was like, oh, I just felt like you weren't there. And I felt like you were always spending time with this person more. You always saw that person more. Well, that other person ended up passing away. And I thought about it. I'm like, wow, maybe it actually worked out that they got to spend more time with that person because that person had less time on this earth. And it was hard for me to see that as a kid, but I can see it now. They were spending more time with a person who ended up being here less. And that just brought me so much peace because I was like, how many? There are probably an infinite number of stories like that in my own life where I have where I just was like this happened. This happened, this happened and I filled this way about that. And it's like, wow, but wait a second. There's probably a lot of other possibilities and ways to look at the story. So yeah, I don't know what to make sense of that, but it's just something I've just been exploring. I'm like, okay, there's more to this than.

Madagascar USA Lee
"madagascar" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

02:05 min | 11 months ago

"madagascar" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"Not only that, it turns out that the grasses that are in the grasslands are actually can be grouped into two groups. One are the fire adaptive grasses, which are adapted to fire going through it once in a while. And it turns out that in Madagascar, there are actually natural fires happening, what is it? Every three years, two to three years. So you do get fires going on there without human beings starting it. And also it has grazer adapted grasslands or sorry grasses or grass species. So you actually get species that are adapted to either fire or grazing. And secondary grasslands usually don't have such coevolution. I don't know what to really call it. Fair enough. Yeah. So again, it's probably in the mindset of these people. That grasslands are degraded forest, and they should become forced. So I don't know. So what's the problem with planting trees like crazy? If you're doing it for the wrong reasons, it's usually a bad idea. Right. You know, if you plant trees where they don't belong, that's usually a bad idea. You know, planting trees on terrain that snowy or something like that. People sometimes don't realize that trees actually absorb heat, absorb light because they're darker than a lot of landscape. You can actually increase heat by planting forest. Another problem we just planting trees without regard for anything else is that you're not looking at the underlying problem. You're making things too simple. So if you're not correcting the underlying problem, you could be planting trees and it will be deforested at exactly.

Madagascar
"madagascar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:04 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"No conviction That's after the news BBC News I'm John Shay a 5 year old boy in Morocco who fell down a well on Tuesday has died Ryan was recovered from the 30 meter deep well after a huge rescue effort by emergency workers but a short time ago at king Muhammad confirmed that he had died He passed on his condolences to the boy's parents on live television A tropical cyclone has said the east coast of Madagascar with winds of about 180 kilometers an hour Cyclone bats irai had struck less than two weeks after another storm left at least 55 people dead and tens of thousands homeless The first American troops have arrived in Poland as part of a deployment ordered by President Biden to bolster NATO forces as tensions with Russia remain high The soldiers are from the 82nd airborne division Mexican police have found bodies of 16 people in two locations in the central state of zacatecas where a dispute between two drug cartels has escalated in recent months The bodies of ten people were dumped in a street in the city of Fresno The authorities in Peru have authorized the Spanish oil giant rap soul to resume operations at its refinery near the capital Lima for the next ten days La pompeia refinery was shot three weeks ago after more than 10,000 barrels of crude that were being unloaded from a tanker leaked into the sea Officials in the east of the democratic republic of Congo say three civilians have been killed in an attack blamed on the allied democratic forces rebel group it happened in Benny territory in North Kivu province And China has won its first gold medal at the Beijing Winter Olympics on the first full day of the games The host nation won the short track skating mixed team relay Norway has won two golds one in the women's ski Athlon and lettered the biathlon mixed relay And that's the latest BBC World news You're listening to news We go now to Peru where the authorities are given permission to the Spanish oil giant to resume operations at its refinery It was closed down three weeks ago after thousands of barrels of crude oil leaked into the sea but international airline companies have been complaining of fuel shortages Let's speed to our America's editor Leonardo Rossi and Leonardo firstly that oil league How did it happen Leonardo are you sure Yeah it happened The leak happened while tanker was offloading crude oil into the refinery And it happened hours after that explosion of a volcano in Tonga three weeks ago across the Pacific Ocean So it generated the tsunami strong waves and that accident happened about ten to 12,000 barrels of crude winds into the sea very near the capital Lima with devastating effect not only for the environment but for fishermen and for tourism in the area But if it was an accident why did the Peruvian authorities react in the way that they did closing down the operation The situation escalated It's a new left wing government in Peru that's been in power for 6 months after lots of problems corruption instability I think they wanted to make their mark and they say they're not going to get away with that So initially they said that the company had the true extent of the damage and then they accused them of not doing enough to clean up in letting allowing basically the oil to spread to other areas of the country But nonetheless this left wing government has a bowed to pressure from international airline companies Not only international airline companies that there really were struggle struggling to refuel because la pantea refinery provides about 40% of all the fuel in the country It's the biggest refinery And about two thirds of the petrol fuel there are cues in petrol stations outside petrol stations and concerns that in two or three days the country would run out ran out of diesel and petrol So they were in a very difficult situation and they decided to give this temporary allowance for permission for them to reopen for ten days and reps or what they say is it was an accident that they're doing all that they can to clean up and it will all be finished at cleaning up operation by the end of March But ten days time when it closes down again would be left with the same problem of fuel shortages I think there will allow them to reopen because just two days ago the company filed all the papers asking to begin operating again say they've solved the problem It's all safe again and it was an accident And then two days later the government allows them to reopen temporarily I think they will allow them to start operating again normally from next week Leonardo many thanks Leonardo Rocher America's editor You're listening to new Tsar from the BBC I'm Julian Marshall The drums of war tend to beat less loudly at the weekend on the Russia Ukraine border the voices from western capitals and Moscow quieten but this isn't just a war of words tens of thousands of Russian troops remain massed on the border while NATO is beefing up its military presence in the region and today in the eastern Ukrainian city of Harris thousands of people took to the streets carrying national flags to show their patriotic spirit A Ukraine's president volodymyr zelensky said recently that Charlie just 40 kilometers from the Russian border could be the first to be invaded Meanwhile much further to the west the American troops first American troops have arrived in Poland as a part of a deployment ordered by President Biden to bolster NATO forces I heard more from the BBC's Adam Easton in Warsaw It's the first elements of the deployment that have arrived so far In fact it's mainly equipment which has come from Germany the U.S. bases there The bulk of the 1700 soldiers from the 82nd airborne division in North Carolina will be coming into gesture from southeastern Poland not far from the Ukrainian border in the coming hours and days And also a role is envisaged for them Their role is unknown Julian there here on standby but there's been no information about what they will be doing This is a political gesture It's a significant political gesture but it's not a meaningful military reinforcement of course 1700 compared to 100,000 Russian troops massed on the Ukrainian border is not unequal match In July it's a political gesture It's significant There's 1700 increases by more than one third the number of American troops that are already in Poland And if you go back to 2014 when Russia annexed Crimea then president Obama was talking about sending 100 troops to Poland so 1700 is a significant number and one that's been warmly welcomed by Polish leaders including prime minister Matteo mod of the Etsy who described it as an important signal of NATO unity against the potential of Russian military threat Do poles feel the same way as their leaders about the arrival of these U.S. troops Obviously so you get mixed opinions about that but I would say that there's a majority of Polish people support having a U.S. Military presence in Poland and an increased military presence in part because they feel more secure given Poland's history with Russia where we had tsarist occupation for more than a hundred years communist occupation polls understand what it is to suffer under the Russian heal and with Kaliningrad the exclave of Russia which borders Poland missiles can arrive in war so in a matter of minutes So certainly when you get a buildup of Russian troops on the borders of Ukraine that raises anxiety levels in Poland That was the BBC's Adam eastern in Warsaw and as western governments and NATO square up to Russia president Putin has been strengthening ties with China He was in Beijing on Friday for talks with president Xi and the two menaced a statement of posing NATO's eastward expansion With the west threatening sanctions over any military action in Ukraine Russia will look to China to fill the void and signs of Sinai Russian friendship are springing up from a Chinese decorated metro station to increasing trade links But as president Putin and she smiled for the cameras in Beijing what are the limits of the partnership from Moscow our correspondent Kerry Davis sent this report In a snow covered language school in central Moscow the first lesson of Mandarin is scratched out on the blackboard Has been teaching in Moscow for over.

"madagascar" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar" Discussed on WBUR

"Quality chocolate as a 90% dark chocolate from Madagascar I think there's a lot of pretentiousness in the industry Another thing is a lot of people tend to think that the higher the percentage the better the quality And that's another marketing trick which I would advise anyone listening to watch out for It's not the case that because something has 90% cocoa content that it is better than a 60% madagascan single origin You know what I mean It's just the percentage that we see on these chocolate bars only tells you what is the cocoa content It tells you nothing about the quality of that cocoa And I think that's something that is used to it's a very easy thing to convey There's a percentage 90% is better than 60 That's not the case at all What have you found to be the most challenging part of working in the chocolate industry When I was starting out making chocolate attending all of my chocolate classes and really learning the basics I thought tempering chocolate was one of the hardest things to do Can I just ask you to explain very briefly what tempering chocolate means What is it when you temperature chocolate Temperature and chocolate is one of the stages that you go through when you make chocolate So just to give you an idea there are 6 crystal structures inside chocolate and what we're trying to do is to isolate the beta crystal That's the crystal structure which creates smooth shiny and stable chocolate that gives you a good snout So snap would be let's say you take a chocolate bar and you break a piece off It should have a very good snap And when it has that snap you'll know that it was properly tempered So getting to that process takes a bit of science and a lot of skill I think you've seen chocolate makers pour a huge amount of chocolate on a marble slab and you see them doing the tabling method The method that I use so you pour liquid chocolate on a marble table and the point is for your chocolate to reach a certain temperature So you raise it Then you lower the temperature again What you're trying to do with this raising and lowering of the temperature is trying to isolate the crystal and once you do that the whole chocolate becomes stable and tempered And while you're doing that and you reach that certain temperature when you put it in the mold and you can make a chocolate bar with it then it creates a snap and a very good shiny and stable chocolate So when I was learning that was one of the more challenging parts of chocolate making That's what I thought right And then I start learning about treat to bar chocolate and bean to our chocolate that I realized that cacao farming fermentation harvest processing are equally if not more challenging Because I work with the cacao itself the tree and the fruit and every process So the hardest part for me right now as I am learning is the fermentation part because once we harvest the pods you're supposed to go through a process called fermentation And fermentation is a very very important step in chocolate making especially in beans or entry to our chocolate because all the flavor gets developed when the cacao beans are fermented That's what it has in common with chocolate wine beer cheese you know so that's what it has in common with all those products because the yeast and the bacteria and the heat that builds up creates the chocolate flavor and chocolate aroma So that's what turns the white pulp that you see in the cacao pods That's what makes it into the brown cacao beans that people associate more with chocolate So the fermentation is very very important And also very scientific certain temperatures have to be maintained to make sure that the fermentation is done well So lots of technical things to master Correct And Vicki what did you find to be the most challenging aspect of working in chocolate I think the most challenging aspect for me was finding suppliers really in a country where artisanal chocolate is not really a thing And particularly for us we have a big sustainability and environmental concern within the brand so there's a lot of things that we can not and will not use And I think that was the hardest thing Remember I came in from Belgium where you can walk into a shop you can find packaging that fits to chocolate That's not the case in South Africa You really are starting from scratch So for me tempering was fairly easy The whole technical side of it was the first time in my life that I found something that was easy for me But the hardest thing for me was to be able to find for instance a packaging producer who can make boxes for us out of South African groan paper with an FSC stamp on it that is recycled Not recyclable which is very fussy I like to tell people you and I and this phone and the glasses on everything is recyclable if you have the money and the technology But we want to be using recycled material as much as possible And I went through 2030 40 packaging suppliers and they all kind of said to me lady you're not in Europe anymore you can not do that And I said thank you very much And we moved on And eventually we found a spire who was prepared to work with us and we are I think that only chocolate tears in South Africa that have locally made recycled packaging boxes that.

Madagascar Vicki Belgium South Africa Europe
"madagascar" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"It almost <Speech_Male> shows like <Speech_Male> a tourism campaign <Speech_Male> for the country, <Speech_Male> to be honest with you. He's <Speech_Male> quite interesting. The videos <Speech_Male> are quite <Speech_Male> well produced, especially <Speech_Male> this one, and number <Speech_Male> four as <Speech_Male> well. And he's <Speech_Male> extremely fashionable. <Speech_Male> I would like to share <Speech_Male> some of his clothes as well. <Speech_Male> So we're gonna go <Speech_Male> next to number three <Speech_Male> and that's Lion hill, <Speech_Male> lie on here, <Speech_Male> which is one of the <Speech_Male> biggest artists in <Speech_Male> Madagascar at the moment. <Speech_Male> And this song <Speech_Male> is a proper ballad <Speech_Male> and he invited <Speech_Male> another very famous <Speech_Male> musician <Speech_Male> from the country <Speech_Male> elite LED art. <Speech_Male> And the song is <Speech_Male> called see <Speech_Male> hiya la vitra, <Speech_Male> which means in English, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> will not <Speech_Music_Male> go away. Let's have a <Music> listen. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> Everyone <Music> <Advertisement> follows <Music> <Advertisement> up <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> she will take <Music> a no matter <Music> <Music> what <Music> <Music> and <Music> I was on <Music> my participate. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> Lying and go <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> see I <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> love you trying <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> even their ballads <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> are quite cheery, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you know, it doesn't <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> have kind of it <Speech_Male> doesn't feel very sad. <Speech_Male> I couldn't <Speech_Male> actually found <Speech_Male> the lyrics in English <Speech_Male> properly, but you <Speech_Male> know if you look at the video <Speech_Male> they are clearly talking about <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> love and <Speech_Male> there's a sense of <Speech_Male> positivity <Speech_Male> in the air. I might be <Speech_Male> wrong. <Speech_Male> Well, <Speech_Male> in their <Speech_Male> languages, see a <Speech_Male> la vitra, which <Speech_Male> means will not <Speech_Male> go away. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Madagascar <Speech_Male> is exceptional. <Speech_Male> I'm <Speech_Male> very impressed. Where are <Speech_Male> we heading next number two? <Speech_Male> We're heading to Nigeria. <Speech_Male> But to be honest, <Speech_Male> a quiz this song <Speech_Male> has been a global <Speech_Male> hit. <Speech_Male> It's a fantastic <Speech_Male> success story for <Speech_Male> Nigeria. <Speech_Male> This is CK with <Speech_Male> his <Speech_Male> song love one TT <Speech_Male> and this is the <Speech_Male> North African remix <Speech_Male> actually. <SpeakerChange> Let's <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Male> It's a fantastic <Speech_Male> success story for <Speech_Male> Nigeria. <Speech_Male> This is CK with <Speech_Male> his <Speech_Male> song love one TT <Speech_Male> and this is the <Speech_Male> North African remix <Speech_Male> actually. <SpeakerChange> Let's <Speech_Music_Female> have a listen. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> If you leave <Speech_Music_Female> me a good thing <Music> I said <Music> you I like guilt <Music> you not need to <Music> survive I'll <Music> be honest <Music> <Music> love it <Music> <Music> <Music> I'm so <Music> <Advertisement> obsessed <Music> <Advertisement> I'm good <Music> <Music> <Music> and I did it like <Speech_Music_Female> that <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> love that girl <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> so one track <Speech_Male> there that's not <Speech_Male> from Madagascar that's coming <Speech_Male> in at number two <Speech_Male> CK. And they're <Speech_Male> following the food steps <Speech_Male> of basically the whole <Speech_Male> world. I mean, everybody <Speech_Male> loves this track. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> I mean, it's <Speech_Male> so easy on the ear, <Speech_Male> right? Yeah, <Speech_Male> it really is. <SpeakerChange> It really <Speech_Male> is. And number <Speech_Male> one, where are we heading? <Speech_Male> Look who is back. It's <Speech_Male> lie on here again <Speech_Male> with a song <Speech_Male> called ampe, <Speech_Male> which means <Silence> that's <SpeakerChange> enough. Let's <Speech_Male> have a listen. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> I <Music> don't belong <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> mid 2000 <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> find me no <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> team I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> do it as I can as <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I

Nigeria Madagascar
"madagascar" Discussed on UN News

UN News

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar" Discussed on UN News

"This is Matt wells at UN news more than 1 million people in southern Madagascar are going hungry in what the World Food Program WFP believes could become the first ever famine brought on by climate change. Successive years of drought have forced people in rural communities to eat locusts fruit and cactus leaves because they've been unable to plant or harvest sweet potatoes tomatoes and other crops. Alice ramune, WFP communications officer in the capital, Antananarivo, was in the region recently. She said families have been selling prized assets such as cattle, farmland, and even homes to survive. Ramune spoke to dian Penn about the UN agency's support to some 700,000 people with plans to reach more and hopes for the cop 26 climate change conference which opens later this month in Glasgow, Scotland. It's been several years now that Madagascar and especially south of Madagascar is aided by a very civil growth that's people and without any ways to feed themselves. Because with a job and especially with no rain, they are not able to harvest anything because it can plant. They can't always do anything. So they don't have anything to eat right now. And we can say that there is more than 1 million people in search of Madagascar or suffering from hangar right now. Thank you so much Alice. And tell us about that region. What's it like? Because, of course, a lot of people, myself included have never been to southern Madagascar. It's a very rural area. With small villages and many people are living from their fields and from their field prediction. So if there is nothing growing anymore, so you don't have anything to feed themselves and to sell at the market. So now, in some harrier, you can find villages surrounded by fields, but fails out to tell you nothing can rest and sometimes. When some of them are little hope so some seeds and try to irrigate more or less and so something is growing, but it's just a few weeks after because there is no rain. It just drying. So it's quite impressing to see tomato plants, also aren't completely yellow or even brown because they are just dying because of the lack of water. And now WFP are saying that this could be the world's first climate change induced famine. Can you explain why and how? First of all, Madagascar as many countries as buyers seasons are usually there is a price season, rainy season, and so on. But now, the climate is really changing and farmers are really dependent from the climate from the season. They don't really understand its operating, because as for example, more and more wins, stronger win that cover feels from sands and so on. As there is, of course, less rain. So when there is the first rain, they can maybe have hope and so some seeds, but one little rain is not a proper rainy season. So if the first leader rain is not fall out by a second rain and several weeks of rain, it's not enough to have a proper air rest. And everything is dying. Because of the lack of rain. What we can say is that the impact of climate change are really stronger and stronger. People can grow animal. So fails constantly. And so people don't have anything to harvest and.

Madagascar WFP Matt wells Alice ramune Ramune dian Penn UN Antananarivo Glasgow Scotland Alice
More Than a Million People in Drought-Stricken Madagascar Face Food Shortages

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 1 year ago

More Than a Million People in Drought-Stricken Madagascar Face Food Shortages

"Southern madagascar more than a million people urgently need food and thousands faced dire famine conditions. The region is normally hot and dry but multiple years of severe drought have devastated harvests of maize rice and other staple crops on the african island massive dust. Storms and locus have ravaged. What few crops remain. There's very little sign of water on this theory. Little sign of vegetation as well showy fac role as with the world food program which provides emergency food aid in the hardest hit communities. She's met people who've been forced to eat wild. Cactus leaves and tubers to survive rates of severe. Malnutrition have spiked especially among children people. Living day in day out morning tonight every day with empty stomachs as the climate warms. Southern madagascar is expected to grow even hotter with more frequent droughts. None of these people in the south have contributed to the climate crisis. They don't drive cars. They don't like hanes. yes she says. The people of southern madagascar are already suffering the impacts of climate

Southern Madagascar African Island
"madagascar" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

07:24 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"You couldn't call it fast. Fashion simon peers and his team spent almost a decade on their creations unique textile pieces made of shimmering golden spider silk. And it's no wonder it took so long workers. In madagascar harvested the from almost two million spiders three of the four rare garments will soon be on display in london as part of an exhibit of rare objects connected to the natural world. We reached textile designer. Simon peers in antananarivo madagascar simon. I know is difficult to put into. Words what these garments look like. But can you give it your best shot k. There three textiles on on show to them. I suppose best described as shoals so the rectangular pieces the bright yellow color sort of golden yellow color. The third textile is larch brocaded woven textile which is based on a tradition of. I guess weaving with very elaborate patterns on the surface. And what are the. What are the the patterns that you have over into it. The patents will. They're very idiosyncratic. Very jim metric patterns. Which apart of a tradition of weaving from the highlands of madagascar which caught my many many years ago. And i think it's just wonderful extraordinary. They're hard to describe that sort of like more like stylized flowers and maybe bird patterns. It's hard to say exactly. There's a lot of conjecture as to what the original source was. But they're they're very unusual geometric patterns and is down. There's one of the The the garden instead actually has spiders woven into its or images of spiders. Is that right. Yes that is right so the the one piece which is not on show which is a cape. The cape is covered in Embroidered images of spiders and plants and other things going on it as she tells many stories in fights but The obvious one is anything to do with spiders and everything to spiders. Just get into this paris. This what does it i understand. The fabric feels quite extraordinary against the skin yet. I have never worn anything that we've made. I have to say that and one or two people actually walnut cape. But what i do know. Is that if you get a large handful of the silk putting it into one's hand it doesn't actually figuring thing it's quite uncanny so if you close your eyes and place the silcon someone's hand the sensation you have. Is the heat reflected from your hand back onto your hands. So it's really quite bizarre. And i caught all scientists are. I can't explain it. But it is sort of the invisibility cloak type thing. I mean it really is. It's unlike ordinary sealed. It is a huge undertaking and requires literally millions of spiders. How did you do it. Well i sort of go back in time because the story of people trying to do this goes back several hundred years so back in the eighteenth century. Someone tried to do this. And it was repeated one or two times after that and the last time really anyone tried to do was in madagascar at the end of the nineteenth century and they manage to produce silk which was used as a bed hangings and after that whole thing died out so i thought when i was living in started giving guess garin was interesting textiles that this was a sort mad apocryphal story than discovered. It wasn't and then thought well wanted to try and do it because no one's done it since then and that's how it sort of started that was the germ of the idea and then was a lot of trial and error and also trying to find out how they did it back in the eighteen nineties all right so the spiders themselves. What did they look like. Well this part of the you see is the female and the female is a large spot when it's full grand spider. It's sort of would sit in the palm of your hand and fill the palm of your hand basically so it's a big spider. The male is minute of not bigger than your digital fingernail sorta thing. It's a very small thing and usually ends up being lunch for the female. The female is well. I like spy this otherwise. I wouldn't be doing this and they're very very beautiful. I think and when you say it would fit in the palm of your hand would you put it in. The palm of your hand is a spider. That with ethan's mate youtube they do bites the obviously. If it's provoking anyway will bite. You has a very minute amount of poison in that bites which doesn't have any effect on human does on another insect but it does have very short sort of pinson manuals and that will will punch the skin and actually hurt. But they didn't do any harm having said that the people who've been involved in this whole project over the years it's the women who've been in the ones who don't mind being bitten. Basically the men run away from the spiders and want to handle the the. The women have theaters but they but they have. The women have been in harvesting this threat. Right so how difficult is that to do well. It is quite difficult. Soak is literally extracted directly from the spider's abdomen. One trade obviously is far too fine to us. We need about twenty four threads together which pulled twist at the same time in a threat which we can then start as a basis for going onto doing things and do these spiders. Get to go home at the end of the day or what happens to them. Yeah they they absolutely do so. We collected the spiders in the morning and release them again in the afternoon. No harm came to the spiders. Basically doing this. I mean it it taken off longtime but we managed it. It has taken years in order to get enough for these garments. And so what will they. What happens to them now. They're going to be on this show and then do they become part of somebody's wardrobe. One day well. I thought it'd be nice to think that the couple of the may end up you know in the public collection somewhere in the museum collection. I think that would be place. But who knows i mean might be if they are being auctioned off. Do you think that that somebody might purchase it and where to dinner and spill superindent. Well i think it would be to go out and wear it with the chance of soup being spilt. That would be tempting faith. It's more i sorta cabinet of curiosities but you never know. I want to say what might happen. Signed it just sounds extraordinary. Work extraordinary pieces and so i appreciate speaking with you about it. Thank you over by. Simon peers is textile designer. He was intendant areso. Madagascar.

madagascar simon peers Simon peers antananarivo madagascar jim metric walnut cape garin simon london paris pinson ethan youtube Madagascar
"madagascar" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Seeing one in three children with acute malnutrition you know. These are well beyond emergency levels of malnutrition so currently catholic. Relief services treating about twenty five thousand malnourished children this year. That's a lot of children. What is the government in madagascar doing about this crisis right now. The government of madagascar is playing a large active role but more in terms of coordination. And planning they. Just don't have the funding available to support the needs and the south of madagascar so madagascar's relying on mostly humanitarian assistance. And there are a number of organizations responding sierras world food program and a number of donors. Us aid as providing an enormous amount of money for the needs in the south There's also the world bank So there's definitely money and support coming. It's not enough and we worried that some of the assistance will come late or that will dry up because the south of madagascar really needs long support. The emergency support is definitely needed. But it won't stop the problem. What we need is investments that will improve education that will improve the health system that will help farmers adapt and start using climate-smart techniques..

madagascar south of madagascar Us
"madagascar" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

06:38 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar" Discussed on Today, Explained

"A survey found that millennials can spin around ninety minutes a day swiping on dating apps. Recant find ourselves in a relationship with someone else. If we don't know who we are. I that's professional matchmaker. Margin bobby of three day rule. There's no one-size-fits-all for everybody but shopping around is important. I can feel a little exhausting. But you you gotta go through right. Everyone does in the end. The things you look for when comparing potential mates are unique to you. So why not find a credit card or loan that fits you just as personally. Linden tree is a one-stop marketplace where you can easily compare loans credit cards insurance and more so not only do you save money. You save time and that means more time to spend with your special someone find leading tree on the app store or go to linden tree dot com to learn more terms and conditions apply in. Mls number one one three six one of the most biodiverse places on the planet is an island nation off the coast of east africa. Your favorite kids might be obsessed with it thanks to some anthropomorphic animated movies in madagascar. There actually aren't any penguins or lions but it is a beautiful amazing country with beaches and forests. It's an enormous island that spans the distance would which would be the equivalent of going from the canadian border. All the way to florida and madagascar has an amazing biodiversity. For example there are three hundred fifty frogs hundred one. Lemurs and it's it's different depending on where you are the north of madagascar Central areas is very green and lush with forests and then in the deep south. It's really try and desert like this days. At wasteland and southern madagascar was once arable and fertile but years of drought mean only a few patches of green remain this year. The south of madagascar is really in crisis. Food seeds children who are malnourished. One million people are suffering and really needs the court it took in the morning. I prepare this plate of insects because we have nothing else to eat and no rain to allow us to harvest. What we have sown so madagascar is different than some of the other countries. That experience food insecurity like yemen ethiopia. Madagascar that causes not conflict or political issues. The problem in madagascar is really about climate related issues like no rainfall unpredictable rain. So farmers don't know when to plant and people in the south of madagascar are subsistence farmers so they rely on rain to make sure their crops grow tanya your on the ground bare in madagascar's capital antananarivo with catholic relief services. This famine is the first of its kind one we know was caused by global warming. And we know that even though this region is typically dry the south is known for being very dry and this has been going on for over a decade but this year has been much worse so a much longer period of time where people don't have food a lot more people who are going to bed hungry so the amount of time where people are suffering and the extent to which people are suffering is much more. I've been working in madagascar for over four years. And i've been going to the south regularly and this year visiting the south. I was even more struck and saddened by what's happening. People are digging for yams. let you hold what. It's now nearly two years. Since we had a harvest all we can do search for edible roots. Fortunately since it rains the crickets hatched and that has saved us. People are walking fifteen twenty miles to find. Cactus fruit to sell an eat. People are not eating at night missing meals. Eating last migrating as the situation becomes unbearable. Thousands of fleeing to more hospitable regions climate migration has skyrocketed in just a few months. We collect data every month from the same participants in the south to better understand trends in the south and in november of last year we saw the number of people who sold assets were five times from last year. And now we're not seeing this probably because they don't have much left to sell. I hit and sold our land for just twenty euros. Even that was huge after we'd spent or we left. We didn't have anything to eat. That's how we ended up here. I saw people complaining about you. Know constantly leaping hungry. I met this man named beau belo. Who sold everything. He had showed me his clothes and said this is all. I have laughed. I've sold my kitchen items. I've sold my clothes. What i'm wearing is what i'm left with. I'm going out to eat cactus fruit and very little else. I met a woman villa ilisu who walked for a whole week with her whole family her whole community to try to find something to make ends meet and survive. She had one child who was very thin Who.

madagascar yemen ethiopia east africa app store penguins Mls lions antananarivo florida beau belo villa ilisu
"madagascar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"So <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> this foreign agent <Speech_Male> law requires you <Speech_Male> to put these <Speech_Male> massive <Speech_Male> ugly <Speech_Male> legal disclaimer <Speech_Male> on top of everything <Speech_Male> published <Speech_Male> and that includes <Speech_Male> your social media <Speech_Male> and also <Speech_Male> your <Speech_Male> promotional materials <Speech_Male> and as you <Speech_Male> can imagine not. <Speech_Male> Many advertisers are <Speech_Male> prepared to see these <Speech_Male> massive legal <Speech_Male> disclaimer. declaring <Speech_Male> this information <Speech_Male> is published <Speech_Male> by new organization <Speech_Male> declared foreign <Speech_Male> agent on top of every <Speech_Male> piece of sponsored <Speech_Male> content medusa. <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Male> immediate effect was that <Speech_Male> ninety percent. Divide advertisers <Speech_Male> fled <Speech_Male> and a business <Speech_Male> model was ruined. <Speech_Male> We had to <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> self inflict <Speech_Male> massive cuts <Speech_Male> all across the board had <Speech_Male> to lay off people. <Speech_Male> We had to get <Speech_Male> rid of offices <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> it just increases workload <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> puts a huge <Speech_Male> bureaucratic pressure and asked <Speech_Male> which prevents us <Speech_Male> from doing actual <Speech_Male> journalistic work <Speech_Male> and it's just <Speech_Male> makes life <SpeakerChange> <Silence> significantly difficult <Speech_Male> well. <Speech_Male> These labels are <Speech_Male> existential. As you said <Speech_Male> you've <Speech_Male> worked abroad. <Speech_Male> Alex say you know about <Speech_Male> the relative freedom. <Speech_Male> Journalists have in places <Speech_Male> other than russia. <Speech_Male> now you're <Speech_Male> based in moscow. You still <Speech_Male> work in independent journalism. <Speech_Male> Did you ever think that <Speech_Male> russia would return to a <Speech_Male> place where terms <Speech_Male> like extremes <Speech_Male> organization and foreign <Speech_Male> agent are so common <Speech_Male> or <SpeakerChange> was that always <Silence> a concern for you. <Speech_Male> I don't <Speech_Male> think the word <Speech_Male> return applies <Speech_Male> here. Because i don't <Speech_Male> think we've ever been <Speech_Male> in a situation like this <Speech_Male> not <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> time. Which had its own <Speech_Male> problems. But i don't <Speech_Male> think the term <Speech_Male> foreign agent which <Speech_Male> would be <Speech_Male> applied so broadly <Speech_Male> to hundreds of thousands <Speech_Male> of people and so <Speech_Male> many organizations <Speech_Male> even existed in <Speech_Male> the soviet union. So yeah <Speech_Male> it's pretty. It's pretty unprecedented. <Speech_Male> We <Speech_Male> are in unchartered. Words <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> where does this leave <Speech_Male> you and your work. Then <Speech_Male> if essentially <Silence> you <SpeakerChange> cannot work <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> while we still <Speech_Male> can't work <Speech_Male> because we <Speech_Male> haven't yet and <Speech_Male> hopefully never will <Speech_Male> be designated <Speech_Male> as an undesirable <Speech_Male> organization <Speech_Male> like another investigative <Speech_Male> outfit product <Speech_Male> which makes them <Silence> just simply <Speech_Male> illegal. <Speech_Male> Which makes any <Speech_Male> collaboration <Speech_Male> with them. An illegal <Speech_Male> acts. We're <Speech_Male> not get there. The <Speech_Male> foreign agent designation <Speech_Male> just makes work significantly <Speech_Male> harder <Speech_Male> and it's designed <Speech_Male> to be so so <Speech_Male> it's designed <Speech_Male> to hamper. I work in <Speech_Male> very petty <Speech_Male> and addictive bureaucratic <Speech_Male> way but we <Speech_Male> can still work. We <Speech_Male> don't know how long it's gonna <Speech_Male> last that. I'm <Speech_Male> gonna stick around <SpeakerChange> to see <Speech_Male> him. <Speech_Male> Aleksei kovalyov <Speech_Male> is an investigative <Speech_Male> editor at medusa <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> russian-language news <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> outlet speaking with us <Speech_Male> about the kremlin's bus <Speech_Male> recent crackdown <Speech_Male> on russian <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> independent media and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> politics <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> aleksei. Good luck <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> thank you <SpeakerChange> very much for <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> being with us. Thank <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you <Speech_Music_Male> finally today. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> A little over <Speech_Male> two weeks ago. Videos <Speech_Male> on social media <Speech_Male> showed the streets <Speech_Male> of cities and cuba <Speech_Male> filled with protesters <Speech_Male> then. <Speech_Male> Suddenly the video <Speech_Male> stopped <Speech_Male> the cuban government shutdown <Speech_Male> the internet <Speech_Male> there one <Speech_Male> communications <Speech_Male> length though <SpeakerChange> remained <Speech_Male> open <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> amateur <Speech_Male> radio hobbyists <Speech_Male> in cuba were sharing <Speech_Male> news with other <Speech_Male> hobbyists across <Speech_Male> the water in florida <Speech_Male> then <Speech_Male> the frequencies they <Silence> were using were blocked <Speech_Male> a radio operator <Speech_Male> near miami <Speech_Male> w seven <Speech_Male> h you. <SpeakerChange> Alex <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> sounded the alert <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement>

"madagascar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"You might question. it's not just about beauty. She says people get into. Mermaid are athletic and like to challenge themselves lou young. The diving instructor says the pandemic and the related travel restrictions have only increased interest in the sport without being able to travel to exotic locations to scuba dive. For example people are turning to diving activities closer to home one student at the diving centre long. South korea had another motivation to learn how to mermaid. The shaw i love ocean. Animals and i want to follow them. She says i think in a past life. I was a fish and i want to return to the ocean and be efficient again. That's why i keep training. Instructors say that idea that humans should respect underwater. Animals in their environment is what they hope. These numerous rates will take away with them for the world. I'm rebecca can't they're in shanghai. We've got photos. From a chinese mermaid training center no gills needed. That's at the world dot. Org the kremlin is doubling down on its suppression of all things associated with alexei navalny. The opposition politician is already in jail after surviving a poisoning attempt now. Moscow is blocked nearly fifty websites that he's connected to the government said the websites promoted propaganda and banned extremist. Activity joins us now from moscow as alexei kovalyov. He's an investigative editor at medusa. A russian language news outlet. I say first of all remind us of the current status of aleksei navales political organization well for all intents and purposes as of june divinely and either gonna sation are illegal. It's now in illegal extremist organization so any contact and engagement with carries significant legal consequences but also extralegal even if you're not donating to anti-corruption foundation and all of its associated grassroots organizations even if you're just expressing support tweet if you are a career position your career is over so you not running for office ever again and the kremlin has a lot of tools at its disposal to a bar you from ever running orange politics again. So that's where we are so anything to do with an accent is now off limits and that also retroactively disenfranchises hundreds of thousands of people who have ever communicated or engaged one organization in any way in the bustiers so to say the least navales organizations already in a difficult place essentially frozen. Why would the kremlin take the further. Step shut down the organization's websites. Well because they can. It's the process result. They want to not just bar nonviolently anyone however essentially connected to him from engaging in russian politics in anyway but the also wants to raise a trace of their existence. That's how it works. This machine doesn't just doesn't stop somewhere. it's just. It keeps rolling race existence. I mean we should remember. As i said nevada's imprison a lot of his allies are also imprisoned or in exile. I mean what's the kremlin's motivation behind all this censorship and political crackdown. Same answer because they can and also because seen as essential threat to their existence so they will not stop anything. I mean we've already passed the chemical warfare stage so at this point looking website seems pretty mild. I mean it's also interesting. The language the kremlin uses the legal language navales organization has been labeled an extremist organization by the state other groups and individuals have been labeled foreign agents. Explain these terms for us and would affect. They actually have well. It's pretty easy for me because medusa organization is also for an agent. Now right so it's pretty mild compared to what's happening to wiliness people so it's a first stage and raising you. If you're a declutter foreign agent. It's pretty much self inflicted death by thousand cuts. because it's not the kremlin who bands you or poisoning or arises from existence. You have to do that yourself. Because there isn't significant bureaucratic burden on you. If you're a foreign agent not illegal per se but you have to file these very intimidating quarterly reports to the ministry of justice and also other effects of these designations that if you're a media organization your sources will be afraid to talk to you. Well as he said. I'll say i mean this is not theoretical. Your organization has been labelled a foreign agent. How's that affected medusa. And your own work first of all. If you are for profit meteorologist me do the business. We make money on ads..

lou young alexei navalny alexei kovalyov aleksei kremlin South korea rebecca shanghai Moscow moscow legal language navales organiz medusa organization government nevada ministry of justice
"madagascar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"An indoor pool in shanghai christina bow. A music teacher is learning how to swim like a mermaid. Her teacher gives her tips on how to move her body through the water bottle. It says the appeal is simple tax tax. No one can resist a bikini top and along fishtail. She says the first time. I thought i thought to myself i must become a mermaid that was on a vacation. She took an indonesia several years ago beta tall pool to dive in so envious. She says everyone was diving. And all i could do was wear a life vest. I wanted to be like them and feel comfortable in the water. Not just watch others. In chinese mermaid translates to human fish and the term can be used for all genders instructor. Rachel long so so far. Her students have mostly been woman. Who wants to post mermaid photos onto their social media. Feeds the classes include a photo shoot with a wide range of mermaid tails to try on those away down job. Learning mermaid diving is really about looking beautiful and taking glamour shots. She says it's about toning your body and showing off your curves but there's more to it than the novelty says diving instructor lulu young. There are health benefits to especially for postpartum recovery and for people who work long hours in front of a computer. Actually the whole body has to get into the movement. So it's very good for recover the muscles and the body shape keep finis. You honor the water. The buoyancy will flow moscow. It's very good for relaxation. Even though she was already an accomplished diver she says learning to be. A mermaid requires a whole different skill set. It was hard. I i start to slow myself. Dung and to get to know how to use my body muscle to control the movement to make it very elegance very slow and very joyful. I want to experience it myself. So i put on a mafia and slide into.

shanghai lulu young indonesia Rachel moscow Dung
"madagascar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"A year for aspen to fill their order for four hundred million cova nineteen doses if they get enough supplies for the world. I'm alana The island nation of madagascar in the indian ocean continues to suffer from its worst drought in four decades. The lack of rain in southern madagascar led to crop failure and mass hunger. The un's world food programme's has more than a million people don't have enough. Food and tens of thousands are on the brink of starvation joining me to discuss the situation as shelley mackerel. The world food program last week you wrapped up a month. Long trip shelley to the most impacted reaches a madagascar. Tell us what you saw. Incredible logistically quite a treacherous journey to even get to the south. I started my journey on a sunday. I actually breached the south of four days later. These roads that are fairly impassable sort imagine driving over rocks. Full seven to eight hours then. Driving across bridges normally would stay flowing. Rivers gushing streams. This is cracked stunned. A gusts of winds almost halley type sandstorms that sweeping across a land. Which would not be. You'd be cultivating rice or maize is just crops and empty. What were people actually eating. Then when you were there apart from the russians that we give them often edges foraging eating whatever they can find that is planned studies leaves. That is this red. Cactus fruit is what we call survival coping mechanisms. There's a word in malagasy cooled kerry kennedy means empty stomach children who met some of the treatment centers for severe acute malnutrition. Children who you would look us in. You would think they were tiny toddlers but they probably five or six years old because poor nourishment under development obviously affects a child's growth. When you sit in the centers it's just silence. No energy children to laugh to speak i. I met one brother and sister who mother was in the field. I asked both the little boy and the little girl his sister what their names were they barely could lift their is to look at me and it was so sad to see tiny tiny children whose childhood is just spin stolen from them. The root causes of food insecurity can be pretty complex often political economic and climatic factors but the world food program has stated that in the case of madagascar climate. Change is the number one driving force. Explain that why is that believed to be so instead of the gas got monaco. It's absolutely apparent because of no rain and whenever it does rain it's never enough rain. It's not the right sort of rain. Thunderstorms swept across and destroy the land. Where you would normally be harvesting this community of people. One point three million people who are food insecure. They've done nothing to contribute to climate change. They don't burn fossil fuels and yet they are living on the front line of what is a deteriorating situation. So what kind of solutions is a world food program proposing short and long term. And where's the government of madagascar and all of this. So we all will concede with the government amount augusta and they will probably say the same as well. It's resources it's attention. It's awareness the wolf who program we've been asking for seventy eight point six million dollars to help get people out to this desperate situation. We are looking at other ways where we can help varmus who've lost their land to work in other means or give my car insurance so give some.

madagascar shelley mackerel kerry kennedy indian ocean aspen shelley un monaco augusta varmus
"madagascar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"World. Russia is now blocking websites associated with opposition leader. Aleksei navalny who accuses the government of poisoning him. This supporters shrug it off. I mean we've already passed the chemical warfare cage so at this point looking website stoops pretty mild view from moscow. Coming up on the world. I'm marco werman this is the world. We're co production of gbh boston npr. X. almost two months after a runoff election peru gets a new president tomorrow. Pedro castillo a rural schoolteacher will wear peru's right red and white presidential sash and take the oath of office. The was latin. America correspondent or valencia. Reports baidu is politically divided. You see that. A few days ago when members from the two leading parties in congress faced off on national television. I've community style carlo up more. Not your congressman lewis. Messiah is with the right wing up allowed the main opposition party agrees dying for and congresswoman bits. Each of us is a member of the leftist leader. Which is the president's party. China's and messiah debated president elect bidder casinos biggest and most controversial proposal. Rewriting bit constitution gives them too soon. Saw ovaries chavez said. Congress shouldn't change the new constitution without input from farmers and indigenous groups sees it differently and it's not altogether rewriting baidu's constitution would be illegal or prove politics is very hard to predict. Garrincha is a political scientist in lima and my area of solicitation is populism byron chair specializes in populism across the andes president elect custody joe's challenges to writing a new constitution are the same. He'll face in governing a divided. Congress led by an assertive opposition. Even though custody. Joe roast power on a popular wave against political and economic elites in the capital of lima baronet. Chairs has goes strength. As an outside candidate will be vulnerability as president. He comes from outside the usual circles of political economic and social influence so he has very little connections to the levers of power and to people and groups that could lend him their support. Think know them they know him. But whose congress is unicameral it has only one chamber with one hundred and thirty members representing the country's thirty two million people custody. Joe's party is not just in the minority chest. Says it's also divided the question to me for the first few months or weeks. Maybe is what will be your decide regarding the leader of his party. Mitterrand around vladimir cerrone is in avowed marxist leninist about an chess s. gusty joe has sought to distance himself from around. But not too much. Reseller sarasota blah google as a political science professor at the national university in st joe's home province of homolka kish international law constitutional law and tax law seller. Sarasola buco agrees. The opposition in congress will restrain custody. Joe's biggest ambitions sing embargo. Supposedly are up or kill precedent equator. Pooku says gusty. Joe needs to lower his expectations. His party may not be able to rewrite the constitution but they might be able to implement some tax reform jokic In congress tyrod show explains that for example raising taxes on extractive industries. Mining isn't possible underpaid who's constitution custody has promised to do so to spend more on education and health solicits hoopla pogo says perhaps gusty just party and congress could instead pass reform on that part of the constitution and yet gusty joe's biggest challenge may be just staying office. Altogether precedents yellow. It's not maybe that could all continue political. Salazar supply pogo explains that removing the president from office has become a political tool that congress uses like a nuclear weapon and the used it and the last presidential term for different people held the office in five years the first three were accused of corruption for the world. I'm core valencia this week. A manufacturing plant in south africa shipping its first doses of corona virus vaccines across the continent. This is an important development until now africa had been importing. It's cove shots as the world's alana gordon reports manufacturer has a very tall order to fill. The numbers are stark globally. More than three billion cova. Nineteen vaccines have been administered. One percent or less of those are in africa at the start of this year. The hope is in kovacs the main. Who initiative to distribute vaccines equitably around the globe in february the first shipment of vaccines made an india arrived at the international airport in ghana's capital within a few days in is the on a nurse in.

congress Aleksei navalny marco werman gbh boston npr Pedro castillo baidu congressman lewis peru Garrincha Joe roast lima Joe's party valencia Mitterrand vladimir cerrone gusty joe national university in st joe homolka Sarasola buco moscow
"madagascar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Graduation means that my time is running out. Ironically i was definitely not a happy thing named joe. She's june visa will expire when he graduates but his immigration issues started long before that he and his parents left their home country of india when joshi was a toddler and came to the us. When i'm joshi was just ten years old they now live in katy near houston. My dad came as a high. Skilled worker is a instrumentation engineer. The oil and gas industry so my family came to houston with him with his dad's work visa. The family applied for green card. Which would give them a path to citizenship but because of the way green cards are distributed with specific country caps people from india base long backlogs. Here's joe she's dad giant. Who says it will take decades. Before he'll get his green card mine was fired in two thousand twelve. Vid bill thing. It will take another thirty years for me. Giant is still protected by the work that he came on but if he quits his job before those thirty years he'll also be forced to leave. Andy says he'll likely leave earlier. If nothing happens to speed up the green card backlog if nothing happens and five. I'm just gonna leave. The country lee frustration a frustrated but his son Joshi may have to leave right away because when he turned twenty one he aged out of his dad's work visa protections and green card eligibility is student. Visa was the only thing that allowed him to stay when he graduates those protections and he joins other young immigrants who face a similar fate. They came legally to the us as kids under their parents work visa. That as adults are no longer eligible to stay in the us unless congress takes action the issue springs from the growing greencard backlog for families many from india who came to the us for jobs. The us is the country that i've known the longest and yet i'm in danger of having to leave immigration advocates estimate. At least two hundred thousand people are confronting the same problem aging out of visa protections. Deep towel founded improve the dream and national advocacy group and says four years ago. This issue wasn't on lawmakers radar but now along the way there's been some good successes patel says kids of these high skilled workers were included in the dream and promised act legislation that passed the house in march and was created to protect undocumented. Docker recipients. I don't see us as being different any child who grew up here whether it was with the documents status or undocumented status deserves to Stay bill faces republican opposition. Though patel says there's a chance protections could also come while pass in the twenty twenty two budget. I asked him if he's discouraged looking at how long daca recipients have fought still with no permanent solution. He's not as on the contrary. The next six to twelve months are probably the most hopeful that i think i've been because it seems like there are multiple avenues that are possible. Potala may be hopeful but on a mission. I'm juicy is concerned about what's going to happen next. If he's unable to find a work or student visa to remain in the us with his parents and little brother younger brother were pretty close. And i'll have to separate from my parents and my brother and says if this issue isn't solved in the next decade his younger brother will face similar fate for the world. I'm elizabeth trove all in. Houston you're with the.

joshi india houston joe us katy patel Giant Andy lee Docker congress Potala elizabeth Houston
"madagascar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

09:42 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Thousands of people in france have been protesting this and other measures saying these mandates infringe on personal freedoms meanwhile several other european countries are moving in the same direction. Hungry for example says it's making vaccines for all healthcare staff obligatory. Belgium is reportedly considering the move and poland. Says it's also mulling it over for the world. I'm lydia mainly due in athens in russia. There's a green light for a new vaccine. Trial the ideas to combine a first dose of the russian vaccines but nevi with a second dose of the british astrazeneca shot. Russia's still has a lot of jams left to give only about twenty percent of russians have been vaccinated with vaccine hesitancy high across russia. Join me now to discuss. All of this judy twig. She's a global public health expert at virginia commonwealth university. And in fact. Judy your specialty in public health is russia and your asia. Before we talk this new vaccine cocktail the russians are gonna be trialing. Generally what is a current state of the pandemic in russia they've been hit pretty hard with the delta variant so caseloads and deaths from covered nineteen have increased significantly over the last month to six weeks. Vaccine rates are incredibly low opinion polls show somewhere between fifty and sixty percent of the population says they will not get vaccinated under any circumstances when this new wave of the delta variant hit about six weeks ago. The government started to take some more proactive measures in trying to get people vaccinated and yet they still seem to be roughly around a feeling of about a quarter of people with at least one shot and only about sixteen percent of people. That have had both doses. So that's the background judy. For this trial that will start with a first dose of sputnik the followed by a second dose of astrazeneca. What health experts in russia hoping to learn. Obviously they're hoping to learn some science the astrazeneca vaccine and this the vaccine are based on the same adna viral platform. So it's an interesting piece of science to see how these two vaccines that are tweaks. Basically of a very similar vaccine work together. It's a relatively small trial but it's significant that it's the first western vaccine that will be at least legally administered on russian soil to me. What's significant about. This trial is that it is an effort to increase the legitimacy of the sputnik z. Vaccine despite v. vaccine was the first one in the world to be approved by any national regulatory authority back in august of last year the russians rolled it out a little too quickly made a lot of premature claims about its safety and efficacy and they've been playing catch up ever since then trying to convince people that this is a safe and effective vaccine which looks like it is but they think gain an extra ara of credibility when they're working together with a respected western vaccine like astrazeneca so you mentioned the addenda virus platform that's what both these vaccines are based on neither of them. Use the marin rene technology so how might mixing these two vaccines improve efficacy and help people even though they're both based on an ad no viral platform. They're still coming at the virus in slightly different ways new. They're using slightly different techniques to teach the immune system how to fight off the virus. And so we're hoping to learn more about how that works by combining these two vaccines together. So judy mentioned earlier. That authorities in russia of tried requiring vaccinations for public sector workers some restaurants and cafes insisting on vaccine proof what else can be done because this is not just a problem in russia. The us is right behind russia in terms of global vaccine. Hesitancy there are many different tactics. I think that need to be put into place because the vaccine hesitant population in united states in russia. Anywhere isn't monolithic. There are many different reasons that different groups of people have for being hesitant to take the vaccines. Some of them will found familiar to anyone. Following vaccine hesitancy in the united states and western europe and other places in the world. There's a distrust of authority. There are plenty of conspiracy theories about the vaccine. I think in russia a large part of it will be just standard tolls that we've had in place for decades to try to overcome vaccine hesitancy. Finding out who the influencers are at the community level. And here we're getting down into individual communities churches mosques neighborhoods workplaces social media nodes and finding out who the people are that have the capacity to influence large numbers of the folks in their networks. And making sure that the right kind of scientifically grounded messages. Get out through. Those influencers. Judy twig global public health expert at virginia commonwealth university. Speaking with us about a new vaccine trial in russia combining sputnik v and a. Second dose of oxford's astrazeneca. Judy thank you very much. Thank you my pleasure. You're listening to the world. I'm marco werman you're with the world as the biden administration struggles to cope with an influx of migrants at the us mexico border. It's announcing a big shift. In immigration policy asylum cases can now be fast tracked at the border. After an initial screening sound seekers who do not qualify for entry can be swiftly. Sent away the policy known as expedited removal. Randy caps has been following the. He's the director of research with programs. At the migration policy institute in washington explain the basics of expedited removal randy. Few would who exactly will it. Apply to expedited. Removal is another form or procedure that the border patrol can use to sometimes bypass immigration courts. It means that the presumption is that that individuals who was arrested by the border patrol doesn't go before immigration judge but instead can be fast-tracked deported expedited removal does however still allows someone to claim asylum in when they do so then they get an initial interview with us asylum officer so just to be clear. Is this forced removal. And if it is where are these individuals or families sent back to their home countries. It is fourth removal. Only if they don't have a valid asylum claim and that's a pretty low bar so most of them will pass that why does biden administration wanted us his policy. What problem do they say. It's all well. They've been accused of catch and release. Which is the phrase that people who want stricter control use when describing this process of giving the basically a piece of paper to go into the immigration court process and then letting them loose in the united states and i think what the biden administrations attempting to do is to make the process a little bit more controlled and sharing that they can get that family through the at least the initial stages in much more controlled setting expedited removal does sound like it will make things easier for administration at the border but lawyers and immigration advocates. Must see this differently. Well from an immigration advocate or defense attorney point of view. The essential thing is that whether they're an individual or family get that right to apply for asylum and everything that i've read from what the vitamin ministrations put forward suggests that that will be the case right so explain briefly how the legal constraints and calendar the time restrictions are actually changing the big change. Here's procedural it's that the procedure would not be to go into that immigration court backlog. I it would be to go through the asylum office. I with the understanding that a broader core of asylum officers can handle the cases more quickly so just to be clear. I mean this has been tried. Expedited removal has been tried before by both democrat and republican administration. How has it worked in the past. Most of the time. It's actually been used for adults not families and for people who are unlikely to claim asylum and in those cases it's very speedy there's immigration court involvement. It's a matter of days and sometimes hours using it for families and asylum-seekers is always been tricky because you've got to bring in that extra step of the asylum claiming us uscis officer and the other thing is you can't by law detain a family for very long so that first part of the process has to be done very quickly. If you want that family to be in detention or you have to find another setting where you can do that. Initial credible fear interview with the us. Cis asylum officer. That's randy caps in washington. He's the director of research for us programs at the migration policy institute randy. Thank you very much. Thank you so much for having me on when it comes to young immigrants in the us. We hear a lot about daca deferred action for childhood arrivals. The obama era program protects certain undocumented people in the us from deportation another group of young people who arrived with their parents on work visas also faced uncertainty because of growing visa backlog houston public. Media's elizabeth trove all spoke with one family about what's at stake for them amish joshi types newt in his online economics plus one of his last courses at the university of texas at austin in a matter of weeks joshi plans to graduate with a degree in economics for most. It's an exciting time. But for him..

russia astrazeneca virginia commonwealth universi biden administration national regulatory authority judy Judy us Judy twig marco werman lydia Randy caps athens Belgium migration policy institute Russia france
"madagascar" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"madagascar" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"By aaron baker heatwaves wildfires floods. If there's still any doubt that the summer of twenty twenty one is a turning point for a global awakening over the looming climate crisis. You can add one more plague of biblical proportions to the last famine. The southern part of the island nation of madagascar off the east coast of africa is experiencing. Its worst drought in four decades with the world food program. Warning recently that one point one four million people are food. Insecure and four hundred thousand people are headed for famine. Hunger is already driving people to eat raw. Cactus wild leaves and locusts a food source of last resort the world food program which is on the ground helping with food distribution describes scenes of unimaginable. Suffering with families bartering everything they have even cooking pots and spoons for the paltry tomatoes scrawny chickens and few bags of rice still available in the markets. The next planting season is less than two months away and the forecast for food. Production is bleak rights. Wfp spokesperson shelly. Talk all and a dispatch from the most affected area. The land is covered by sand. There is no water and little chance of rain. The wfp warns that the number of locals facing face five catastrophic food insecurity development speak for famine could double by october and the group has the responsible party squarely in their site. This is not because of war or conflict. This is because of climate change says wfp executive director david beasley historically famines resulted from crop. Failure disaster or pest invasion modern famines are largely considered to be manmade sparked by conflict combined with natural disasters or incompetence and political interference. Madagascar is facing none of those making it. The first famine and modern history to be called solely by climate change alone. It's unlikely to be the last says. Landry nicorette say the africa director for climate advocacy organization. Three fifty dot org in recent years. We've seen climate calamities hitting one country after another before. It was the horn of africa. And now it is madagascar. Tomorrow the cycle will go on may be in the northern part of africa the suhel or the west and unfortunately it is likely to continue happening because of climate change increasing temperatures are disrupting global weather patterns that farmers particularly those in the developing world relied upon for centuries monsoons have become increasingly unpredictable. Starting later than usual showing up in the wrong place or sometimes not showing up at all. This is wreaking havoc in places that depend on rain for agriculture. The southern part of madagascar a lush largely tropical island famous for its biodiversity has experienced below average rainfall for the past five years. Most people in the south depend on rainfed small-scale agriculture for survival but because of the drought rivers and irrigation dams have dried up. The wfp says it needs seventy eight point. Six million dollars to provide lifesaving food for the next lean season in madagascar. But it is going to take a lot more than that to help. The countries most affected by climate change able to adapt in ways that prevent future famines southern madagascar for example will probably need irrigation systems along with more drought tolerant crops and hardier breeds of cattle madagascar. One of the poorest nations in the world is unlikely to be able to afford such innovations on its own as part of the twenty fifteen paris agreement on climate change. Wealthy nations agreed to set aside. One hundred billion dollars a year in climate financing to help developing nations adapt but they have yet to meet that goal and twenty eighteen. The latest year for which data are available donors were still short. Twenty billion dollars but investing in climate change adaptation and mitigation pays dividends in the long run the world bank estimates that climate change could cause more than one hundred forty million people to move within their country's borders by twenty fifty in sub saharan africa south asia and latin america with severe consequences on economic development. Many others will seek to leave their countries entirely. We used to see our brothers and sisters in the suhel leaving because of conflict and looking for better economic opportunities but now it is climate change that is becoming one of the major drivers pushing out people who can no longer cultivate their land. Says new threats say. This is not only going to impact africa but also europe asia and america as well as people seek safer places where they can live. Madagascar may seem far away but the issues should feel close to home. Wherever home might be this famine in madagascar. The heat wave and america the floods in germany. This is an indicator that climate change needs to be taken seriously says nicorette say in the same way the world reacted through the pandemic and were able to get vaccines in less than a year if the world would have reacted in the same way when we started sending the first warning signals of climate change. The situation would be much better than what it is. now meet. lucy bella owner of fancy flowers. Business was slow until lucy received an email wedding date february fourteenth flowers only red roses. Valentine's day the most expensive day for red roses so she used her american express business card. Which gives you the ability to pay overtime with interest so she can buy those red roses. Now talk about love.

madagascar wfp aaron baker africa famines david beasley Landry nicorette africa director for climate ad Madagascar east coast shelly suhel saharan south asia paris latin america america
Dr. Colin Walker on Snake Plants Aka Sansevieria

On The Ledge

01:49 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Colin Walker on Snake Plants Aka Sansevieria

"Well hi folks are. I'm calling walker. I'm currently president of the british koch succulent society. But my eight year presidency is just about to come to an end. I have been interesting growing and studying succulents for just over fifty years. I'm now retired. So i can spend more of my time looking after them. Them and writing about them. I have a lodge collection and two greenhouses conservatory on a porch. I currently live in scotland just gloss so the dry conditions are a bit challenging to what i was used to embed fiche. We hate talk about sense of areas and this has been a subject that people have been requesting pretty much since they thought of making this podcast. And we're finally talking about them dating a whole episode to them and these of grown his popularity in the last few years. But i wonder whether you could tell us. Start off by telling us a bit about where and how they grow in the wild and what conditions are like. I'm guessing they have to be tough because they're from a place where the not getting much moisture sons. Fear is a genus of about eighty species distributed in africa Also there's a couple in madagascar then going east daycare innova beer and his fall eastern burma. There's a severe burn money. I've only ever encountered severe is in the wild once we were on a safari in the eastern province of south africa. And there. I encountered what i am believed to be some severe hyacinth. Authorities are about five species native south africa

British Koch Succulent Society Walker Scotland Madagascar Burma Africa South Africa
The Silver Dollar Vine, Xerosicyos Danguyi

On The Ledge

01:38 min | 1 year ago

The Silver Dollar Vine, Xerosicyos Danguyi

"This week's show is really devoted to a little delve into one particular plant species the silver dollar vine. Zero six dangle dankali. It's an madagascar native that i picked up a couple of years ago now at the characters world live event and the i've rather fallen in love with this succulent foreign. So i hope you'll indulge me chatting to you about this plot for a few minutes in this episode but you know what it will be so much better if i had my plant in front of you. I'm talking so hang on a minute. I'm just gonna pop into the house and get my silver coin. Be right back just to yourselves. Did you miss me or back. Got my my zero six ios here. And what can i tell you about this plant. There are a lot of plants that reference money on their from plants that have coin shaped leaves like pilot pepperoni oevp's to plants. That are supposed to bring you good luck. In some way like precare aquatic and also the jade tree chrysler of autre but this plant is definitely in the camp of being named after the shape of its leaves because they really do look quite like coins. The mature leaves already quite thick and chunky. I would say there were good almost half a centimeter in depth and they all quite round.

Madagascar Chrysler
New Species of Prehistoric Turtle Discovered in Madagascar

News, Traffic and Weather

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

New Species of Prehistoric Turtle Discovered in Madagascar

"Which roamed Earth. Some 66 million to 100 million years ago, has been discovered in Madagascar. Archaeologists unearth the near complete fossil of the quick mouths frog turtle and 2015 the freshwater turtle out of frog like appearance with the flat skull. Researchers say it was likely a suction feeder, which eight small living prey. Like insect larva and tadpoles. This is

Madagascar
Interview With Matt Chambers And Juan Buhler Of Boon AI

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

02:33 min | 2 years ago

Interview With Matt Chambers And Juan Buhler Of Boon AI

"We are so excited to have interviews because we always get such unique perspectives and You know it helps bring different points of view to this podcast. So i'm excited to say that we have to special guests today. We have matt chambers who the principal architect and one bueller. Who's a senior data science engineer at boone. Ai so hi guys and thanks so much for joining us today going high. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background. And your current role at brunei. Matt will start with you. I'll bet chambers i. My background is mostly in production and visual effects. I mean in past life. I worked in like internet service and industrial machine monitoring things like that but most of the work i've done is in render farms and big data asset management. And things like that. For feature films. I've worked on the hobbit and the planet of the apes movies and some marvel movies and all those movies generate tons and tons and tons of data in so at buna. I you know. My main role is the principal architect in its to manage a lot of customers data that they are trying to organize on the back end so taking the the results of the aml algorithm running in putting the database in normalizing that data. So people can then searching compare it in determining what's be best for them bueller i Do that science and machine learning brunei. I also have a like the previous life at career in computer graphics on visual effects I worked on Movies like shrek madagascar. Let the wally different studios What's interesting having done. The transition from Computer graphics and visual effects to machine learning and data science is that We were back. Let's say in the nineties doing computer graphics visual effects we were doing big data before it was cool in a way Were dealing with. That's not said again right. We were dealing with this huge production of

Matt Chambers Brunei Boone Matt Madagascar
Saving Sea Level Records: What Historical Records Tell Us About The Rising Ocean

Short Wave

09:56 min | 2 years ago

Saving Sea Level Records: What Historical Records Tell Us About The Rising Ocean

"So lauren you sent me a picture of one of these century old title logbooks and it's so cool. It's really detailed. You can see where it says one. Am someone's written thirteen feet one fifteen. Am fourteen feet one inch in this. Really lovely old penmanship tracking tied. Did people really do this. Twenty four hours a day every day of the year they did. They had technology. That actually made it easier though In the late eighteen hundreds they developed an automatic system which had this float that rested on the surface of the water and then fed information to kind of a pen that recorded the movement so then people just had to read off the values and put them into the ledgers and this was done in other places to lake near hillary island. The port of liverpool also has a really long running title record. That makes sense because this was the era of ships rights. Watercraft was the way that people and things got around. Yeah exactly you had a lot of ships going in and out of port and so they were shipping companies. That had to keep track of the tide so it can be done safely two day. Some of those old records are archived at the permanent service for mean sea level which is an organization in the uk that gathers ocean data worldwide Andy matthews a data scientists. There told me the data are pretty reliable. You know most of the time. Those woman over on point is a little hand square school saying they. They sweet because the Tyja for was sick. You get little insights now with him. Everybody needs a sick day right. Of course andy says they're trying to organize a bigger effort to find these records. Because you know since kind of obscure they're hard to find yet but it can be anywhere these kind of things now in libraries from people that we all kaisei done coin. Doug well they are. Yeah this is quite the quest and an even bigger issue. I imagine is that when they find them. The data is still stuck on those pages. Yeah his colleagues scanned about sixteen thousand pages. But the numbers are on the page and they haven't been digitized so they're really not usable by scientists. They're trying to use computers to do it through character recognition. But i mean you saw that writing right. It's kind of like the script and the formats can be really hard to decipher so india's hoping that the public will help he recently put the images on zoom verse. A website and so volunteers can kind of in and and read the numbers. Type them up. I love this approach. I mean we're all bored at home looking for something to do this pandemic so why. Not some historical data as tree right. Yeah i mean data entry for a greater good seriously but to get into the nitty gritty of it. Why exactly is an important to look at data from the eighteen. Hundreds to understand sea level rise today an into the future right. What does that matter. Yeah right. I mean it has to do with how complex sea-level rise is because it's been caused by a number of different things. I mean i. You got glacier's melting temperatures causes them to shrink and that water runs off into the ocean and the same thing is happening in greenland and antarctica. Where there are these massive ice sheets on the land and there's so much is melting in gigi tons tapping increasingly fast. And i know that oceans are also rising because the water itself is warming up and hotter things expand so the water slick taking up more space. Yep you got it and actually. This is kind of cool. Sea level rise did slow down in the nineteen sixties and seventies because that was the era of dam building around the world. When you know when these big reservoirs were being constructed. They held back so much water. It was actually measurable. Ooh that is so strange and it really shows how we humans do impact the oceans. That's like a tangible detail of how quickly we can do that. It's a huge scale. But it's not really a factor anymore because you know dams aren't really being built at the same rate these days got it. Yeah anyway since one thousand nine hundred there's been about eight inches of sea level rise and by the end of this century. We couldn't be looking at three to six feet of sea level rise or even higher depending on how much carbon humans emits but. that's globally. The water is rising at a different pace depending on where you are. Yeah how exactly does that work. Because wouldn't the phil evenly kind of like when you fill a bathtub. And here's where it gets a little weird. The earth is slowly changing slowly getting a different shape lake. You know when you've been sitting on the couch while and you kind of get up and the cushion rebounds like morphs back into its old shape. Yeah not all couches but sure theoretically Well okay that same thing happens to the earth's crust During the last ice age Kind of started waning. Eleven thousand years ago. There was a lot of ice on canada and greenland super heavy and was pushing down the earth's crust since that melted the crust has been slowly rebounding. And that's actually not good for the east coast especially around the mid atlantic region. Because you know it's on the same tectonic plates as canada and greenland and when one side goes up. The other side goes down So what you're saying is where i live on. The east coast is on the lower end of the see-saw basically your thinking about that slowly. I mean the east coast is seen more sea level rise than other parts of the country. And then there's a whole bunch of other things that can cause that to you. Know ocean currencies big things that span hundreds of miles in the ocean. They cost the water on one side of them to be higher on the other side. You know so. Because of currents and gravity the oceans themselves are just kind of lumpy which is why sea level rises different everywhere. I am learning so much right now. You're basically saying is that sea level rise is local essentially and if cities want a plan for this and figure out what an who is at risk they'll need tailor-made information for their location. Yeah that's where these historical records come in. You know they reveal what these geologic processes and ocean conditions are doing in each place right right and i signed us refine their computer models. Which are those high powered ways that we get forecast about climate change. I spoke to scientists. Tomas friedrich's at nasa's jet propulsion laboratory about this and he said local records really matter. If we don't have that information for these see to be like a few feet off the local records of sea level so especially when we try to projects like high water levels of like extremes sea levels that's how we call them It's very difficult to to get an accurate picture of that but there is a big issue with a historical records. They already have almost all of the ones that have been digitized. Come from europe and north america So what you're saying is we gotta find more places. More hillary islands so to speak with historical sea level data all around the world. Yeah and this is a problem across many kinds of climate data. actually the southern hemisphere hasn't been covered as well with things like whether stations and other kind of data collection historically So there's just this big effort to find these historical records outside of europe and the us in argentina. They're working to digitize records from nineteen o five that were taken at the port of raise But to go back farther in some countries it means looking at the records of former colonial powers that took control because when countries like the uk and germany and france extracted. Huge amount of resources from colonies often through force. They did it largely through shipping colonialism stealing and keeping a record of it yeah pretty much so right now in france the national hydrographic service is digitizing these title records from dozens of their former colonies from madagascar vietnam Some of those records though aren't as long running you know they were gathered. As part of geographic mapping or you know to study an area where they were putting in port project. But i spoke to one person who is working with the french to stitch together a longer running record dating back through his country's colonial history marbella unika for seafood unique is from cameroon and he's a phd student in france right. Now he started in german archives. Because that was the colonial power in the late. Eighteen hundreds until france took control so he's gathered the french records as well and then he the cameroon records after it became independent in nineteen sixty. Yeah that's really interesting. Project and just a clear example of how the legacy of colonialism continues to impact science today. Yeah yeah i mean. It's digging through. His legacy is how he's kind of finding these records And there's really only one other long-term record in africa and that's from the car senegal so he knows cameroon could be crucial for improving global climate models But it could also be really helpful for cameroon itself. Nieto's just told me that. The country's largest city douala right on the atlantic coast and estuary and it's extremely vulnerable to flooding already. I'm just last year. There was a huge flood that displays thousands after really heavy rains. So when you add sea level rise to that it just makes the flooding issue worse. So he's hopeful that the historical records he's finding will lead to more detailed forecasts about just how fast the ocean is rising there because twala like other cities needs to start preparing now communities need to decide whether to move out of the way or build some kind of protection and

Hillary Island Permanent Service For Mean Sea Andy Matthews Greenland East Coast Lauren Liverpool Tomas Friedrich Doug Antarctica Andy UK Mid Atlantic Canada India
Archaeologists delved into medieval cesspits to study old gut microbiomes

60-Second Science

00:19 sec | 2 years ago

Archaeologists delved into medieval cesspits to study old gut microbiomes

"Time than it takes to drink a cup of coffee you can learn about muscle mass loss during spaceflight track the migration of asian hornets and explore the supernova. That caused extinctions at the end of the devonian period subscribed to science sessions on itunes spotify. Google play stitcher. And wherever you get your podcasts. I'm scientific american assistant news editor. Sarah lou frazier. And here's a short piece from the january. Twenty twenty one issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine. The article is titled quick hits. And it's a rundown of some non corona virus stories from around the globe in costa rica researchers embedded gps devices in decoy sea turtle eggs to track poaching patterns in their first field test. Five of the hundred and one decoys which had similar size weight and texture to real eggs traveled significantly potentially reaching consumers in latvia dna harvested from a seven hundred year old public toilet in riga as well as a six hundred year old cesspit in jerusalem will help researchers examine. Human microbiomes have evolved over time. Microbial dna from both sites matches some species common in modern hunter gatherers and some in today's city-dwellers in antarctica. New analysis suggests a fifty million year old foot bone found on seymour. Island comes from a species of bird whose wingspan reaches six point. Four meters across the researchers also attributed part of a large jawbone with tooth like structures to the species in a madagascar garden researchers found several volts goes chameleons a rare species whose females can change from green to vivid black white and blue excited. The short lived species had not been documented for more than one hundred years and no females were previously recorded at all in indonesia. new research shows that fluffy but venus slow lawrence's frequently bite one another to settle territorial disputes a rarity in venomous animals in australia an enormous newfound coral reef off the continents northern coast is taller than the empire state building rising more than five hundred meters above the sea floor considered part of the great barrier reef. It is the first detached reef structure discovered there in one hundred and twenty years. That was quick hits. I'm sarah lewin frazier.

Sarah Lou Frazier Rica Riga Latvia Costa Google Antarctica Jerusalem Seymour Indonesia Lawrence Northern Coast Australia Sarah Lewin Frazier
Deadly earthquake hits Indonesia

UN News

01:05 min | 2 years ago

Deadly earthquake hits Indonesia

"This is. Un catch-up dateline. Geneva a weekly review of international news from the united nations. Thanks for listening to the show. I'm daniel johnson and over the next fifteen minutes also will be hearing about the week's top stories from yemen to peru to the hunt for the origins of covid nineteen plus. We'll be hearing about how the world food program is addressing hunger crisis in madagascar. This forced some people to eat mud and leaves to survive and as ever will be hearing from regular guests salon bell tailgate cutters and alfred yellow. That's all coming right up. But first to madagascar where the worst food crisis in decades continues to play out in the south of the country also known as the grand sued apart from a chronic lack of rain the indian ocean island is vulnerable to climate shocks like the massive thunderstorms that have shifted sand dunes. Burying what little people have managed to grow. The caveat crisis has made things even worse putting a halt to the occasional neighboring

United Nations Daniel Johnson Madagascar Geneva Yemen Peru Indian Ocean Island
After drought andfailedharvests, people of Madagascarreduced to eating mud

UN News

05:17 min | 2 years ago

After drought andfailedharvests, people of Madagascarreduced to eating mud

"Years of drought. In with what little the people of madagascar have managed to grow destroyed by flash flooding more than one point three million in crisis in some are even eating ground up clay just to survive movement restrictions relating to covid nineteen has also made it impossible for the poorest of the poor to find work to tide them over the lean season the world food program or p has warned in an interview with you and uses daniel johnson. Wfp's regional director for southern africa. Lola cash through explains the un agency his helping by empowering communities to withstand future climate shocks. The situation basically has been over the last five years with recurring droughts and only one good harvest and we have heard about it. Before in september we immediately had to come in and attend areas that we have never supported as well for program before because the crisis will saw huge. That success more tally. This is what we're talking about. How many people are you helping. And how many people are in need at this moment in the ground south of madagascar grants would gas in december. We supported five. Hundred thousand people almost half a million. We need to scale up to at least nine hundred thousand adults. They one point three million that are in dire need at this moment. Who are the most in need. The most need basically the poorest of the poor those people that in fact they have sometimes they produce small harvests but having been able to produce due to the lack of water. An incredible sunday's storms. That have hit this year. The harvest has been buried under sand. Basically if you want a picture and those ones also who migrate to cities to look for labor due to covid nineteen having been able to find any labor anywhere even in the fields or even in the city's so basically the situation is much worse than what we have seen in decades. Would we are talking now in the past. We've reported on the situation amount and recently we were hearing that people were forced to scavenge for cactus leaves cactus pears and eating leaves with some salt and some sugar. I mean this is just nowhere to live. Why can we not get in there immediately and do more to behind as we have been doing more we. The government will bank agencies. We having working on resilience bidding activities in a number of districts in the suit and we have been doing quite a lot building on irrigation trying to stop the dunes from moving sand occupies the fields the arable lands working with the communities. What we call foot for us activities. Let's say a conditional transfers that people get food or cash but they do something to improve the livelihoods and that has worked in the communities and this is where we have done most of this work. It has been bedtime this year. Let me yes report. But we are not doing enough. We have to also do much more. We have to help the people to get much more resilient in these very difficult climate change times where we know will never rain enough in south of madagascar so with much more. It's great to hear about the resilience building and certainly there seems to be more awareness that southern africa madagascar is at more risk of climate shocks. So is that how the humanitarian approach is changing is to promote resilience by getting the communities. Involved is what we call. If you want the nexus between humanitarian recovery and development with really need to move from year to year support of variable able to move them into more resilient as is to be able to feed themselves to be able to have water. If i'm eligible and to find water to be able to move their foods and have markets where they can buy if they receive social safety nets and social protection castro transfer. So that's the area where we all have agreed. This house in madagascar strategy long-term term strategies but not a gasket isn't poll everywhere it produces vanilla and lots of people are seeing that hollywood movie about madagascar and the wonderful wildlife and the natural riches that the country has so. Why isn't it doing more to help itself. It might sound a bit ruthless. But why isn't more being done in country to empower people to help themselves two days a lot being dining country but is not enough. Say in fact. It's very poor country if you look at. The human development index is very poor in general is true that samaria survey productive days rise by neela species etc. But it's not everybody who can benefit. The population is densely populated. It has also berry berry big promise. China change like it ocean lot of land goes to the days deforestation because of days. Nothing for the populations to eat. So tell

Madagascar Daniel Johnson WFP Southern Africa Lola UN Africa Castro Neela Hollywood Berry Berry China
‘I Like To Move It’ DJ Erick Morillo Found Dead In Miami Beach

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

‘I Like To Move It’ DJ Erick Morillo Found Dead In Miami Beach

"Ah popular Miami Beach Deejay has died less than a month after he was accused of sexual assault. Sarah Bartlett has details. Miami Beach Police found the body of Eric Morello inside of his bedroom, and investigators are looking into whether he died of a possible drug overdose. The 49 year old award winning deejay was well known for writing the hit song. I like to move it for the 2005 animated film Madagascar Last month, Morello was charged with sexual battery for an incident with a woman at his Home. Sarah Bartlett, NBC news radio.

Miami Beach Deejay Eric Morello Sarah Bartlett Miami Beach Police Drug Overdose Assault Madagascar NBC
Mauritius seeks compensation as oil spill cleanup continues

Pod Save the World

01:08 min | 2 years ago

Mauritius seeks compensation as oil spill cleanup continues

"Residence of Mauritius which is an island east of Madagascar in the Indian. Ocean are calling for international help to stop the economic and ecological damage from an oil spill that has already leaked thousand tons and could dump twenty, five, hundred more local authorities have done what they can to plug this leak but they're concerned that this tanker that ran aground could just split in half. This bill is already devastated local wildlife the local economy the local food supply the ship is Japanese Japan said they're going to help with the operation but locals are calling for a full-scale international response. Let's hope they get it. We just wanted to raise that because this sounds like a potential disaster. Yeah. In the kind of thing that. You know he's not front and center given all the other news in the world. But again, like this is another reason why you need like a functioning vehicle for collective action around the world, which is missing in the absence of the US playing that role. Because you know these kinds of things can have devastating a long lasting ecological impacts so. Good to raise it in in the kind of thing that I'd like to see the. US. Again, if there's a change administration would take the lead on on in the response to this kind of thing unfortunately, not going to happen under trump.

United States Madagascar Japan
Scientists Discover New Lemur Species

All Things Considered

01:54 min | 2 years ago

Scientists Discover New Lemur Species

"And gorillas may be our best known primate cousins. You might be less familiar with mouse lemurs, the world's smallest primates. They're tiny and adorable, with big googly eyes and fairy tales. They can be tough to spot in the forests of Madagascar and even tougher for scientists to identify when you go to the forest, and you will see your mouth remark is night time to actually tell what species belongs to. Marina Blanco is a research scientist at the Duke Leamer Center in North Carolina, and for years her team surveyed the lowland forests of northeastern Madagascar are capturing and measuring the tiny nocturnal creatures. I took genetic samples to now. All that work has paid off because they see one of the mouse lemurs they sampled, often found clinging to cardamom bushes is a new species. Only about 10 inches long, and half of that is its tail, and it weighs just two ounces. A scientist named it Micros Abyss Janahi or Jonas Mouse lemur. In this case, Jonah is Jonah rats and Buzz offi, a Leamer, researcher in Madagascar and his reaction to the news. Good news in a bad time brats and Gadhafi says levers, including this new species are surrounded by threats, one first off them are critically endangered. On the brink of extinction. 98% of them are friends. So that means, But there is a big risk for the next generation not to see any more dreamers, mining, poaching and illegal hunting all threatened lemurs. But the biggest problem, he says, is deforestation. There's no discussion when the first is gone, the MIRs are like fish. Fish cannot survive outside of the water, humorous candles your life outside of the forest Red. Simba's offi says Conserving forest is crucial to the future of Lamers. And he says he hopes this new tiny primate will illustrate just how much we have to lose.

Madagascar Research Scientist Duke Leamer Center Forest Red Jonah Buzz Offi Marina Blanco Lamers North Carolina Simba Gadhafi Researcher
Travel to Comoros

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:34 min | 2 years ago

Travel to Comoros

"I'd like to welcome to the show. Fiona Jones from Scotland who's come to talk to us about Comoros? Fewer welcome back to the show. Thanks for having me and I say welcome back to the show. Some of you may realize I. Don't Remember Hearing Theater on the show before. Yes. We had one of those that we have. Every three to four years lost episode whether according didn't work, and so Fiona is coming back to talk. Komo's again so for you. This is new those of you who are listening but for Fiona tonight. This is very familiar, so if you're old hat at this, can you put commerce on a map for us? Says I didn't know where it was. This is one of those things. There's episodes that Fiona pitch me rose that I had to go googling. What are we talking about? Is this country which it is? Yeah it's a country. It's well three or four depending on how you look at it for Collins. It's in the Indian Ocean northwest of Madagascar. The northern part of Mozambique And you say three or four, because there are four islands, but only three of them are Komo's. Yeah the whole country used to be French when they voted for independence, then three of the islands voted to become independent and the fourth island, which is not decided it wanted to stay with France but I. Think the rest of the Comoros is terribly happy. But May stays resolutely French. Excellent, and why should someone go to Komo's? The reason we won was because our daughter. Who's GONNA traveling. We wanted a family holiday and it was over the tail end of the Christmas holidays, so we wanted somewhere hot. We wanted somewhere that would be good diving and we wanted somewhere that maybe a little bit different that that might be a bit of. Of An adventure so for those reasons we, we looked around, and now at actually seen an article by unknown or unexplored islands I think it was on tripadvisor and seen the Comoro and and I was quite entrusted I'd also rashly sets the family that I as a bit of a surprise for them, so I thought well. That will give them a surprise if we to the Comoros. As I'm surprised you don't know who you are. Being hot, so we're right off the coast of Mozambique and Madagascar and not that far from Tanzania another from Zanzibar. Which people have probably heard of and it seems like it's kind of like Zanzibar except with a French flair. Yeah, we bar. Oh, Gosh, by well. It must be about twenty five years ago. There are some similarities birthday. Islands are obviously much smaller probably per than Zanzibar wealth. Wise I know. Zanzibar isn't exactly a rich country, but Comoros is quite far down to kind of GDP league, but in other senses it's Israel serve Indian ocean stuff so white sand beaches very green interiors very heavily forested interiors, so in that sense, I guess top graphically, probably quite similar. Excellent will what kind of area or are you going to recommend for us well well, what we did was to land in Grand Comoro switch. I guess everybody will. Think he can probably catch a from the mainland. I. Think just made way for everybody to come. In is going to be defined to Grande Comoros. We landed there. We had a couple of days there. It to be honest is not an awful lot. See and the island. I think we did what everybody did. which was to get yourself a taxi? Going to run the island is laconic island. An active volcano in the middle so much you can do is drive around the outside of the island i. think was one ruined. That goes across the middle, but otherwise he just sits the perimeter. you see the beaches and such like. So. That's pretty much it and he kind walk-ups civil. No, that wasn't something that we did. The seems to be mixed reports about how you do I know. We talked to a couple of guys who were there and holiday who were going to do that and they've got themselves. Guideline think they were gonNA count and some accounts say that you've gotta take a couple of days in walkout, but I've seen something else, so you can get a car or jeep close to the top, and then just walk up the rest of the day so I'm not quite sure which was correct, but between a to the islands. A chip up the volcano, a suspect that's probably about it for a Grande Comoros so after we'd spend our couple of days of them went to Miley which the island that we were going to be based for the rest of the time

Comoros Fiona Jones Komo Zanzibar Grande Comoros Madagascar Mozambique Indian Ocean Scotland Collins Tanzania France Miley Israel
Coronavirus in Africa

The Current

01:16 min | 2 years ago

Coronavirus in Africa

"Been about three months since the pandemic was officially declared covid nineteen has swept around the world hitting some places much harder than others. The spread of the virus in Africa is a bit of an enigma for public health officials south. Africa has one of the continent's Straits of infection causing fear among these supermarket employees in Capetown. All anything that? We have kids at home. Off. My granddaughter. Is. Dead, that's in South Africa despite relatively few cases in Madagascar that country has been under lockdown for weeks and the shopkeeper his feeling the strain. Yes I don't know folks. The people are struggling. They have no more money. It's not easy because people have their rent to pay. Many of them have lost their jobs while this situation doesn't bother our rulers, but it hurts. Overall the continent has seen a slower rate of infection and deaths than other parts of the world, and some credit goes to the continent's experience with previous viruses. People say there are success stories in Africa stories, the Qatif those of US elsewhere a thing or

Africa South Africa Capetown Madagascar United States
How do pirates retire?

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:25 min | 2 years ago

How do pirates retire?

"And all next week. I'm investigating the myths and mysteries of the pirates that sailed the seven seas during the golden age of piracy. Yesterday I debunked the idea that pirates never had treasure chests full of gold blooms and pieces of eight and cited the discovery of the pirate ship wide up by BERRY CLIFFORD CHESTER TREASURE. That he hold from the remains of that ship and yeah it was a treasure map that led into that site today. I'll detail how pirates were able to repair their ships despite being unable to pull in any protocol and where they ended up when they go to old from the coast of wealth leak Massachusetts where Clifford found that pirate ship. Wider will travel eight thousand miles across the Atlantic cross the continent of Africa to an island in the Indian Ocean in the seventeenth century. A thirty one mile stretch of land was called Ile Sainte Marie. Just a short sale as the seagull flies. For in the seventeen and eighteenth century was home to more than a thousand pirates but it was no mere coincidence that the colony was set up on seemingly remote island this particular stretch of land in the Indian Ocean was chosen specifically for location from here. The pirates could easily intercept and plunders ships. Traveling from the East indies laden with valuable cargo. So associated was island with piracy that gone to Madagascar for Limes. Was a message often left at pirate meeting places. It is believed that feared Brin Adam Baldrige realized that the bays and inlets of the island would provide safety for ships as well as affording about a full supply of fresh food water and women. It is also thought that the ample supplies of fruit were used for making that infamously favorite drink of these. See Ferry Marauders. Rum was the many inlets. The provided a defensible harbor for careening. This ship was pulled ashore and much of its whole. Planking was either scraped clean or replaced because this process placed ships and their crew in a vulnerable situation change were pulled across the entrance to the inland just below the surface. In the event of the pirate harbour was discovered in an English or Spanish ship attempted to enter the chain would rip out there Keel but more than a pirate harbour. I all Sainte. Marie became last stop for aging pirates. To this day you can go. To The island of find hundreds of stone markers at with names dates and the skull and crossbones on some many times entire crew would end up on the island and bury their treasure often in fear of having it taken by another pirate truth. Tunnels were dug containing all kinds of traps. Should an attempt be made to steal their booty? One of the most notorious Captain Kidd suffered at the hands of his crew burned his ship to the water that was the adventure galley and then sank after the remains of the ship were discovered so many tourists came to what was commonly called. Pirates island. This would be about nineteen eighties. They were injured when they descended into those ancient pirate tunnels so many were injured that the local government had the entrances cemented over. Well Monday. I'll describe what life on a pirate ship was like. And how many pirate cans couldn't fire a cannonball more than one hundred feet and what the battle between ships was really

Ile Sainte Marie Indian Ocean Marie RUM Massachusetts Madagascar Captain Kidd Africa Adam Baldrige Clifford Planking East Indies Keel
Pirate Myths and Mysteries

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:32 min | 2 years ago

Pirate Myths and Mysteries

"And for the next week or so. I will be focusing on tyrus during the Golden Age from sixteen fifty to about seventeen thirty and in my ongoing research for these podcasts. I have had a few surprises one. Pirates DID BURIED TREASURE TO PIRATES. Made MAPS FOR THOSE TREASURE. I will be producing evidence of this also. Pirates did make other pirates and English Spanish ship captains walk the plank pick up any book on the Golden Age Pirates. Sixteen fifty to seventeen thirty and it would have you believe that they sailed the Atlantic but in fact when the English began actively pursuing what they call privateers and hanging entire crews many fled attempting to sail around Cape Horn. The southernmost tip of South America but few survived where the Atlantic and Pacific collided strong winds large waves unpredictable current and icebergs challenge every vessel. Pirates formed egalitarian. Orders based on elected officials and mutual trust. They did make some crews of captured vessels walk the plank in eighteen twenty two captain of the British ship. Rudd poll was made to walk the plank when his ship was captured by the pirate ship. Emmanuel before turning himself in Captain Kidd buried his treasure somewhere on long island also around area will discuss Madagascar. He was hanged for piracy in London before it could retrieve it for two hundred years. Fifteen sixty five to eighteen fifteen. The Spanish Treasury Cross Pacific from Alka Poco laden with gold and silver had been caravan across the isthmus there from there. They sailed to new Spain at the time Manila unchallenged until sixteen ninety nine. It was late in that year. That the five masted pirate ship made the run around Cape Hope captain by check Berryman. The Spanish treasure galleon left behind by the rest of the Spanish fleet was just ten days out of port of Al Capone sailing. Lazy five knots for Manila when they were intercepted by another vessel when the peach pulled within five hundred yards of the Galleon and unfurled the Jolly Roger and fired. Twenty two cannon on the heavily Laden. Gallia well that was all it took without hesitation. Captain Fernandez de the Tinian unloaded his sixteen cannons in response and beat a hasty retreat up the coast of North America. No Vashem's speed for the gold. Silver she carried the San. Jose couldn't lose the peach. A Jose carried eighty pounds of gold twenty-six tons of unkown silver and four hundred thousand pesos. For ten days with a damaged rudder Santellien led the peach on a wild chase up. The coast of North America finally anchoring off a rugged coast the captain of peach saw his chance sailed to within a hundred yards the guy and for best effect of short range cannons and let fire twenty two guns in a final show of defiance. The San Jose unleashed her sixteen cannons. And by chance hit the powder storage of the each flowing. This ship to splitters but it was too late for the San Jose sinking by the Stern. Captain gathered the ship's log and perched on the bow made his final entry dated January. Seventeen O one. Half of his crew sixty were lost in the final battle. The remains managed to wrath from the decade paddle to the surging forty degree water toward shore with the sun high overhead. The Sea retreated leaving the San Jose on Solid C. Four on her starboard side the raft high and Dry Captain. Sotoudeh crossed himself as he watched one hundred foot. Waves sweep in from the ocean. The final entry in the log. Read Longitude Forty five five sixteen degrees north latitude one twenty three ninety one and ninety four degrees west with a slight adjustment of just a couple degrees the final resting place of that treasures. Scallions San Jose is just off the Oregon coast off the little town of Nice. Colin perhaps a mile out from the famed ghost forest. You see the last great cascade. Subduction zone earthquake occurred early in January. Seventeen O one. The famous Oregon Ghost florist was once a Sitka. Spruce forest dropped twenty five feet during that quake justice shifting place of pushed. What's left of that forced to the surface? A fascinating side at low tide. Perhaps in a few years if the place continued shift the remains of the treasure. Galleon San Jose may appear on that same

San Jose Captain Kidd Peach Jose North America Manila Captain Fernandez Spanish Treasury Cross Pacific Atlantic Dry Captain Tyrus South America Cape Horn Al Capone Alka Poco SAN Spain Rudd Sotoudeh Cape Hope
Brand New Blend With A Citrus Twist

Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

02:38 min | 3 years ago

Brand New Blend With A Citrus Twist

"Now we explore ginger. There are over one thousand species of ginger plant that exist in the world today. But did you know that Ginger is Culture Gen? A cult agenda is a plant species or variety known only in cultivation which means that it has no wild ancestor we know that ginger originated from island. Southeast Asia and that it does not exist in its wild state and while it's most often called ginger root it is in fact not a route at all. It's what's called a rising home. Which is an underground stem of a plant? One of the groups that has the longest recorded history of utilizing. The ginger root is the Austronesian people or more accurately the Austronesian speaking peoples. Now they are a large group of various peoples in Taiwan Island Southeast Asia Micronesia Coastal New Guinea Island Melanesia Polynesia and Madagascar that speak the Austronesian languages. Ginger was carried with them in their voyages as canoe plants during the Austral Megyn expansion starting from around five thousand BC. They introduced it to the Pacific islands in prehistory long. Before any contact with other civilizations the rise homes and the leaves were used to flavour food or they were eaten directly. The leaves were also used to. We've maths aside from these uses. Ginger had religious significance among Austronesian being used in traditional medicine and for asking protection from spirits. It was also used in the blessing of Austronesian ships. In Indian cuisine. Ginger is a key ingredient. App has a role in traditional IRA basic medicine which is one of the world's oldest medicinal systems and remains one of India's traditional healthcare systems to this day. Ginger is used in many forms for example raw crushed or powdered in the culinary practices of cultures around the world from Korea. To France to the Philippines people around the world have fallen in love with the scent taste and benefits of Ginger. The ginger in the citrus twist blend adds a fun spiciness. That makes this blend. Perfect for any

Ginger Austronesian Taiwan Island Southeast Asia M Southeast Asia Guinea Island Melanesia Polyne Austral Megyn Madagascar IRA Korea Philippines India France
Pirate Treasure

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:34 min | 3 years ago

Pirate Treasure

"Today. Something on shipwrecks buried. Treasure shipwrecks what the exception of iron ships those frozen in the far north are usually devoured by their watery environment. means that the classic tall else ship. Spanish galleons and Yes for the most part pirate ships have been absorbed by the sands of time literally one of the few pirates ships discovered route which included a chest of gold and silver coins. Was the white on brought up off the coast of Massachusetts by Barry Clifford in the nineteen eighties portion of the ship poor preserved under twenty feet of sand but the wider is the exception to the rule most ships from the golden age of piracy. Roughly sixteen hundred seventeen forty. Today are nothing more than a line of Canon pile of stone. Balasore iron anchor. There are plenty of shipwrecks in the base around. The world could be explored by the recreational diver. But for those that don't want to strap on an air tank. There are abandoned ships and submarines in Bays base from Russia to Scotland. And even in the desert I'll begin with Russia's Elena Bay off the Col- of Peninsula dozens of submarines up Marines and the remnants conning towers bristle out of the shallow waters abandoned some dating back to the seventies for mini-subs travel to Scotland. Our Lady Bay once you've for bombing practice. Many submarines stopped the beach. Along with the rusting. hulks of larger vessels in the South Pacific. Truk lagoon boasts the largest graveyard of submerged. Military vessels two hundred seventy five ships and sixty planes. Some of the ships sank while loaded with jeeps motorcycles earthmoving equipment many are just sixty feet below the surface. The Bay was empire Japan's main base in the Pacific during World War. Two when it was hit by a surprise attack operation hailstone but the largest Bay of Bandon ships in the world is not bay located on the edge of Nina located in the northwest list of Africa ships have been grounded and left abandoned in the bay since the nineteen twenties today. Upwards of ten ships are left in the bay every year any mention in of shipwrecks pirate or otherwise raises the question of buried treasure. I've already mentioned the wide off the Massachusetts coast as classic treasure chest but also in Massachusetts in Lynn Forest is dungeon. Rock the hiding place a pirate Thomas Tunes Treasure Hoard. It's also believed that to was the father of the man that established pirate island off. Madagascar were very clifford. Governor of the wider found the remains of captain kids ship the adventure. Galley blackbeard is said to buried a hundred and twenty gold. But says it only he and the devil know the location. Needless to say it is never been found. Pirates never drew maps with large x marking the location of their treasurer essentially. Because they were smarter than that but when they pulled their ships ashore for careening careening the processes scrape the barnacles off the planks of this ship. And sometimes those planks were placed. They would bury bury their valuable so the while they were stranded assured they would be raw by another pirate crew. Perhaps Oak Island is the most famous side of an alleged Treasure referred to as the money pit. Franklin Roosevelt attempted to find treasure there in nineteen thirteen. But to this day it is yet to reveal. Oh any treasure. No buried treasure real or myth compares to the Lima treasure removed from Lima Peru in eighteen twenty and believed to be two two hundred million in gold. Spain had ruled over Lima since the sixteenth century but was losing control and so it was decided by the mayor to transport support the richest of the city to Mexico for safekeeping. William Thomson captain of the married gear was chosen but he and his crew got greedy slit the throats of the guards guards and the priests accompanying the ship and threw the bodies overboard then headed for Cocos Island. Three hundred fifty miles off of. What is today Costa Rica where they buried read the Treasury a plan to split up but the ship was captured. Captain Crewe retreive piracy but the gold was never

Lady Bay Massachusetts Lima South Pacific Barry Clifford Bay Of Bandon Blackbeard Lima Peru Russia Oak Island Captain Crewe Elena Bay Cocos Island Truk Lagoon Scotland Franklin Roosevelt Treasury Madagascar Canon Spain