5 Burst results for "Macmillan Cancer"

"macmillan cancer" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

The Autosport Podcast

07:07 min | 4 months ago

"macmillan cancer" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

"I'm joined by Matt Q and Jess mcfadden, and we'll be analyzing the singer poor Grand Prix and the shambles that followed, but that wasn't the biggest race today, not by a long way, because our friend and colleague, Luke Smith completed the London marathon today, just over 5 hours. We couldn't be more proud raising money for charity. Done it myself, in over 5 hours, similar time to Luke funnily enough, Matt, have you ever fancied putting on your trainers for 26.2 miles? I've not run it before. My brother has, so in a competition to be parents favorite charge, he has that over me, but no real desire. I enjoy obviously the endorphins after I just find it so tedious, so it's got to be, I've got to be kicking a ball or have a rack at my hand to make exercise that bit more fun, but fair play to Luke an amazing cause, really, really inspiring job saying how hard he's been training. And if I had to write an autosport, runners ratings for the Singapore Grand Prix weekend Lee could be getting a slam dunk ten, I can assure him of that. And Jess, I swear I've seen on your socials, you've put stuff like, oh, just home for a run, what is that? Is that like a little 5 K park runner or thinking one day that you might bite off a little more like Luke today and do the do the full marathon? No. No, well, so I was one of those people that got into running in lockdown. I wasn't really, I wouldn't ever call myself a runner. I was a bit like Q in that I prefer sports or actually doing something competitive rather than running. I find running quite tedious sometimes, but seeing as there was nothing else to do. My partner and I, we took, well, he's a keen runner, but he's done the London marathon. He's done more than one marathon in his time. So he tried to get me into it. And I don't mind it. I do enjoy it, but I'm definitely one of those people where I need to run with other people, like I can't do it on my own. And I know that you've got a big crowd of people with you for the marathon, but oh my God, I just could not. The idea of taking on that long of a run. Terrifies me. So genuinely what Luke has done is amazing. And obviously, for an amazing cause as well, remembering his mom and raising money for macmillan cancer support is awesome and he should be extremely proud of himself because it's definitely something I can't imagine I would ever do. Absolutely, absolutely. And if you check out Luke's Twitter, the best place probably I imagine the easiest way for me to explain it's Luke Smith F one on Twitter, most people are releasing it how to use it. Luke Smith F one, pinned post at the top, which is a link through to his just giving page, raising money for macmillan as Jess says. And even though it's after the event right now, and he smashed his target, whatever you can pass their way. I know it's a tough times, everything's tight at the minute, but you really will be helping and it will be massively appreciated. All right, here we go, then. Let's get into the Singapore Grand Prix. Business as usual. Really, leclerc was on pole. But he didn't win. Sergio Pérez took the lead before turn one. And he never ever looked back. Metaphorically, of course. He was looking at his rearview mirrors for large sections of the race as leclerc piled on the pressure, but couldn't eventually beat him. Hamilton shunted into the barriers, big time, but somehow. Man, that Mercedes is built tough. Change your front wing change of tyres, but unfortunately, put him out of the podium, hunt, which is what he was doing at the time, eventually finishing 9th Verstappen spent the afternoon coming through the pack. He also locked up massively, attempting a move on Norris, which put the Red Bull to the very back of the pack, fighting back eventually finishing 7th and today we should be heaping praise on Perez and talking about nothing else than a fine fine drive in changeable conditions. Well, very wet conditions at the start. Talk about Ferraris double podium talking about McLaren strategy and a big old dose of luck to come home forth and 5th. On both Aston's in the point, stroll 6th Vettel 8th, but instead, somehow, we're asking why fans of the sport that we love didn't know the results for well over two hours after the flag. The world's fastest sport once again takes longer than any other sport in the world to come to a decision. And there's copious amounts of hard data, but once again, the stuarts may the stewards making judgment calls based on how well the driver and their team representative argues their case, looking for mitigating circumstances, long after the race has finished, like it shouldn't be like this. It fosters conspiracy theories about how they're working out how to both dish out the penalty because Perez did break the rules, but also not so much that Red Bull get denied. Like that was what we saw after the race. I'll give you the background and then we can talk about this. Sergio Pérez fell back from the safety car more than the allowed distance of ten car lengths on three separate occasions, earning a 5 second penalty for the final time that he did it. He finished 7 seconds up the road from leclerc at the flag, therefore the result doesn't change, but it's the result that fans had no idea of long after the broadcasters had gone home and that's ridiculous to treat the fans that way and the sport. Now, here's the actual wording of what happens stewards say that poire has dropped back too far on three occasions. The first time lap ten on enters between turns 13 and 14, he was investigated for that and given a reprimand. The second time it happened on lap 36 on the slicks between turns 9 and ten, he was given a warning. The team was given a warning by the race director. The same lap, he did it again after being warned between turns 13 and 14, and for that he was given a 5 second penalty. Not at the time. But hours after the race finished. Let's get into it. You've heard enough of me. Jess, what is going on at the FIA? You're asking the fans that the story isn't over, two hours after, you know, sky had gone off the air if you're in the UK or most of TV broadcasters has stopped reporting because they ran out of broadcast allocation time and we still don't know who's won the race. People find out either through our websites. Hopefully all through social media, who is actually won the race. Now, as it turns out, in this instance, the penalty meant that the race results still stood from the provisional results that we got when the checkered flag dropped. But for me, it's a case of why on earth was something like that. Which happened, as you mentioned, so first incident was lap ten. The last incident was lap 36, so just about just over halfway through the race. Why on earth it took two hours from the checkered flag dropping for the result to be made? Completely ludicrous, it makes the FIA look like a laughing stock. If I'm honest, people just don't believe that the stewards are in control. They believe they're being influenced by people by calling them into this suit.

Luke Smith Luke Matt Q Jess mcfadden Sergio Pérez leclerc Jess macmillan cancer London Twitter Perez Matt macmillan Lee Ferraris poire Red Bull Mercedes Norris
"macmillan cancer" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

The Autosport Podcast

02:14 min | 4 months ago

"macmillan cancer" Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

"F one, it's all about sort of evolution and innovation and I think that looking to the future they're looking at things like electric pick guns and things like that to try and make them a bit more eco friendly and efficient and they'll look at what they can do and if the cars get lighter than perhaps we might be able to get back into that kind of range of a sub two second pit stop. But I think for now, if you're under a 2.5 second stop, that's pretty good going. Could we get to sub two? That would be really, really cool. But I don't think we're going to see the world record be beaten any time soon. I'm afraid. Well, there we go. Thank you so much for joining us to fill us in and get us up to speed on the auto sport podcast today. We will not have you on the air for Singapore because you're doing something, well, all together, a little more challenging. And that is running the London marathon. How is the training going? Everyone wants to know. Could be going better. But it's okay. I'm trying to say, I'm trying not to panic about it, but I've put in some good long runs and yeah, my goal is to finish it, but I'm equal parts terrified and excited for it, but I think on the day I'm just going to soak it up and love it and I think it's going to be, yeah, just a really, really cool thing to do and everyone I've spoken to yourself included says that running it is just one of the best things you'll ever do in the atmosphere is absolutely incredible. So yeah, I'm sad to be missing Singapore because it's one of my favorite races, but yeah, I know it's for a worthy cause and running for macmillan cancer support in memory of my mom who passed away last year and yeah, if anyone listening would like to make a donation, please head over to my Twitter account at Luke Smith F one and there'll be a link at the top of my profile and yeah, I'm hoping to raise a good amount of money and do something really cool for charity. And you can also go to just giving dot com slash fundraising slash Luke Smith London 2022. That is your Luke Smith London 2022. May I then at once I was 5 hours 35, I trundled around and there was like marines carrying a boat on their shoulders like 6 of them came jogging past me and I'm like, it was just the litter pickers behind me. It doesn't matter. It is just the best experience. So please support Luke and if you can, things are tight for everyone. I know that, but if you can, please do support and we'll catch a look again on the auto sport podcast. Very soon.

Luke Smith Singapore macmillan cancer London Twitter Luke
"macmillan cancer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

04:51 min | 5 months ago

"macmillan cancer" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"So I think that's really interesting. Now, diageo is continued to do work in the space. Where do you see this going for brands like diageo in terms of conversational engagement with customers? Back to that discovery piece. It was that real insights that after our first doesn't know so customers realized that the biggest problem to solve within this sphere was how to bubble up discoverability and make these assets work particularly for the brand and rather than this being an innovative showpiece that looks good at the board, but no one else ever engages with, how do you actually package up that product? And that's where we really took it to our next steps. Yeah, so this evolved into basically add products. Eventually you introduced. Do you want to talk about that a little bit? Yeah, yeah, exactly. So it was actually what a wonderful opportunity that we had within COVID. So we didn't in 2019 we'd won this Alexa cup and take a little bit of angel funding in for the business and we were building out the product that we'd like to cut with, which was products to help book services using an excellent, we knew that Amazon very good at setting products, but less so building services that aggregating those services. And our initial trials evaporated at the beginning of COVID and we looked for something else to do and we had this idea at the back of our mind that we needed to have a product which tied demand generation into any kind of engagement with the skills. So how can we package up a product which I've used existing advertising inventory to drive to a skill and we then took another step back and looked at behaviors because all advertisers and anyone building technology knows you need to follow behaviors, not to technology and so the behaviors were people had smart speakers, they were using them to listen to streaming or streaming audio and ask questions. So we package that whole thing up as a product, what do we want some innovate UK money some grant funding, specifically they were looking for innovative problems innovative solutions to problems that were specifically caused by COVID. We saw that in the UK world, there was a big kind of 4 billion pound funding gap that they expected from the lack of charitable donations. And we said, look, how about we try radio advertising that encourages people to engage with their smart speakers to make a donations? So we won that funny on the 1st of June 2020. We then used that story to go to global, which is Europe's biggest radio group that got about 330 radio stations and Ethan and they committed a whole load of inventory to this project. We then used that story to run through the top 5 charities in the UK and so we then brought on board comic relief the world wildlife foundation and species crisis and macmillan cancer care and it said, look, let's do the biggest pilot of these actual audio as campaigns. There's ever been done and I think it was 15 million audio ad impressions towards these charitable campaigns to see if anyone was willing to donate because the. Value proposition to the radio group was wouldn't it be interesting if we were able to get in the moment insight as to exactly how people were engaging with our radio ads because we've been running radio ads forever. And with the advent of audio, we can get tighter and tighter audiences, but we still don't know whether they're engaging. And so what we promise is that we bring together into a dashboard, this whole idea of we know exactly when that ad has been served, exactly how many people have engaged with it. And then what they've done. And so we run that for 5 months. It was an incredibly powerful. We wrote a lovely white paper with global about the outcomes of this and we showed that even though no one in the world had heard radio ads that had asked them to talk back to them before, people were willing to engage and then part with their cash. It was a big challenge with Amazon trying to onboard charities, which was a issue within the process, but beyond that it would be proved out the concept of that paved the way. Yeah, so Amazon had a charitable giving early on with Alexa. I think it was, I think it came out in 2019, but was that U.S. only and not urine? Yeah, that was U.S. only. So everything that we've been doing previously with the Alexa cup stuff had been working very closely with Amazon pay team and specifically how to try to make business cases for voice using Amazon pay. And so a prerequisite, if any of these charities to be able to run these campaigns as they had to be in Amazon pay that's a 100% pay merchants. And that onboarding process is riddled with bureaucracy and very manual process with an Amazon that we honor and manual processes with Amazon run less smooth..

diageo COVID Amazon UK world wildlife foundation macmillan cancer Ethan Europe U.S. Alexa
"macmillan cancer" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

07:23 min | 9 months ago

"macmillan cancer" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Okay. Back to the show. Was not awesome talking to Christian and Olaf. It was. It was amazing. We're laughing because we haven't recorded it yet. We're pretending like we just had that experience where you will you the audience member will have had that experience. You've had it. We have not. I hope it was good. I was good for you. There are a couple more stories from the world of endurance. We got to talk about this 6 year old kid who ran the flying pig marathon and Cincinnati. Right. What's your hot take? It's not really my business on whether a certain 6 year old kid runs the mayor. I'm not going to be outraged by it or celebrated. It's all none of my business. Is that a good hot take? That is a hot take because you're kind of in the middle. I mean, I'm like carry on. Carry on with your lives. I will not judge all of you. This sort of lit up the Internet. The other week, a lot of people had had a lot to say about this, including people like Cara goucher. I had Steve Magnus in here the other day who's an elite track and field coach. He had some not so nice words about is it a bad thing to do? Well, at 6 years old, it's not a great idea. And I think there was some indication. Obviously, I wasn't there. I don't know the parents. The parents are defending their decision. But there were some video and some sense that the kid was crying and they kind of urged him to complete it. All of that, whether or not that's true or not, I'm not sure, but it certainly somewhat controversial. And I don't think you can make the argument that it's healthy for a 6 year old to run a marathon. Certainly if there's pressure on that young person, apparently it's a family full of very active people who are strivers and they all do the marathon together. So was there pressure on this young person to complete it? In order to kind of get that parental approval, who knows? But maybe not wise, I think it would be prudent for race organizers to be more conscious about age minimums and protecting the young people out there. So I just, you know, I'm all for getting young people out there and active and doing challenges. But I just don't think that at that age, something that challenging is in the child's best interest. Fair enough. That's my hot take. Good. Can we celebrate Jackie hunt breer's mask? She completed her 104 marathons in 100 consecutive days. Unbelievable. Setting the record for the most marathons run on consecutive days by a woman. And she did it as an amputee. She's been an amputee for 5 years. She lost the lower part of her left leg to cancer. She's also a 46 years old and a mom, and she did it to raise money and she raised quite a bit of money. By latest amount, her GoFundMe looks like she's raised a $194,080. And those funds are directed towards the amputee prosthetics charity called amputee blade runners because those blades that you see her if you're watching this on YouTube that kind of blade that she's running on are super expensive. They're like ten to 20 grand each. And insurance doesn't necessarily cover them. So to be able to create a fund that will make that more widely accessible to other active minded amputees, I think it's pretty cool. I agree. It's super inspiring. She was sharing the whole thing on social media every day. And fantastic. Shout out to RXR bar that matched donations. Up to a $104,000, which is what they donated to her GoFundMe. So if you want to learn more about Jackie, if you want to support her go fund me, there's links in the show notes. You can find her at NC runner, Jackie, JA, CKY, on Instagram. And there's a bunch of news stories and we'll link those up in the show notes as well, including this piece in ESPN, which is pretty cool. Very cool piece. So much love, Jackie. Yes. And shout out to moms. I didn't get to do my Mother's Day thing, and she's a mom, so I'm gonna take my opportunity to get the kids to school, and then she was going off on marathons every day. That was her. That was her dropper kit off at school. And then she'd run a marathon and try to finish it in time to go pick her kid. Right, right. And so I just want to say, if it wasn't for you, moms, we'd all be still, we'd be cavemen. If it wasn't for the moms, we'd all still be cavemen as my point. At least the males would. Well, you wouldn't exist. Well, there's that. But I mean, I don't mean the biological function of motherhood. Oh. You just mean unrefined we'd be wild beasts. Yeah. I hear you. Yeah. I bet even the first cave painter, if it was a male. I bet the first cave painter was just like this goth vegan caveman that didn't want to go hunting. Vegan. And just lazing around the cave. Until his wife said, you know what? Do something useful. You either are you paint that cave or you're out of here? Do something with your time. I did not marry you for this. Right. Let's talk about William gooch. So we brought him up the other week because he is the model slash ultra runner slash hypebeast, dude. Who supported Robbie ballinger in his effort to outlast the Tesla in the hill country of Texas the other week. But Robbie had previously supported William in his effort to complete 48 marathons in 30 days, which was a challenge that he set out to accomplish to memorialize his mother who died of cancer and to raise money for the macmillan cancer support, which is a cancer charity in the UK. And there's a documentary that just came out about the 48 30. It's called 48 30. You can find it on Amazon. Here's if you're watching on YouTube, here's a little link to the film. William posted a trailer for the video on his Instagram that I shared the other day. And it's pretty cool. So shout out to William, check out the movie and all sales of the movie or rental fees for the movie go directly to McMillan cancer support. So it's basically a charitable affair and a cool movie to boot. Also, I thought it was cool that he's a whoop athlete and whoop has this blog post where they chronicled the strain of running 48 marathons in 30 days. So they kind of tell his story and then they have all of his data. Which is pretty interesting to kind of take a look at. It's also cool how whoop is doing more and more of this. They've got whoops on a lot of the cyclists from these one day classics and then you can kind of go and look at the data and see what the strain is and all of that sort of stuff, which I think is you want to geek out on your favorite athletes. I like that. That's really cool. What else you got for me? I got this wonderful surf photography book, it's an art book by Clark little, the art of the waves Clark little is a one of the great surf photographers..

Cara goucher Steve Magnus Jackie hunt breer Jackie Olaf Cincinnati cancer William gooch Robbie ballinger YouTube Instagram ESPN William macmillan cancer support Tesla Robbie Texas Amazon
"macmillan cancer" Discussed on RunPod

RunPod

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"macmillan cancer" Discussed on RunPod

"Hello there jenny. Faulkner here with you to gauge you through this episode of run port. Now it's been said before and it's absolutely true but everyone has their own reason to run a fitness mental health loss personal challenge and for some. It's also a mechanism to help cope with grief. And will today. I'm joined by someone who wasn't really a runner until a pivotal moment in his life. I think that many people completely relate to why he started so welcome to run. Port will gauge. Hello there hello journey. Thank you so much. I know it's lovely to have you on run. Put a new. I mean gosh. I i flew to you and i can see that. Running is very much part if your life you to loads of incredible running challenges as well it's become a big my life which would be strange to say four years ago said not really sure about running because you you just go out you suffer for a while around any teammates having fun while for the most part and it's just a struggle you get back and what does that mean. I don't wanna go into details yet. Because i want to hear biden a but if i just say fourteen marathons in thirty days. That's basically what you're planning to do. In the immediate future's should be quite follow wreck. Innovate over nice. Challenge looking forward to. And i kind of i like the madness. It is quite funny thing when you do and so i think any kind of challenge even in life notice with running but when you when you overcome something you miss those moments where he struggled the most so this is going to be a good opportunity to have an extended version of that. Can i the accounts i have to ask. So forty marathons why forte. 'cause there are forty eight counties in england. Okay what you're gonna do each marathon in each county. Yeah that's correct. So most days will be two counties in two marathons and then every three or four days. They'll just be a singular one which will be as close to off. I'm gonna go. Oh my goodness and the last one is the london marathon. Yeah that's that's the real. So of pivots will cool for me. That i can finish it. Such an iconic racing of never actually done tomorrow in the only official one. I've ever done despite during the fifty fifties ally so it's going to be my second journey to actually enjoy a real race. Okay well if you're just setting off running now you will find it hard to believe that. That is only his second official our thin. That's coming up in october. Because the amount of running you have done in just four years is incredible and you are also quite an extraordinary runner. And a low of running you do isn't supportive macmillan cancer support as well which we will touch on onto 'em but i will. Let's talk about the fact that despite the fact you run ultra marathons and you're generally just a running enthusiast. Actually as she said it wasn't always the way..

Faulkner jenny biden forte england london macmillan cancer