32 Burst results for "Machiavelli"

How Did America Get to This Point?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:35 min | 5 months ago

How Did America Get to This Point?

"Mean, how did the west go from the towering world power, right? The driver of actual progress. And intellectual thought and industrialization in the world to this sort of corrupted backward and really decaying kind of situation that we're in now. What do you think? Well, yeah, I think we've managed to hang ourselves with the rope of our own creation. I'm a conservative that's unafraid to say that not everything that came out of the enlightenment was good. If you had a thought crime in some right circles I really don't care it's true. The enlightenment was great for some things obviously. David wrench is not going to like this bucket. But yeah, you have to be you have to but first, the most important question is, when do you think the enlightenment began? All right, that's the most important question, right? Yes. And French would say that it began with like spinoza or Galileo. What it obviously started Machiavelli. And Machiavelli, and maybe if French would agree this, I don't know I don't know if it words in his mouth. And his own words will suffice for prosecution against him. His thoughts I should. We should say the friend chest. Yeah. Let's say it's really important because Nicole Machiavelli in 1532, right Conor? Yeah. He wrote the prince and one of the most famous lines or sentiments was why are we focusing so much on these imaginary republics a direct stab towards Plato? A 2000 years before. And he's like, we know what we want. Why don't we just go get it?

David Wrench Machiavelli Spinoza Nicole Machiavelli Conor Plato
The Philosophical Fallacy in Bodily Autonomy

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:03 min | 6 months ago

The Philosophical Fallacy in Bodily Autonomy

"Because if you're only pro choice up until the point when the baby can survive outside the womb, then medical advancements every few decades enable us to make the child viable at earlier and earlier stages. So are you saying that one's in trident intrinsic dignity and natural right to life is dependent on the external advancements of scientists and the ideas that they come up with to make children viable at earlier and earlier stages. That's a very strange political vision of natural rights. But of course, that doesn't make any sense because our babies fully viable. No, if you leave an infant in a crib they die. You know, and what if mom tells the judge in a court of law, Charlie? Well, you know, judge my lesbian dance theory professor at UC Berkeley. She told me I have bodily autonomy. She told me I have bodily autonomy my body, my choice. My breasts are part of my body. So I didn't nurse my infant because I have bodily autonomy. What judge would accept that form of argumentative? Baby yes, the fen for itself. Very few. 6 week old. Once boring is the fend for itself. That's right. Yeah. So obviously the viability one doesn't work. And if you really want to go that route, that you only have rights if you're not dependent on someone or something else. Everyone dependent on insulin heart pacemakers kidney machines life support caretakers would all be non personing and can be killed in people. And you know, it's funny Charlie with the left says that right. Mother earth. Mother, what did they say? We're all dependent on this mother earth goddess without which we can not continue to live. Oh, you mean like the baby can't continue to live apart from their dependency on their mother? So I guess all of us are not persons because we're dependent on the earth ridiculous. So viability doesn't work. Well, they're not developed enough so they don't have desires. Then this is a more fine tuning philosophical argument with Charlie. But you don't have to find will then you're not exactly or that you don't have a claim to act unless you have a desire for X and can understand that you've been denied X and so unless you're aware of your right to something and can articulate it or have a desire for it. I guess you don't meet that list. This is enlightenment thinking gone wrong. Oh, totally. Yeah, this goes right back to the enlightenment period. Yeah. And right back to misses Machiavelli, the beginnings of what became post modernism relatives. It all started with Machiavelli. That's exactly

Uc Berkeley Charlie Insulin Heart Pacemakers Kidne Machiavelli
"machiavelli" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

06:04 min | 6 months ago

"machiavelli" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Slash NPR. This message comes from NPR sponsor into it QuickBooks live. As a small business owner, you do everything yourself. But now you don't have to. Introducing a major advancement in small business bookkeeping, having someone else do your books for you right from your laptop. Into a QuickBooks live connects you with trusted experts who understand your business, guaranteeing your books get done right. So do the best thing you can for your business by letting QuickBooks take bookkeeping off your plate. Learn more at QuickBooks dot com. Hey, welcome back to wisdom from the top. I'm guy raz. So here's more of my conversation with Stacy van Smith, host of NPR's the indicator podcast and author of the new book, Machiavelli for women, a playbook for getting ahead. One of the things that really stood out to me is this idea that women tend to be at their best as negotiators when they're advocating on behalf of others. And it reminds me of something Simon sinek talks about and has talked about with us on the show about mission when the mission isn't about you, you tend to perform better. How can you apply this idea of advocating for yourself, but using the principles of advocating for others? Because clearly you discovered that women are more effective when they advocate on behalf of others. Oh yes, this was one of my favorite discoveries when I was writing the book. I called it the Erin Brockovich exception because although we do tend to look at women quite negatively if they're pushy and assertive and aggressive, we don't do that if women are being pushed assert and aggressive on behalf of someone else. That is very much in line with what we think an ideal woman is. She's selfless. So as a woman, you can kind of leverage it. For instance, if you want to ask for a raise, one thing you can do is think like, well, what should share in my colleague be getting paid? And it's like, you know, she's totally underpaid. She should be making at least $80,000, that's what you should ask for. And you're negotiation is likely to go better and be more successful if you do that. Also, when women get into leadership roles, I think this can be very, very powerful. It's something that's often called transformational leadership. So instead of asking people to do something, if you say we need to do things on behalf of the team, you know, the team basically becomes the other person that you are fighting for. So it's, you know, we really need to stay late so that the work that this team does is well represented. Like I really believe in this team, but the work that we've been producing is not up to the standards that I really know this team can meet. That sounds much different to people's ears than you guys are not working hard enough. This work is not up to par. It's not okay, you're going to need to work all weekend. One of the quotes in the book, among many of the quotes in the book from Machiavelli, is when he writes, he says the first method of estimating the intelligence of a ruler is to look at the men he has around him and essentially use this as a jumping off point to talk about building a support network at work finding mentors. And there's lots of unpack here because finding a mentor is not always very easy for women and for underrepresented folks at in workplaces because especially workplaces where men are in positions of power as you write. People tend to mentor people who remind them of themselves. So what is your kind of begin to understand about how to build a support network around yourself in the work environment? This actually emerged as maybe one of the most important things about succeeding in a workplace and in a profession overall is building a network. And by network, I mean, yes, mentors, what they call sponsors, which are like people very high up in the company. You can kind of do things for you, but maybe aren't actively mentoring you every day. Also, colleagues. Also, people who are newer than you are who have positions that aren't as powerful or well paid as your own. That network is crucial, I think, because that will help determine people suggesting you for projects, people telling you about what they're working on. People wanting to collaborate with you, people speaking up for you, suggesting you for things promoting you full stop. And people standing up for you in meetings. If you get talked over or interrupted, having someone else jump in on your behalf can be really powerful. So I think finding a mentor in a situation where there aren't a lot of people who are natural mentors is a process I think I would recommend looking for people whose work you like, look for people you admire. And for whatever reason, maybe they're really maybe they have amazing ideas. Maybe they're just really good at getting those ideas executed. Maybe they're amazing at working at a team. Maybe people just say really great things about them. And reach out to them and tell them that exactly, just say, you know, I really, you come up with the most creative ideas. It's so inspiring, I'd love to just get some advice from you and hear about your career trajectory because I'm hoping to get to X and so that person might not look like you. That person might have a really different background than you do. And it might not be a natural thing for this person to gravitate towards you, but I think if you feel a connection yourself to them for some reason, you admire their work, you like the way they operate in the office. You like the way they relate to other people. Whatever it is, you like their leadership style. Tell them that thing..

NPR Stacy van Smith Simon sinek Erin Brockovich Machiavelli
"machiavelli" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

04:12 min | 6 months ago

"machiavelli" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"And it was really disturbing to me. And yet all of the advice that I saw being given to women didn't seem to be looking at the reality of the situation. Yeah, I mean, when you say the advice that the lean in kind of stuff or that kind of trend that was happening in the last several years? Yes, for sure. I mean, it was twofold, really. I mean, on the one hand, when I came into the workplace, it was like, just work really hard and let your light shine and you will rise. And then on the other hand, it was sort of like girl power, girl boss, that, I mean, that whole movement that has, of course, largely imploded to, and you know, as a person trying to navigate the workplace and not like to think of myself as a devious person, I do really love my work. I feel very lucky. I try to work really hard and I do try to let my ideas shine. At the same time, I thought a lot of the advice just wasn't working for me. A lot of especially the negotiation advice. I was terrible at negotiating and I hated it, it might negotiations weren't going well, and I was looking at the advice that I was being given. And I was like, this doesn't work. And I think this is when the idea of Machiavelli started to kind of come from the back of my brain. What is the real advice is it? Is it uncomfortable? Is it disturbing? What should I really be doing? I just wanted that information. I wanted the truth. That is not always pretty. Some of it's really disturbing, like some of the advice I give in the book does not make me feel great. You should smile and negotiations. Negotiations likely to go better or you should ask the person you're negotiating with about their family because women tend to do better in a negotiation when things get more sort of social and personal. That is a little disturbing to me, but it's a lot more disturbing to me that women when they retire are twice as likely to live in poverty or that women start 40% of businesses but get 2% of venture capital so that during the pandemic, a huge number of businesses started by women and people of color failed because those businesses were not capitalized that well. I mean, that I find way more disturbing. And so if smiling during a negotiation will help get more money in women's bank accounts, if it will help them get a promotion more quickly, I want people.

Machiavelli
"machiavelli" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:50 min | 6 months ago

"machiavelli" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Cared deeply for creating a city in which people could prosper and thrive and do their best work. And he basically spent 20 years going from place to place, Pope's newest name, king's newest name. He was kind of wheeling and dealing on behalf of Florence. Because Florence did not have an army, they didn't have a ton of money. And so the only thing preventing France or the Pope from invading Florence and taking over was negotiation was Machiavelli's wits, honestly, was one of the main things standing between Florence and a despotic ruler, eventually Florence did fall. And the Medici family took control of Florence. And Machiavelli lost everything. He lost all this money, he was thrown in jail, tortured, and kind of run out of town. And Machiavelli loved his work. He loved his work. He found it so fascinating and invigorating and all of a sudden, not only was he not did he have no money and he was disgraced in living in this tiny town outside of Florence, but he had no power, like trapping birds for a living in this old tavern slash brothel that his family ran. I mean, his life basically vanished like an alka seltzer tablet. And so he wrote the prince to Lorenzo de Medici. Who was the person responsible for this terrible twist of fate for him? And if you look at the beginning of the prince, it almost, it's very cringey. Now to look at because he's like you're so glorious and you know I don't even my ideas aren't worthy of you. I mean imagine this is a man who tortured him and taken everything from him and monkey Billy comes crawling back and was basically hoping that the prince would be so smart and so kind of transplanted that Lorenzo de Medici would say, you know, this guy was working for the other side, but he is so brilliant I have to have him advising me and give him his job back. That was the prince. TLDR it did not work. It didn't work. No. So it was cover letter for job essentially. And do you think he imagined this book to be a manual for others or is it not really known? He wrote it as a manual, but it was a very particular manual. I think the universality of it, he never thought of. He writes the prints for what he calls the conquering prints. So he says there are two kinds of prints, those who inherit their kingdoms, and those who conquer a new land. Of course, Lorenzo had just taken over Florence. And he says, you know, for an inheriting prince, things are pretty cushy. No one really questions why they're there. They kind of have a precedent of power. But for a conquering prince he says things are really tough. Everybody's questioning their power, their right to be there. Why should I pay taxes to this guy? Why should I follow this guy's laws? Who does this guy think he is? Which makes it an amazing proxy for women in the workplace, honestly. And for marginalized workers in general, because you are essentially in this new kingdom, this new territory, right? The workplace. And you're there, but everybody's a little skeptical. There's a lot of pushback. There are a lot of people questioning whether you have the right to be there, and you have to fight to keep what you've earned. And you have to fight to grow it. I want to ask you about that very important insight you had and how it relates to women and marginalized people in the workplace in a moment. But before I do that, I wonder why do you think this manual, which was written for this specific print and maybe other people in similar positions, why did it come to be embraced mainly secretly by corporate leaders and politicians and others and leadership positions? Because we know so many of them have read it or parts of it, even if they might deny it. What about this book made it become this sort of manual for power for pursuing power? Such a great question. I mean, it had a very inauspicious beginning. Not only did Lorenzo de Medici seems like he never read it, never read the book at all, but the Catholic Church did read it, and they flipped out, they thought it was completely immoral. And they threatened to excommunicate anyone who bought the book. If you have the book, you could be excommunicated. And Machiavelli was I think shocked by this turn of events. He basically had been trying to get back in the good graces of the medicis and suddenly he was this villain. I mean, it was a complete catastrophe for him. And I think he died thinking the prince was a failure, not only a failure, but kind of got him canceled as much as one could be canceled in the 1500s. He was sort of thought of as evil. But when I was reading the book, I probably read it like a hundred times at this point. I have really come to love it and find it really beautiful. And I think the reason that it has endured, even though a lot of it's very outdated, there's something in there that's very timeless. And I think the thing that's timeless about it and I think the thing that makes it controversial are the same thing, which is that he just removes morality. And just looks very logically in situations. It is as if he's looking at people and human relations like a chess board. It's like, okay, what are your moves? Where are you powerful? Where are you weak? What can you do to maximize your power in a situation? And that makes it timeless because a lot of times our morals evolve over time, that can date things in a way. And it also makes it sort of shocking because when it's like, well, you know, if you wrong someone, it's probably a good idea to kill them and their whole family because otherwise they're gonna be angry with you and they're like dangerously plotting against you. I mean, it's solid advice, but it's bone chilling, you know? But this is like it's both the beauty and the horror of Machiavelli, it comes from the same place. If this is a manual, let's say, broadly speaking, to help pursue and hold onto power, it's largely been historically been, as I said, read by men, right? Men in positions of leadership. When did you first read this book and think, wait a minute? Everything he says here applies to me, my situation, women in general in the workplace and how women operate in the workplace. The idea came before I had reread the prince. The idea was it was actually kind of born out of some frustration. Because I've covered business and economics for 15 years, most of the people I talk to for my job are men, because economics is 75, 80% male. It's also very white. And business leaders, CEOs, 80% male. I mean, there's a huge issue happening in our economy, the gender pay gap has been stuck for a decade. There were all these things happening and we were looking around me at the economic data.

Florence Lorenzo de Medici Machiavelli Pope Lorenzo France army Billy king Catholic Church chess CEOs
"machiavelli" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

06:43 min | 6 months ago

"machiavelli" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"On business and finance for close to 20 years. She's the host of the indicator on planet money. And throughout her career, she is reported on everything from oil and Oklahoma to monetary policy and Pune India. And the more she examined the business world, the more she kept bumping into some unpleasant truths, 80% of CEOs are men. Women make 80 cents for every dollar a man makes. Women start 40% of the businesses in the U.S. but get 2% of venture capital. And of course, these trends extend into the world of politics, law, entertainment, you name it. So what to do? Well, Stacey started to think that some of the answers might lie in Niccolò Machiavelli. The oft quoted and sometimes misquoted 16th century philosopher of politics, diplomacy and power. Machiavelli is the source of lines like it is not the title that honors the man, but the man that honors the title, and the first method of estimating the intelligence of a ruler is to look at the men he has around him. And, of course, it is far safer to be feared than loved. For her new book, Machiavelli for women, a playbook for getting ahead, Stacy takes lessons from the careers of female leaders, including Janet Yellen, Adele Lim and Neha Nida, and from the philosophy of Niccolò Machiavelli, to propose a set of tools that women can use to gain more money, more confidence, more respect, and more support in the workplace. Stacy first read Machiavelli's most famous work, the prince, in the late 1990s. When she was an undergrad at Princeton, pursuing a degree in comparative literature, and she was not a fan. I really hated the book incidentally. I remember just having visceral reaction of hatred when I first read it. Because it's like this power or hungry, right? It seems like the key setting you up to live in a scary world. It's so cynical and sort of, I mean, the word that keeps coming into my mind is basic, right? It's like, how to get power over people. How to bend them to your will. It wasn't inspiring to me. This was nothing I had any interest in at age 18. I mean, I was a complicated guy. I was not interested in power or crushing anyone. Yeah. So who were the philosophers that appealed to you? I remember really loving Cicero. Cicero was so optimistic the way he wrote about mankind and humans and just the potential we all have in the inherent goodness we all have and that is also true, incidentally. I still love Cicero. I still get excited when I think about those ideas, but you know I've been working for a long time and slowly I've found myself thinking about Machiavelli a lot more over the years than Cicero. And I've developed an appreciation for Machiavelli that I definitely did not have in college. What were those triggers? Like, when do you remember him kind of popping back into your life from time to time? Yeah, it didn't happen in the early part of my career. I think it happened maybe 5 or 6 years into my career. I started thinking more about Machiavelli, because at that time, you can start to sort of see the arcs of people's careers a little bit. You see people start out and where they're starting to move, I've been working in public radio now for 15 years. So I have seen career arcs. I've seen interns turn into hosts. I've seen people drop out of the profession altogether. I've seen really talented people get kind of pushed aside. I've seen less talented people get elevated, I started to realize that, and this may sound incredibly naive. I started to realize that the situation we're in is not fair. And I started thinking about Machiavelli and I started noticing that the people who succeeded were not always the people who worked the hardest or who had the most talent, but a lot of times it was that mixed with people who were very savvy who could deal with other people really well who wielded power or dealt with people who were wielding power in a smart way. And I think that is when I first started thinking about Machiavelli, there was a line in the book that stuck with me from college that where he says we have control over about half of our lives. Fortune leaves us one half of our lives to control maybe a little less. And at first when I read it, I was like, of course, fortune doesn't control half of our lives. We control all of our lives. But of course, the longer I reported on people in the economy, the bigger my world got the more aware I became of people in different circumstances and just watching people in the circumstances around me, the more I began to think that was actually very wise. Most people who know the name Machiavelli know the prince and might know a few things like his famous line that it's better to be feared than loved. But best to be loved and feared, but if you have to choose one, better to be feared. And people often ascribe that to Richard Nixon, apparently famously would quote that. But tell me a little bit about him about Machiavelli. What was the context in which he was writing this, but what was this book supposed to be when he put it out into the world, you know? Hundreds of years ago. It was a cover letter in short. The prince was a cover letter. And it was a cover letter to the people who had taken everything from him. It was a groveling cover letter. If I had to sum it up, so Machiavelli, this was back when Italy was city states. And they were all at war with each other, and there was a lot of violence. A lot of blood, the king of France was running around, killing a lot of people, the Pope had armies. He was running around killing a lot of people. It was desperate. It was violence. It was chaos. And Machiavelli was essentially the Secretary of State for Florence. And he, he loved Florence. He wrote in a letter to a friend, I love Florence, more than my own soul. And he.

Machiavelli Niccolò Machiavelli Cicero Janet Yellen Adele Lim Neha Nida Stacy Pune Stacey Oklahoma Princeton India U.S. Richard Nixon Italy France
The Truth About Thomas Jefferson

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:58 min | 7 months ago

The Truth About Thomas Jefferson

"Thomas Jefferson was one of the most incredible men ever to live in the history of the planet. He was a statesman, he was a president, he was he was a civilization changer. He's the author and was the author of the Declaration of Independence. Now we must understand the beauty of the declaration independence. When in the course of human events, it becomes necessary, for one people, to dissolve the political bands with another. Deriving from the powers of the earth the equal and separate station. I'm going from memory here, so I might be bouncing around. And it goes on to say the laws of nature and nature's God. Thomas Jefferson was able to connect the fruits of the enlightenment and the roots of antiquity. Thomas Jefferson did that. Thomas Jefferson connected the fruits that came out of the ideas of freedom of speech and consciousness and self government, separation of powers checks and balances. But he did not go only and merely towards the enlightenment as if Machiavelli, what Machiavelli or Rousseau or Hume would have done. Jefferson instead struck a balance. Jefferson understood that there was a new type of thinking that was derived from the ancient. And then if we forget the ancient and go too far into this new way of government, it will collapse, but if we go to into the ancient, there's no claim to challenge the monarchy. Thomas Jefferson being a brilliant man wrote the words that we hold these truths to be self evident. That all men are created equal amongst these are life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness, originally, it was property. Now the exact reason why they're getting rid of Thomas Jefferson I don't know their exact reasons because he owns slaves. Is that what it was? Do you know that Thomas Jefferson actually worked to abolish slavery when he was governor of Virginia in the 1790s? Do you know that Thomas Jefferson heavily influenced by George Mason who wrote the Virginia declaration of rights? In 1776, argued for slavery to be ended do you know that Thomas Jefferson who, of course, wrote the declaration, inspired the first state to abolish slavery in 1777 Vermont? Did you know that Thomas Jefferson was partners with Ben Franklin for the first ever abolition convention? Held in 1775 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Do you know that Thomas Jefferson was the first president to sign a moratorium saying that no new slaves were allowed to come into the United States? Thomas Jefferson was a good

Thomas Jefferson Machiavelli Jefferson Rousseau Hume Virginia George Mason Ben Franklin Vermont Philadelphia Pennsylvania United States
"machiavelli" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

06:53 min | 8 months ago

"machiavelli" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Goes back to. Your question is a better to be shared a love while it's churchill was governed by being loved. what would what impact with that have had on the enemies. He was confronting. It wouldn't lead to anything other than probably more aggression wars a tough business and And they're very few rules of engagement so at orna machiavelli and you have to be tough and so there's a quote here That i wanted to ask you about that. Machiavelli said which segues beautifully there is. No avoiding war. It can only be postponed to the advantage of others now. I suppose you could take that a variety of different ways to mean war in the sense that we mean war or is he writing this advice to a political figure. You're saying like if you have you have to crush your political opponents now or else they're only gonna grow stronger. Both you're referring to a quote that comes up from chapter three of the prince. At least the next chapter. He lays out the differences between ancient rome in the way modern politics in its business in modern politics. Machiavelli says there's an inclination that you think that somehow wars avoidable that if you just avoid war it won't come to you. In the context of the coat you're mentioning machiavelli talking about foreign enemies for machiavelli. It's it's natural for human beings to want to expand into acquire and so it's the natural inclination of all governments want row a net means imprint in in japan your own borders and national interests. So then you're caught in arms race so to speak of expanding yourself so machiavelli. He thought that the seeked wrong a classical rome was they never thought war was it. Avoidable always took the fight to their enemies now in the discourses he talks about the same phenomenon domestically he says. Sometimes you're gonna find you have enemies within you better stripe while they're still week before they grow and become a faction and which as you're going to have to have either a civil war even worse. Yeah and that's why. I believe. And you don't have to comment on this from hillsdale but i can That some some aspects of the biden regime striking their domestic political opposition as taking a page of the prince. So help me unpack this quote. Men judge generally more by the i. Than by the hand for everyone can see and few can feel never one sees what you appear to be but few really know what you are. What machiavelli mean by that. He was giving advice in the prince to a ruler that has to always appear. He says moral has to always appear religious that he just can't be either if he wants to be effective and he's trying to encourage this leader to do what it takes to win political points against one's domestic and foreign enemies and essentially tell them it's okay people judge with there is if you just walk around the bible under your your arm. They're gonna just think you're pious but behind the scenes. Don't let piety getting away with what's politically expedient. So so. Luckily he's teaching you optics. There people said yes all right so. Let's just pretend to be something right. I kind of basic public relations. So let's talk now about. And i hate to do this because i i I think you could learn something from everyone. But i could just already here. So many of our listeners like man this guy is so dark and kind of all about earthly power and all this what were some of the weaknesses and kind of what he wrote and again. It's is written five hundred years ago. So who are we to try to critique weaknesses but let's say like if someone were to embrace machiavelli unisom. What are some of the. The the spots that make most vulnerable if it's employed as governing strategy. Well two things come to mind an. I'll just cheat off the smart kids like maan askew mon- askew raise the very same question and concern. He thought that what was wrong about machiavelli. Is this assumption that empires not only inevitable desirable so in a short work called on universal monarchy in europe modest. You essentially argues that if you follow machiavelli's advice and just have this foreign policy of imperialism you're gonna lead yourself to ruin. So he turns the tables machiavelli's. What's imaginary leads to your ruin. Adopting machiavellian in the modern world is actually imaginary. Why monarchy said when machiavelli was writing weren't any new there wasn't anything to say nuclear weapons. Commerce hasn't really taken shape. The the playing field has now even doubt technology has made it almost superfluous to have the kind of ancient virtue. That machiavelli was talking about so you never going to cultivate that kind of gusto that he thought was necessary. So if you wanted to adopt machiavellian policies in the modern world and which is to say imperialism You're gonna end up bankrupting your nation. The only way you could continue to fight these foreign wars as if you keep printing money. Mrs offer honest so modestly saw clearly. That look what he got right was his business about institutions and mixing republics. And all that. That's good where he goes off. The rails is this idea that empires necessary for modest askew empire in a modern age. Especially when you throw in modern weaponry and modern wealth from manufacturing and industrialization. You're going to have to bankrupt yourself arming yourself. Did not that would be necessary for some kind of mecca. Gillian enterprise or agenda. The other thing. I think he simply goes wrong. Is he just claims that it is natural for human beings to acquire but he means by that is. There's no sexting really as moral virtue which you not to acquire indulge your desires a rather to to the moderate them now. The reason why. I say that fundamentally wanna don't think it's natural human beings to do that And also happens if you don't encourage restraint in moreover shoe will then you're gonna have a society of degeneracy and And license rather than liberty. So i think there's a fundamental flaw there and in spite of the fact that he wants us to have skin in the game and be concerned with our liberty what he says about morality ashley teaches license and hedonism not virtue. Yeah i think we're living through that. An era of sensuousness. Nece matt on loose talked a lot about that. So that's an interesting question. Which is what so machiavelli was. He was not necessary. He was writing for a very specific type of person or a nation or a ceo that whereas aristotle in the ethics was talking risk writing for all people right how to be properly sold individual. I don't think in nineteen year old college student of a son. Saying you know what i'm going to become a maquiavelian. That's what i'm getting at.

Machiavelli orna machiavelli machiavelli maan askew hillsdale rome biden japan askew europe Mrs Gillian mecca Nece matt ashley
What Was Machiavelli's Position on War?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:39 min | 8 months ago

What Was Machiavelli's Position on War?

"A quote here That i wanted to ask you about that. Machiavelli said which segues beautifully there is. No avoiding war. It can only be postponed to the advantage of others now. I suppose you could take that a variety of different ways to mean war in the sense that we mean war or is he writing this advice to a political figure. You're saying like if you have you have to crush your political opponents now or else they're only gonna grow stronger. Both you're referring to a quote that comes up from chapter three of the prince. At least the next chapter. He lays out the differences between ancient rome in the way modern politics in its business in modern politics. Machiavelli says there's an inclination that you think that somehow wars avoidable that if you just avoid war it won't come to you. In the context of the coat you're mentioning machiavelli talking about foreign enemies for machiavelli. It's it's natural for human beings to want to expand into acquire and so it's the natural inclination of all governments want row a net means imprint in in japan your own borders and national interests. So then you're caught in arms race so to speak of expanding yourself so machiavelli. He thought that the seeked wrong a classical rome was they never thought war was it. Avoidable always took the fight to their enemies now in the discourses he talks about the same phenomenon domestically he says. Sometimes you're gonna find you have enemies within you better stripe while they're still week before they grow and become a faction and which as you're going to have to have either a civil war even

Machiavelli Rome Japan
"machiavelli" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

08:15 min | 8 months ago

"machiavelli" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Machiavelian equates tranquility with the death of liberty. He wants tension conflict clashes. He wants you to wake up every morning. Thinking your liberties somebody wants to take your liberty way from him and he thinks that. That is the kind of not in your stomach. You should have that. Listen incentivize you to stay vigilant and focused on politics. What moscow thought machiavelli got right was on the separation of powers that you begin to see developing and macula discourses Monarchy will adopt data but its ultimate aim is not empire it's sort of in domestic commercial republics Fundamental goal is tranquility and peace that machiavelli's taste at all and so then machiavelli influenced bacon. Who he influenced almost everybody every honor as he kind of just up ended the tradition before and it's important to note. I think we talked about this. In the previous podcast Where machiavelli was in the midst of warring italian city states now were these small republics for these same republics that they were talking about in the federalist papers like the gym an-and city states or geno estate. Is that right. Yeah that's exactly right and they reflected the classical republics in the sense that they were completely unstable. But you add to the mix though something. That wasn't in the classical world guarding the machiavellian net is the catholic church so he never tires of critiquing The institution of christianity in an address forces in the prince says essentially. What you have is an institution that is too strong a to simply take over. But it's too weak to unify italy and His goal ultimately to unify italy but unify it with a civil religion the In which the state has national sovereignty. And you don't have. A universal institution led the catholic church. A dictating what What a nation ought to do or not to do a classic example of shakespeare's play king. John where you have. France and england at each other's throats but it's the papal levy it who's determined thus undermining national sovereignty so machiavelli's other agenda for those kinds at you're talking about is also considerably. Weakened a church is a political player and subordinated to state ultimately. And so if you were to ask kind of a normal political Blas affi student had a school. Not like hillsdale. What valley stanford. There's two things that they would say the most common things they would say the justify the means and it's better to be feared than loved if you cannot be both so let's start with that one this kind of tension between a ruler. You have to make a decision of. Do you want the citizenry to fear you or love you can you talk about that Because that is something that is commonly quoted. But i don't think properly understood as machiavelli wrote it. Should the key to understanding. Almost every point machiavelli wants to make. Is that chapter fifteen that you would alluded to earlier. Remember from machiavelli truth is factual. How do you and i know. A moral theory is true or not. Machiavelli would stay if it leads to your ruin. Its imaginary so take better to be feared into love for machiavelli. People rarely fall out of fear they fall out of love and if you're only leverage over them as love and people are fickle it's not a factual he also doesn't think that you can found government on anything such as love and instances where have that have only have only owned that The people especially criminals will exploit it so abbott. He also qualifies that very same idea in criticizes For example An ancient And he talks about how sometimes you have to be you have to also adopt the persona of being loved that only when circumstances allow it so in other words. If you're dealing with hostile foreign actors you don't want to take the moral high ground and wanna be loved. You're gonna end up losing your lunch. But if there's nobody really sphere and you put your your threats on under control then machiavelli say would be okay to love. But it's all optics for him okay. It's all factual it's all what circumstances determine or dictate. So i'm gonna ask you something that i personally am not able to explain. Well which is the end justifies. The means we don't like saying that that's usually Something that we're very dismissive of I talk about that that. I have a very specific question about that of someone that we would consider a hero that could be put in that category. What did he mean by that. As i guess we've covered this a partially but basically you have to know what you want and then if you have to do something along the way then so be it is. That is that right right. So the and justify the means which is a phrase he never actually says but you can infer it from what shade his essentially comes down to a rejection of the idea that moral virtue say moderation is inherently good in itself for machiavelli's sometimes moderation is good. Sometimes it's bad the way you determine whether it's good or bad is based on what the end goal of what it is that you want to achieve. So we'll go back to the his favorite example of treasurer borja who didn't use mercy been displayed any christian virtue at all toward the criminals. Who are ransacking this town. I forget the name of it He basically brought down hammer on. These guys used cruelty. Machiavelli says but cruelty. He says well us why because the end was to restore peace and law and order will. You can't be loved by criminals. You can't sing. Whom by would you can't turn the other cheek and if you do that take advantage. And so the end. Security and law and order justifies. The means cruelty. So what's inherent in that phrase. Is this idea that there's no such thing as moral absolute that's just simply good in itself. It's good for something it's good for me is good for us. It's good for our community. And that's where you take your moral compass not some kind of abstract more like yet and so two people that i love and we talk about frequently here on the charlie kirk perks. That hillsdale college has actually statues to winston churchill. And abraham lincoln now the two critiques that some people have towards winston churchill. Abraham lincoln is that they were willing to kill a lot of people. Uh suspend habeas corpus in participating firebombing of dresden but the justification i at times and dr arnn would have a really good answer on the churchill side of this would be no they knew what they wanted and knew that there was something that was greater and they had to eliminating the enemy obviously this was in a combat theatre and in a place of war which obviously an exception of kind of domestic tyranny but was belly. Totally wrong in this sense is is that sometimes we need to put what we would consider to be. You know peacetime morality. You know an suspended if we have to crush. No he's absolutely right on that and Where it gets. Tricky though is if you're constantly fighting foreign wars eventually the means that you're using to conquer your enemies often come back home and be inflicted on your own citizens. That's where things get harry dicey so for example if you are involved in foreign theater in your overturning elections so your national interest well it's only a matter of time before something like that could turn on your own citizens so yes machiavelli's right. Obviously if you have a republican form of government principles that you cherish you. Have you have to be willing to defend them But i think with machiavelli though you defend them by becoming expansionistic he wants eventually empire. And i'm not sure. Churchill was imperialism. I i i don't either. I'm a huge churchill fan. I'm saying though that some people would criticize churchill for what he did at dresden or his campaign almost mercilessly accurately would say he did what he had to do and i agree because he was out war against in house that goes back to. Your question is a better to be shared a love while it's churchill was governed by being loved. what would what impact with that have had on the enemies. He was confronting. It wouldn't.

machiavelli geno estate Blas affi italy Machiavelli hillsdale moscow treasurer borja catholic church shakespeare prince abbott charlie kirk winston churchill France england dr arnn John hillsdale college dresden
"machiavelli" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

06:39 min | 8 months ago

"machiavelli" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Of classical virtues. Generosities magnanimity courage cetera. And then he mixed them up and makes it almost impossible for us. Determine which ones device in which one's the virtue and that's revolutionary because he's essentially saying that the virtues are not good in themselves. what they are only effectual. So sometimes it's good to be merciful and sometimes it's bad to me merciful. No one had spoken about moral virtue. In those categories. Before nixon completely revolutionary. And so for him anything that would lead your own personal life to ruin or anything that would lead save. The united states national interest to ruin is an imaginary moral prejudice. So do you think that he was onto something or without imparting too much of your own critique on this. I'm sure there's some fruitfulness otherwise we wouldn't be talking about him but i'm i'm guessing he did not anticipate a couple hundred years later. How someone would pervert kind of his revelation for this and saginaw why there is no such thing as absolute truth instead basically power play. Let's try eugenics as an extreme example. You can see where this leads you right when you start to say that. We're not gonna have the struggle between the vices and the virtues or have you know some sort of golden mean as aristotle would say instead machiavelli says well we kind of know what we want. And let's just do it. Can you help unpack that of absolutely in fact. Machiavelli doesn't dissipate that in the same book into princeton. Chapter twenty five. He talks about the conquest of fortune. Now what that essentially means is We can put our mind and our will behind the conquest of nature. We don't need to be submissive to nature. We don't need to assume. Dodd has any providential role in politics so you funny you bring up. Eugenics machiavelli would say that is a testament to man's ingenuity capacity to govern his own affairs. So anything else would be servile. He has absolutely no problem going in that direction and in fact encourages it now. Whether or not as you said that would lead to Sort of corruption in in the hands of the wrong person next week by deadly machiavelli would say so. Be it the that. They're a threat regardless. At least i met you valium teaching you about how the world really works. Though in the declaration of independence it says the laws of nature. And nature's god with machiavelli rather say the will of man and what we want or early it would be it would be acquisition in other words imperialism and tough military institutions Machiavelli never speaks of natural law. There's no natural right teaching inmaculada. There's not even a state of nature teaching from what you can deduce any of those principles and machiavelli. So no he he would. Gi is not. Hey put it this way. Simplistic but i think would explain a lot. Machiavelli's political teaching very flexible. You don't want a hamstring. Your political leaders are institutions behind any moral prejudice of any kind. That could getting away a bit of your country being a effective in defending its own national interest. So machiavelli is used as a pejorative sense. What can those of us that believe in the natural law which both you and idea what can we glean for machiavelli. What what can we learn from him where we says about. He was really right about this. He was really right about that. You know what. Where can we say that we need more machiavelli and our political process. Well we're machiavelli was right. Was the importance of citizens remaining vigilant over there. Liberty one of the innovations that he spotlight for us in the discourses is he says everyone. Prior to me assumed that civic harmony was the goal of politics and that liberty could be achieved when it was moral virtue permeating society and people were just in harmony with one another. He says the secret to liberty is actually clashes and pummels properly guided by institutions to form checks and balances where he's absolutely. He thinks that if a populous becomes indifferent to its liberty it will lose it and so he was not a fan of people simply just Abnegating public responsibility and just living just merely private lives in the discourses. He constantly ties owns liberty and the strength that it had as a republic to the village vigilance of its people If you could say one thing about rome had this it trust but verify. Everyone of its leaders. Everybody has skin in a game and nobody would turn their back on politics there. He's absolutely right now. Even in the roman emblem. I believe it was the senate and the people of rome right. Speak you are was clearly. The people must be involved in in the roman project. So i let me. There's so many questions i have about this. Let's ask this question. What who in history was the first one to dust off the prince and say like that and become like a disciple of machiavelli who in history post fifteen thirty two. I think when it was published all the sudden that implement this. Well mean to certain elements in francis. Bacon are machiavellian. he mentions machiavelli by name and says that he had heard a clarion call machiavelli. What's interesting about bacon is. He primarily focuses on metaphysics focuses on philosophy of science. The greatest ration- he was machiavellian in in the sense that he wanted to bring the spirit of conquest not so much the politics to nature so he encourages the liberation of science from theology and morality so that it can conquer disease. It can conquer geographical limits that had previously held people back and so bacon in his works. Wants to inspire a new kind of conquest. Not so much. the militaristic find nakivale is this forces. But one in which science can interrogate and conquer nature and sweets. Her for her secrets. That's very machiavellian but taking a different direction They are writers like modest. You clearly brett Very highly of him. But simon is ultimately a corrosive influence and in the spirit of the laws on a ski. We have yet to cure ourselves of machiavelian ism. He thought that machiavelli had some great insights in politics and on modest few would polish them up in reform them take them in different directions but overall. He thought that he was terrible insolence. He didn't like the emphasis on Militarism he didn't like the emphasis on fear from few. Our nature inherently seeks tranquility machiavelian equates tranquility with the death of liberty. He wants tension conflict clashes. He wants you to wake up every morning..

Machiavelli machiavelli Eugenics machiavelli nixon Dodd princeton united states rome senate brett Very Bacon francis bacon simon
"machiavelli" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

06:00 min | 8 months ago

"machiavelli" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Up here. We go charlie. What you've done is incredible here. Maybe charlie kirk is on the college campus. We are lucky to have. Charlie can run the white house. I wanna thank jollies. Incredible guy his spirit. His love of this country country's done an amazing job building one of the most powerful youth organisations ever created turning point. Usa not embrace the ideas that have destroyed countries destroyed lives and we are going to fight for freedom on campuses across the country. That's why we are here. Hey everybody welcome this episode of the charlie kirk show. We are so thrilled to have this episode. Brought to you by hillsdale college remember. It is charlie for hillsdale dot com charlie f. o. r. hillsdale dot com. I am currently working to the constitution to a one course started to see us louis course and we took a little bit of a pivot away from that and so it's dr khalil. Habib back from the beacon of the north hillsdale. College doctor habib. Welcome back to the charlie kirk show. Charlie's fit to be with you so we kind of stumbled into machiavelli. Last conversation and i promised our listeners. We will get back to it commonly you'll hear on cable television with almost no explanation. Someone say well. That's very machiavelli by this politician. Or that's very maquiavelian. And i think people at best have a very surface knowledge of machiavelli Who was this man. And why was he so important. So machiavelli was born in florence italy and you lived during the middle of fifteenth century. And he lives at a time during the renaissance where there was growing frustration with politics with the church Time for corrupt and it was a movement known as the renaissance that wanted to revive classical virtue stress. The emphasis of moral education on restoring civic harmony and restoring as states crap essentially machiavelli comes in and crashes in on this party and says that's a no go. You can't restore politics on classical moral virtue. And so what. He wants to spread in books like the prince which bookies most famous for today although does this is many years ago was one that people mostly focused on. He presses that of politics requires a cunning. You have to be manipulative. You have to be willing to use force there when you're gonna have to break with traditional moral virtue To essentially affect transition in politics for example One of his many critiques of the renaissance and the attempted to bring christianity in classical moral virtue. Together in a modern republic machiavellian. The prince talks about a situation in which a group of christians in a small town wanted to deal with criminals unchristian grounds and he says well this guy treasury borja who was a brutal dictator essentially showed mercy to the innocent by crushing. These people not turning the other cheek so in other words you measure your your use of force in relation to your end goal and if it's to bring about law and order you don't do it by a holding some kind of classical moral virtue forces necessary and so that forced burns the reputation of some kind of gangster Sort of a low philosophy a politics but It's incredibly influential and foundational in many ways. And so let's dive deeper into that. You know you mentioned how Machiavelli basically you know critics criticized socrates and plato and mostly plato saying why trying to build these imaginary republics. We know what we want. Let's just go get it. Can you talk about how machiavelli in some way liberated this conversation. Not in a good way of the will of kind of how the political will should triumph good. Yeah that's excellent. Actually you're referring to chapter fifteen in prince and it's one of those chapters that are so crucial that anytime i ever teach machiavelli. Distracter has to get almost a full day of line by long line. Reading will in chapter fifteen of the prince machiavelli says he's going to depart from all classical writers. So forget the debate. Whether or not machiavellian was Doing something new was just sort of an ancient and modern clothing. He tells us that he's doing something new. What is it that he's doing new. Just so happens. Charlie that i have that chapter in mind. Let me just read it to you. He says because. I know that many have written about this politics friendship etc. I fear that in writing of it again. I may be helped presumptuous. Especially since in disputing this matter i depart from the orders of others so he tells us he is not gonna follow anything that had been written about before regarding moral philosophy and politics and then he says the following since my intent is to write something useful it suggesting that classical fodders not useful to whoever understands it appeared to me more fitting to go directly to the effectual truth of the thing than to any imagination of it so he makes a distinction between philosophy. That is simply imaginary and philosophy. That is actually factually true. Which is a unique phrase. No one's ever used that. Before now that in a moment but what is he talking about. He says that many have imagined republics he's referring to plato and principalities and kingdoms say saint augustine kingdom of god to have never been seen are known to exist in truth why because they are so far from how one lives to how one should live that he who lets go of what is done for what should be done learns his room and rather than his preservation so now he tells you what philosophy really should be. The factual truth is that which preserves your life and preserves your republic and imaginary truth moral or political. Is that which leads to your ruin. So if turning the other cheek in a political circumstance leads to your ruined and it's an imaginary teach and in that same chapter. He gives.

charlie kirk charlie f dr khalil north hillsdale Charlie charlie hillsdale college treasury borja hillsdale Habib habib machiavelli white house prince machiavelli florence Usa italy
Machiavelli Demystified With Dr. Khalil Habib

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:24 min | 8 months ago

Machiavelli Demystified With Dr. Khalil Habib

"Habib. Welcome back to the charlie kirk show. Charlie's fit to be with you so we kind of stumbled into machiavelli. Last conversation and i promised our listeners. We will get back to it commonly you'll hear on cable television with almost no explanation. Someone say well. That's very machiavelli by this politician. Or that's very maquiavelian. And i think people at best have a very surface knowledge of machiavelli Who was this man. And why was he so important. So machiavelli was born in florence italy and you lived during the middle of fifteenth century. And he lives at a time during the renaissance where there was growing frustration with politics with the church Time for corrupt and it was a movement known as the renaissance that wanted to revive classical virtue stress. The emphasis of moral education on restoring civic harmony and restoring as states crap essentially machiavelli comes in and crashes in on this party and says that's a no go. You can't restore politics on classical moral virtue. And so what. He wants to spread in books like the prince which bookies most famous for today although does this is many years ago was one that people mostly focused on. He presses that of politics requires a cunning. You have to be manipulative. You have to be willing to use force there when you're gonna have to break with traditional moral virtue To essentially affect transition in politics for example One of his many critiques of the renaissance and the attempted to bring christianity in classical moral virtue. Together in a modern republic machiavellian. The prince talks about a situation in which a group of christians in a small town wanted to deal with criminals unchristian grounds and he says well this guy treasury borja who was a brutal dictator essentially showed mercy to the innocent by crushing. These people not turning the other cheek so in other words you measure your your use of force in relation to your end goal and if it's to bring about law and order you don't do it by a holding some kind of classical moral virtue forces necessary and so that forced burns the reputation of some kind of gangster Sort of a low philosophy a politics but It's incredibly influential and foundational in many

Charlie Kirk Habib Machiavelli Charlie Florence Italy Treasury Borja
"machiavelli" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:07 min | 8 months ago

"machiavelli" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Can you talk about how machiavelli in some way liberated this conversation. Not in a good way of the will of kind of how the political will should triumph good. Yeah that's excellent. Actually you're referring to chapter fifteen in prince and it's one of those chapters that are so crucial that anytime i ever teach machiavelli. Distracter has to get almost a full day of line by long line. Reading will in chapter fifteen of the prince machiavelli says he's going to depart from all classical writers. So forget the debate. Whether or not machiavellian was Doing something new was just sort of an ancient and modern clothing. He tells us that he's doing something new. What is it that he's doing new. Just so happens. Charlie that i have that chapter in mind. Let me just read it to you. He says because. I know that many have written about this politics friendship etc. I fear that in writing of it again. I may be helped presumptuous. Especially since in disputing this matter i depart from the orders of others so he tells us he is not gonna follow anything that had been written about before regarding moral philosophy and politics and then he says the following since my intent is to write something useful it suggesting that classical fodders not useful to whoever understands it appeared to me more fitting to go directly to the effectual truth of the thing than to any imagination of it so he makes a distinction between philosophy. That is simply imaginary and philosophy. That is actually factually true. Which is a unique phrase. No one's ever used that. Before now that in a moment but what is he talking about. He says that many have imagined republics he's referring to plato and principalities and kingdoms say saint augustine kingdom of god to have never been seen are known to exist in truth why because they are so far from how one lives to how one should live that he who lets go of what is done for what should be done learns his room and rather than his preservation so now he tells you what philosophy really should be. The factual truth is that which preserves your life and preserves your republic and imaginary truth moral or political. Is that which leads to your ruin.

Machiavelli machiavelli Eugenics machiavelli nixon Dodd princeton united states rome senate brett Very Bacon francis bacon simon
What Can We Learn From Machiavelli?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:07 min | 8 months ago

What Can We Learn From Machiavelli?

"Can you talk about how machiavelli in some way liberated this conversation. Not in a good way of the will of kind of how the political will should triumph good. Yeah that's excellent. Actually you're referring to chapter fifteen in prince and it's one of those chapters that are so crucial that anytime i ever teach machiavelli. Distracter has to get almost a full day of line by long line. Reading will in chapter fifteen of the prince machiavelli says he's going to depart from all classical writers. So forget the debate. Whether or not machiavellian was Doing something new was just sort of an ancient and modern clothing. He tells us that he's doing something new. What is it that he's doing new. Just so happens. Charlie that i have that chapter in mind. Let me just read it to you. He says because. I know that many have written about this politics friendship etc. I fear that in writing of it again. I may be helped presumptuous. Especially since in disputing this matter i depart from the orders of others so he tells us he is not gonna follow anything that had been written about before regarding moral philosophy and politics and then he says the following since my intent is to write something useful it suggesting that classical fodders not useful to whoever understands it appeared to me more fitting to go directly to the effectual truth of the thing than to any imagination of it so he makes a distinction between philosophy. That is simply imaginary and philosophy. That is actually factually true. Which is a unique phrase. No one's ever used that. Before now that in a moment but what is he talking about. He says that many have imagined republics he's referring to plato and principalities and kingdoms say saint augustine kingdom of god to have never been seen are known to exist in truth why because they are so far from how one lives to how one should live that he who lets go of what is done for what should be done learns his room and rather than his preservation so now he tells you what philosophy really should be. The factual truth is that which preserves your life and preserves your republic and imaginary truth moral or political. Is that which leads to your ruin.

Prince Machiavelli Charlie
Joe Biden Lied About Mandating Vaccines

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:01 min | 9 months ago

Joe Biden Lied About Mandating Vaccines

"Remember joe biden said no. I don't think that vaccine should be mandatory demand it to be mandatory. Let's go to cut eighty four. I don't think it should be mandatory. I wouldn't demand mandatory. But i do everything in my power. I don't think mask have to be made mandatory nationwide now. Of course he contradicted himself and he was lying. But according to the bible the left which is the prince by machiavelli the promise given was a necessity of the past. The word broken necessity. The president nicole. Leo nicole machiavelli. The prince perfectly justifiable to talk out of both sides of your mouth in fact a famous french foreign minister famously said about lying. He said we were given speech to hide our thoughts. Not as aristotle would say that we are the speaking beings to actually communicate our thoughts honestly precisely. He said that we were given speech to hide our thoughts.

Joe Biden Leo Nicole Machiavelli Machiavelli Nicole
A Quest to Support Women-Led Businesses

The Indicator from Planet Money

01:10 min | 9 months ago

A Quest to Support Women-Led Businesses

"Stacey. You've got a new book out this week. Yes i do. It is called machiavelli for women. I love this item. Thank you. It was very fun to right. It's all about women and work and a lot of it's sort of based on some of the economic data that's kind of frustrated me for a long time. That's right one of the big ones has to do with company leadership. So deary nearly. Eighty percent of ceos are male. Nearly ninety percent are white and these numbers haven't really budged in a decade and it could never understand quite what was going on especially since some of the other numbers in the economy were so promising and exciting. Things just seem stuck in this area. And as i was doing research for my book this article caught my eye. It was written by alana samuels. She is the senior economics correspondent for time magazine and apparently she had been noticing. These numbers as well. I was just feeling very frustrated and thinking. What can i do about this. And the only thing i can think of is to stop giving my money to all these businesses that are run by men and giving them. Instead to businesses run by women alana decided to buy only products from companies that will owned or run by

Deary Stacey Alana Samuels Time Magazine Alana
A Discussion on Power With Prof. Dacher Keltner, PhD

Speaking of Psychology

02:16 min | 9 months ago

A Discussion on Power With Prof. Dacher Keltner, PhD

"Us today to keller. It's great to be with him here. Speaking of psychology we often start by defining terms. And i asked this question in the introduction. What is power. how do you define it. And is your definition different from machiavelli's. Yeah you know this turns out to be one of the hardest things to do in the science of power bertrand russell. The great philosopher wrote that power is the basic medium of social life. And as i've studied power of my colleagues for twenty five years i tend to agree. It's it's just everywhere. And that makes it hard to define. And we really align and their various definitions of we really aligned with somebody named steven lukes who has a wonderful treatment of power. Assess the gist. That power is your capacity to alter the states of other people or to influence others right so power is different from status. Which cameron anderson has studied. Which is the respect you get from your peers and your colleagues in the people around you. Power is different than wealth and class and in fact in our work those two contracts only correllated about point one five point two power is different from dominance which is strategies to coerce people to manipulate. Power is your capacity to influence and alter the states of mind of people around you too. Why do some people seek power. What are the psychosocial hallmarks of people who actively want power. Well this is an old question. People like david winter really were interested in it. It's it you know. There are individual differences in how much we want power. So people want the spotlight. They wanna lead. They have certain characteristics They like power they enjoy it there a little bit more extroverted why we want that. Is i think one of the really subtle lessons of this research. Which is that. There are a lot of good things that come with power people feel better. They are happier. They have more freedom. They have more connections with others. They enjoy more resources. So there are lot of good reasons for wanting power and and we shouldn't condemn people for that aspiration. Why

Steven Lukes Cameron Anderson Bertrand Russell Keller David Winter United States
Michael Anton Says U.S. Should Have Made Afghaninstan War 'Short and Big'

The Dan Bongino Show

01:37 min | 10 months ago

Michael Anton Says U.S. Should Have Made Afghaninstan War 'Short and Big'

"This is a good one. Michael Anton is terrific, right? We've had him as a guest on the show. Now, I think twice spent on my Fox news show as well. The pieces in the American minds called Afghanistan doing from the start now, Michael Anton Calls out the swamp but admits Hey, listen, I was in there he was in the national security infrastructure team. The Bush administration and also the Trump administration. But he's been in my opinion, a truth teller on these issues. And let's bring up the idea of revenge first, and we'll go into another point. He makes about how the left and the the the world utopians always like to celebrate diversity. And yet when you bring up the idea of diversity, and that cultures may view democracy differently. Representative democracy then it's considered racist. You can't say that Well, we'll say what we want, because it's not racist. It's factually accurate, but getting back to the whole idea of revenge is, Congressman Crenshaw said this morning, not being a strategy. It absolutely is. Anton says this These are quoting Machiavelli. He says. The Romans Machiavelli says made their wars short and big. Americans have taken to making our wars small and long. We inflict pinprick strikes over decades rather than getting the whole thing over within a matter of days or weeks. A better strategy right after 9 11 would have been to do what we did, but finish the job at Tora Bora and then leave immediately with a note on the fridge, saying, if you do anything like that again, We'll be back quickly. With overwhelming force. And we'll leave just as quickly. We will do that as many times as you

Michael Anton National Security Infrastructu Trump Administration Congressman Crenshaw Fox News Machiavelli Bush Administration Afghanistan Anton Tora Bora
"machiavelli" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"machiavelli" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Introductory note niccolo machiavelli one of the most brilliant and versatile intellects of the italian renaissance was born at florence may third fourteen sixty nine. He entered the public service as a young man. And between fifteen hundred and fifteen twelve. He was employed in a number of diplomatic missions to the other italian to france and to germany when the medici returned to power in and fifteen twelve machiavelli lost his positions and suffered imprisonment and torture on his release in the following year. He retired to the country and devoted himself to study. And the composition of his most famous work the prince other writings followed and in the last year of his life. We find him again and active life. This time as a soldier he died. June twenty-first fifteen twenty seven a more detailed account of machiavelli by lord. Macaulay will be found in the volume of english essays in the harvard classics. machiavelli's amy. The prince has been very variously interpreted. His motive was probably mainly patriotic but the exclusion of moral considerations in his treatment of politics lead even in his own century to his. Name's becoming a synonym for all that is diabolical in public and private policy. Whatever may be the relation of the methods expounded in the prince to his personal ideals. The book remains the most vivid and suggestive picture of political conditions in the italy of the renaissance. Machiavelli discourses on lives. Decades deals on a larger scale with many of the topics of the prince. His art of war elaborate his views on the military side and his history of florence. His life of custody. Oh connie and his comedy mandra gala ristic products of an accomplished man of letters. One time was diplomat and soldier at another historian. Poet and dramatist fuming represent so thoroughly the extraordinary versatility of that wonderful age of all machiavelli's writings says garnett. The prince is the most famous and deservedly for. It is the most characteristic. Few subjects of literary discussion have occasion more controversy than the purpose of this celebrated book some have beheld in manual for tyrants like the memoirs of tiberius so diligently perused by emission others have regarded it as a refined irony upon tyranny on the sarcastic plan of swift's directions to servants. If so humble analogy be permissible from various points of view it might alternately pass for either but it's purposes accurately conveyed by neither interpretation. Machiavelli was a sincere though to supple a republican and by no means desire the universal prevalence of tyranny throughout italy. His aim probably was to show how to build up a principality capable of expelling the foreigner and restoring the independence of ili for this intention could not be safely expressed and hence his work seems repulsive because the reason of state which he propounds as an apology for infringing the moral code appears not patriotic but purely selfish with all his faults and oversights nothing can deprive matter of the glory of having been the modern aristotle in politics the first or at least the first considerable writer who derived a practical philosophy from history and exalted statecraft into science..

Machiavelli niccolo machiavelli germany france first english florence garnett one italy June twenty-first fifteen twen third fourteen sixty nine fifteen hundred fifteen twelve machiavelli Macaulay One time Few subjects republican italian last year
"machiavelli" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"machiavelli" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Other cities seem to have retained under all changing dynasties of invaders under owed Acer and Theodore. ICK Nour's is in Albion the municipal institutions which had been conferred on them by the liberal policy of the Great Republic. In provinces which the central government was too feeble either protect or to oppress these institutions gradually acquired stability in vigor. The citizens defended by their walls and governed by their own magistrates in their own bylaws enjoyed a considerable share of republican independence. Thus, a strong democratic spirit was called into action. The Karlovy Jian sovereigns were to imbecile to subdue it the generous policy of oath. Oh. Encouraged it. It might perhaps have been suppressed by a close coalition between the Church and the empire. It was fostered an invigorated by their disputes. In the twelfth century it attained its full vigor and after a long and doubtful conflict triumphed over the abilities encourage of the SWABIAN princes. The assistance of the ecclesiastical power had greatly contributed to the success of the GALS. That success would however have been doubtful good. If it's only effect had been to substitute a moral for political servitude and to exalt the pope at the expense of the Caesar's. Happily. The public mind of Italy had long contained the seeds of free opinions which were now rapidly developed by the genial influence of free institutions. The people of that country had observed the whole machinery of the church it saints in its miracles. It's lofty pretensions and it splendid ceremonial. It's worthless blessings in it's harmless curses too long in two closely to be do. They stood behind the scenes in which others were gazing with childish line interest. They witnessed the arrangement of the police and the manufacturer of the thunder's. They saw the natural faces and heard the natural voices of the actors. Distant. Nations looked on the pope is the vice chairman of the Almighty, the Oracle of the all-wise the umpire from whose decisions in disputes either of Theologians or kings know Christian ought to appeal the Italians were acquainted with all the follies of his youth and with all the dishonest starts by which he had attained power. They knew how often he had employed the keys of the church to release himself from the most sacred engagements and its wealth to pamper his mistresses and nephews the doctrines and rites of the established religion they treated with decent reverence. But though they still call themselves Catholics they had ceased to be papist. Those spiritual arms which carried terror into the palaces and camps of the proudest sovereigns excited only contempt in the immediate neighborhood of.

Italy ICK Nour Acer thunder vice chairman Theodore SWABIAN Oracle
The Hippie Trail Killer Charles Sobhraj

Serial Killers

05:08 min | 1 year ago

The Hippie Trail Killer Charles Sobhraj

"We're all born with the need to be nurtured and loved we cry out for our parents when we're hurt or when we're scared for those whose please go unheard however, the desire for affection is sometimes unbearable and can lead down a dark road. Charles Sobhraj. Never felt the love and support of a stable family. He was born in the spring of nineteen forty four in Saigon French Indochina better known today as Vietnam. His mother was a shop girl named Chen Lang Fun who went by Noy and his father Hotan Chun Sobhraj was a wealthy Indian textile merchants but the union wasn't to last when Charles was only. Two years old noise took her son away from Hotan after learning he had another wife back in India. Fortunately, for Noye, she found a new start with French army Lieutenant Alfons Doro they fell in love and married in nineteen forty eight when Charles was four but Charles wanted nothing to do with his new stepfather and long to be reunited with coach and his real family. He got his wish in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty, nine when they moved to France with Alphonse and sent five year old Charles to live with his father. But the reunion didn't go as Charles expected just like his mother Ho Chun had remarried and started a new family amidst the growing number of half siblings. Charles struggled to compete for hotel son's attention and felt unbearably neglected. Vanessa's going to take over and the psychology here, and throughout the episode please note Vanessa is not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist, but she has done a lot of research for this show thanks Greg unlike some of the serial killers we've discussed in the past Charles never faced physical or sexual abuse. Instead, he endured a different kind of childhood trauma. He was ignored in favor of his half brothers and sisters according to psychiatrist Bruce, Perry, feelings of parental neglect can lead to increased aggression and cruelty. He adds that one of the most disturbing elements of this aggression is that it is often accompanied by a detached cold lack of empathy. Charles started showing signs of this developing aggression over the next three years. He joined a gang of street thugs who attacked and robbed on spending tourists. Unsurprisingly, his criminal activity didn't win his father's affection. In fact, when Noyon Alfons returned to Saigon in nineteen fifty to poach on sent eight-year-old Charles. His mother it's likely that the feeling of being unwanted by both parents haunted Charles for the rest of his life. In Saigon, Charles was still a handful. So in an attempt to curtail the unruly behaviour, Stepfather Alfonse formally adopted Charles, but it made no difference. The young boy was beyond caring about the acceptance of his family worse as he got older Charles started showing signs of Machiavelli Anisim the psychological trait based around manipulation and his favourite victim was his half brother. Andre. Andre, idolized his older brother which made him. The perfect target for Charles's machinations when Charles was ten years old, he convinced two year old Andre to steal from a shopkeeper when the toddler was caught under a confessed to their mother that Charles put him up to it to which Charles proudly scoffed I can always find an idiot to do what I want. It was clear to know that something had to be done before things got out of hand. So in. Fifty Nine Nov moved the family from Saigon to Marseille hoping the change would help to manage Charles's behaviour and further his education she enrolled the fifteen year old and an agricultural school, but it didn't help though he did display an industrious nature that December Charles tried to make some pocket money by selling Christmas cards on the street but his sales tactics were aggressive. The troubled teen was arrested for threatening people with a knife when they refuse to buy his cards in another bid to reform her son noise secured Charles a job at a cafe in Paris perhaps, some menial Labor would straighten him out that year. Charles Bounce from one Parisian restaurant to. Another either working as a busboy or kitchen hand peeling vegetables and washing dishes Charles, hated the work. But no, he refused to let her son slide. He needed structure Charles moved up in the ranks of fine dining and near the end of nineteen sixty became a busboy at la, Cupola of favorite eatery for the Parisian elite according to journalist Thomas Thomson at La cooply. Charles caught glimpses of high society from his place in the back. Those few seconds is the kitchen door flapped open were enough to inspire Charles to strive for more to be rich like them,

Charles Charles Sobhraj Charles Bounce Saigon Saigon French Indochina Andre Vietnam Hotan Noyon Alfons Alfons Doro France Stepfather Alfonse Ho Chun India Chen Lang Hotan Chun Sobhraj Vanessa Alphonse La Cooply
"machiavelli" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

Boring Books for Bedtime

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"machiavelli" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

"His manner, nobly, plane and serious. In the prince, it may be truly said. There is reason assignable not only for every word, but for the position of every word. To an Englishman of Shakespeare's time. The translation of such treaties was in some ways comparatively easy task. For in those times, the genius of the English more nearly resembled that of the Italian language. To the Englishman of today, it is not so simple. To take a single example. The word entrust. Tanay employed by Machiavelli to indicate the policy adopted by the Roman. Senate, towards the weaker states of Greece would buy an Elizabethan be correctly rendered entertain. And every contemporary reader would understand what was meant by saying that Rome entertained the Italians and the canes without augmenting their power. But today praised would seem obsolete and ambiguous if not on meaning. We. Are compelled to say that Rome maintained friendly relations with the toll liens et. CETERA. Using four words to do the work of one. I have tried to preserve the pithy brevity of the Italian. So far as was consistent with an absolute fidelity to the sense. If the result being occasional ASPERA, thirty. I can only hope that the reader in his eagerness to reach the authors meaning. May Overlook, the roughness of the road that leads him to it. The prints. Dedication. To, the magnificent Lorenzo DP Harrow Domenici. Those who strive to obtain the good graces of Prince. Are accustomed to come before him with such things as they hold most precious or in which they see him take most delight. Desiring therefore, to present myself to your magnificence with some testimony of my devotion towards you, I have not found among my possessions, anything which I hold more dear than or value so much as the knowledge of the actions of great men. Acquired by long experience in. Contemporary Affairs. which having reflected upon it with great and prolonged diligence, I now send digested into a little volume to your magnificence. And although I may consider this work unworthy of your countenance. Nevertheless I trust much your benign, not that it may be acceptable. Seeing that it is not possible for me to make up better gift than to offer you the opportunity of understanding in the shortest time. All that I have learnt in so many years and was so many triples and dangers. which work I have not embellished with swelling or magnificent words nor stuffed with rounded periods. Nor with any extrinsic allurement or adornments whatever with which. So many are accustomed to embellish. There were six. For I have wished either that no honor should be given to it or else that the truth of the matter and the weightiness of the theme shall make it Depauw..

Rome Senate Shakespeare Depauw Machiavelli Harrow Domenici Greece
"machiavelli" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

Boring Books for Bedtime

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"machiavelli" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

"Says that he who thinks new favors will cause great personages to forget old injuries deceives himself. Julius did not rest until he had ruined chesser. It was to Julius the second that Machiavelli was sent in fifteen o six. When the pontiff was commencing his Enterprise Against Bologna. which he brought to a successful issue as he did many of his other adventures owing chiefly his impetuous character. It is in reference to Pope Julius that Machiavelli moralizes on the resemblance between fortune and women, and conclude that it is the bold rather than the cautious man that will win and hold them both. It is impossible to follow here the varying fortunes of the Italian states which in fifteen o seven or controlled, by France, Spain and Germany with results that have lasted to our day. We are concerned with those events and with the three great actors in them. So far only as they impinge on the personality of Machiavelli. He had several meetings with Louis, the twelfth of France and his estimate of that monarchs character has already been alluded to. Machiavelli has painted Ferdinand of John as the man who accomplished great things under the cloak of religion. But who in reality had no mercy faith humanity or integrity. And who had he allowed himself to be influenced by such motives would have been ruined. The Emperor Maximilian was one of the most interesting men of the age. And his character has been drawn by many hands. But machiavelli who was an envoy at his court in fifteen o seven to fifteen o eight reveals the secret of his many failures when he describes him as a secretive man without force of character. Ignoring the human agencies necessary to carry his schemes into effect. and never insisting on the fulfilment of his wishes. The remaining years of Machiavelli official career more filled with offense arising out of the League of Cambrai made in fifteen o eight. Between the three. Great. European. Powers already mentioned and the Pope with the object of crushing the Venetian republic. This result was obtained in the battle of file when Venice lost in one day, all that she had one in eight hundred years. Florence. Headed difficult part to play during these events. complicatedness they were by the feud which broke out between the Pope and the French. Because friendship with France had dictated the entire policy of the. Republic. When in fifteen eleven. Julius the second finally formed the Holy League against France. And with the assistance of the Swiss drove the French out of Italy. Florence Sleigh, at the mercy of the Pope and had to submit to his terms. One of which was that the MEDICI should be restored. The return of the MEDICI to Florence on the first of September fifteen twelve. And the consequent to fall of the republic. Was the signal for the dismissal of Machiavelli and his friends, and thus put an end to his public career. For as we have seen, he died without regaining office..

Machiavelli Julius France Florence MEDICI Florence Sleigh Venice League of Cambrai Italy Louis John Holy League Spain official Germany
"machiavelli" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

Boring Books for Bedtime

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"machiavelli" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

"Machiavelli in his history of Florence. gives us a picture of the young men among whom his youth was passed. He writes they were freer than their forefathers, interests and living. And spent more in other kinds of. Is. Consuming their time and money in idleness gaming and women. Their chief aim was to appear well dressed and to speak with wit and acuteness. Whilst he who could wound others, the most cleverly was thought the wisest. In. A letter to his son. Guido Machiavelli shows why youth should fail itself of its opportunities for study and leads us to infer that his own youth had been so occupied. He writes I have received your letter, which has given me the greatest pleasure. especially. Because you tell me, you're quite restored in health. Then, which I could have no better news. For if God grant life to you and me I hope to make a good man of you if you are willing to do your share. Then writing a new patron he continues. This will turn out well for you. But it is necessary for you to study. Since. Then you have no longer the excuse of illness, take pains to study letters and music for you see what honor is done to me for the little skill I have. Therefore, my son. If, you wish to please me and to bring success and honor to yourself. Do Right and study. Because others will help you if you help yourself. The second period of Machiavelli life was spent in the service of the Free Republic of Florence. which flourished as stated above from the expulsion of the MEDICI in fourteen, ninety four until their return in fifteen twelve. After serving four years in one of the public offices, he was appointed Chancellor and secretary to the second chance. Sorry. The ten of liberty and peace. Here we are on firm ground when dealing with the events of Machiavelli's life for during this time, he took a leading part in the affairs of the republic. And we have its decrees, records and dispatches to guide us as well as his own writings. Amir recapitulation of a few of his transactions with the Statesman and soldiers of his time. Gives a fair indication of his activities and supplies the sources from which he drew the experiences and characters which illustrate the.

Guido Machiavelli Florence. Amir MEDICI Chancellor secretary
"machiavelli" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

Boring Books for Bedtime

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"machiavelli" Discussed on Boring Books for Bedtime

"Now, let's get to the reading. Tonight where relaxing with a classic of. Politics. The prince by Niccolo Machiavelli. Translated by W K Mary, it. Published by J M Denton, sons London in Nineteen Oh eight. Let's begin. Introduction. Niccolo Machiavelli was born at Florence on the third of May fourteen, sixty nine. He was the second son of Bernardo did Niccolo, Machiavelli. A lawyer of some repute. And, a Portola Mia. Distefano Nellie. His wife. Both parents were members of the old Florentine nobility. His life falls naturally into three periods, each of which singularly enough constitutes a distinct and important era in the history of Florence. His youth was concurrent with the greatness of Florence as an Italian power under the guidance of Lorenzo Domenici Il Magnifico. The downfall of the MEDICI in Florence occurred in fourteen, ninety, four in which year Machiavelli entered the public. Service. During his official career. Florence was free under the government of a republic which lasted until fifteen twelve when the MEDICI return to power and Machiavelli lost his office. The MEDICI again rolled Florence from fifteen twelve until fifteen, twenty seven when they were once more out. This was the period of Machiavelli literary activity and increasing influence. But he died within a few weeks of the expulsion of the MEDICI. On Twenty Second June fifteen twenty seven in his fifty eighth year without having regained office. Although there is little recorded of the youth of Machiavelli. The Florence of those days is so well known that early environment of this representative citizen may be easily imagined. Florence has been described as a city with two other currents of life one directed by the fervent Indus- dear Savonarola. The other by the splendor luffing Lorenzo. SAVONAROLA's influence upon the young Machiavelli. have been slight. For although at one time he wielded. Power over the fortunes of Florence. He only furnished Machiavelli with the subject of a jibe in the prince. where he is cited as an example of an unarmed prophet who came to a bad and. Whereas, the magnificence of the MEDICI in rule during the life of Lorenzo appeared to have impressed Machiavelli strongly for he frequently recurs to it in his writings and it is to Lorenzo's grandson that he dedicates the prince..

Niccolo Machiavelli Florence MEDICI Lorenzo Domenici Il Magnifico Lorenzo Portola Mia J M Denton Machiavelli. official representative Bernardo
How Tight and Loose Cultures Wire Our World

The Psychology Podcast

06:53 min | 2 years ago

How Tight and Loose Cultures Wire Our World

"What are social norms? So this is a great question and as a cross cultural psychologists. I tried to understand this really puzzling. Phenomena of culture culture is one of these puzzles because it's omnipresent. It's all around us but it's invisible like we tend to ignore it all the time and it's like the story of two fish. Were there swimming along? And they pass another fish. Who says how's the water boys and they swim on and wants US the other? What the Hell is water and for fish? This invisible thing is waterboy for humans. It's culture and a big part of culture is social norms or these unwritten standards for behavior that sometimes become more formalized in laws and rules but nevertheless we follow social norms all the time endlessly without even realizing it and we have to really understand their impact on social behavior. And that's why I wrote the book. That's so cool. Well thank you for writing it and for shyness late on this. But certainly there's individual differences in them like dark triad people. You know people who score high on the dark triad Scales and Machiavelli's and narcissism psychopathy. They they don't like social norms. They are versed. Do it. Well you know I've right in the book about sort of individual differences in people who like or dislike social norms rulemakers rube acres. You can think about the analogy of the chaos quarter. Muppets exactly like think about sesame. Street like the chaos. Muppets are like you know. Cookie Monster and you know and animal who loved to just create chaos. And don't follow rules by Ernie and Bert actually and Kermit the frog who love rules and I actually have tight-loose mindset quiz on my website where you can find out. Where do you veer in terms of mindsets people who like tightness really notice rules? They have a lot of impulse control. And they like structure. People who beer lose tend to ignore rules more often. They're more impulsive. But they're more creative and more open minded book. I talk about the advantages and disadvantages of this construct across levels from nations to neurons from states to organization. So it's something that I think about as a fractional pattern which is repeated pattern of phenomenon across different levels and I tried illuminate why titans differences evolve in the first place at Cross levels and what what consequence love the link that to creativity. Some people have. I wonder how that relates to some people. Argue that Asian cultures are less creative? You know then. Do you think that some of that can be explained by sort of the laser looseness titan of the culture itself? Yes so in our first analysis tight. Lucy was across thirty something nations where we were able to classify nations as veering Erg loose. Even knowing that all nations have tightened elements and some countries like Japan and Singapore China. Beer tighter than places like Brazil and New Zealand and the Netherlands Brazil anything goes indicators of Titus was the accuracy of clocks and how coordinated crops are city streets tight cultures the quad city streets. Pretty much say the same thing but in loose cultures like Brazil or Greece entirely. Sure what time it is because the clocks around you say a lot of different things and that speaks to something. That really is about the tight lose. Tradeoff tight cultures have a lot of order and loose cultures a lot of openness and that means that both have strengths and liabilities. Depending on your vantage point so your question about creativity. We have found that across nations across states. 'cause organizations that are tight. They tend to have less novelty idea generation than loose cultures by. What's interesting and we're finding this recently. Is that each. Has its own strengths. In terms of innovation. So who's cultures can create a lot of ideas but tight cultures can implement that much better so in fact both again have strengths that can be brought to bear on a common issue like innovation. Oh great have you read Richard Florida's work at all and the credit? Yeah the creativity class and yeah and at the city level. Also I think he's really staying. That's right because this also differs state by state within America rate. Do you think like is there a south difference versus? I don't know I don't WanNa grossly stereotype things without you. Actually telling me what the data says so in one of the chapter in the book. I talk about how we can move beyond red vs blue right right. In fact we have a paper in the Journal. Precedes National Academy that rank orders the fifty states into the tight and loose and often? You're saying that the South tends to actually of your tight. They have more strict rules. They have more order to some extent they have less creativity. They're also more polite so the route estates are the loosest states which tend to be on the coasts but those states had to have more creativity like like you surmised and so what got me does that we can kind of look at different different states now through a new Lens. One of the more important things that I talk about in the book is why these differences evolve in the first place and what we find across nation states etc is that groups. That have a lot of threat. Whether it's from Mother Nature like chronic disasters are famine or other human types of threats pathogens or population density or invasions tend to veer tighter. And the logic's pretty simple when groups have a lot of threat. They need rules to coordinate to survive and norm provide that they help people to actually control themselves in difficult situations and the titus states in the US tend to have more threat. They have more pathogens have more disasters and so forth and so there's some kind of logic to why groups evolved to be tighter loose. I mean with that sad and we could talk about it later. Threats now are whether perceived or real tend to produce the same psychology and. That's something nowadays that we're dealing with more. And more in terms of how tight who's manifesting itself in politics and in other contexts where threat is less objective and more

United States Brazil Machiavelli Richard Florida Lucy Singapore China Ernie America National Academy The Journal Japan Netherlands Brazil Bert New Zealand Greece
Beauty Headlines for 15 April

Fat Mascara

03:36 min | 2 years ago

Beauty Headlines for 15 April

"I really tried hard to keep things from not being like all corona craziness you know like some just like some different upbeat stories. I'm sorry but coronas dominating the news just affects everything. Okay what's going on all right? So space and K. I love a bit of space. Okay my Alma Mater. They are shifting to online consultations and masterclasses. Okay their clients want to know how to look. Good a zoo meetings. They WANNA know how to get their skin looking great. They're really want the education because they can't go inside and shop got it so they're doing that. Yeah Dennis Gross is hosting stuff. Charlotte Tilbury is going to be doing masterclasses. Sarah Chapman Kate Somerville. It's all happening online. And they're not the only company there's no I heard I heard keells is going to be doing some online consultations. Any store that is. I'm going to call it. High touch as they say in the Biz. High touch beauty industry You know it's all about like what the client needs. It's not just like fast moving goods. They'RE SMART. They want to get online and make sure that they maintain those relationships with their customers so expect to see more of that from especially the luxury brands in personality driven brands. Ill McKee am I saying that right? You know what I'm talking about. Machiavelli the cosmetics brand. They have a plan to hire makeup artists who are affected by Kobe. Meaning that make who've lost their jobs from being let go so they're creating an online beauty school in which two hundred makeup artists are going to teach up to eight classes a day. Getting twenty five dollars an hour. So this is what I love. They're paying like a decent hourly wage to their makeup artists. This isn't like Oh we'll trudeau. Have you have time? Why don't you just like be free in here? Come give us some free advice online. This is like no pay for these services. These people work hard right. They work hard. They're talented so pay them for their skills. So many talented people are working from home or like they're just sitting at home and they have skills to teach in people can learn from them at home so I think this is a creative way to help employ people so and like listen. I talk about this all the time like people are willing to pay for content or they should be so. I love that they're creating this model. Also expect to see that soon and this is this is not covert related so excited to to give you this one okay. This is the best news ever right. I did ready go. Okay this is. It's the inciting incident is sad. You know it is the twenty fifth anniversary of Selena's death Selena the famous iconic Selena Quintanilla not Gomez people were talking the classic Classic Selena. Bidi Bidi Bom Bom so. Selena is going to have another collaboration with MAC cosmetics I saw the cosmetics bag. Do you remember that on rag boost? Ea I am so excited that you like the bag to. When I saw the products I was like these. Aren't that different from the first Selena Mac collection which was maybe six years ago or something that was fabulous but the boosts ta rhinestone cosmetics studied bag. It's a black leather bag with the silvery studs on it. If you saw the movie J.lo's wearing you know the iconic started boost. It's just incredible. It is the accessory of the season so run. Do not walk to get this bag. It's fabulous so anyway. I'll never sing selena against. That's my new. I love it. Those are the

Selena Bidi Bidi Bom Bom Alma Mater Charlotte Tilbury Dennis Gross Keells Mckee Sarah Chapman Kate Somerville MAC Gomez
"machiavelli" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

12:21 min | 2 years ago

"machiavelli" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Back the market rally and Machiavelli had no no I cast up at all well no that wouldn't be true to say in high demand fields which shudder I I I fear that my entire performance in this thing someone repeat here my ability that it is my position learn from my teacher yeah that no man can really learn well more than three great books and even that's very difficult so I protest that most what I'm talking about I don't really know but I say that for such as Harvey Mansfield in particular but no Machiavelli is a contemporary of Martin Luther and might make you really see some problems that have developed in part because of the birth of Jesus and the spread of Christianity all of a sudden the idea of growth that because there is one god for every man then the authority to rule the governor comes from the heart and there were abuses in church governance which will be owned nearly spiritual matters that were very very difficult to correct it's taken a long time to correct them in my opinion the United States of America and the doctors are the correction not to go back to part one of our conversation when you're talking about your teacher Harry Jaffe said the it read three great books and one was the ethics and the other was the Bible of thirty left on a good that third of been the prince no I think the question is more I think part of the public is included yeah you're right it wasn't and that then the Bible or Shakespeare or I guess it's really a contest between those two contests speculated on this for you yes you have but it's not the difference no not not for him it would be it could be for Harvey I don't know if they have currently that he would give me a cryptic answer to get away what about the Republic Machiavelli's other great work well it's a different kind of thing that Plato's Republic the distinction between it and he all of Machiavelli's works the prince of the discourses included that discourse about Livvie Machiavelli idea about how to study politics is not constructive every team of perfection and then measure the ones we have buy it is likely to excuse that idea and so these books seem very different and all of his books seem very different than reading Plato and especially Plato and any of the classics such John Martin Luther big subject for five minutes here on well loser is born in fourteen eighty three in in Germany he becomes a mock he goes to Rome he notices that Rome is very world they play in by worldly I mean the way Washington DC is today at its worst involved in power and whisperings yeah that's right it he is Paul but what the same thing is the selling of the dollar they say there's an argument it's very important in the reformation about the nature of church authority that's one of of you argument and his second name that's going on there there is the nature of church authority there's the relationship between faith and works as a means of salvation that calls into question the standing of the virtues and vices the truth is it is the doctor at the time that loser came I really derive from the passage in Matthew which says who who do you say that I am in Peter replies there are two classes of the living god and to his surprise to him we don't have a crummy but upon the ark Peter Peter is try the Greek word for stone and upon this rock I will build my church and would you bind on earth I will bind it happened and what you lose all her I will lose in heaven and the special place of the apostles and carrying on she's teaching and this particular thing gives rise to the idea that it is bishops they say the contents of the pot apostles who had their hands laid upon who Kerry with within a special way the message of Jesus down through the ages and that the successor of Peter who became the bishop of Rome are the key art he the card the representatives of god honor Catholic Roman Catholic doctrine well what that means is that with the two hour and one of the things that grew up that was a terrible corruption was this idea that if you pay money to a priest maybe the teachers maybe to the priest personally your sins will be forgiven in other words do him a favor and that corruption by the way is used by the reform to Catholic Church that we have today hi myself understand the pope the current pope John Paul the second to be a very great man and the argument to very serious argument Luther solve that and he rebelled against it and that led him in their long series of work I think it's translated works in English take up fifty six volume that led him to develop a new way of understanding church Gordy and the relationship between faith and works these two things are related by the way because if the church authority and the work that the things that you do are important to your salvation that gives the church according to control your he was also though not just revolution AB was really quite a reactionary when it came to government on this planet over people like the peasant revolt in his regions of German that's right and what would be fair to say you know he if there was a conservative you know I I that's hard that's it's not a very good word conservative I'm one but I you know I I can see what I mean when I said that the patriot what I mean what I'm a conservative is that I want to keep certain doctrines alive the name what they are it was of a conservative temper he he did not wish to determine if he was not nor with Calvin his his blood brother and near contemporary neither of them with with with characterized himself as political thinkers and having an idea about how to convert they thought in general it is from the Bible that about anybody in power if he was in power was put there by god and that and that even the worst hiring could not extinguish faith or tech face and so politics are are there not worked out the way some Christian thinkers politics there my my my my own opinion is that that is a failing of and I'll get to that when we get to the American revolution you did not mention Francis Bacon and I don't know anything about Francis Bacon why did you pick and what we need to now I think that because of one word science and they can is the development on Machiavelli that leads to the understanding in the modern science technology bacon he works for the new Atlantis and new Oregon I'm no from our god I'm wrote a utopian work they can agree Machiavelli that we have to concentrate on the here and the now but he said something and that is one in here now admire what we love are they grateful for their heroes are they grateful for the people who helped the expression the release of man's state his that is born in Baker and bacon foresees a time in which there will be enormous energy poured into that and that we will have science been did to the job that of discovering the greatest and deepest and most fundamental truth but it's being serviceable more than fifteen sixty one he dies in sixteen twenty six so this makes a Melissa beef that's right right at the renaissance going on anything if you know the the there's there's a permit under way you know because with it in in if you look at that if you go back and you look at the doctrines of of it is a public for example doing is something that issues in the and in the question and the guilt of the good life that is implicit not explicit but implicit in Plato's works is a good life is a what is it is a life of arguments about the highest things we have an argument in you don't get a doctor there you get more of that in a little but not have played well this is the opposite idea serviceability this is useful and and it is very powerful intake and they can make of course is very very powerful poll I'm not getting this you you think bacon is important because he stresses that we ought to put science in the harness and make it make the lights down at night he's one of the he's one of the way stations along the way of modern philosophy and and remember Machiavelli turned from elevation to use for my Alex here is the way here is the introduction of a tool of useful call of course one of the defining things that I want that's why you ask yourself do we care about the Taliban a hundred years ago we would not know their names but it is because of they can strike I and we can correct them back the world is we remain by and here he said at enterprise is really articulated first and clearly in the works of bacon in it is it is a very spare just the facts ma'am it is the launch of the scientific method yeah you could say that but remember that that implies remember what is the height you know because philosophy that means the love of wisdom and wisdom and knowledge of the things that do not change each of these people that we're talking about are giving an account of the giving of a great a great account of those things and and so in in this turn to the usefulness of modern science is the is that that is indeed the hard thing useful useful tool useful to our love of honors just as well usefulness to our comfort our preservation our prosperity remember what that box is always there what's his greeting in his farewell live long and prosper and what are the things about life they're not it it it you know what what why are we all going around where it can't be sure to take the in one right those farmers who went up in that building did not live long and they are not prosperous today except in honor and service to right there is a narrowing of the perspective that goes on here honor and service to right that is what we are about on this the first broadcast day of the year here for Hillsdale dot com if you're just joining as a man I wish I had all this conversation it's over there you for health L. dot com all things they'll Hillsdale dot EDU stick around right back with doctor learned I'll be right back with doctor Lori on on.

Machiavelli
Foodie calls: Dating for a free meal (rather than a relationship)

Brett Winterble

01:22 min | 3 years ago

Foodie calls: Dating for a free meal (rather than a relationship)

"Researchers at the celebrated zoo's a Pacific university. And you seamer said had three hundred and fifty seven heterosexual women answer a series of questions about their personalities thoughts on traditional gender roles and their personal. Foodie, call history's interesting only thirty three percent of the participants admitted to engaging and at least one foodie, call second study was performed on eight hundred twenty women of the women collected eighty five percent reported being at her a sexual, and they were used as a. Focus of the study respondents were asked to similar set of questions as the first group twenty three percent acknowledged participating in a food he call. It's worth noting. Most of the women surveyed believe the food. He call was anywhere from moderately to extremely unacceptable. Among the groups of women who admitted to food he calls they scored higher in the dark triad. The dark, triad the dark web, they had a tendency to suffer from narcissism, psychopath, psychopathy and Machiavellian, ISM me to women who because you Jack a free meal, your MAC Machiavelli. Prince Machabeli prints Machiavelli, what women who expressed a belief in more traditional gender. Roles were also more likely to engage in a foodie call John. Yep. This is this is a

Pacific University Prince Machabeli Jack John Thirty Three Percent Twenty Three Percent Eighty Five Percent
"machiavelli" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

Jocko Podcast

03:23 min | 3 years ago

"machiavelli" Discussed on Jocko Podcast

"By this individual Machiavelli. This is the Machiavelli Nicolo Machiavelli. This is the guy that wrote the prince he's. Got all kinds of great quotes out there. It's better to be feared than loved. If you can if you cannot be both. He's got never never was anything. Great achieved without danger. Here's one if an injury is been done if an injury has to be done to a man it should be so severe that is vengeance. Need not be feared that's pretty ruthless. Here's another one. Hence, it comes about that all armed prophets have been victorious and all unarmed prophets have been destroyed. In one more quick, quote, as you you can you can just Google Machiavellian quotes and you'll find a bunch of great ones men rise from one ambition to another. I they seek to secure themselves against attack, then they attack others, and that's actually from the prince which is his most famous book. And if you think about the process of being a human being that right? There is very accurate, and you can really see that with accuracy. If you overlay that on jitsu, I you seek to secure yourself from attack and then you attack others, right? And when you're rolling at first when you first start you're just trying to defend your string not to get choked. And then eventually you can stop from getting choked. And you can stop from doing are mocked, and then you start to attack people armlock them. So that's Machiavelli, and if you don't know anything about him, he was an Italian really apoliticial in a diplomat. And but on top of that. That. This was during the renaissance period, and he's an actual renaissance man. So he was a poet. He was a philosopher, he's a playwright. He was an author of books. Born in fourteen sixty nine died and fifteen twenty seven from fifteen three to fifteen o six. He was in charge of the Florentine militia. And when he was in charge of that militia, he didn't like mercenaries. Because he realized that weakness of mercenaries is that they they're they're getting paid. That's why they're fighting not fighting from their true belief system. So he raised and recruited a citizen army, and they were well respected on the battlefield. And they fought and some pretty good battles and one, but it didn't last forever fourteen was eventually defeated and dissolved and Machiavelli was accused of conspiracy and tortured. And I of course, whenever I I go down a lot of rabbit holes. But I went down that torture rabbit hole for a little while yesterday. And they pretty brutal about it. But he. They thought of use a conspirator whatever he did he even after torture. They couldn't get it out of him. Dave, actually, just exiled them. And that's when he wrote his book the prince, which I'm sure we'll cover on here at some point. This is where you hear this is where the word Machiavellian, that's kind of it usually refers to his book, the prince and usually that word nowadays is used to describe someone that's kinda scheming unscrupulous..

Machiavelli Google Dave
Has Amazon selected its next headquarters?

GeekWire - Geared Up

03:38 min | 3 years ago

Has Amazon selected its next headquarters?

"Of role in this decision. Right. It's possible. But another thing to keep in mind is that it seems likely that these two cities are the ones that Amazon's ended Vance talks with, but we don't know that exclusively and given how tight of ship Amazon runs. It's hard for me to imagine that the leakers at least all of them come from Amazon. I think it's more likely that they come from the city's. So it's very possible that Amazon is in advanced talks with more cities than these three that we talked about earlier, but those are keeping a better tighter lid on it. You know, you also mentioned Dallas that was part of one of the reports and Jeff Bezos has a large rocket operation in Texas through his blue origin space venture. So there is actually a common thread among the three of these locations. That's true. And then Texas like Washington state doesn't have an income tax. Any other two cities do and Amazon can be a little. Tax sensitive, Texas. I don't know what the appropriate term is. But I I don't think Dallas totally out of that game. Okay. So that's Texas is still a possibility. And obviously Austin in another part of the state is home to whole foods. So they could still be in the running and they were part of the final twenty as well if I'm not mistaken. No, you mentioned the cynics view earlier, and it's easy to look at this and say, this is a very Machiavelli and move all around by Amazon, one of the people you talk to this past week was Richard Florida. Who's been an outspoken critic of the way that Amazon is going about this search and specifically Amazon's focus on getting government incentives. Really if you look at it. Amazon has so much intelligence on the willingness and the ability for so many municipalities around the country to provide tax incentives tax breaks and other things that would make it worthwhile for them to go into a city. It seems like they basically got in a blueprint for their US and North American expansion over the next ten years here is that what's going on. I don't think it's not going on.

Amazon Texas Dallas Jeff Bezos United States Vance Richard Florida Austin Washington Ten Years