35 Burst results for "Macmillan"

"macmillan" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

02:57 min | 3 months ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"Or your local book <Speech_Female> store. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Yeah. If they want <Speech_Male> to know more about brac, <Speech_Male> what's the <Speech_Male> website? If <Speech_Male> they want to follow <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> your work <Silence> <Speech_Female> USA <Speech_Male> ORG is <Speech_Male> the U.S. affiliate, <Silence> <Speech_Male> you can also go to <Speech_Male> brac net, <Speech_Female> which is sort of a <Speech_Female> big bracket <Speech_Male> ash. So we're a <Speech_Male> family of organizations. <Silence> A lot of <Speech_Male> our work is still driven <Speech_Male> by donations. <Speech_Male> There is a certain <Speech_Male> portion <Speech_Male> of very large portion <Speech_Male> that is <SpeakerChange> self <Speech_Male> financed, but <Speech_Male> a lot of the schools <Speech_Male> and the <Speech_Male> adolescents empowerment <Speech_Male> program <Speech_Male> that in Uganda, for <Speech_Male> instance, that I'm personally <Speech_Male> working on. <Speech_Male> That is driven by <Speech_Male> donations. <Speech_Male> So we are still a <Speech_Male> philanthropy driven <Speech_Male> organization, <Speech_Male> so that's <Speech_Male> one way to <SpeakerChange> help. <Silence> And yeah, <Speech_Male> buy the book, <Speech_Male> read the book, tell others <Speech_Male> about the book and the <Speech_Male> message in the book. <Speech_Male> That's <SpeakerChange> my message. <Silence> <Speech_Male> Well, I'm doing my <Speech_Male> part here, Scott. <Speech_Male> Ken, thank you so <Speech_Male> much. <Speech_Male> My pleasure. Like again, <Speech_Male> I'm just embarrassed <Speech_Male> that until <Speech_Male> I read your book, <Silence> I had <Speech_Male> no idea about <Speech_Male> Abed and <Speech_Male> brack and <Speech_Male> now I can't <Speech_Male> get out of my mind <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> I'm just hoping <Speech_Male> that that virus <Speech_Male> infects all <Speech_Male> these listeners out there. <Speech_Male> All of the United States, <Speech_Male> all the world, because <Speech_Male> it's not just <Speech_Male> about the person and <Speech_Male> his story, <Speech_Male> it's the examples, <Speech_Male> the very real <Speech_Male> examples, even <Speech_Male> learning from the setbacks <Speech_Male> and the mistakes <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> we need to have that same <Speech_Male> spirit. We need to <Speech_Male> not just think of ourselves. <Speech_Male> We need to want to see <Speech_Male> the world a better place for <Speech_Male> everybody <Speech_Male> for everybody to have <Speech_Male> enough. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> this story, the <Speech_Male> book that you've written, the <Speech_Male> story that you've told here. <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> is a huge step <Speech_Male> in that direction. So <Speech_Male> thank you so much <Speech_Male> for all the work that you <Speech_Male> did to put the book <Speech_Male> together and the <Speech_Male> work that you're continuing <Speech_Male> to do <SpeakerChange> with brac. <Speech_Male> He was thinking <Speech_Male> about this, by the way, <Speech_Male> until the day he died. <Silence> <Speech_Male> There's one little story <Speech_Male> I forgot <Speech_Male> to tell, which is <Speech_Male> when I <Speech_Male> met him in mid 2019. <Speech_Male> <Silence> You know, <Speech_Male> and I sat down with <Speech_Male> him and I said, so how are you <Silence> doing? <Speech_Male> And I had been working <Speech_Male> on the book for a while. <Speech_Male> And I was kind of <Speech_Male> dragging my feeders <Speech_Female> as writers <SpeakerChange> often <Silence> do. <Speech_Male> I said, how are you? And he said, <Speech_Female> honestly, <Silence> I've been diagnosed <Speech_Male> with terminal brain <Speech_Male> cancer, and I'm going to <Speech_Male> die in four months. <Silence> <Speech_Male> And he shared this news. <Speech_Female> I mean, just so <Speech_Male> in keeping with his character, <Speech_Male> he shared this news <Speech_Male> with me as though <Speech_Male> he was telling me about <Speech_Male> a shift in strategy. <Silence> <Speech_Male> And then he said, <Silence> that book <Speech_Female> that you're writing, <Speech_Female> can you finish it? <Silence> <Speech_Male> Because I'd like to <Speech_Male> read it on my deathbed. <Silence> <Speech_Female> And so <SpeakerChange> I did. <Silence> And so <Speech_Male> here. No pressure there. <Speech_Male> It's no pressure. <Speech_Male> And here we are. <Speech_Male> And here we <Speech_Male> are. <Speech_Male> Well, I'm glad <Speech_Male> you had that pressure <Speech_Male> because <Speech_Male> the book is done. <Speech_Male> It's out there, <Speech_Male> folks. You got to <Speech_Male> get your hands on it. <Speech_Male> It's not something <Speech_Male> you can kind of read <Speech_Male> and be distracted. <Speech_Male> It's something that you <Speech_Male> really want to be focused <Speech_Male> on, but the story <Speech_Male> after story, <Speech_Male> it's so compelling. <Speech_Male> In its own way, <Speech_Male> it's a page Turner. <Speech_Male> So thank you <Speech_Male> again, Scott for being <Speech_Male> so gracious to be <Speech_Male> my guest. And <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> more importantly, thank you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for giving us <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this resource <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> because <SpeakerChange> I think <Speech_Music_Male> it's invaluable. <Speech_Music_Female> Thank you, Ken. <Speech_Music_Female> Thank you. You're welcome. <Music>

U.S. Uganda Scott cancer Turner Ken
"macmillan" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

06:48 min | 3 months ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"The teacher would ask? What the teacher is more like a facilitator. Let's Tiger represents fierceness, wildness, kind of the untamed state of nature, if you will, it's something you need to be the rooms in the jungle and it should be avoided at all costs. And the teacher would say, so let me ask, can a Tiger build a house? Well, back to the first lesson, the home, the word for house or home. No, of course not the villagers would say. Tiger cooperating with a hundred other tigers did not build a house. What can you build a house? Well, yes, we can. If we have the means and know how and the materials, what is a Tiger do when it rains? Runs under a tree. What does human being deal with? He takes shelter and he can build a sheltered for himself. The Tiger is therefore different from the human being in the sense that the Tiger can only adapt himself to nature. Whereas human beings through their own creative activities can adapt nature to suit their own needs. And the sum total of those creative activities is in fact the process of civilization itself. And mind blown right away. This is just the facilitator talking, right? Yeah. Yeah. So can anybody in the class in this class and this group talk about some of the creative activities they've done recently? And people would raise their hand and go, well, I actually repaired a flood wall the other day to direct the water in a certain way. I repaired the roof of my leaky house, you know, I planted some seas. I harvested the rice. And gradually, the point starts to become clear. Society or civilization is not something that is given to them. It is something that they participate in. Through their creative actions. Through their agency. And whether they realize it or not, there are many, many more things they could do, especially if they act together. Poverty itself is not something that is ordained by a higher power. It is something that was made by humans and can be unmade by humans again through their creative actions, be they large or small. And Abed said to me, it was like a light was turned on when they sort of had that first moment of realization of self worth and solidarity. Over the sense of fatalism. Hope, over fate. There's your title. I thought it was their fate to be poor. Yeah. And that spark of hope became a flame. And when those flames were lit as of it described it, they became very difficult to extinguish. And that's the moment when I said, huh. Somebody had to write a book about that. And anyone? They did not realize at that time that that would end up being me. But here we are. There are three things that jumped out at me both from what you just shared and also reading in your book. Number one, I guess it was this resilient thinker writer that it was basically saying the mistake that many educators make is they assume that illiterate people have blank minds. They're functioning every day. They're functioning human beings is just the things that you're teaching them because you're top down kind of following the typical pedagogy. It's not relevant to actually where they're living. And so I thought that was a genius paradigm shift is to say, well, they have a house, and that house has issues. And they know what a Tiger is. And so you start where they are. And then you engage them at a deeper level and then, as you said, the lightbulbs are going off. Prairie wouldn't even further and he said that he called it the banking theory of education as though human beings minds were like empty bank accounts and they just needed to be filled with deposits, which were the knowledge that the teacher gave. That's what it was. And he sent this banking theory of education is part of a system of oppression. Wow. Okay, so then that leads to my two other points. One is, I think you also talked about even the religious leaders, the imams, at the time, in some ways, they're reinforcing the fate thing. Talk about the story about the imam shows the fingers. I have this image in my head of Abed sort of holding the forth about this. And by the way, it was hard to get him to really open up about this stuff, but when he did, he became sometimes quite animated and he remembered, I remember him holding up 5 fingers in front of me and he said, my mom's used to say, you have 5 fingers. How many fingers do you have? You have 5 fingers or all your fingers the same. Is this finger? The same as that finger? No, his finger is big. This figure is small. Some people are rich. Some people are poor. Accept it. God made us this way. And he said, that's what we were trying to fight against. Yeah. And I shared this with a room of students at Cornell recently and actually there was a student in the audience and graduate fellow from Nigeria when I held up my 5 hands and before I even got to the punchline of that story, he said, ah, I know exactly where this is going. Because he had heard of himself. Sure. I would think that this whole approach of waking up the masses, individual by individual, showing them that they have this inbuilt creative agency as they start to organize as they start to recognize, let's say, the oppressive actions of the landowner who's taken advantage of them or the person who's jiping them when they're selling their milk in the market, that before they were just kind of feel helpless and powerless, but I would imagine that they start to get organized. They're talking to each other now. They have vocabulary. They have this more complex understanding. And they start to organize, I would think, and then push back against that, you talk about this, how many people accused Abbott and Bragg of being this furtive Marxist movement to act against the existing government. Yeah, I think that took place on a local level in the early days. And actually some brack employees in the very early days said, I think we're going to get arrested. Okay. Abed was part of the establishment. Let's keep this in mind. I think the president of Bangladesh and a future prime minister was in a future president who was at his wedding as a guest of honor. He was a well to do person born into a zamindar family. Zamindar is sort of the feudal aristocracy of Muslim British India. He said, we are doing something that the government wants us to provide that is an essential service. And in that case, it

Abed tigers Prairie Cornell Nigeria Bragg Abbott brack Zamindar Bangladesh India government
"macmillan" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

06:28 min | 3 months ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"She had never felt anything akin to motherhood before that. And when one of her goats was killed by the fox, it was though her own child had been murdered, and she said to me, I don't know where all the tears came from. She eventually gets over it, but when she tells me that story about goats, it occurs to me that, you know, her confidence now is perhaps a little bit deceptive because rising out of poverty like that. It must be like walking on the edge of a knife. Any little thing, any set of bad harvest. You know, a single dead goat can send you reeling. And send you back. And it also occurred to me that she's so confident right now. One might be led to believe. Of course, she's confident now because look at her asset. She had nothing before. I had trouble reconciling this woman that was speaking to me with such confidence. You know, she spoke at the confidence of somebody who had overcome great odds. I had a police escort with me at the time because there was violence against foreigners at that time. And she had shouted at the police. You never come here. You don't need to come here because everybody gets along here. I just thought your sassing the police don't do that. No matter what color yeah, no. That trouble reconciling her confidence. Okay, she came out of poverty. She keeps building her assets. She has three acres of land, a couple of cows, last time I saw her, she's gotten a milk card. She's got an electricity in her home. So sure. She's more confident because she's risen from extreme poverty. War is it the other way around? I began to ask myself, is it possible that the causality runs in the opposite direction? Because there is a rich body of research. I'm thinking of some of the research that was done by o-b-gyn and Esther duflo to MIT economists that won the Nobel Prize in 2019. They posit that hope itself for confidence and hopefulness that the future can be better can itself be in driver in the path of people out of poverty. So the fact that she would receive these regular visits from the brac case worker, you know, who would comfort her and say, don't worry. Yes, you lost a goat. You will have more goats. You will overcome this. Look towards the future and plan for the future and imagine a better future. You can do this. That gives somebody hope. And that hope itself, I think, is what helped lift her out of poverty. Now you said before, kind of a dangerous idea. Yes, it is. Right? Yeah. It's not like all she needed was a pep talk. Right, right. Right, it's not like to say that hope itself can help break the poverty trap, almost risk suggesting that poverty is self inflicted. And all people really need is to change their attitude. And that is plainly not the case. Well, and what I'm hearing right behind those words got is that if we kind of entertain that there's more agency involved here that the people in poverty actually have the power to lift themselves out of poverty, if they only would have the right mentality, right? The right mindset. It doesn't address systemic evil injustice, oppressive culture. All these other kind of things, especially for women. And the oppression of women especially is something that is real and it holds you back. So you need a ladder. You need hope, but you need a ladder, and you need to grab on. And that's where things like the assets come in. When I say assets, usually I'm talking about livestock and situation where situations like this like goats. So let's say goats, cows, microfinance. Healthcare, educational opportunities, right? Abed used to talk about all we're really doing is we're creating the enabling environment for people to lift themselves out of poverty. Once they have the opportunity to do so. And the hope and not just the hope that hope is knowledge that the future can be better or feeling that the future can be better, but it's actually more than that because you said the word agency. It's hope and agency. The future can be better and there's something that I can do to help bring about that better future. Once you have that, it's like a light being turned on. And then once the enabling environment is available, that's when things really start to change. Part of brax approach certainly from the brain and the spirit of Abed was, well, how do we then raise the literacy level? How do we educate people who for generations have never had that? There were some hard lessons at the beginning. Some of those attempts can you talk about that and then this whole other approach that still is functioning today that equip people not only with belief that the future could be better, but it actually helped them understand their agency that there are things that they are doing and can be doing to actually move towards that preferable future. I would say agency and creativity. Yes. In the early days of brack, Abed had a more traditional mindset when it came to education, literacy, and numeracy. He put a large amount of stock in the importance of the written word. Like I said, he appreciated poetry, the poetry of Rabindranath Tagore, who was the national poet of Bangladesh. It pained him that others could not enjoy poetry in the way that he did simply because they had the misfortune of growing up illiterate. And he also believed that it was a fundamental prerequisite for absorbing new knowledge. New agricultural techniques, right? Not getting swindled at the market, being able to read a contract before you sign the contract. All these things in his mind were essentials for navigating the poverty. So we began with a sort of a top down approach if you will. You set up these community centers in a very rural pocket. I isolated pocket of northeastern Bangladesh where they were working and nobody had ever seen anything like it before. In these community centers, which were essentially one of them shacks located in the common area, people would gather at night and they would get literacy and numeracy lessons. Things that had never been taught before to adults in this part of the world. And the uptake was tremendous at first.

Esther duflo Abed brac fox Nobel Prize MIT brack Rabindranath Tagore Bangladesh
"macmillan" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

05:59 min | 3 months ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"In poverty alleviation. So anyway, I heard about this organization called brac. And by the way, when I first heard about this organization, somebody was saying, I know about this organization called brac, there's a job at brac, maybe you'd be interested in brac and I was like, what is this word that you're saying? Brad is doing this. It's still just a syllable. I don't understand, what is this word? What is the acronym? I went and I looked it up. I learned more about this organization called brac br AC, formerly Bangladesh rural advancement committee, and I just thought to myself, wow. How come nobody ever told me about this? Exactly. The largest NGO in the world by many measures, people sung its praises and especially in some of the praises of the founder, it was very much a founder driven organization, had been around for, well, it was about to celebrate its 40th anniversary when I joined, and this year is its 50th anniversary. So I ended up joining Brad through a communications role. I thought, okay, well, I did journalism, surely I can do some communications work. By having no previous experience, in corporate communications, nor an international development or any sort of nonprofit work. Perfect resume. Yeah, exactly. So for some reason they hired me, right? And fast forward a couple of years, I'll tell you a funny story. I developed my spiel about this about this amazing organization. And I had met somebody. It was just an acquaintance that I met through a friend. And I was telling him about the work that I did about this organization. Oh, largest NGO in the world, world's best kept secret. Tens of thousands of schools. And nobody's ever heard of it. And he goes, man, you've got to fire whoever handles your publicity. And I said, well, that's me, actually. Yeah. Oops. So in the years to come, I did become friendly with, you know, I met the founder. I became friendly with him. We ended up developing somewhat of a rapport based on I'm not sure what, because there were chasms of culture. I mean, he was approaching 80 year old Bangladeshi man when I met him at the time. And I'm not shady, and I'm not wrong with essie. But I did study Shakespeare when I was in college. He loved poetry and he loved Shakespeare and he could recite a long passages of T.S. Eliot Shakespeare keats and others. Wasn't that one of his early passions? He was hoping to be a poet? Yeah, he said that at times. I'm not sure if he was ever really hoping to be a poet. He ended up becoming an accountant instead. Yeah, I know. It's just like a more opposite path. Okay, so here are a few things that I noticed about Abed as I started to get to know him. One, he's no longer with us. He died in 2019 as you mentioned. We can talk about that later. That was a big thing. He died in 2019, but I think if you were here today, he would not mind me saying this. He was exceptionally bad at marketing himself. He was not a great public speaker. He was not a self promoter. He abhorred anything with a whiff of pontification. I wrote an early version of one speech for him when he won the world food prize in 2015. He said, you have me pontificating. I don't want to fund 50. If you have a nonprofit, you got to promote yourself. Yeah, you have to be the rainmaker. Yeah. You got to promote yourself because who the heck else is going to promote you? If you don't do it, who will? Well, he didn't believe it. He believed in keeping your head down, focus on the work, let the works be for itself. One on one, he was great. In front of a crowd, not so much. So that's one thing I noticed about him. And number two thing that I noticed about him, the stories that he told about brack, well, first of all, he didn't love telling stories about people. And I said that. Oh no. He did not. That number is not number. Yeah, yeah. He didn't have pepper his speeches with anecdotes of the ordinary people that he had met like a politician would. Yeah. And I said to him once, you know, like stories so much. You like numbers. He's an accountant. And he corrected me. Sort of young padawan. The numbers tell the story. Okay. And he truly believed that. And he could tell stories that had no names, no faces, just statistics. And of course, one of those stories was about the nation of Bangladesh and how it had risen from poverty and all the indicators had risen so sharply over the years. Some people say it's the biggest change in basic standards of living in the shortest period of time since perhaps the major restoration in 19th century Japan. We're talking about a square mileage of like the state of Iowa. With like half the U.S. population. A 160. What is it? I did the math once. It's like a couple it's a chunk of humanity. It's several percentage points of humanity on a flood prone patch of land, the size of Iowa. I'd imagine if I were like most of it were underwater half of the year. Third thing I noticed about him, the way that he told the story of the organization was not amenable to an elevator. He didn't have like one thing that he did, like, you know, we're going to fix all the playgrounds of the world because children should be allowed to play and that'll solve the problems or we're going to cure malaria or, you know, and I'm not downplaying all those things are important or microfinance, right? They did tons of microfinance. Brack is huge. It was one of the world's largest providers of microfinance. But it is

Bangladesh rural advancement c NGO Brad T.S. Eliot Shakespeare essie Abed Shakespeare brack Iowa Bangladesh Japan U.S. malaria Brack
"macmillan" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

06:00 min | 3 months ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"This, so I hope that this puts a big smile on your faces. See you next year. And thanks so much for listening. Now I'm ready you're coming. Back down to the perfect you want to explain. Listeners if you've been listening to this show for a while you know that I'm always on the lookout for South Asian people to bring on as guests or to highlight by bringing on a guest who knows something about a good South Asian person. The person that we're going to highlight today is someone that was completely off my radar. His name is sir fazle Hasan Abed. He is arguably one of the most important people in modern history in terms of dealing with global poverty and until I read a book that you're going to hear about in just a moment. I knew nothing about him. Let me read you a little bit about his work and then I'm going to introduce the author of the book. In hope over fate, Scott McMillan takes readers inside brac, which celebrates his 50th anniversary in 2022 and is by many measures the world's largest non governmental organization. He recounts the life of its enigmatic founder, fazle, Hasan Abed, a mild mannered accountant who put into practice a groundbreaking idea that teaching people the skills to improve their own lives would give them the hope necessary to lift themselves out of poverty. This insight which is now supported by hard data and economic research led Abed to create one of the most effective anti poverty programs in history. Fazli Hassan Abed was an unlikely revolutionary, born in 1935 to a wealthy and influential family in what is now Bangladesh, he left home at 18 and spent over a decade studying and working in Britain before taking a job at Shell, the oil company, where he was quickly promoted to finance director of Shell Pakistan. Following the Bangladesh liberation war in 1971, Abed's homeland was the world's second poorest country with a per CAPiTA GDP of less than $100. One in four children died before the age of 5, and much of the world had written off Bangladesh and its 70 million people. Using the skills he honed as an international businessman, Abed founded brac in 1972 as a temporary effort to help rebuild the country. It would quickly pivot to long-term development and become his life's work. By the time of his death in December of 2019, fazli Hassan Abed, had grown back into a massive institution active in a dozen countries with 100,000 employees mostly self financed with a university, a bank, commercial enterprises, and large stand-alone anti poverty programs in nearly every sector of development. As many innovative ideas and programs had transformed the way world leaders understand global poverty and how to combat it. The book is called hope over fate fazli Hassan Abed and the science of ending global poverty, it is my great privilege to have the author here, Scott macmillan. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much, Ken. And you know, I just want to share it's so great and heartening and remarkable. Here you talk about this, you know, this topic that I've immersed myself in for such a long period of time, and it's just this topic that is sort of it's an untold story. And to hear somebody that's sort of on that same journey that I went on, wait, like, how come nobody told me about this? Right, and I'm looking, you know, former president Clinton is singing his praises. I mean, all these notable world leaders, but then I don't know who they're talking about. Yeah. I was there. I would love for my listeners to be taken on the same journey in this hour that we have. And I think the best way to do that, Scott, is for you to share with us how you got involved with brac because I think that in and of itself is a vehicle for taking us into the story of bracken Abed. Great. Okay, so I was a freelance journalist about ten years ago. 2011, actually. So 11 years ago. And I was traveling around Africa. I was on a I was doing a lot of travel writing at the time. And I was on an overland trek through Africa. I actually went from Madrid to Cape Town overland without touching the ground. Really? Yeah, yeah. My idea was to travel all around the circumference of Africa to be able to write about it without getting on a plane. I got as far as Nairobi in the sense that, you know, you go down the West Coast, which nobody ever does that. And then down to Cape Town in the South Africa and start to go up the east coast and they got to Nairobi and I thought, okay, it's time for me to finally go home. But anyway, while I was there, I kind of got the development bug. And when I say the development book, I just mean a curiosity about what works and what doesn't work in international development. And a lot of people even say like, what do you mean by development international development? Poverty alleviation. It's the alleviation of global poverty. And, you know, there have been efforts for decades and more to eradicate poverty or alleviate poverty and a lot of them have failed at the time and perhaps still today. When I say at the time in 2011, when we're talking, there was an impression that there was a lot of

Abed fazli Hassan Abed sir fazle Hasan Abed Bangladesh Scott McMillan fazle Hasan Abed brac Fazli Hassan Abed Shell Pakistan Scott macmillan bracken Abed Shell Britain Africa president Clinton Ken Cape Town Nairobi
"macmillan" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

02:12 min | 3 months ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

"And welcome to Asian America that can find podcasts, where my mission has always been to spotlight Asian American culture makers and shapers by having them share their remarkable journeys and stories with us. As of 2022, I've proudly partnered with UCLA's Asian American study center which will eventually archive all of my episodes so that future listeners will be able to access them. And of course, as always, I'm your host, Ken fong. Welcome to episode 395. Mike yes this week is American author and former journalist Scott macmillan. After finishing his must read book, hope over fate, fazle Hasan Abed and the science of ending global poverty. I asked God if he would enlighten all of you wonderful listeners about Abed, who's been right at described as, quote, one of the most unsung heroes of modern times, yet is arguably the most influential person most people have never heard of. As the founder of brac in Bangladesh, Abed found a way to fight poverty that was based on evidence and results rather than rigid dogmas, most of which have proven to be ineffectual over time. Former president Clinton told him that you've revolutionized the way we all think about development. By the time he died at 83 in 2019, he was revered in international development circles, while still remaining largely unknown to the general public. Before joining brac in 2011, Scott was just as much in the dark about this revered NGO and its legendary founder and director Abed. He eventually became sir Abed's speechwriter for 7 years, and today serves as the director of learning and innovation at brac USA. This episode will especially be impactful for those of us who want to see an end to the cycles of global poverty because brack has a measurable 50 year track record of innovating sustainable ways to equip and empower hopelessly poor people with creative agency. But even if that doesn't happen to be an area of interest for you, you will still be inspired by how

Asian America Asian American study center Abed Ken fong Scott macmillan fazle Hasan Abed brac UCLA Mike sir Abed Bangladesh brac USA Clinton NGO Scott brack
"macmillan" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

03:26 min | 8 months ago

"macmillan" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

"Of substantial national importance. Your host for the program is David in Chicago, a D.C. based healthcare policy analyst and researcher. We invite you to comment on the program by visiting the healthcare policy podcast dot com. Now, here's David. Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host David ando. With me today to discuss reporting gun violence is the Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Jim McMillan, the founder and director of the Philadelphia center for gun violence reporting and its parent organization, the initiative for better gun violence reporting. Mister macmillan or Jim, welcome to the program. Good morning. Thank you for having me. I with this opportunity. Mister McMillan's bio is, of course, posted on the podcast website. Just two notes on background first, after New England Journal of Medicine published research that guns in the home were associated with an increased risk of homicides in the home for 24 years beginning in 1996, the NRA lobbied congressional Dickey amendment named after J Dickie a former House member, effectively banned the CDC from conducting gun violence research. Second, considering the 2012 sandy hook shooting in which the gunman fired over a 150 rounds killing 26 and wounding 32, the British newspaper columnist Dan Hodges tweeted in 2015 quote unquote in retrospect, sandy hook marked the end of the U.S. gun control debate. Once America decided killing children was bearable, it was over close quote. I'll add since sandy hook there have been 950 school shootings. Gun deaths are the leading cause of death among American children and teens. With me again and discuss gun violence reporting and the debate is again Jim McMillan so Jim with that. As baccarin obviously, the sandy hook is in reference to the latest school shooting. In Texas. So let's begin the obvious question for me is for context is if you can briefly describe your organization's work, again, the Philadelphia gun center for violence reporting. Great. Well, thanks so much. Thank you for that introduction for framing it, because it's grim, and it puts us in the right mindset to address the challenge at hand. So I launched the Philadelphia center for gun violence reporting two years ago. But at the same time, it's the culmination of 40 years of work for me. It's been a long journey and at the same time it's just the beginning of a fairly new endeavor and with so much work left to do, of course. In a nutshell, I launched it to consider the hypothesis that changing the way that journalists and news organizations report on gun violence might actually prevent violence. Stop shootings and save lives. And there are three primary programs at this point. It's a nation lean and evolving organization. But it becomes clear at this point that we've got three main programs. We have a community reporting project called the credible messenger reporting project that it's intended to shift power from traditional news organizations to people with lived experience..

Jim McMillan David ando Philadelphia center for gun vi Mister macmillan Mister McMillan J Dickie Dan Hodges David Pulitzer Prize baccarin Jim New England Journal of Medicin D.C. Dickey Philadelphia gun center for vi NRA Chicago America CDC Philadelphia center for gun vi
"macmillan" Discussed on Epicenter

Epicenter

08:29 min | 1 year ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Epicenter

"Capital of the resources and sleep rules. But as more kind of different I mean, this is a somewhat cringe and complicated term, but natural capital or other forms of capital become legible on chain, but they can be really good ways to confirm mutual aid for different communities, or to confer a kind of large amount of access to different people, not only gathering, but also distributing. So I think kind of next gen dollars will have to focus more on the distribution rather than the gathering. Talking about distribution, I think one of the things here that comes to my mind is how Dao can sort of distribute capital in the real economy, right? So the friction between the crypto economy and traditional banking still remains. And I think if there was less friction there, it would be easier for dows to perhaps finance a lot more things outside of the crypto ecosystem, which is like, I think a lot of dowser are helping to contribute to and finance today. What are some ways that we can hope to see dows have an improved or improved interaction with the real economy and what are some of the barriers there that need to be broken down and for like a more generalized type of application? Yeah. I mean, I think in terms of barriers that need to be broken down. It's just relatively few established pathways for essentially legal plasma hood for a Dow or the ability for a doubt to. Tangibly own real world assets or interact with the real world that says there is a handful of Trail Blazers that have gone off and actually have established some kind of road density that's. Wrapping or otherwise interacting with the Dow. And then also a handful that kind of explicitly gone the other direction and become. A legal entities defined very well structured participation agreements between members to account for the fact that they are deliberately not seeking confirmation or seeing job recognition by one jurisdiction explicitly. I think there's been some really great efforts by, but again, a whole bunch of different actors, one in particular has been really commonly the Kuala model, which is taking to create a model or that different jurisdictions can adopt in order to find a common ground on how to treat these kind of a legal Taos. So probably some jurisdictions starting to adopt that or something similar to that is a really great first step to enabling widespread legal personification or at least kind of legal interaction or interaction between thousand and a lot of the kind of real world. But also in terms of people trailblazing or projects translating this projects like opal S and sparked out that have gone the opposite direction and very kind of explicitly said let's set up Colorado limited cooperatives on the corporate associations and actually make those kind of the mechanisms of the kind of data structures that we create into our operating agreements and then the constraints of the Tao and the constraints of the legal wrapper that we're choosing into our data structures and try to marry the two and yeah, I don't know that one is necessarily that they can have right of the wrong way to do it. It's interesting to see kind of both threads being pushed forward in parallel by different groups and I think there's probably pros and cons of both, obviously, idea of spinning up a legal wrap, I feel like you've seen more immediate access to real world things than the alternative where you can have a waiting on some jurisdiction to create some kind of recognition. Yeah, I think the legal rapper that some people and law firms have been able to sort of come up with is perhaps like a stepping stone to something that's a lot more a lot more organic to the Dow. Like structure and to the functioning of a Dow. And so that paradigm. And so I think what's going on in Wyoming is probably like the most interesting. Are there other places that you're aware of where jurisdiction like the other jurisdictions that have started discussing or are looking into Dow personhood? Yeah, I know folks thought police at a working pretty hard with legislators in Colorado to set up something pretty similar. I say similar and they probably are going to be scowling at me now for saying someone because I think there's a whole bunch of issues that they see with the Wyoming legislation and a lot of what they're doing in Colorado is kind of a direct response to that. But I guess the goal was to create an outcome where Dallas can have a reasonable can I believe on personification that I guess mirrors the kind of value assumptions that a lot of web three organizations make on a similar kind of value alignment. I guess another example I'm aware of is the valent legislation, which actually was preceded Wyoming as well. The blockchain based LLC is another kind of legal rapper that you can spin up for similar purposes deal. Pioneer that and I think maybe in both of those cases in the Vermont case and the YMA case, they really just kind of show they kind of flexibility of LLCs in general. Really, you can make an LRC. You can construct LLC that does just about whatever you want. And so it's more about how much you want to go and do the kind of bespoke work to create analysis that functions as you want it to. Yeah, I think in Europe it's probably a little bit more complex than I've been talking with people who are trying to find ways to. Create some form of rapper that would allow us to have legal personhood, but it's not quite there yet, and I don't think that Europe will be at the forefront of this innovation. Typically for a way that I've seen people approach it in Europe has been through like a foundation model, right? Where you would have, I think, generally people would like to prefer a Swiss foundation, but there's a handful of other jurisdictions where people would spin up some kind of foundation and that foundation would have no direct tied to the Dow itself that would be kind of as part of its operating agreement bound to decisions made by the Dow bound to act in the best interests of the town, which usually just kind of act on behalf of the Dow as opposed to being directly tied to it in the way that the blockchain LLC.

Dao Trail Blazers Colorado Wyoming Kuala blockchain based LLC Europe Dallas Vermont Swiss foundation Dow blockchain LLC
"macmillan" Discussed on Epicenter

Epicenter

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Epicenter

"Think one we already tested on co ops, but I don't know if it's necessarily from the kind of theory of change where it's like co ops themselves, transform into dolls, but more that these kind of principles of existing organizations become more familiar among our ecosystem. I also think one thing that does happen to be very good at the moment and often not always to the best ends is a pooling capital. Or pulling some type of resources. So I laugh because I'm thinking of spiced out, which recently bought some IP. Or I thought they got some. But they tend to be good vehicles, you see constitution now. You also think see things like climate doubt. And I think that there needs to be a lot more thoughtful consideration around the kind of what you would call Dow governance or corporate governance of these vehicles. But you see it rei sawed yesterday like a hotel, which is aiming to be a pack. So political action committee specifically to look at U.S. regulatory landscape and crypto and specifically kind of advise policy positions. So basically looking at these organizations that often need a certain amount of capital to be bootstrapped and to be effective, those are very kind of natural tools for these organizations. In terms of having the best possible outcomes, we also see this with things like the Prius sandstone and other things of basically being able to kind of quickly boot up resources to a narrowly scoped cause. But I think and what I'm hoping for is that it becomes more variegated where we aren't necessarily looking at financial.

U.S.
"macmillan" Discussed on Epicenter

Epicenter

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Epicenter

"Would then kind of race to add signatures to it. Once you have a threshold of signatures from then, you take that and you call an execute signatures function on the mainnet side and you pass in those signatures as a parameter. So someone needs to take that, but it's a public function. So all you need to do is have their signatures and you can trigger execution on the other side. For the route notice chain to mainnet, you have to pay for it or someone has to pay for it going the other way. It's subsidized because it's trivial, the cost, but because of the costs on that, much less predictable than it's harder to subsidize. Longer term what we're really hoping to develop and to see the kind of use case being is doused essentially choose a chain as their kind of home chain, but then are able to spin up a safe on each and every other AVM compatible chain and bridge decisions to them. So that their influence can extend a long way beyond their children homeshare a Dow on nurses chain might control a safe on mainnet and one on public on an optimism and arbitrament and anywhere else with the safe ecosystem is deployed to. Interesting. So with this recent, I guess, like in the last year or so, there's just like been a proliferation of EVM compatible chains or layer twos and how do you foresee Dao's like very much in the spirit of what you just said? How do you foresee Dao's sort of spreading across those ecosystems and what's that going to look like? I don't know, let's say you have, I don't know, flamingo down, right? Okay, well it's on the main net and it also wants to be on the other ecosystems what is that going to look like for users and also perhaps technically like what kind of control mechanisms would they want to implement or what it would be like centrally centrally managed from one chain then managing those sub dows or thousands of other chains or they all operating sort of horizontally at the same level. Sure. So I think as with all those because it's a wide open organizational design space at the moment, there's not necessarily one pattern or one design path that I think all dowels will assume. Other than the fact that I do strongly believe that most doves will be multi chain. So I could see some example where Dao particularly an art collection now or social doubt. Maybe wants to have a presence on multiple EVM chains because maybe an artist they're collecting is primarily based on polygon. They do governance layer on nurses chain, and then they secure their most larger assets on mainnet. And I think it would be really good also as a kind of ambassador function for different dowels to have presence on different chains of communicate between them because at each you'll find different communities and different kind of tool sets and also strengthen the resiliency of the bridges between them, both on technical and also a kind of community level. And even so I'm on the board of regen foundation, which is region network as a cosmos escalating for ecosystem services. And we've been talking about the and we've been talking with the utmost team about saying about getting zodiac tools deployed there. And I think really this kind of multi time presence will be hugely beneficial to the ecosystem. And also basically allow kind of different participants and approve the term like participant over user. Basically like different types of accessibility. So for, say, their regen network regeneration community staking those will have all different levels of access and familiarity with protocol governance. But we can really have the patterns and kind of acclimate to them and meet people where they're at, especially if it's kind of chain specific applications or chain specific usability. So you think that there may be some functions of the Dao that would exist on one chain and some of the functions with these design other chain and you may have assets being managed on different change and I guess my next question is what is the what do you foresee as the role of this chain as a place where lots of people are hosting dows? Do you think that dows are becoming or will become one of the predominant use cases for nurses chain? So I think we've already seen that there and that the XI ecosystem has been really thriving with teams mentioned before, like thou house, as well as the garden style and one hive communities. So in a way it already is very much a kind of dough oriented chain. We also have things like circles, which use the safe contracts at their core. So there is very much an idea of collective accounts being the identity standard on this chain. So I can very much see it progressing in this manner, and even but also in the sense that I really believe that Dow should be multi chain. So I wouldn't want it to become a kind of monopolistic chain specifically focused on Dao's. And I think a part of this can be shown in the ethos of also noses chain trying to make it very easy for people who wish to be able to post their own node. So working with deaf note and others. And the way we started the conversation about chains kind of being their own douse. I think noses chain would ideally like to kind of operate in that manner as well where there's a really kind of decentralized ownership of the chain itself and very strong cross chain community as well. So taking a step back here and coming back to sort of like douses paradigms society I wonder what types of existing structures you think are right for transformation or transition into Dow form. Sure, so I think one we already tested on co ops, but I don't know if it's necessarily from the kind of theory of change where it's like co ops themselves, transform into dolls,.

Dao regen foundation Dow
"macmillan" Discussed on Epicenter

Epicenter

08:22 min | 1 year ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Epicenter

"The reality module is the key to this thing working and it plugs into basically the way that it brings off chain voting on chain is via an oracle called reality eth. Hence the name the reality multiple, because we're plugging into this reality Oracle. The Audi R 8 is this really cool article mechanism that is not very widely known about our understood. So it's worthwhile diving into quickly. Essentially, is an escalation game based article. So what that means is anyone can ask you a question and anyone else can come along and try to answer the question by putting down a bond. You put down a bond, set the outcome to what if you like. And then anyone else can come and double the bond to change the outcome. Each time the bond is set, a time out, kind of resets, and if at any point you get to the end of the timeout, then the answer is locked in. And so you basically play this escalation game until someone gives up and loses their bonds. And the way that the game theory plays out is at the top of the escalation game, the bonds get so large that people have to coordinate around setting the bonds, and thus have to coordinate around which outcome is correct. So the shelling point for the current for the correct outcome is the true outcome. It's much easier to coordinate around a true outcome than a false one. And so at the top of the escalation game, it should always resolve to the true outcome. That being the case that they can bottom is very little incentive to set a false outcome because you're essentially just giving money to whoever comes in corrects you. So in practice we very rarely see it move beyond the first step where someone just comes along and sets the true outcome. I remember we did an episode about this in 2014 because it used to be called reality keys and we had I remember first hearing you know about this thing and just like this was one of the things that got me like super excited about the idea of blockchains and the types of decentralized autonomous decision making you could make, so yeah, episode 33 of that presenter is about this very thing. Yeah, yeah, yeah. And it's been kind of out in the wild for ages, and it's been used for things like that, the home and prediction market, it's the mechanism for resolving those outcomes for their markets and was obviously a mechanism that we were comfortable with. We had seen working in practice with large volumes of a large amount of money at stake. And so that was the reason for kind of landing on this. The neat thing with it and again, part of the reason for this confusing, confusing cacophony of names is that it could be used to bring in decisions from just about anyway. So we chose snapshot because that pattern of kind of snapshot plus notes is safe was already really common. But you could use it to bring outcomes from say a Discord poll or a discourse poll or a Twitter poll. You could flip coins on raw diocese and whatever you want. And it could, as long as some reasonably easy way to kind of publicly verify the outcome, then you can use this as a way to bring that information on change. So yeah, this is kind of our first module and has already gotten a pretty good bit of adoption and there's a whole bunch of projects out in the wild using this as the way of enabling cheap or free kind of voting for their participants that still kind of autonomous control over their assets. The next kind of more fundamental building block was essentially a piece that we took from the first version of the reality module, and it's just a delay module. So I talked about compound reviving or reinventing this centuries old concept of a time lock, and that's essentially what a delay module is. It's just like making a very small component that you can put between a safe and other modules just to delay the things that it tries to make happen. And so it creates a really good safety hatch for if you want to give an individual or a smaller people some ability to control the assets on behalf of a safe, maybe to as a way of mitigating the overhead of voting, but you still want to have the security of being able to know that we can stop these things if it turns out that they do something malicious. Then you have some mechanism by which you can decide what it takes to override such decisions like with that type of way. Yes, you have this kind of delay period, and then there is an of delay modifier and the ionic and basically skip any any transaction that gets included. And so if for whatever reason, there are no, which is probably the Dow, it might be some of the mechanism. If the owner decides that it's malicious, then I can just trigger a transaction to skip that malicious transaction. Then the next one that we the next module that we write on is this exit module, which essentially adds moloch like kind of rage quick functionality. You designate any SC 20 token and as your organization version of a share and then users can redeem any amount of that the SC 20 token for a proportional share of the safe assets. So it allows that the combination of a voting mechanism, a delay module and an exit mechanism allows you to create this kind of very small organization out of a bunch of fundamental pieces. Then beyond that, we have a handful of others that we've built and currently working on. I'm curious about the bridge module and the types of things you can do with the bridge module. Yeah, okay, that's a very important emission on my so yeah, the bridge module is essentially a way of importing. Control of a safe to an address on the other side of a bridge. So essentially, the use case that we're imagining here is you have assets on mainnet, but maintenance to expensive to vote on. So you want to put your decision making mechanism somewhere else. And no sustained formerly X dire has established itself as a bit of a home for dowers that community ecosystem kind of lives there, colony and all of its style is going to live there and then there's a whole bunch of Aragon dowels that have been deployed there. The garden style ecosystem will live there. And so giving those towers, the ability to control assets on mainnet is kind of a really key piece to allowing them to function in this multi layer multichain ecosystem. So yeah, essentially, the bridge module lets you set an R and R and a chain ID and say and a bridge module contract or a bridge contract and just say message just passed from this chain by this address are allowed to pass through and control the safe control the avatar contract. In that case, so let's say like in the case of a contract on the Ethereum mainnet and a controlling address like on xDai or even polygon or like some other layer two chain, does get paid on the main net at that point. Because I can see a use case here for DeFi where you might have some liquidity positions or you might have some DeFi positions on mainnet, but you want to control those from a different chain in that case who pays the fees. Yeah, so this very much depends on the bridge that you're using. In our case, we're using the examples that we've built out so far. We're using the nurses chain arbitrary message bridge, in which case you on the notice chain side you would have you can Dow your decision making mechanism and it would pass a message to the a and B contract on the nurses chain side. There's a bunch of bridge articles that are watching that and they would when they see your message get passed in..

oracle Audi R Twitter
"macmillan" Discussed on Epicenter

Epicenter

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Epicenter

"Of your account and control mechanisms. So essentially the accounts are in the governance tools and all of the other tools where people interact with the Dow are sort of like decoupled in this stack. Can you describe well before we go into the stock, maybe describe what is zodiac and then perhaps we can talk about the different layers in the stack and how you guys are looking to marginalize a lot of those aspects. Yeah, so zodiac is really, I don't know materialization of our of this kind of key insight that by decoupling these things we enable the whole world of possibilities on how you design and build. So zodiac is really this kind of standard for and set of tools built to the standard standard for essentially how to build these composable and interrupt interoperable pieces of data away. And so when I say doubling, this could be the existing Dow frameworks that are relatively large monolithic doll like structures or it could be much more granular pieces of tooling for enabling specific functionality. And the nice thing with this particular way of building dials is the two aren't mutually exclusive. You can have multiple mechanisms running in parallel being used for different types of decision making within the context of one organization. So zodiac is really just this standard for composable data link. It's a specific kind of set of contract interfaces that if you expose them, then you're going to you can play nicely with all of the other tooling. It's a kind of library that basically has a programmable account at the center. We've built a lot of the interfaces around the noci safe, because we know it's a trusted account and it's extendable open-source. But fundamentally framework agnostic. And our tools mainly, it can be used through the zodiac app unnecessarily. And what I like about being able to kind of combine plug and play and stack them and also connect them to other data platforms. So not just the safe, it can be a molar can be basically anything you dream of is that it kind of, you know, we saw with recent criticisms of web three that there's still platform centralization, even if there's potentially protocol decentralization. And we don't want to mimic with the platforms that we build the same type of user centralization that we've seen with web two or other platforms. So by having participants in dows, get used to kind of plug and play their own framework where you can add a module that allows you to connect them all up on depth change windows to save. But also to maybe add a delay modifier so that you have a time before it transactions can be executed. We'll go deeper into the stack, but basically being able to set these up and add qualifiers to all the mods, reorients, I think, both on a protocol level, but also on a platform participant or user level. The kind of relation to the tools that we use for Dallas. So it's the idea that we can put kind of small components together to make custom setups. We're not locked into one monolithic platform. And we're not stuck there because everyone's using the same platform. So zodiac is really about building bridges in the same way that protocols were about decentralization. The zodiac approach is almost a platform decentralization approach to how we do governance in the future. It is really an antithesis to a lot of the kind of platform governance or democratic governance tools that we saw that over into some really anticipated use cases in the past. We want to let use cases emerge and then build the bridges to them. That's really cool. So notice it's safe sits at the middle of this. And then this is integrated as a UI in the nurses save interface. Can you talk about the different modules that you've built and what people can what flavors that people can sort of put into there into their zodiac Dow? Yeah, I think one key thing that you mentioned that's worth reorganizing there is that we kind of use the safe as our prototype for this as the prototype for what we call the avatar as in like the thing that represents the doubt on chain. But it is fundamentally agnostic to what that Avatar is. So if someone else wanted to write some different contracts to function as an avatar, functions that programmable account at the center, they absolutely could. And we think that this is a really important thing to just be explicit about because we want this to be a kind of open standard. We want it to be something that other people feel free to come and build on top of. And we don't want it again to unreasonably lock people into anyone specific solution. We obviously think that the safe is the best solution, and that's why we use it as our prototype. But it's a wide open standard there and anyone can implement whatever they like. In terms of the pieces that we've built, we have a handful of a handful of kind of additional modules and modifiers that we've built on top of this to basically try to extend what the Dow ecosystem is able to do in some cases in other cases just provide what we think is some fundamental building blocks. We've deliberately avoided for the most part replicating work in terms of voting and decision making tools because for the most part, they already exist. There's a whole bunch of really great data tools out there in Aragon and Malik and tasks that can colony and compound and so we didn't necessarily feel the need to try to replicate those things. But we do have a handful of other tools that we've built that again feel like in a fundamental building blocks. The first one was very much need to revenge was the thing that kicked off this whole endeavor is our reality module. And it's what underlies the safe snap plugin for snapshot, which basically lets you take an off chain vote from snapshot and bring it on chain to trigger on chain execution. So there's a bit of a confusing layer of names here in terms of snapshot that kind of voting platform safe snap that they can plug in to snapshot and then the reality module that lives underneath it that then plugs into the nose a safe. There is a very good justification for the separation of all of these names, but it does lead to a little confusion. So maybe we can dive into that really quickly. But yeah, essentially, like at a high level, what this does is let you take off chain votes and bring them on chain..

Dallas Aragon Malik confusion
"macmillan" Discussed on Epicenter

Epicenter

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Epicenter

"Realization that most of the Dale frameworks were much more complex than what they needed to govern the compound protocol and ended up deciding to roll their own in the compound governance framework and the big, I don't know innovation that they made was not really animation at all, but the revival of a centuries old security technique and just having a time luck, having a window of time where things are cute out before they execute and making sure that you have a way to respond to things. In advance of them being executed and compound being a kind of relatively simple unchained mechanism for confidence proved to be a winning combination for a whole bunch of protocols. Until gas prices started skyrocketing at which point we started to see projects take different approaches to mitigating that. And I think that largely that the most popular approach was to essentially push varying off chain and delegate the actual control to a relatively smaller group of multi sig sinus or in compound case to delegate vote weight to larger kind of protocol politicians that would financially incentivize to or at least have enough stake to justify the gas cost of riding on chain. I have totally glossed over the hulk of molecular ecosystem that evolved beyond the original molecule as well. The Dow house guys spun up a mark V two and an interface for that. And exile, which is now notice chain became the kind of home for a whole class of Taos. And then yeah, over the last maybe year or so, there's been a whole bunch of more tightly focused just different styles of dal frameworks starting to emerge. A lot of them built on top of and around them as safe as a core, and this is largely what we've been trying to standardize and accomplish with the zodiac framework. Yeah, there's so much to unpack here, but yeah, there's no save I think it's been like instrumental to the success of the ease of people's ability to summon dows. As well as all the different frameworks that you mentioned, you know, one of the things that came up in researching this episode and talking to people who had been working a lot more closely than I had in summing down and things like that is that there's an abundance of tools and in my research I was able to find lots of different frameworks like and what is the overlap between some of these tools and are we arriving at some standards on how we how we construct dows and what is this abundance of good thing or does it end up actually make things a bit more complicated in the end for people who are building down? I think it's definitely a good thing. Choice and kind of plurality of options is great because it's a good forcing function for. Tools to develop in a way that actually serves users needs. So those people's real world requirements. It obviously makes it more complex for someone new to the space coming in and trying to figure out what to do, figure out what framework works will work well for them how they should go about making decisions. But nevertheless, I think that abundance of choice is a net positive, it's definitely part of what inspired zodiac is a framework trying to find a way to I guess mesh all of those things together in a way or at least have a common way for them to play nicely together. Probably worth giving a quick bit of backstory on that to help give illustrate why so in, I guess late 2020, we started doing some research to figure out what the essentially how we should set up the notes. We had this desire to move a huge chunk of narcissist treasury into something that was community controlled. And had a couple of really key kind of requirements. One was that it would be well can have proven to secure vast amounts of funding to that we don't have unreasonably restrict participation. We don't price people out of participation. And three that we don't have unreasonably restrict out future choices. We don't lock ourselves into one particular road map because of a choice that we make early on. And we realized that none of the existing frameworks really checked all three of those boxes. And the third one I think is relevant to what we're talking about here in terms of unreasonably restricting future choices. And so you imagine S scenario I say I'm brand new to the space and I come in and discover Aragon. And I said, wow, this is this amazing delta. I'm going to go from John create a Dow. And then after 6 months of operating the Dow space and having built up a community using the Sarah gone down, the community decides, hey, actually, we'd really love to use a molex Al, more like as much, much more suitable for our style of organization, and so we want to migrate. And so the migration process now is essentially they've got to spin up this new molecular. I can populate it with all of the users. And then go through this kind of arduous process of making proposals to transfer all of the tokens and all of the systems that this Dow controls, you know, if it's the owner of any other external systems to update any kind of external references to that Dell, probably on a bunch of websites they don't control. And so there's really monumental coordination challenge of moving from one framework to another. And so they kind of key insight that we had with zodiac was that if we decouple your account and the mechanism that controls it, we can make that migration process much less painful where if you imagine as a new organization you come in and you spin up a not so safe, and then you say, hey, we really love Aragon. We want Aragon to be the mechanism for a Dell. Then we plug an arrogant out into our nose is safe and have the argument out control the safe. But then same thing if 6 months down the road, the community now decides, hey, we'd really like to be a molecule, then we simply would one proposal are able to plug in this new molecule as a module to our safe, unplug the Aragon Dao and now all of a sudden we are a molecule rather than Aragon Dow. None of our assets had to move, none of our kind of owner settings on any systems we control had to be updated. None of the external references to our Dow had to be updated. It all kind of happens in one step. So we are much less restricted in our future decisions by our current decisions just through that simple simple decoupling.

Aragon Dell Sarah John Aragon Dow
"macmillan" Discussed on Epicenter

Epicenter

09:41 min | 1 year ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Epicenter

"And I think the early dows like the Dow maybe had more of this philosophy of fully automating, for instance, like a fund in a sense. And it was less so about this grassroots sort of effort. When you think of something that's grassroots and that brings together lots of different people, you think of cooperatives and I wonder what are the parallels in your view? What are parallels between cooperatives as we, as we know them like in most jurisdictions, you have like a sort of legal status for co op or a cooperative in France with like a associated or something like that in Germany we have the same thing and so what are the overlaps between dows and cooperatives as you see them? Sure. So in a recent essay, a prehistory of Dao's, I gave one definition of a doubt that doesn't definitely does not apply across the space, but potentially a kind of voluntary association that prioritizes, let's say the operating principles of cooperativism. So when people are talking about co ops, they actually usually mean a specific legal structure with democratic member control and economic ownership. I say that does prioritize them as operating principles. Basically, to shift the space towards because basically because they could emphasize ownership of contributors to the Dow. It's quite easy for those who are contributing to be able to have greater economic stake and what they're producing. And this isn't something that we always see with traditional firms. So I think that does have the propensity to be hyper capitalism, but they also have a different propensity to be kind of remember owned. And basically by giving these definitions and patterns, we can encourage them to go more towards the space. And just maybe a more meta note on that level is that I think that we're at a stage where we can kind of put these patterns in place and say, hey, you should really look at how ownership is playing out in your dad because right now that's critically what's being determined. Both ownerships within Dao's and also crossed out so ownership in crypto networks. And that basically by prioritizing co ownership right now, we can make sure that it doesn't become too lopsided in the future, and it more does take this to heart. And I think one last note on that is that there's also been a criticism and a kind of overlap with thousand co ops that the mistaken will leave the cooperative or kind of co ownership or democratic control. How can that touch the kind of base layer of global capitalism that crypto kind of glides on top of? And I really think it's about a deep understanding of how technology developed in the cultural norms. And basically pushing cultural norms at the right time. And right now, thousand co ops seen from the recent FW piece called what can collapse on from each other as well as this is a long winded response, but as well as other pieces like more shed manon's earlier work on thousand co ops that I think is really important, but really has only come to visibility and its right time now. So he wrote this 2018 paper called fostering worker cooperatives with blockchain technology. And basically, in it, he looks at the difference between a capital management and a labor managed firm and also the colony project. So colony is a job platform. They've recently launched a new face, and so back in 2018, more ship was writing about this. And basically saw fundamental challenges that a lot of these labor manage firms had one was that they had difficulty bootstrapping funding. Sometimes for good reasons, because it limits the amount of private investing. They also had problems of operating across different jurisdictions. And they also had problems of operating at scale. And basically, by looking kind of closer to the colony platform, he said, you know, maybe maybe just maybe these tools that are across jurisdictional, but help with kind of alignment or coherence would be able to aid cooperatives to be able to grow into a more global movement. Yeah, that may sound sense. And I think perhaps when I think of cooperatives like the people who are in cooperatives I think that there's such a rejection of hyper capitalism or even just capitalism and the images that sort of blockchain and crypto conjure up. I think those people with mine is just like totally goes in opposition with what I think a lot of cooperatives, goals are. And so I think there may be also a generational thing where increasingly what we see as cooperatives today, traditionally cooperatives may start forming into dows as the people in that form those groups are more inclined to scale beyond the boundaries of national borders and jurisdictions and things like that and seek funding and this sort of thing. I'd like to ask you, let me just take a step back here first and brief history of dowels on Ethereum. Can you describe sort of the arch of how dows have evolved from the initial the Dow, which I think is the most emblematic data a lot of people remember us being like the first to some more recent ones like molok Dow, which inspired a lot of subsequent hours and now this sort of explosion of dows that are doing everything from buying an FT portfolios to funding projects to funding development. What does the history of dows look like? Yeah, I think he has some really great insights on this and her prehistory of Dallas, articles, so definitely worthwhile people checking that out. In terms of maybe just a quick overview of the history of say frameworks and technologies, obviously I think the cryptocurrency kind of networks Bitcoin in Ethereum and a whole bunch of others. To me, the first time I've really widespread instantiation is often down like organizations. In terms of I guess the other kind of broad category of downs, these kind of less tightly scoped more organizational doubts as opposed to kind of really, really tightly scoped. Participation in terms of being a minor validator in this protocol down. Yeah, the Dow, I think it was probably the first one of the first instantiations of this type of Dell. It was essentially a mutual pool of capital that the intent was to allocate it. And I think, intend to attempt to kind of own a return on it in some way. It was fairly loosely defined by design, just that very much wanted that to be an emergent thing for the community to decide what they wanted to do with this poor funding. It was a reasonably complex system at least for the time and that is kind of part of the reason that it ended up having an undiscovered exploit that ultimately had it crash and burn. And to molok was this kind of direct reaction to that deliberately very simple contract with a very simple mechanics that allowed participants to very easily recover their share of the capital and leave at any point in time. The key innovation for molec was this rage quit mechanism, so you as a member of a molecule have shares and you can redeem those shares for a router portion of their of the Dao's assets at any point in time. And then around that mechanics that allow you to do that at kind of critical moments whenever the Dow passes a decision you have a cool down period where you can rage quit if you disagree with how the decision went. In parallel to that a whole bunch of other gall frameworks can have sprung up and developed in parallel for several years Aragon, Dow stacking colony, where they can primary examples that spun up around the same time. I think colony actually started building slightly before the Dow, but has been in development for a great many years and Aragon spun up kind of shortly after the Dao Dao stack similarly I think shortly after the Dow, I think at the time, it was cold. I'm trying to blank now and what it was at a different name. But nevertheless, these three kind of separate approaches to creating dows, Aragon very much designed as an operating system for dows doused at kind of more opinionated on what the decision making mechanism was introduced novel decision making mechanism in holographic consensus, which is essentially combined token weighted voting and prediction markets to modulate what the quorum for those votes should be and then colony introduced a really interesting reputation mechanism where you earn reputation for contributing to the organization and they can organization gets to define what reputation means within the context of that organization. I think later on.

Dao blockchain technology molok Dow manon Germany France molok Dallas Dell Aragon dows
"macmillan" Discussed on Epicenter

Epicenter

08:45 min | 1 year ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Epicenter

"That were decentralized that were private, hopefully. And also that could really kind of change how not only software finance operates how organizations operate. So I followed Ethereum for quite some time, basically kept a tab on after the launch and as projects were built on it. And then I joined the space full-time in 2017 hypnosis. So I've been there the last over four years. And I've always had more of a focus on what organizational change it will bring. So I've been really lucky to work with boring and basically cofound noses guilds, which has been incubated by focus on governance and dachshund. And I guess I stumbled into the blockchain space in 2013. I saw a news article on the deep web, the dark web and started poking around 12 browser and found my way into various marketplaces. Everything was denominated in this Bitcoin thing. And so that kind of was the start of the rabbit hole, trying to figure out what that was and why it was valuable and why people were kind of selling stuff on the deep web for a Bitcoin. And I guess shortly after that found noise to a bunch of metallics reasonably early writing. And the thing that kind of immediately captivated me there where some of his early pieces on Dallas on the concept of Dallas I was playing basketball, professionally at the time and so that was eating most of my time. But this kind of seed just grow and slowly consume more and more of my bandwidth over the subsequent few years. And then in 2016, the Dow project kind of sprung up and I immediately just immersed myself in that founded the Dow hub forum. Which became the de facto home for the dows community. And that kind of snowballed into a full-time career in Dallas and all things dows. So you can have went through this meteoric rise and catastrophic fall of the Dao and then from that did a whole bunch of work with various different projects in the space, kind of early on, narcissist included back in 2017 and then spent some time with colony for a couple of years as well and then back to nosis. A few years back. And yeah, since being there helped launch the notice hour and now founded nurses filled with clear to focus on zodiac, this new kind of, I guess standard and suite of tooling for kind of composable interoperable dows. Cool. Yeah, I mean, I definitely like associate with what you're saying in terms of being feeling fully encapsulated by this new concept in this new technology. I mean, I remember early in the early days around 2014 and 2015, I think one of the things that I found the most interesting about Bitcoin and Ethereum was that we didn't really have the word Tao then, but there was this concept of those things like those blockchains within themselves being autonomous and being sort of organizations of people that were maintaining the ledger and I think that for a lot of people that really resonate with them and then there's I think the first time that I ever encountered this concept of autonomous agents was an early Mike Hearn talk from 2013 or 2014 where I think he said some Google event and he's describing this world where we have autonomous vehicles that are sort of self owning and they're able to buy their own energy and get on fast lanes and pay for things and receive payments and even spawn off like new cars like by ordering new cars to build their self-driving business. And that just blew my mind and I think that's what really got me excited about this whole space and about dows in general. What excites you the most about those? And what would you say is like the sort of cutting edge of like Dow technology today? What are the most innovative things that people are doing with dows? So I think. Maybe meshing the answer both of those questions into one. The thing that kind of excites me most, I think that real cutting edge of downs is that the potential and kind of reality of systems that produce some desired outcome from as an emergent result of kind of uncoordinated inputs. And so you talked about the Bitcoin network of Ethereum network being these early instantiations of Dallas in large part before that they concept or at least like the word Dell was in ready circulation. But these networks are most certainly doubts and they're doubtful of these kind of very, very tightly scoped roles, a very high risk sculpture of outputs that are very carefully engineered to be the result, the economic result of a whole bunch of uncoordinated actors providing inputs to the system. I think there's this huge design space for essentially engineering other outcomes as a merchant results from uncoordinated inputs. Quadratic voting, quadratic funding in particular, I think it's great examples of this where you have in quadratic funding case that desired outcome is a well allocated pool of capital to some sector of public goods. And the way that you can arrive at that allocation is from the uncoordinated inputs of people contributing to projects that they value. And I think generalizing that idea of finding some desired outcome and then engineering a way to reach that outcome through uncoordinated inputs is can it be really crucial for Dallas to continue to achieve the scale that I think a lot of people are hoping to be able to as in push beyond the kind of theoretical or practical limits of more traditional firms. And likewise building on that, I think it's interesting that you wrote styles in terms of its autonomous quality because I think that that's a quality that is much less emphasized today. We see it with kind of distributed ledgers, but a lot of the social doubts or even some of the protocol does operating today. It's much less at the forefront than it used to be. Because I would give a kind of early definition of what the idea of a Dow was as something like an organization with automation at its center and humans at the edges. So the idea that actions like how capital could be released or how protocol functions happen in an autonomous manner. And I think it gave root to a lot of interesting imaginations like for natural systems or D of dance in the same way that we see legal personhood given to rivers and coral reefs, et cetera. And a lot of that discourse has kind of faded into the background, but it wholly expected to reemerge in the next couple of years as doubtful and starts to mature. What I'm most excited about is actually the kind of cultural ramifications of those. Because I feel like it's kind of captured in energy of activism as well as maybe not autonomous in the technical sense, but autonomous and a more kind of approach to political organizing that groups can have a kind of more grassroots approach, but still have as much if not greater than impact of traditional firms or corporations that operate at larger scales. So I'm really excited about just the kind of good hearted energy going into the space. And really competent that people with more political science minded or essentially more social science minded can guide some of the daoist towards these better outcomes or to more impactful outcomes. Of course there are always flops along the way and hilarious kind of missteps, but I think it's promising much more so than other spaces that I see people working in today. That's a really interesting way to look at it. I guess I guess we still think of it as a decentralized autonomous organization, but you're right. A lot of the doubts that we see being summoned today and sort of organizing today are more just organizations of humans working together towards a common goal than something that's fully automated..

Dallas Mike Hearn Ethereum network basketball Dell Google
"macmillan" Discussed on Epicenter

Epicenter

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"macmillan" Discussed on Epicenter

"We talk to Kia and Arun, are they telling you about our sponsors this week? Are your crypto assets sitting idle in your wallet? Start earning rewards and contribute to network security by staking with course one. As taking provider, securing $5 billion in assets on over 25 decentralized networks, including Solana, cosmos, and Ethereum. Course one has released the annual staking review for the year 2021, it contains over 70 pages of insights and analysis and to some of the most important proof of state networks right now. You can go to chorus dot one and download the report for free. And if you've been a loyal Solana delegator with course one, make sure to check your wallets. In the first ever major NFT drop by any validator course one air dropped over 3600 exclusive NFTs to its Solana delegators, according to their delegation profile in December of 2021, the NFTs are also available on the secondary market on platforms like magic Eden. But if you missed on this AirDrop, don't worry, you can still participate in the upcoming AirDrops for cosmos change by simply delegating to course one notes. If you're interested in running your own branded notes, while they have a managed white label Nord as a known as a service offering that leverages course ones highly available and proven infrastructure enabling you to participate directly in decentralized networks. So head over to corus dot one to start your staking journey. And we're also brought to you by Paris one with periscope you can beat market prices every single block. It's fast, highly liquid, and they just launched 35, which has new contracts and new API. It has a more module infrastructure, which is more gas friendly and now supports free approvals using Ethereum's permit messages. They also recently added support for avalanche polygon and BSC, and you can always use para swap with your ledger right in ledger life. So go to Paris swap IO.

"macmillan" Discussed on RunPod

RunPod

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"macmillan" Discussed on RunPod

"I decided to the anti a bit Because because of I because i wanted to make it more of a challenge so thinking about the twelve songs of christmas or whatever that will ever want is one do twelve miles of christmas I did one every day in the lead in the final. Was christmas day again. That macmillan again the the response was was was special again. That was just another nice happy. Christmas present saw that means you know unlike a lot of people who are christmas go. Oh my goodness. I've on so much weight by the time christmas. You're like i can't eat enough to kind of on the calories. It's a really good excuse for why overindulgent for the rest of the christmas days. Yeah yeah everyone else is struggling to do their pop. Afterwards day try quite gone quickly and so honestly well i find remarkable is that things didn't just stop there. It's not just christmas marathon you do. And this is old kind of in memory of your mama's well you've actually escalated up and every year on her birthday. You'll so run so i do the mileage of how she would be so on august i takes. I will be dang fifty seven miles on on the day on the day. I like to. It's one of those things. It's like still i still have. It's sunny been just over three years. So i still have those. Those moments of not looking foods. is celebrating and ignoring it rather than just night. Me friends asking me how i am and i'm guy near fine. Just we're gonna for dinner or something to celebrate. Yeah it's it's it's a not acknowledging it and then hopefully maybe raising some money as well Photography that you weren't really into running prior to your mom you know telling her you by being in remission and what would she say if you tune all these amazing feats these amazing challenges night which she find it surprising to you think..

macmillan
Derek Chauvin Trial Sees Witnesses, Juror Struggle Emotionally With Recounting George Floyd's Death

WISH TV's News 8 Daybreak

01:32 min | 1 year ago

Derek Chauvin Trial Sees Witnesses, Juror Struggle Emotionally With Recounting George Floyd's Death

"Emotions run high in a Minnesota courtroom as the jury hearing Derek showman's cases exposed to new video of police arresting George Floyd Camilla pronoun reports. Another witness to Floyd's death is feeling guilts. MM court Coming to a halt Wednesday. 61 year old Charles McMillan breaking down watching video of George Floyd bagging for his mother in his life as Minneapolis police officers. Neal on him. I don't have a mom reader understand here. Relax. We're the first time in the trial. We're hearing Children's voice in never before seen police body Cam video that caught showman defending the way police handle Floyd in an exchange with MacMillan for control of starting a sizable died. Yeah, that looks like it looks like it's coming on something like Macmillan, telling the court. He interacted with Children days before the incident with Floyd and offered up some punishing comments. That guy fair to him. Five days ago. I Told you the other day. Go home the open to say better next place. Go make them to say, but the dead guy look at you after maggot. New surveillance video showing George Floyd in the store where he allegedly passed a counterfeit $20 bill, the cashier working at the time, said during testimony he now feels guilty about calling the police if I wouldn't just Not looking to build. This could've been

George Floyd Derek Showman George Floyd Camilla Charles Mcmillan Floyd Minnesota Neal Minneapolis Macmillan
Witness breaks down in tears watching George Floyd police video

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

01:10 min | 1 year ago

Witness breaks down in tears watching George Floyd police video

"Jurors are spending a third day hearing witnesses testify in the trial of a former Minneapolis police officer facing murder and manslaughter charges. For George Floyd's death Last year, they've heard testimony about the convenience store where Floyd allegedly used the counterfeit $20 bill to buy cigarettes, which led to his ill fated arrest by Derrick Show Vin and other police officers. Christopher Belfry says he was sitting in a parked car outside Cup foods. I heard him actually him, T O. Let me see your hand. He's saying, please. Something about being shot or something before. Please don't something like that. And at that time, that's when I heard the sirens pulling up and pulling him out on. That's when I went to back up and turn around. The defendant maintains he was following policing protocols in his treatment of Floyd. White police officer was captured on video pressing his knee on the African American man's neck for nearly nine minutes, despite Floyd's police that he could not breathe. They've just played that recording in court. Another eyewitness, Charles McMillan, broke down in tears and recess was called. Mr Macmillan is now back on the stand.

George Floyd Derrick Show Vin Christopher Belfry Floyd Minneapolis White Police Charles Mcmillan Mr Macmillan
Louisville cop shot during Breonna Taylor raid files suit against her boyfriend

Scott Sloan

01:17 min | 2 years ago

Louisville cop shot during Breonna Taylor raid files suit against her boyfriend

"Jonathan Jonathan Madeline Madeline was was shot shot in in the the leg leg during during the the deadly deadly raid raid that that killed killed Briana Briana Taylor. Taylor. Now Now he's he's filed filed a a lawsuit lawsuit against against Taylor's Taylor's boyfriend, boyfriend, Kenneth Kenneth Walker, who fired the bullet, they say Walker says police kicked in the door without identifying themselves ABC Steve Austin. Sami has more. Walker isn't the only person who says he didn't hear police announced themselves. This was an apartment complex, and there were other neighbors who say they didn't know that these were the police, either. This is an unfortunate and tragic case that will now Drag through the courts. There is still a question of who fired the shot. Forensic evidence hasn't been able to prove that Walker's bullet hit Mattingly, according to published reports. Walker's attorneys overnight say that they are shocked and this is the latest in the cycle of Police aggression, deflection of responsibility and obstruction of the fax visitation is today for Corporal and MacMillan. The funeral tomorrow is private. Today the family will receive Mourners from 1 to 5 o'clock. At Spring Grove funeral homes on Spring Grove Avenue, the 19 year veteran of the family of the county Sheriff's Office here in Hamilton County will be laid to rest. Tomorrow at Arlington Memorial Gardens after procession that begins around noon on Spring Grove Avenue this

Kenneth Kenneth Walker Briana Briana Taylor Jonathan Jonathan Madeline Mad Spring Grove Funeral Arlington Memorial Gardens Hamilton County Sami ABC Sheriff's Office Steve Austin Mattingly
Pike's Peak: The Complete History of the World's Highest Hill Climb

Past Gas

05:33 min | 2 years ago

Pike's Peak: The Complete History of the World's Highest Hill Climb

"Pike's peak is a giant among giants. It's the highest mountain in the front range of the rocky mountains. It is formed from billion-euro old granite. That's right. Billion with a B. and was first named by the native people who lived in shadow the called the mountain. Taba meaning son and they were the Tableau Watch meaning people of San Mountain. In eighteen o six, the mountain was quote unquote discovered. By American explorer lieutenant, Zevulon Yuan Pipe. These God I sounds like an alien spaceship guy. On. Doesn't look as cool as his name suggests I'm just GonNa tell you right now he was sent by Thomas Jefferson on a mission to explore the West and upon seeing the Mountain Zevulun apparently swore the mountain would never be conquered by man cars didn't exist yet, but it's safe to assume pike would have included them in his assessment as well. Given the chance it only took fourteen years. To prove old Zebulon Pike. Wrong. The mountain was first scaled by a European in eighteen twenty when Edwin James, a botanist and explorer successfully reached the summit collecting flowers all the way up quote the most notable day of the expedition for botanical collecting. Now, I don't WanNa give all the credit to Edwin. James although it sounds like he had a great time, I'm sure that one of the Taboada probably. Did it before him yeah. One hundred percent. Yeah attaboy watch like a a wildfire up their boot who was just like I'm GonNa Climb that today flowers. We're lovely but it was a Shinier commodity that attracted the first wave of settlers to pikes. Peak Pike's peak or bust was a common slogan of the Colorado Gold Rush of the eighteen fifties although is more of a marketing slogan. Do the prominence of the mountain gold wasn't discovered near pikes peak until later in eighteen ninety three, it won't be the first time that the mountain inspired the imaginations of those who climbed it in that same year after reaching a summit of the mountain and taking in the view Katharine Lee Bates wrote the Song America the beautiful. Describing Purple Mountain Majesties above the enameled plane over the years the mountain was commonly referred to as Pike's highest peak before finally being simplified just to pikes peak the next notable American to shape the fate of the mountain was Spencer Penrose, and he also might have been the one to introduce cars. Penrose had a name that sound like the bad guy in a murder mystery but he also had a job that would fit right into the genre. He was a mining speculator of the American West just like a murder mystery penrose had a history that could make you think you is both a suspect and a savior he graduated from Harvard but at the bottom of his class. His father and brothers were doctors and lawyers he decided to travel out west and try to make a name for himself at first he failed before getting a tip about some land near Cripple Creek that made him millions of dollars, and that's million dollars like in the movie this guy is played by Walton Geoghegan's. For sure. That's love that whilst. Yeah. And that's millions of dollars in eighteen hundreds money, which is like a lot today billions today. I Love Walton Gardens he's so. I feel like if I went to Harvard I'd WanNa, graduate the bottom of my class. Look I'm I'm the best on the rowing team but. Not great at socio economics I mean I went to. Harvard. So I'm pretty good at stuff but like I partied penrose settled. Colorado. Springs. The closest town to pikes peak was met a woman named Julie Villiers McMillan although. Penrose was by then in his forty s, he had sworn to stay a rich entrepreneurial bachelor but Macmillan proved to be grimes to his Elon Musk and the two got hitched in traveled to Europe for a lavish honeymoon staying at beautiful resorts around Europe inspired penrose to murder his wife what now? In fact, the inspiration was to open his own motel modeled after the places he had stayed specifically on the Mediterranean coast. This became the Broadmoor hotel opened in nineteen eighteen at the cost of three million, nineteen eighteen dollars translating to scrooge mcduck. Gold Coin Swing Pool amount of money in today's money. The Broadmoor was and is a seven hundred, seventy nine room Italian renaissance style palace with eighteen restaurants a golf club with three courses including one designed by Arnold. Palmer himself an automotive museum, the contents of which will soon arrive at this thing is like massive. It looks awesome. Yeah. I WanNa go to the odd more. Yeah. Let's do it. How do you feel? Seven hundred rooms every night. That's nuts penrose was no fool. He knew he knew that to attract people to the hotel you needed to do things great reviews on tripadvisor, dot com and promotional stunts. He set out to work on an ambitious project as he built the hotel, it was a two hundred, eighty, three, thousand, dollar gravel and dirt road to the fourteen thousand, one, hundred, fifteen foot summit of pikes peak with the idea of promoting tourism to the area and indirectly his own hotel.

San Mountain Spencer Penrose Pikes Peak Zebulon Pike Harvard Murder Edwin James Purple Mountain Majesties Colorado Mountain Zevulun Walton Geoghegan Giants Zevulon Yuan Pipe Katharine Lee Bates Europe Thomas Jefferson Rowing Cripple Creek Mediterranean
Using Tablo Publishing for your online book

Self-Publishing with Dale L. Roberts

04:48 min | 2 years ago

Using Tablo Publishing for your online book

"Hey there, this is Dale and I'm just tickled to death that you took a little bit of time out your day to spend a little bit of time with me to talk about our favorite things and self-publishing books. And you know, I don't say this enough, but I appreciate each and every single one of you that it's taking a little bit of time out your day. So with that being said we're episode 76 of this freaking podcast. I mean we've been going seventy six weeks straight. So that's freaking awesome. But without any further bloviating cuz we got a lot of ground to cover today when it comes to self publish books online. It can be so stinking overwhelming. There's so many options. We're not really sure which ones to go with what's the pertinent information that we need to dive into to get started, you know, is this going to be okay for you or is this going to be okay for me? Well, that's why I'm kind of demystifying this process and this is why we're working on a 15th straight episode has self publishing a book online. The solution when it comes to publishing to various platforms can be found through what's called aggregate publishing how to aggregate publish your works like this you upload your content to a given platform. That's an aggregate publisher. Then they send it out to various Avenues to say places like Amazon Apple Barnes & Noble Kobo Google Play books. So on and so forth rather than having to go to each and every single one of those Dash boards and uploading each one of them individually. You can just do it through one and I guess what your CPA is going to love you to the end of the year because you'll have 50 different w-9s to file with them and it's only just one that you can have to worry about. We're going to be talking about aggregate publisher today known as tab Volvo. I'd heard about Tableau a few years ago. When the MacMillan publishing company known as pronoun went out of business pronoun was an aggregate publisher and it was great. I really loved It actually brought me at a fair chunk of change and was distributing some of my stuff over to places like Google Play books when I couldn't do that. So I was looking for some solutions wage in Tableau was one of them but had a little bit of a hang up and you going to find out why a little bit of a hang up in just a second here. That's not to say that tableaus bat. Don't tune me out because that's actually pretty good news full disclosure. I'm just curating information here. So don't shoot the messenger have never used any of this stuff. So anything I say is an opinion when I say well that's good or that's bad. It's just from the outside looking in that I'm saying this I can say for sure I can say for certain that the alliance of em, an author's very reputable company that it's a non-profit organization run by Indie authors for Indie authors. They fully vet different services and part of those Services is off. Watchdog service and they have actually given Tableau in excellent rating and they're even an ally partner. So that speaks volumes to what they you have and what they bring to the table just to kind of summarize before we jump into things if you listen to my episode about published Drive Tableau functions much in the same way, but there's some deviations there's some differences than what they have with published drive. So before we jump in with all that, let's break down each one of the things they do what they do not do is they do not distribute audiobooks. Just going to get that off the table get that out the way they don't deal with audio books whatsoever. They distribute e-books and print books. Now. I'm going to save some of the stuff for last for instance. We're going to talk about royalties and how it's all paid out a little bit later because wage They're all the same royalties. So for ebook distribution and it appears for ebook and print book that they have 35 online bookstores and they also feed out to scores of other bookstores online. But part of those bookstores include Amazon Apple Books Barnes & Noble booktopia never heard of them before wage Scribd Microsoft. I thought that was pretty interesting. I had never seen anybody should be two Microsoft before overdrive and another one called readings and then they just say home and More in quotations. I tried to track down there and more to find out what these other 35 different platforms were but I couldn't find a job information literally couldn't find it anywhere. You're going to find out why there was some issues that I had

Partner Publisher Dale Google Apple Macmillan Volvo Microsoft
ByteDance Says It Won. Trump Says Not So Fast. TikTok Continues For Now.

Techmeme Ride Home

05:04 min | 2 years ago

ByteDance Says It Won. Trump Says Not So Fast. TikTok Continues For Now.

"Okay, here's what I can tell you. You can still use tiktok as of this moment president trump since we last spoke said he approved Oracle's bid for the US. Operations of tiktok quote in concept, and so essentially the US delayed the planned tick tock band by about a week as Oracle Walmart looked to take a twenty percent stake in Tiktok globals planned pre IPO round as well as of course, the deals to host talks us user data and computer systems quoting Bloomberg I approve the deal and concept trump told reporters Saturday as he left the White House for a campaign rally in Fayetteville north. Carolina if they get. It done. That's great. If they don't, that's okay too and quote the new company which will be called tiktok global has agreed to funnel five billion dollars in new tax dollars to the US and set up a new education fund which trump said would satisfy his demand that the government receive a payment from the deal quote they're going to be setting up a very large fund. He said that's their contribution that I've been asking for an quote Oracle plans to take a twelve point, five percent stake in the new tiktok level. While Walmart said, it has tentatively agreed to by seven point, five percent of the entity. Walmart's. Officer Doug Macmillan will serve on tiktok global's board of directors. The retailer said in a statement for of the five board seats will be filled by Americans according to the statement tic TACs. Owner Bite dance is seeking evaluation of sixty billion dollars for the APP, according to a person familiar with the matter Oracle and Walmart would pay a combined twelve billion dollars for their stakes. If they agreed to that asking price, the final valuation has not been set as the party's worked out the equity structure and measures data security. The person said terms are still in flux and the proposed valuation could still change and quote. Yet more about that flex in a second but more about that five billion dollar payment to the government. The president mentioned I. Guess That's the key money by another name that he was asking for all along except that seems to have come as news to at least most of the parties involved Oracle later confirmed it to a degree but quoting Dan primack on twitter. More about tiktok quote Payments Number One the Education Fund is not to fun trump's patriotic history project number two, the five billion dollar figure is not codified anywhere and no one expects it to be anywhere near that big number three, the five billion dollars to the Treasury is anticipated payroll taxes over an unspecified period. Of Time, there will be an education focused effort using tick tock short video format distribution tool, but there is no dollar amount tied to it with trump seeming to inflate the payroll tax figure with the Education Fund remember Tick Tock doesn't have five billion dollars at least not until its IPO wants to complete within twelve months and quote. So. Again has this all been Kabuki theatre make the president think he's getting his key money. Give a politically connected firm, a sweetheart deal, and even if the five billion dollars is really not going to be five billion dollars again, we have the president of the government forcing the investment of private property, giving it to favourite entity and essentially asking for a kickback exactly. What happens in Banana Republics Super? Oh and about that whole thing being inflex bite dance. This morning was asserting that it is maintaining majority ownership and control over tick tock global and will not transfer any source code or technology to Oracle or Walmart so essentially waving a flag saying they won. Quoting the Financial Times bite that set on money that it would maintain majority ownership and control of tiktok global contradicting statements by Donald trump oracle, and Walmart after it agreed a deal with the companies to continue operating in the US Oracle, the US technology group, and Walmart, the world's biggest bricks and mortar retailer said in a joint statement at the weekend that Tiktok level would be majority owned by American investors and quote however while they're state combined with the equity held by. Long standing US investors by dance might mean, American investors would be the biggest financial beneficiaries, direct majority ownership and control of the business is set to remain with the Chinese company in a statement released on January tat chow by dances Chinese social media platform. The company said tiktok global would be a quote one, hundred percent fully owned subsidiary. The company added that after raising funds ahead of a potential initial public offering, it would have an eighty percent stake in the company and quote. So maybe that wasn't a good thing to go spouting off about because this either means now the deal is really off. Because the Chinese side really doesn't want it or else the deal is off because the president isn't going to be pleased about that more in just one second or else everyone is just GonNa declare victory and. Meaningful has actually changed my money's on that but hard to tell at this point because to conclude. About thirty minutes ago. President trump. said, he would not approve a tick tock deal bite dance ceded control, and well I don't know.

Oracle Walmart Walmart President Trump Tiktok Global United States Donald Trump Carolina Education Fund White House Bloomberg Fayetteville North Treasury Tiktok Twitter Doug Macmillan Officer Dan Primack
Walmart Joins Microsoft In A Bid To Buy TikTok

Motley Fool Money

04:52 min | 2 years ago

Walmart Joins Microsoft In A Bid To Buy TikTok

"Shares of Walmart rose six percent this week and hit a new all-time high on Friday after the retail giant confirmed it is teaming up with Microsoft in a bid for Tiktok the wildly popular Chinese social media APP Tiktok his close to selling operations in the US Canada Australia and New Zealand in a deal expected to be in the range of twenty to thirty billion dollars. Andy, this is moving pretty quickly. So it's quite possible by the time people are listening to this. The deal is already done but. When I first saw this news. It didn't make any sense to me why Walmart would get involved here. Yeah I think that probably was a little bit of a shock to too many people but the thought about it kind of makes little sense. Chris. So just think about what Doug Macmillan. The CEO at Walmart has been doing in their e commerce business trying to have so much success even before the covid nineteen lockdowns and having that success partnering with for example, the likes to shop of five announced earlier on me well, more has a very large ecommerce presence when the larger sites out there they're ECOMMERCE businesses going gangbusters. Right now they generate a lot of profits and cash as Microsoft and so I think when Walmart is looking to expand their audience, maybe continue to compete with Amazon when it comes to third party sellers, they have four, hundred, fifty, thousand third party sellers, Walmart does that's a fraction of what Amazon does. So again, to expand its reach reach a different audience, take talk may not be so much of a stretch depending on what price they can get. Now there's there's big numbers being tossed out of thirty billion or so but that's I'd be surprised if tick tick talking get that but I see as a way for Walmart to really expand into different audience expanded advertising business and build out ECOMMERCE platform in a way that it hasn't it would be very tough to do on its own. Jason if you're a Microsoft shareholder, are you would you rather see Microsoft go all in on this or do you like the idea that a company like Walmart is helping to spread the risk around because they're going to pay for part of it? I mean mean I would rather see Microsoft just take this on its own I. Mean I think the bigger risk probably. is on Walmart side just given what the business does given given the history of the business kind of how it. Built itself up to this point and physical retail. So You know personally, I'd rather see one parties opposed to many but. We'll cross that bridge when we come to it it, it does seem like an odd combo. TIKTOK perspective I mean you you have to figure they tiktok or trying to figure out how to be more than just an ad play right? What we know about the business today, it's very little. We know they have a big network of people that use the platform. I mean, no, they don't make a heck of a lot of money and it's essentially just an advertising play and and that's a very tough space with plenty of incumbents that do really well already. But if you're not facebook or Alphabet, then you're just part of this sort of collective of mediocre businesses that are taking a little bit of what is a very. Big Hi there I mean twitter it's just kind of mediocre business snap. It's just kind of mediocre business in tick, Tock faces that same fate if they don't figure out how to become more than just an ad plays so so you've seen facebook with instagram trying to get into social commerce twitter's made some here and there with that with that as well as snap. Eligible that Walmart would view tiktok from that perspective and tiktok would be looking to do that. It's just going to be a very. Interesting situation if it is a consortium that ends up acquiring Tiktok, because you have more people trying to determine more companies trying to determine the fate, which typically can be a more difficult thing and a lot of speculation of Walmart might do with this but you gotta like the fact that Doug Macmillan is keeping his cards pretty close to the vest he's not. Really saying they're GONNA use it. He's not saying whether it's going to be part of the Walmart plus service that they're going to roll out later this year. Yeah. Not Surprising just the quality of management that Doug has been able to showcase in just the type of leader he is and will be very interesting on the pricing perspective how much they WANNA pay If the deal does go through there aren't very many platforms out there. I think they're reportedly eight, hundred, million users of TIKTOK. Imagine they're very active there they probably skew young. There aren't many platforms out there when you look at the acid base, this is one that that I think Walmart is one of the larger companies out there in the world is saying listen this is a place where we can maybe have some immediate impact in there and to to continue our our transformation too much more of a larger of a digital company.

Walmart Microsoft Doug Macmillan Tiktok Facebook Twitter Andy Amazon United States CEO Chris Canada New Zealand Jason Australia
Pacers fire coach Nate McMillan after four seasons

Dana Loesch

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

Pacers fire coach Nate McMillan after four seasons

"To the Indiana Pacers have fired head coach Nate McMillan. The team had just announced two weeks ago that they were giving MacMillan a one year contract extension. But after getting swept in the first round of the playoffs, the team decided it was time to let him go. MacMillan had been the head coach for the pacer of the last four seasons, but was three and 16 in the playoffs, not making it out of the first round any of those years. Pacers president of basketball operations Kevin Pritchard says. It was a very hard decision but wants to move in a different direction, and the search for a new coach begins

Macmillan Indiana Pacers Nate Mcmillan Pacers Kevin Pritchard President Of Basketball Operat
The Only Black Pastor In Town Wasn't Invited To A Black Lives Matter March

All Things Considered

01:27 min | 2 years ago

The Only Black Pastor In Town Wasn't Invited To A Black Lives Matter March

"Church in tiny Lake City, Colorado, needed a pastor a couple of years ago, Brendan MacMillan took the job and moved there with his wife and seven Children. I would say overall, the town has been very receptive of our family, and the reason is that when it comes to ministry and the role that I believe God has asked me to do then race doesn't matter. Not everyone in Lake City is white. In some here, we're proud one. About 50 of the town's 400 residents turned out for a black lives matter March in June. But nobody invited McMillan despite other faith leaders being asked to attend, he says. It sounds like potential Saturday night Live sketch and first is quite comical. But I would say that my feelings were hurt just a little bit, but more so I would chuck that office. Exposing some of the areas That might be problematic in like city or mountain towns. Blind spots we made this march is an act of solidarity, but we also do not do our best to reach out to black people in community. 21 year old Caleb Chambers was one of the organizers of the march in avoiding Organization of our black population. We avoided connecting with them and building relationship that ended up being Really hurtful. McMillan says he received heartfelt apology emails from the organizer's, but he still hasn't spoken to them. There is a

Tiny Lake City Mcmillan Brendan Macmillan Caleb Chambers Colorado
Levi's to lay off hundreds of workers as revenue plunges and losses grow

MarketFoolery

04:26 min | 2 years ago

Levi's to lay off hundreds of workers as revenue plunges and losses grow

"Shares of Levi's down eight percent this morning. After second quarter, sales fell more than sixty percent. There's a lot going on with Levi's Andy including some layoffs will get to those. This is one of those situations where. The online sales just could not make up for the fact. That Levi's stores were closed for roughly ten weeks yet. Chris Online sales ECOMMERCE. Business was up twenty five percent, and the actually in May the the run rate them. The may growth was eighty percent year over year, so it was some really nice acceleration. This is a quarter by the way that captured March April and May for the most part all those months are really the heart of the of the Cova pandemic. But overall revenues fell sixty percent year over year during that quarter, most of their stores were closed. For Up to ten weeks at a time there, so like you said the e commerce sales just really couldn't make up for the for the lack of of the regular retail sales. Lots of just worries about what was happening leave. They entered the the year of actually doing doing pretty pretty well. They were pretty excited that they're they're. They're a CEO chipper talked about how the the beginning of the year looked pretty positive, but then obviously they committed pandemic, really hit them, and then they ran a net loss of three, hundred and sixty, four, million, most of that was two hundred and forty, two million, due to a restructuring inventory, costs and other costs tied directly to the pandemic, so the good news is now that most of their stores North Ninety percent are. Are Now back open. However, one of the things that has many of us worried is just that the resurgence of some of the cases, the covid nineteen cases were seen around the country in the US cases spike gene on a per day level has them has leave is looking at up to forty of their stores and wondering how do we have to kind of re shut those down for the time? Being similar to what apple is, so? They suspended their share repurchase. They did pay a dividend, but they they. They are not going to pay that in the third quarter. And so, and they suspended their guidance for the year so. Tough Times leave is and other retailers Chris that came public about a year ago little over a year ago. They raised. Their money at seven dollars stock price and had a really nice day. ONE JUMP UP TO I! Think as high as twenty three, and now the stocks back down to thirteen, so we're really tough ride for Levi shareholders over the past year. And laying off somewhere in the neighborhood of fifteen percent of corporate positions, so that's one more cost saving measures. They're. They're trying to pull in terms of levers. twenty-five percent ecommerce jump, you know. Under normal circumstances that would be seen as really good, but we've seen plenty of other retailers. Come Out, andy and maybe their online sales don't make up for stores being closed, but they come a lot closer. We've seen any number of retailers, not just the the big ones like target and Walmart, but smaller niche players whether ECOMMERCE is in some cases doubling so I mean that's that's one thing that Levi's has to do an even better job of. Of over the next six to twelve months. Chris you got that right, so it's fifteen percent of their sales that's up from five percent last year, but only five percent so five percent was really ECOMMERCE, so so unlike I think so many the other companies you mentioned Walmart for example with what Doug Macmillan's been doing and target and Home Depot, and so many of these companies that are making these big investments in in the in the Omni Channel. Efforts to be able to sell directly to consumers through their channels online as well as retail whatever strategy it may be leave is obviously has a lot of work to do, and they're. They're talking all the right language now, but you know I think there's some some some hesitations doubt there. I mean the Haas family is still largest shareholder in the Levi's. Shareholder base by far. Across their their family, the on large amounts of steak, so so they have a very stable shareholder base. Maybe wither the weather this storm, but on the margin It's you know the the cost reduction. Chris you mentioned from the seven hundred positions or fifteen percent of their workforce that maybe as a savings of one hundred million per year. That's about two percent of their annual cost structure, so so it's it's meaningful in the margin I. Think, but it's not like game changer. They're really. They gotta make sure. They have a new strategy for how to sell her

Levi Chris Andy Chris Online Walmart Cova United States Apple CEO Home Depot Omni Channel Doug Macmillan
Johann Sebastian Bach 3: What's a Concerto?

Classics for Kids

05:25 min | 3 years ago

Johann Sebastian Bach 3: What's a Concerto?

"Kids. Concerto comes from two Italian words with sort of meanings first concerto means in agreement or together like the word concert. You go to a concert to hear people playing together but the Italian word contract. Tari has to do with struggling. And a concerto also has to do with one or more solo instruments doing friendly battle in concert with a larger group. Italian COMPOSER GIUSEPPE. Torelli gets most of the credit for developing the instrumental concerto. In the late sixteen hundreds an Italian who lived a bit later on Tonio Vivaldi wrote Zillions of Concerto will actually only five hundred or so. But it seems like Zillions Vivaldi's most famous set of concertos named for the four seasons the earliest concertos were written for violins. But you can have a concerto for any instrument. Here's one that you'll have nipple Makoma road for trumpet. One for cello by front-seat high one for Tuba by Refund Williams who in the late twentieth century Scottish composer James Macmillan wrote a concerto called vinnie Emmanuel for percussionist. Evelyn Glenn you can also have a concerto with more than one Solo Instrument Wolfgang Gone Medina's Mozart wrote this one for flute and Harp Dmitri Shostakovich wrote a wonderful concerto for piano and trumpet the end of the peace sense just like music for a silent movie. Let's because when he was young Shostakovich had a job playing piano for silent movies in box day composers also wrote something called the Concerto Grosso which does not mean. A concerto with slimy stuff. Losing out of it grow is Italian for great. Instead of just one or two soloists. A Concerto Grosso has a whole group of soloists. A smaller group pitted against a larger group. George Frederic Handel. Who lived at the same time as Bach wrote quite a few Concerto Grossi? That's the official plural of Concerto Grosso. a lot of Bach's Brandenburg concertos fall into the Concerto Grosso category in the Brandenburg Concerto. Number two the small group consists of Trumpet Flute Oboe Violin and the big group is made up of string instruments.

Concerto Grosso Brandenburg Concerto Dmitri Shostakovich Zillions Vivaldi Tonio Vivaldi George Frederic Handel Bach Tari Torelli Evelyn Glenn James Macmillan Vinnie Emmanuel Refund Williams Tuba Wolfgang Official
Archway Health's Keely Macmillan Discusses Medicare Bundled Payment Performance

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

02:25 min | 3 years ago

Archway Health's Keely Macmillan Discusses Medicare Bundled Payment Performance

"During this podcast discussed with Keely McMillan Senior Vice President of policy and Solutions Management and archway health archways latest results regarding its participation in Medicare bundled payment arrangements. And we'll discuss as well see message related evaluation findings Miss Macmillan. Welcome to the program great. Thanks very much David. Great to join you. Thank you again. Miss McMillan's bio is of course posted on the podcast website. Very briefly on background since two thousand eleven. Cms through the Centers for Medicare Medicaid innovation has been fielding episode base bundled payment demonstrations generally define. These are payment models whereby Medicare pays a provider a fixed fee for beneficiaries care usually for surgical procedure followed by a limited time limited. Rehab period for example. Cms is currently fielding bundled payment for Care Improvement Advanced CB said Vance A DEMO. That includes thirty one inpatient and four outpatient clinical episodes the comprehensive care for joint replacement demo or CJ are covers l. e. j. r.'s or lower extremity joint replacements. I E hips and knees and there is an Oncology Care Demo that addresses cancer chemotherapy treatment in January besides evaluations were published And last June a second. Cj Our evaluation listeners may recall in February twenty eighteen. I interviewed archery health. Ceo and founder. Dave Terry with meat again. Discuss archways recent bundled payment results in related? Recent evaluation findings is archways Keeley Macmillan. So that keely. Let's go to my standard Opening question that is if you can give a brief overview of archway health. Sure sure thanks very much David. Archway halls is a value based care. Solutions Company. Were headquartered in Boston Massachusetts. And our mission is to first identify. Great Care and then evangelize it and we do that. By enabling providers to achieve it empowering consumers to find it and protecting those who deliver and pay for it so that includes providers in self insured employers and we partner with hundreds providers across

Keely Mcmillan Medicare Senior Vice President Of Polic Oncology Care Demo Keeley Macmillan Miss Macmillan David Miss Mcmillan Boston Massachusetts Dave Terry Partner Vance CEO L. E. J. R. Founder
Walmart reports lower-than-expected Q4 earnings, despite e-commerce sales growth of 35%

MarketFoolery

04:59 min | 3 years ago

Walmart reports lower-than-expected Q4 earnings, despite e-commerce sales growth of 35%

"Walmart's fourth quarter profit and revenue came in a little lower than expected. And am I the only one who looked at this report and was reminded of targets holiday quarter report because it kind of seemed like it wasn't bad it wasn't a train wreck but particularly the fact that video games and toy sales those segments for wall marked really dragged down the result more so than say e Commerce? Which was up another. Thirty five percent. Yeah I mean I do. I agree with what you're saying there. It made me think of target. Initially it also made me think of Amazon and really like Amazon really at a blowout holiday. Quarter the one thing I do think the difference between Walmart in target and I think the reason why the markets okay with this report basically flat. Yeah Yeah I mean I think really it is because of grocery I I think that when you look at the investments that Walmart made in grocery so long ago and I don't WanNa say skepticism. But maybe just sort of the furled eyebrows like. Is that really something that people want or is that? GonNa there was skepticism but there but now that's more than fifty percent of their. Us sales groceries. This is a grocery company in in so I think that's important because it's not very surprising to see the weakness and things like toys games and apparel very highly competitive markets in. We've we've certainly seen toys have been redefined just over the past decade thanks to technology. It's a bit of a different Market all together for that so I. I do think that they're strong. Presence in grocery helps to to mitigate any of the other weakness that we might see in a quarter like this and I mean it wasn't a week it was a little bit below expectations but I think there's enough to be optimistic optimistic about the you know toward the markets reacting to wait is today co. Doug Macmillan. I think deserves a lot of credit for a lot of different things and one of them is. I think he's just an above average communicator in terms of guidance. And also just in with this quarter alone. Just coming out and saying yeah. This wasn't our best and he in talking about e commerce. You see him. Start to ratchet that guidance back and saying look it's going to come in law. I would just point out that we've had. I don't know how many quarters in a row of Walmart growing their ECOMMERCE segment anywhere from the high teens to what we saw with this latest quarter. You know the mid thirty so even if that CO scales back its off of a much bigger base than it was two three years ago. Yeah I can't help but wonder if we won't see another acquisition at some point here maybe we will. Maybe we won't. I mean I do feel like they are. They're looking at this business more and more as an ECOMMERCE in a grocery play that also has everything else under the sun. I mean camps. Were were certainly below expectations. I think maybe the troubling part there it was because of transactions and average ticket I mean transactions in. Us stores were up one percent for the quarter. But I mean it was one half percent a year ago and An average ticket was was up less than one percent and I mean that was to two point six percent a year ago so I mean there were clearly some pressures they're in Walmart is is is a low margin business to begin with so you had to be really really aware of that kind of stuff. I mean I. I think you could be interesting to watch how I mean. I can't believe Mardi talking about this coming holiday season. But let's let's talk about that for a second because there is a big Gaming Console yes fresh cycle coming absolutely I do think there is Certainly potential therefore for them to to exceed expectations was he had the rest of the year goes but I mean you know this is a. This is a traditional retail story right. I mean if you look at Walmart I I always like making this comparison because it just tells you how the market views these different companies but walmart with a market cap of three hundred thirty five billion That's on five hundred twenty four billion dollars in sales and you look at Amazon which is now over one trillion dollars and that's off of two hundred eighty billion dollars in sales and so while Walmart grocery which is awesome grocery ain't aws in an producing those same kinds of margins and it never will But what grocery does is it keeps the traffic coming back and we're seeing more and more as this retail environment Sort of re reshapes itself Really the key is saying. Make sure you have people in those stores whether it's virtually or physically make sure you have people in those stores and grocery is one way to really really do that.

Walmart Doug Macmillan Amazon United States Mardi
#DignidadLiteraria Was Never About Just One Book

Latino Rebels Radio

09:04 min | 3 years ago

#DignidadLiteraria Was Never About Just One Book

"Roberto Lovato welcome back to Latino rebels radio we Brian. How are you a Actually I think this is my first. I did it program once I remember. Yeah I had you on before yes I did. I've had you on before. Okay you're right you're right. I'm just so tired. What puts the pause button on the bus? who leads to an Latino rebels campaign? You know. We're good we're good. We are so good. I'm so happy to have you back. Listen for those people. That don't know what they need. That lead that idea is can. Can you just begin to break it down for people that may be have not been following. What's gone on in the literary world mostly New York World of the last last couple of weeks so tell us about? What is it about that idea that is that you guys are doing well? I'm a I'm a student of social movements. Yes and I try to be a practitioner every so often and so I think I can. We can legitimately say that we have a social movement because we have a victory in the victory came about after McMillan flat iron. Her books decided to publish along with people. In Hollywood and Oprah Winfrey to push the book called American dirt as what Sanders he's narrows caused not just the great great American novel. But the great novel of lasts America's right to that effect so would all that promotion that you gave the book that resembled a marvel comics launch. You know the way they do. These multi-platform launches with multimillion dollar budgets. On made it a big deal and so when Miriam Gerbo my colleague and Dini that Talia terrarium defacto kind of leader of US spiritual leader in this. This is an and other leader of us in his She wrote a scathing essay that was rejected by MS magazine and so she decided in her own unique way with their own unique unique voice to call out the novel for what it was which was a cartoon of of of a Latino experience trying to be so to us as a great work of Literature on power with gotta see a Marcus and Gabriela Mistral. Row after Lanyo I mean I just. I still have a hard time trying to put put the name. Janine comments next to that. Yeah so that really moves that when I saw Mary. I'm just say I I was moved in a lot of us. Were moved to action and it moved. W Bose as well who is on top of this and together. We came to form the united idea which talk about is about Nothing less than the insertion of the Latino voice in the national conversation of the United States right now. We're focused on you know in the inclusion of our voices in US literature as expressed in the number of books the number of writers the number of editors the number the people in the media ecology the number of right. You know critics all of which if you look at the numbers are are pathetically low abysmally hello and so So yeah we're about as our name says about our dignity and we have measures of dignity for corporations like Macmillan or flatiron books as well as for critics as well as our own people. What constitutes dignity and so for example? I've been using the the frame very consciously of the decline in Florida the Folkloric Industrial Complex of Latino Literature. ooh What does that mean it means is basically that the as constructed in US literature you get a book contract two degrees you dance. Mambo Salsa a Ranchera 's dress recipe over and and you start you know dancing wight gays right on event. Here in New York is called Tom is about Latinos in the white gays. And the way the whitegate shapes us through the publishing industry so some that have chosen to kind kinda throw on their colorful clothing and act in ways that are safely an expectedly Latino done. That's what I mean by the decline and fall of the Folkloric Co Industrial Complex of Latino Literature. So the question for us. You're in New York this week. You guys had a press conference anyone that wants to follow the American dirt issue We talked to medium good about two weeks ago. My colleague Maria Hinojosa Doodo media did a did a one hour. MPR Latino USA that everyone needs to listen to I actually wrote about the white gays for NBC News So you mentioned the white Gazeau what what happened. You said this is a victory. So what exactly happened this week for you to say that this was a victory. Well let me describe describe the campaign because one of my roles was very much involved in the design and implementation of the strategy that got us to you meet with one of the titans of US Global Publishing McMillan and it's an imprint flatiron. The publisher let me show American dirt so to get there. You have the explosion of energy around American people criticize the content and the writer and all. Aw Ridiculous and actually really racist marketing of it. When you have for example the now infamous? Barb wire centerpieces at a lobster ops to dinner to celebrate American Dirt Bran Janine comments from an organizing perspective. Did her part to be the gift that they kept on giving from an organizing perspective but that that that energy kind was focused on the book and on her and some of US realize well in we need to kind of pivot this and so our first pivot was to start questioning one of the Thai another Titan in US Latino US publishing and Literature Oprah Winfrey Honor Book Club which has spread definitive role in pumping this book up to be something of Steinbeck Ian of an epic. I mean. It's almost like they've been trying to make it to be homer's Iliad of our time for for Latinos when it was written by this woman who has friends who paint their fingernails with with barbed wire and stuff. So you know we always sort of realize we don't need to focus on her any more her book and she herself has done the damage and they're going to go do their thing but what came out of this explosion was the realization of the crisis in. US is publishing especially as it Threat as it relates to Latinos in the United States who have fewer than one hundred and fifty books about what is published by US per year when you have thousands of books published every year so so then we started many of his questioning Oprah Winfrey in her in her promotion of this. She didn't seem to listen to the beginning. And then little by little. We started catching her attention. was that of other. People like Salma Hayek who admitted publicly that a picture that she took and south that she put online with her promoting. The book was actually Fake News. Because she didn't even read the book right. That's right so you have this explosion of energy now. Starting to focus going on oprah going to oprah only to bring more attention and momentum to it because we had by this time we had already sent a letter to McMillan and flatiron books saying that. We wanted to meet with him to discuss how we were going to try to remedy this matter and take the conversation in a more productive a place for all of us right so they responded immediately they wanted to be with us and we agreed into an are meeting was last Monday. And after some back and forth An- Anna realization. That we weren't going anywhere and that we have a mass ask very incredible amount of power in our community. That's there for us to to to work with. They agreed along along with us to a plan that includes a very measurable into you know indicators of the numbers of employees is not just a flat iron but throughout the the Macmillan ecosystem marketers editors and other people involved in the decision fusion making process. That brings you literature in the United States. So this is this is a major victory in that

United States Oprah Winfrey New York Folkloric Co Industrial Comple Mcmillan Roberto Lovato MPR Maria Hinojosa Brian Janine Ms Magazine Macmillan Salma Hayek America Folkloric Industrial Complex Miriam Gerbo Mary Ranchera Hollywood
Becky Quick and Walmart CEO Doug McMillon

Squawk Pod

02:50 min | 3 years ago

Becky Quick and Walmart CEO Doug McMillon

"These are the sounds of holiday shoppers at Walmart. The largest retailer in America bringing in almost four hundred billion million dollars in sales last year. It's also the biggest private employer more than a million and a half Americans work at a Walmart recently. Becky quick sat down with the company's leader Delaware Maryland. Ellen okay. That's just one two three four. Five McMillan's job is enormous. Think of those one point five million workers they call the associates and twenty one consecutive quarters of sales growth in Walmart stores. That's a streak. That Wall Street hopes will continue. And as you'll hear from Macmillan in this interview and in past comments he's made that will remind you of his job description. It only grows walmart has been thrust into the center of the debate on gun control in America following a deadly shooting shooting at one of its stores in August. A gunman walked into a crowded El Paso Walmart on a Saturday morning and killed twenty two people that location has only just reopened. Now the shooting shooting and policy changes since have made the job of CEO of the country's biggest retailer. A role of national importance will bring you all of this exclusively I beckon. Hi Katie I in this episode of Squawk Pod. Let's catch up with becky quick. Let's talk about Walmart. The biggest retailer in terms of sales in the US one of the biggest biggest employers in the entire world And run by a guy named Doug Macmillan yet. What cracks me up about Walmart is right around the turn of the century they hired and more people than anybody on the planet with the exception of the US government or the Red Army in China? That's still the case today They are a massive employer. They are massive in terms of their reach. I think about ten percent of. US retail sales are just walmart so ten percent overall US retail sales walmart. Doug Macmillan melon is a guy who started there when he was a teenager started working in one of their supply distributions warehouses. And he's been there ever since but he's done just about everything there. We are just getting news of some significant management changes at Walmart. Doug Macmillan has been named to succeed Mike do as president and CEO. This is effective defense. I you had all the stuff going on in Mexico last year with alleged bribery. You've had poor worker relations and then you had this Ohio Walmart recently. Which announced a food drive for its own workers? You can't deny becky that Walmart has been for deserved or not. The subject of a lot of men. How long when you've been covering Walmart is a company? I used to cover retail for the Wall Street Journal I started back in the Nineteen Ninety S. I think it was one thousand nine hundred ninety nine. It's crazy to think about the largest retailer in the world then kind of rebooting itself and deciding that it's going to create a whole new way that it's good that it goes about business

Walmart El Paso Walmart Doug Macmillan Becky United States America Wall Street Journal President And Ceo Nineteen Ninety CEO Delaware Us Government Mcmillan Ellen Maryland Katie I Mexico Bribery
Will artificial scarcity of library e-books push sales?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:31 min | 3 years ago

Will artificial scarcity of library e-books push sales?

"Ninety four percent of libraries offer evokes borrowers but now Macmillan one of the five five biggest book publishers in the. US says it's going to limit each library to just one copy for the first eight weeks after publication so get ready for longer waits to borrow awesome libraries and their users a protesting the move when I last checked nearly two hundred thousand people had signed an online petition against it. Just men west is a librarian in Vermont. She says the move is reflective of a lot of upheaval in the book. World Right now I think publishers are wondering what to do about their revenue model As more and more people go many more different places for content than just the Bookstore Amazon encourages them to lower their prices and lower their prices. Because they're kind of the eight eight hundred pound gorilla in this whole thing and so they're looking at ways. They can serve recoup some of the money they lose and in many ways some publishers. Look at libraries if we're sort of taking money from them by lending the books instead of making people buy them and so it McMillan is basically taking a risk that if they enforce this artificial scarcity by not letting libraries lend their books more people will gotten by their books. Macmillan CEO has said in interviews that the e book marketplace's kind of like that for motion pictures in the new releases. Have all this excitement around them for the first few weeks. And that's when they make most money through sales and they need that money to reinvest in new e books on new authors and illustrators in the whole ecosystem isn't that fair Libraries are willing to pay for these books. I don't understand why they are looking to libraries and saying oh well we know you want to buy dozens if not hundreds of copies of these books right after they come out but instead we think we're going to put the squeeze he's on your patrons and in fact one of our sources of free advertising now that there's fewer bookstores and not take your money in order to try to make it this other way way. Can you suggest a change. That would keep everybody happy. That would give libraries enough copies of the books but also keep publishers happy. I don't understand what the problem was originally sell. L. Books to libraries they are free advertising. McMillan is trying to get patrons to buy books from them directly and I actually number one. Don't think it's GonNa work out that way for them. And number two think it puts a squeeze specifically on more disadvantage patrons in libraries people. The WHO maybe can't read a print book for various reasons. Those people are not necessarily going to be the people that are going to go and purchase those books and so it's really doing is denying certain readerships access to their books. Who would otherwise be happy to have them through the library? Who would be happy to pay for them? And just give us tonight. Era of how important a publisher Macmillan is. I mean how much will patrons of a lab refill this change. Well it's GonNa be really interesting right now. Libraries are just kind of I'm sitting in waiting this thing The embargo basically went into effect. A week ago Some major library systems can county notably in Washington state has decided added to just not purchase McMillan books. Because they're grumpy about this and I don't blame them but we're not sure. I think if you asked most patrons you know what does McMillan publish us who their authors. They wouldn't necessarily know and it puts libraries in this really awkward position of having to explain this relatively complicated situation about the marketplace to patrons who really just want a good book. I'm hoping libraries can react especially by buying more print materials. But we're really not sure how it's going to affect affect readership and attitude towards Macmillan or the other publishers or e books genuinely until we see how this plays out. Do you think there's a chance here that Macmillan might end up backpedaling on this. I do I think it's entirely possible Sergeant the CEO of Macmillan was recently speaking at a meeting of the heads of state libraries. OBREE's like every state has a state library or department of Libraries within the state and the heads of those state. Libraries are kind of grumpy about this too. I mean really what it's about is access right. And this withholding access from the public in a general sense so he kinda trotted out his old. Like this. Why it's a better deal and we're totally trying to help libraries and You know that first copy we let you have is cheap. And it doesn't expire so that's super cool like restating his statement statement and I think the state librarians in many cases weren't having it they pushed back in their kind of friendly mannerly way and sergeant did kind of open the door for. We'll maybe this isn't the right way to do things which is not anything we've heard him say previously. And so I see that as kind for a ray of hope. They basically Based this embargo on kind of an experiment they did with one of their imprints which was tore books. They tried to smaller. Smaller embargo is kind of a test but tore books also publishes a lot of science fiction. Fantasy they have a rabid fan base. Who may be would purchase those books out if they couldn't borrow them at the library but realistically I don't think that's GonNa Happen for the rest of Macmillan's front list and so I think what we're hoping is this? Also also embargo experiment will not go the way they want and maybe they can sort of dial it back to having something. That's more in line with the way other. Publishers appear to be making this happen and also making it work for them from a business perspective. So it'll work for us from a library

Macmillan Mcmillan Publisher Department Of Libraries CEO Amazon Vermont Washington Eight Eight Hundred Pound Ninety Four Percent Eight Weeks
Walmart Ends Handgun Ammunition Sales, Bans Open Carry

Business Wars Daily

06:11 min | 3 years ago

Walmart Ends Handgun Ammunition Sales, Bans Open Carry

"This episode of Business Wars daily is brought to you by sent pro online from pitney bowes shipping and mailing from your desk is never been simpler than with sent pro online from Pitney Leabeau's. Try It free for thirty days and get a free ten pound scale when you visit. PBA DOT com slash B W daily the UH from wintry. I'm David Brown and this is business awards daily on this Monday September ninth while you probably heard the headlines Walmart will no longer sell handgun ammunition in announced the change one month after twenty two people were shot and killed in a Walmart store in El Paso Texas. You'll also stop selling certain kinds of ammunition intended for hunting rifles but which can be used so-called assault style rifles as well. USA Today reported Walmart Mart currently sells about twenty percent of all ammunition sold in the US these actions it says will reduce that percentage to somewhere between six and nine percent. Walmart sells far fewer handguns ammunition. Currently the chain sells handguns only in Alaska. Those sales will end as well. The company stopped selling selling assault style rifles in two thousand fifteen and raise the age of all gun buyers to twenty one last year following the mass shooting in Parkland Florida in a memo to employees posted the Walmart website last Tuesday. CEO Doug McMillan said that he was moved to action by the El Paso shooting but also by numerous other events just in the past month alone own a few days before to employees were fatally shot by another employee in a Walmart in South Haven Mississippi since El Paso there urban mass shootings in Dayton Ohio and Midland and Odessa Texas all of which CEO McMillan referenced in his memo Social Media Lit up with calls for Walmart to get out of the firearms business immediately. After the passer shooting Walmart employees organized a walkout protesting Walmart's business and an employee led change dot org petition calling for Walmart restrict firearm sales and and both open and concealed carry in its stores received one hundred forty thousand signatures the Washington and Post reported Walmart is now asking customers not to carry guns into both Walmart and Sam's clubs in the twenty two states that have open carry laws in the memo. McMillan says it's doing so because workers and customers have been frightened by quoting here multiple incidents since El Paso where individuals attempting to make a statement and test are responsive responsive entered our stores carrying weapons close quote. He added that some customers carrying lawfully unintentionally created situations where employees call all law enforcement and evacuated stores by asking customers not to carry openly. Walmart is hoping to avoid future incidents. McMillan said the chain will continue to to allow people with permits to carry concealed weapons where concealed carry is lawful. Walmart said it will sell out its current inventory of ammunition. It didn't specify the size is or value of that inventory nor long expects to take before it runs out the chain is attempting to balance the new policies while still serving hunters and other sportsmen and keeping gun rights advocates in mind it will continue to sell long barrel deer rifles and shotguns along with hunting apparel and accessories gun control and gun rights advocates advocates reacted predictably with gun control activists welcoming these moves by the country's largest retail chain and pressuring Walmart to go further on the other hand the the NRA called Walmart's policy changes quote shameful still CEO Doug Macmillan wrote to the White House and Congress advocating for stronger background checks he called on Congress to renew debates on the assault weapons ban stopping short of endorsing the ban outright hours after Walmart made its announcement cement kroger the country's largest grocer also announced it would ask customers not to carry openly in its doors. The supermarket chain ended gun and ammunition sales in the months following the Parkland shooting. Walmart's biggest brick and mortar competitor target has been called the quote Liberal Walmart mostly for its stance on guns runs. It doesn't sell firearms or ammunition. In the early nineteen nineties it stopped selling toy guns designed to look like the real thing and it asked customers not to carry firearms arms into its stores five years ago in twenty fourteen. CEO McMillan says Walmart serves more than sixty percent of America's consumers in any given month month have given Walmart's pervasiveness. It's new gun. Policies may cause real change in part by spurring other companies like Kroger to follow its lead. One thing is for sure. These moves are certain to inspire even more intense debates between gun control and gun rights advocates. Hello from one this business Wednesday. If you like our show share with you could do that easily bright for most podcastone sir. Thanks so much for listening David Brown. We'll be back with eatables in this episode is brought to you by Centro online from Pitney Bowes Shipping and mailing from your desk has never been simpler than with sen pro online from Pitney Whitney bows with simple online is just click sand and save for as low as four dollars ninety nine cents. That's right four dollars and ninety nine cents a month. Send envelopes flats and packages right from your. Pc and you are back to business in no time. Try It for free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds found scale but only when you visit P._B. Dot Com slash B W daily that's P._B. Dot Com slash B W daily.

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Walmart changes gun policy.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

06:56 min | 3 years ago

Walmart changes gun policy.

"Coming up on the news Walmart's Walmart's changes gun policies after shootings Boris Johnson Challenges Jeremy Corbyn toback in October election action and we need help rescuers in the Bahamas face a blasted landscape. It's Wednesday September full aw I'm Anthony Davis Walmart is to stop sales of some types types of ammunition following recent shootings including one at one of its stores in Texas that left twenty two dead the head of the company said it would discontinue sales of some bullets that can be used in assault style weapons and those used in handguns the move comes amid increasing pressure on the company often cited as the largest firearm seller in the US Chief Executive Doug. Macmillan said the company had been listening. It's clear to us that the status quo is unacceptable optimal. He said in a note to employees and published on the phones website the firm also said it would discontinue handgun sales in Alaska the only places still offered offered such weapons the firm asked customers at Walmart and at Sam's Club stores to stop carrying firearms openly even in states where it's legally permitted it saying such actions have caused fear and evacuations. Mr Macmillan said we know these decisions will inconvenient some of our customers and we hope they will understand celebrities and politicians including several Democrats campaigning for president praised the firm's decision but America's Gun Gun lobby the National Rifle Association called the changes shameful and said the firm would lose business another major. US retailer joined joined Walmart yesterday. Kroger the owner of Ralphs Grocery stores changed its policy by respectfully asking customers to stop openly carrying guns is in stores where state laws allow it. Walmart's chief executive who also called on the US Congress to pass stricter gun laws said he expected the changes used to reduce the firm share of the ammunition market from about twenty percent to arrange of six to nine percent the company will continue to sell hunting rifles wasn't shotguns as well as much of the ammunition for those weapons he added. Walmart's decision follows two incidents stores in August in which a gunman killed twenty two people in El Paso Texas and a former employee killed two workers at a Walmart store in Mississippi this move by two major retailers. Ella's is the only specific change to come out of the recent shootings with the US government remaining silent on gun reform. The British Prime Minister Boris Johnson today demanded an October fifteen snap election after lawmakers seeking seeking to prevent a no deal brexit dealt him a humiliating defeat in parliament which he cost as an attempt to surrender to the European Union parliaments move leaves Brexit up in the air with possible outcomes ranging from turbulent. Not You exit to abandoning the whole Endeavour an alliance of opposition opposition lawmakers backed by twenty one rebels from Johnson's Conservative Party defeated the government on Tuesday on emotion allowing them to try to pass a law which would force a three month extension to Britain's E. U. Exit date a furious Johnson who resorted to insults and swearing in the chamber vowed never to to delay brexit beyond October thirty first and challenged opposition Labor Party Jeremy Corbyn to agree to an October fifteen election however he needs the the backing of two-thirds of MP's and opposition parties are united in wanting to prevent a no deal brexit before agreeing to an election. Johnson said his strategy was to get a brexit deal by an E. U. Summit on October seventeen and get brexit done he said the British government was making substantial progress yes and would succeed in removing the Irish border backstop however it has since been proven that negotiations with the EU of all but ceased Winston Churchill's Churchill's grandson an piece Nicholas Soames who has been an MP for thirty seven years stood up in the chamber to make an emotional announcement that he has decided assigned to step down at the election due to having the Tory whip removed from him for voting against the government over Brexit rescue crews in the Bahamas fanned out across a blasted landscape of smashed and flooded homes today trying to reach each drenched and stunned victims of Hurricane Dorian and take in the full measure of the disaster. The official death toll stood at seven but was certain to rise. He's a day off to the most powerful hurricane on record ever to hit the country. Emergency workers had yet to reach some stricken areas right now there are just has to lots of unknowns parliament member. Imran Lewis said we need help. Dorian meanwhile pushed its way northward off the Florida shoreline with reduced reduced but still dangerous hundred five mile an hour winds on a projected costs that could side swipe Georgia and the Carolinas an estimated three million people pull in four states were warned to clear out and highways leading inland turned into one way evacuation routes forecast has warned that Dorian is likely to cause storm surge and even flooding even if its core does not blow a shore with the threat to Florida easing and the danger shifting northward Orlando's airport moved moved to reopen along with Walt Disney world and universal to the North the navy ordered ships that it's huge base in Norfolk Virginia to head out to sea for safety and warplanes at Langley Air Force Base in Hampton Virginia will being moved inland to Ohio the NFC said today preparations to protect life and property should be rushed to completion you can subscribe to the news with your favorite favorite podcast APP or ask Your Smart Speaker to play the news with Anthony Davis podcast leave us a review on I. Teens and follow us on twitter at the news undisclosed podcast for daily updates. The news is an independent production covering politics inequality health and climate delivering delivering honest verified and truthful World News daily.

Walmart Boris Johnson Anthony Davis Walmart United States Jeremy Corbyn Mr Macmillan Bahamas Chief Executive Dorian Texas Us Congress Brexit MP Langley Air Force Base Assault Alaska Florida Kroger Imran Lewis Hurricane Dorian