26 Burst results for "Macarthur Foundation"

"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:01 min | 3 weeks ago

"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"MacArthur Foundation, supporting creative people and effective institutions committed to building a more just verdant and peaceful world. More information at Mac found out or And listeners and members like you who listen and support. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin and I'm David Greene, The head of Jordan's government has a warning for Israel and for its ally, the United States. Jordan's prime minister spoke with Steve Inskeep. Omar Reyes is a longtime Jordanian political figure who is now a top official beneath Jordan's King Abdullah. Jordan exists in a very tough neighborhood and it's this neighborhood's been tough for you. Decades, Jordan borders Syria and Iraq and also Israel. If you look at a map, you see that Jordan touches the occupied West Bank, which is called that because it is the West Bank of the Jordan River. Westbank is territory that Jordan controlled until Israeli troops took it in 1967. Jordan is one of the few Arab countries that have since made a peace treaty with Israel. But it is watching with alarm is Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu promises to annex portions of the West Bank. Israel maintains that it has both security needs and historic ties to that land, while the Palestinians have long lived there wanted for a future state. What happens if Israel begins annexing territory in the occupied West Bank is the prime minister. Netanyahu has promised to do Well, we hope it won't happen because Jordan on his Majesty the king. We have been for just and peaceful settlement in the region, which includes a two state solution. With the Palestinian state with Jerusalem as its capital. Any unilateral action undermines that and puts the whole region and if I might say the world In a dicey situation. This is not in anybody's interest, frankly at all. And if the two state solution becomes not viable because of this annexation, then my question is what is alternative? What is the other option? Two. The Israelis visit the thinking off one state, the multiverse E. For Two people, or is it going to be a state of apartheid, which the world was glad to not have in its membership since the end of the South African apartheid state? What happens if this annexation goes ahead is Jordan in a position of saying we will advocate a one state solution in which Palestinians would seek their rights within the Israeli state? Well. Jordan has historically been committed to a two state solution, and it is still a viable solution. If Israel does not go ahead with annexation. If it does, it's creating new facts on the grounds that will undermine the two state solution. And by undermining the two states of solution. We need to know what is the plan that does not undermined long term peace and stability in the region, and I don't think there is one Prime minister, As you probably know. Some figures on the Israeli right have been asked when you take land in the occupied West Bank. What happens to the people Do you end up with stateless people? Or as you mentioned an apartheid state, and one answer given by figures on the Israeli up? Bright is well that the Palestinians can become Jordanian citizens with Jordanian passports, and in fact, they once did that. Would you accept them? That's AH pipe dream. That's wishful thinking. That's not gonna happen. The whole Jordanian society from starting from his Majesty sticking to the government. The people are steadfast above this. Jordan will not be Palestine. Palestine is a state that needs to be on its own territory and Palestinians so we are unified. With the Palestinians on fully rejecting the idea ofthe transfer. Do you think the Trump Administration is hearing your concerns? The Jordan's relationship with the U. S is strategic and we communicate all the time, and there's a common understanding off our constraints and their constraints. And understanding ofthe where Jordan stands on this issue, So the strategic nature of that relationship allows us to coordinate express our views and have our agreements and differences every month. But do you think they hear your concerns specifically about annexation? Israel's promised to annex parts of the West Bank. Yes, His Majesty. The King has expressed his concerns about annexation in lateral action in every international forum that Anything short of a two state solution will send. You know what it would do, It will close the whatever hope prospect for hope. They're still is and when hope disappears. Frustration and anger and that tends to and has in the past, let to extremism and we've seen extremism in the region on Daz. Also, we've seen around the world extremism also becomes global. So Everybody will pay the price of this. Do you think you're being taken seriously by the United States? Steve, I think of answered your question. We've made our views very clear on DH. That's what they do in every setting with our strategic partners. One of the things I want to ask about. The Trump administration has attempted various moves against foreign students international students in the United States. The Trump Administration has also made moves to reduce legal immigration, setting aside illegal immigration. They've moved against legal immigration. And I'd like people to know that you were educated in the United States, which is true of a lot of people have risen to senior positions in countries around the world. What did you get out of your US education? Well, my own individual experience was it was studying in the United States was a huge benefit for me because it was a context in which students from all over the world were there. We learned a lot from each other about each other. But also it was a great opportunity for American students who had a chance to meet students from the world and learn about the world. So that's my own experience. Prime Minister Omar Reserves Thank you very much for the time. Thank you, Steve. He's a top official under Jordan's King Abdullah. Let's look ahead to all things considered later..

Jordan Israel United States West Bank Jordan River Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Steve Inskeep prime minister Trump Administration Prime Minister Omar Reserves Prime minister NPR News King Abdullah MacArthur Foundation Mac Omar Reyes official Syria
"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:42 min | 2 months ago

"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KCRW

"Macarthur foundation at mac found dot org it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king in Minneapolis and I'm Steve Inskeep in Washington DC good morning sometimes for better sometimes worse the United States remains V. country where events capture the attention of the world and protests here are no exception they've prompted protests overseas and other governments have taken the chance to criticize the trump administration's handling of the crisis we're gonna hear what's being said in China in the UK and in France where we begin with NPR's Eleanor Beardsley who's in Paris where some protests grew violent overnight either Eleanor hi Steve what happened well the violence wasn't the main point the main point is that not more than ten people are supposed to get together now because of the corona virus and twenty thousand people amassed in front of the main courthouse in Paris and yeah eventually police had to break it up when they tried to March but it was not about the violence they're very angry about police racism and you know injustice in France no you just said injustice in France but was there a connection to the protests in the United States there absolutely was of course it's George Floyd that the protests in the U. S. have totally inspired the protesters here but it's about a French case a black man I'm at a trial ray died in police custody for years ago and his family has been fighting for justice no police officer was arrested they say that he was a six yet it exactly like George Floyd listen to this now that's the man's sister.

Macarthur foundation mac Minneapolis Steve Inskeep United States China UK France NPR Eleanor Beardsley Paris George Floyd ray officer dot Washington
"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:35 min | 3 months ago

"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Macarthur foundation supporting creative people and effective institutions committed to building a more just verdant and peaceful world more information is it mac found dot org and by the listeners of KQED mostly sunny today and have pretty warm will save some people will say hot highs from the lower seventies at the ocean to the low nineties inland good morning the time now is six forty six this is morning edition from NPR news I'm David Greene and I'm no well king good morning the U. S. and China have a complicated relationship nothing new there but during the corona virus it's getting worse and may even be at its lowest point since the Tiananmen Square crackdown more than thirty years ago and here's Michele Kelemen tells us what the diplomats have been saying and it is not that diplomatic U. S. and Chinese officials have been trading barbs on Twitter and when China's ambassador wrote an op ed accusing the US of playing the blame game secretary of state Mike Pompeii came back with this and I can't wait for my daily column in China Daily News beyond this **** for tat relations seem to be deteriorating at all levels the FBI for example has been warning universities about the dangers of working with China especially in the scientific field that was going on well before the pandemic says Georgetown university's James green a former U. S. official with two decades of experience dealing with China what it's done is made U. S. institutions quite cautious on dealing with Chinese entities and trying to figure out where the law is going and where rules are going so that they can make sure that they're on the right side of the law and I do think that it's putting a chill on collaborative efforts that could make it harder for joint work to respond to the pandemic or revive the global economy says green back in the two thousand eight financial crisis there were a lot of discussions that happened between central bankers and finance and treasury officials on how to restart and save our economies and now that we're talking about re opening I think there's probably some important work that can be done to address some of these economic challenges as well as the health care challenges and unfortunately those lines of communication have gone dead president trump while he was negotiating a trade deal often touted his good relationship with Chinese president xi Ching paying but that's not the case now according to White House spokesperson Kayleigh McEnany right now it's a relationship of of disappoint and and frustration because the president has said how frustrated he is that some of the decisions of China put American lives at risk secretary of state Pompeii presents this as a battle of ideas saying the Chinese Communist Party has refused to come clean about the origins of the corona virus he says China's political system is putting the world at risk James Steinberg who was deputy secretary of state during the Obama administration says this shouldn't be about ideology I think this sort of decision to turn this into a fight with the Communist Party is either in cash or are trying to evoke old metaphors of confrontation in Cold War confrontation which I think are kind of productive speaking via Skype Steinberg now with Syracuse University says a new Cold War is not an option for U. S. partners in Asia there to inter twined with China to the extent that the restoration or others think that we're gonna be able to get people to sign up to a new set of Cold War alliances in which you're on our side against China is very unlikely even in countries like India which have deep reservations about China I think are not likely to be recruited in to a very binary model of feeling richer but Steinberg points out that China is doing damage to itself by bullying other countries and taking an aggressive tone on social media that's provoking even more tough talk from the trump administration which will likely continue to lay the blame on China during this election year Michele Kelemen NPR news Washington this is NPR news we've got the California report coming up in just a minute first we're off to San Jose with Joe the newest traffic.

Macarthur foundation
"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:35 min | 3 months ago

"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KCRW

"Macarthur foundation supporting creative people and effective institutions committed to building a more just verdant and peaceful world more information is at mac found dot org it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king in Washington DC and I'm David Greene in Los Angeles when J. crew filed for bankruptcy yesterday got a lot of attention in part because it's the first major retailer to fall prey to this pandemic the company was forced to close five hundred stores and furlough all but two thousand of its thirteen thousand employees but this might not be the end other companies are very likely to go under in these times let's turn to David Wessel director of the Hutchins center at the Brookings Institution hi David hope you're well good morning so talk to me about J. crew going to bankruptcy court in what what exactly the the company's going to be experiencing here well when a company files for protection of the bankruptcy court under chapter eleven of the law it's allowed to not pay its debts and so we can continue to operate business in the case of J. crew which also owns a company called made well it worked out a deal with its creditors before it went to court people who left the company nearly two billion dollars since we get control of the company squeezing out to shareholders then it borrows more money about four hundred million dollars so we can keep going it's online businesses functioning and it's planning to open at least some of its stores when the corona virus recedes the whole point of chapter eleven is to allow a debt laden company to reorganize and and stay in business so is this I'm an option that other retailers other companies are going to follow we can see more companies seeking protection absolutely American businesses borrowed a lot of money fifteen trillion dollars by one recent estimate when times were good many of them are going to have trouble keeping up the payments it's hard to stay current on your debt when your revenues drive up gold's gym filed for bankruptcy this week already the Wall Street journal says that both Neiman Marcus and J. C. Penney have missed some interest payments and they're talking to lenders about a bankruptcy filing hurts the car rental company has hired advisers and in the oil and gas industry low oil prices are pushing a lot of little companies towards the bankruptcy court as well I mean David you talked in a program about the hundreds of billions of dollars that Congress approved to try and help small businesses what wasn't that supposed to try and avoid this it was an all they need is going to keep some companies out of bankruptcy but it's not enough for all of them particularly companies that were already kind of over borrowed before the corona virus hit in the problem here is this is going to overwhelm the bankruptcy courts and that's going to have unfortunate side effects some companies are going to have trouble finding the money you need to borrow temporarily to keep going while you're in bankruptcy and history suggests when there are lots of business bankruptcies as I expect there will be the courts tend to put their attention on reorganizing the big ones and that means little people little companies have filed for bankruptcy just end up liquidated they sell off their assets with the court's supervision and essentially go out of business what other options are out there David to to try and save a company in these times well the best option of course to get the economy going when the virus receipts so they can start selling again hi Joe Stiglitz a Nobel laureate suggests a super chapter eleven a kind of one size fits all plan David Skeel a law professor at Penn has suggested that Congress legislate a moratorium on debt payments giving companies and even some families the immediate benefits of bankruptcy without having to go through the court and Peter or's agar was the White House budget director the Obama administration says that because bankruptcy can have such a big effect on suppliers he suggests government lending to what he calls firms that are too connected to fail doing essentially what the government did for GM and Chrysler during the Great Recession but none of this is painless yeah you do that that is that is true as we know David Wessel from the Hutchins center Brookings thanks so much you're welcome all right so what do you do if you see someone who is not wearing a mask or standing too close in the supermarket do you shame them into doing the right thing NPR's Jerome Sokolowski went to Rock Creek park here in DC to investigate this urge I'm on the street here in the park that's been closed off by the city to allow people to get out and get some exercise while maintaining social distance their bikers and joggers and some people out for a stroll some of them are wearing masks but a lot of people aren't Stephanie Hughes has covered her mouth and nose and feels everyone else.

Macarthur foundation mac
"macarthur foundation" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:22 min | 6 months ago

"macarthur foundation" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"T. macarthur foundation at mac founder dot org thanks but these hello and welcome to me stay with me Connie shop in London this to Jeff is in west Pokot in Kenya we'll be with out in around five minutes also in this half hour the latest on the coronavirus a **** about the Rio carnival and the latest sports and business days you can text us or send us a message on anything you hit the number is plus four four seven seven eight six twenty fifty eight but first let's start with an update on the world wide spread of the corona virus and its continued disruption of life and commerce the latest flareup as you've been hearing in the bulletin a South Korea which has three hundred thirty four new cases and thirteen deaths the number of cases in Italy has jumped to four hundred worldwide more than eighteen thousand people have become infected a lot of attention has now turned to clusters in and transmission between other countries I've been speaking to Dr Isaac ball gosh he's an infectious disease consultant and scientist at the university of Toronto I asked him what he thought about the fact that the World Health Organization has not yet called the spread of the virus a pandemic whatever we call this if we're calling this a large epidemic before calling it a pandemic it's almost irrelevant because the the strategy suggested by top public health officials including the World Health Organization is to prepare for a pandemic and they they said such so essentially even if they're if they're not ready to define it as a pandemic just yet we're still treating this as such and and and the message to the world is to prepare for what it looks like there's global transmission of this infection every day when we get our news we hear about more and more countries affected in the countries affected we hear about more cases in those countries so you know you'd think it would meet that definition but I really think that you know perhaps there taking their time to use that term to really ensure that people are aware that all of pandemic means is the global transmission of an infection what country do you predict at to see big increases in numbers in terms of spreading it well I'm fascinated by Indonesia yeah I mean it's it's certainly geographically pretty close to China there's a ton of inter connectivity between China and in Indonesia and if we look at all the other countries in the neighborhood almost everyone else is reporting cases they've only recently developed the capacity to detect these cases and you know I think if we look at a map and and look at travel patterns and where this may be amplified that might be one of the regions that doubt that we look at what the advice be for people chopping because they have to do to return home to family members to travel on business trips the world still moves on and even though we're in the midst of a very large epidemic or pandemic however we want to call it so you know there are steps people can take to protect themselves while they are traveling I know there's this urge to put a mask on one's face but I think people have to recognize that these masks don't necessarily protect someone from getting an infection if someone has an infection that might prevent them from spreading it to other people but the key thing here is hand hygiene is crucial especially on airplanes where there's lots of in the jewels and a small compact area lots of high contact surfaces and we know this virus can live on surfaces we don't know for how long yet but it certainly can stay on surfaces for probably hours to maybe a couple of days depending on the the environment so hand hygiene is crucial containment is crucial isn't it I really think that these containment strategies are going to be successful we saw the world's largest public health initiatives ever impacted in China which really affected well well more than the seventy million people that were directly impacted with that and this was not able to contain the infection in China it's certainly slow down the progression of the disease but it didn't contain it in China so there are some significant negative economic footprints and there may even be sociopolitical ramifications of this as well so we have to really think carefully about what our response is going to be most effort should be placed on ensuring there's appropriate public health and clinical capacity to manage imported cases and the potential for locally acquired cases afterwards how do you see this playing out will it eventually burn itself out yeah I mean I think we're going to start to see more and more wide scale global transmission and then of course it's anyone's guess some people think that this might integrate itself into the regularly transmitted seasonal viruses maybe it'll burn itself out and and and disappear but I think the important point is that the vaccine development is crucial because that's a long term strategy and this is not going to be the last coronavirus we see we're going to see this again or another one so vaccine development is crucial for long term preventative care infectious disease consultant and scientist Dr Isaac ball coach eleven minutes up to nine o'clock kia logical more peace school in west Pokot county in East Africa or you can go for that much I seized Africa because to be honest the people who live in this area.

T. macarthur foundation London Jeff west Pokot Kenya mac founder
Whats behind Jeff Bezos $10 billion climate plan?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:28 min | 6 months ago

Whats behind Jeff Bezos $10 billion climate plan?

"Jeff as pledges ten billion dollars toward climate solutions. We have questions from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying digital economy. I'm Ali would. We don't have many details yet on the basis Earth Fund the ten billion dollars that Jeff Bezos pledged last week to address climate change but it is by far the largest philanthropic commitment that isn't from government and other investors in climate tech and solutions will tell you that while we need. Climate policies will and unity. We also need a whole lot of money. Jayco is managing director of the private equity firm. The Light Smith Group which focuses on adaptation technology and. I asked him where this ten billion dollars fits in the landscape of climate investment. Yeah so ten. Billion IS A big number. How you apply. Ten billion can dramatically change the scale capital. That actually is moved As a result. So there's a few initiatives like the Rockefeller Foundation's and Macarthur Foundation's focus on something. Catalytic capital where small amounts of concessional investment or even grant funding Can reduce the potential or perceived risk for commercial investors and encourage them in much larger scale to come in two different new investment strategies. They're this announcement was met with a lot of skepticism. And a lot of you know sort of Monday morning quarterbacking other things that Jeff bezos could do or should be doing. Do you think that's fair? I'm an all of kind of guy and so I think right now. If you really take the climate change problem seriously and I think we all should we face an enormous and potentially existential challenge to The way that life Operates here so I applaud this commitment and the scale of it is something is designed to signal that kind of seriousness. Would I think would be great? Would be to use it not simply just to double down on everything that we have now but to be thoughtful about how could mobilize even more funding. How could actually support targeted kinds of innovation? How could actually particularly support? I think The disadvantaged populations in developing countries out to. They're really going to be to the chin. Here I WANNA ask you about priority setting. What I'm curious about is whether this amount of money by it's sort of Sheer Hampton weight has the potential to create almost like a Softbank Effects. And so what? If as I said I'm going to use this fund for cricket meal would then a bunch of other things get neglected and cricket meal would take off if I could wave a magic one with ten billion? I would say that it should be done over a number of different years and then you should pick a variety of strategies where maybe half of it you double down on everything. That's working best right now just accelerated and then I would take a bunch of it and try to think about exactly what you're talking about. Which are are there one or two really important? Longshot ideas or longshot areas or areas of really important focus where this could have a dramatically important effect. Jayco is managing director of the Private Equity Investment Firm. The Light Smith Group BEZOS and Amazon. Haven't given any more information about how the Earth Fund will work but Bazo said on Instagram. That he expects to start making donations this

Jeff Bezos Jayco Earth Fund Managing Director Light Smith Group Private Equity Investment Firm ALI Rockefeller Foundation Bezos Macarthur Foundation Softbank Effects Bazo Amazon
"macarthur foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:31 min | 6 months ago

"macarthur foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Macarthur foundation supporting creative people and effective institutions committed to building a more just burden and peaceful world more information is at mac found daughter work freedom of the press is enshrined in the Philippines constitution but that hasn't stopped president Rodrigo do tear take from trying to thwart journalists time and again you know what a border they would be allowed to what it is I what you will do a great deal of writing your reporters they will be allowed to criticize us but you will go to jail for your crimes he says one of his targets is Maria ressa one of the founders of the digital news network Rappler filmmaker Ramona Diaz has made a documentary about ressa do territory the president's war on drugs and the spread of disinformation online the film is called a thousand cuts ressa and D. as talked with our co host also Chang from the Sundance Film Festival remote I'm I want to start with you you know given all the journalists who are under siege in the Philippines what made you want to focus on Maria ressa and on Rappler I think because by the time I started researching the film which is in twenty eighteen I found that they were reading the loudest voice speaking up against president detected home then I met Maria and thought wow this could be an angle one thing led to another and the day after I got to the Philippines she got arrested wow so sometimes you know stories just like it happens in front of you you got to jump in and Maria it you worked in traditional media in the Philippines for quite some time I mean you were in several high level positions for CNN for example you are now leading a digital music network Rappler I'm curious how have you seen the relationship between the government in the Philippines and the reporters in the Philippines changed under new territory at it's like night and day you know why maybe this is my thirty fourth year as a journalist and I think you know you have to think about this is not just the Philippines but globally it seemed like everywhere the rules of engagement with power all of those rules were thrown out the window in twenty sixteen when he came to power actually he came to power in may twenty six Steen a month later you had brexit and then like dominoes falling you go all the way to trump's election in the United States but I think this is the beginning of exactly what social media has done to our information ecosystem and the weaponization of that compounded by the abuse of power what I've lived through under the detected ministration is unprecedented well even the fact that I've gotten arrested or the I have eight different charges I have to ask for permission to travel that my rights have been curtailed because I'm a journalist Maria you've been arrested twice right yes I have how representative is that is your experience compared to the experience of other journalists working in the Philippines now I think I'm the cautionary tale you know there's a of a seeing in Indonesia at that the nail that stands up gets the hammer I think because they've also wrap it was the new kid on the block you know and also you know raptor led by women really even think that they were going to do anything we then they didn't do their research yeah Ramona as you've said you know this isn't just a film about Maria ressa Rappler this is also a film about to tear Tay's war on drugs a delicious the last was is out of.

Macarthur foundation
"macarthur foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:35 min | 7 months ago

"macarthur foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Macarthur foundation supporting creative people and effective institutions committed to building a more just a burden and peaceful world more information is that mac found daughter work it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king then I'm Steve Inskeep the president is about to release a peace proposal between Israelis and Palestinians we have the support of the prime minister we have the support of the other parties and we think we will ultimately have the support of the Palestinians but we're gonna see and if we do it'll be a tremendous tribute to everybody and we don't life goes on the prime minister the president mentioned there is Benjamin Netanyahu who is visiting Washington and was beside president trump so how serious is this effort the town sacks directs the center for Middle East policy at the Brookings Institution and we have found him in Jerusalem aka the program Sir thanks for having me as we're speaking the president has not released the plan but do you feel you know the basic outlines of how this would work if at all sorts of different leaks and of course we don't know the the reality of it what we do know and is very telling is that this is a big peace plan between two parties Israel and the United States the particle the Palestinians is not even there wasn't invited it hasn't spoken to the Americans since December twenty seventeen over two years so it would be rather surprising if the plan does not come out rather favorable to the Israelis I guess we should know there are a few elements that are always on the table with Israeli Palestinian peace plans where do you draw borders between two states do you have two states who gets what part of Jerusalem and what happens with Palestinian refugees who were outside of Israel those are the questions so the idea is we think that some proposals made on these and other issues that is active satisfactory to Israel and now they would try to get the Palestinians to buy it yes so what what this seems to be the case is that on settlements quite a bit as move towards Israel on the American plan it looks like the the latest leaks are that all settlements would remain under Israeli sovereignty although some of them might be enclaves within a Palestinian state perhaps and some was known as Salman outposts would be removed on Jerusalem it seems like the old city in the holy basin would be complete Israeli control or the Palestinians may have some role in it minimal role and maybe some Arab neighborhoods on the outskirts of the Palestinians the real question here what everyone in Israel is concerned about or thinking about is if the settlements are part of Israel in this deal is there a green light from the American administration for Israel to apply its law to some of the settlements and the next them to Israel they're prostituting valley perhaps near Jerusalem that is the major question ahead will is really unilateral annexation push forward once the Palestinians reject the plan and rejected they will we're talking about annexing more more territory the Palestinians want for their future state how does this fit in with prime minister Netanyahu's promise to annex territory in the Jordan Valley well it's exactly part of an attorney I was hinting to the possibility that he might do that with the support of the Americans and that's crucial for this but of course the whole background to this and then yells announcement on that Jordan Valley and even these discussions today in Washington are the elections it is was about to have on March second these are the third elections within eleven months and it's any I was facing them while he will be indicted with criminal charges including bribery just today he withdrew his request for immunity from the Knesset because he was facing a defeat on that vote and therefore it's final he will be put on trial for criminal charges including bribery and on the back troubles that he's trying to make this major diplomatic decision even though the government as a temporary government in part to shore up support for him domestically as someone who can champion Israel in the international arena so two leaders were standing together yesterday one of them faces reelection in Israel how significant is it that the other guy faces reelection in the United States it's very significant let's think about the three last presidents who had major problems and face possible impeachment when was Nixon resigned before impeachment but when he was facing biggest troubles guess what he was doing he had Kissinger here in the region to go shooting peace between Israelis and Arabs then Bill Clinton was very active on Israeli Palestinian peace just when his troubles were in the height and now we have trump again trying to distract from things so we have both Anthony out and trumpet playing politics an interesting third actor just yesterday we saw the leader of the Israeli opposition Benny Gantz who came to Washington to meet the president in something and then you know try to do is a big trap for guns but cats managed to turn around and and get an audience himself as if as if he's a head of state although he is not yet one Mr sack thanks for your time really appreciate it my pleasure thank you analysis there from the thon sacks who directs the center for Mideast policy at the Brookings Institution we found him in Jerusalem authorities in California are investigating why a helicopter crash near Los Angeles on Sunday the accident killed all nine people on board including NBA star Kobe Bryant and his teenage daughter Chiana investigators are focusing on bad weather as a leading potential because NPR's Russell Lewis has the story win the Sikorsky S. seventy six helicopter took off from the John Wayne airport in Orange County on Sunday it didn't take long for the weather to deteriorate as the pilot flew north he encountered foggy overcast skies and asked flight controllers for a special clearance to allow him to continue flying visually as the clouds closed in Robert echo echo with you for the work of your heart at that point this recording online ATC dot net captures flight controllers speaking to the pilot as he tried to fly around above in under the clouds in the busy southern California air space your record for your level of her own life following a national transportation safety board member Jennifer Harman D. told reporters it was just after this the pilot radioed for the last time the pilot advise they were climbing to avoid a cloud layer when ATC asked with the pilot plan to do there was no reply the helicopter then began a descending left hand turn and crashed in high speed how many says the pilot a commercial flight instructor was experienced with more than eight thousand hours logged she says the investigation will be lengthy we take a broad look at everything around an investigation around an accident we look at man.

Macarthur foundation mac
"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:15 min | 8 months ago

"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KCRW

"Macarthur foundation supporting creative people ineffective institutions committed to building a more just verdant and peaceful world more information is that mac found Donald it's seven forty six it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king and I'm Steve Inskeep we take you next to a homeless shelter it's in Seattle it is new and it's helping to house some of the more than one thousand homeless native Americans Alaska natives and Pacific islanders in Seattle Casey Martin a member station K. U. O. W. reports eagle village sits near Seattle's industrial district south of downtown it's pressed up against railroad tracks and next to a large bus terminal Gary Fisher has lived here about a month after bouncing around other shelters around the city for three years lot of times even sleep outside in conditions like that might be the better safer environment and some of the shelters that I've been in Fisher says other shelters he's been to have too many people coming and going you don't stay by the same person every night so it's always a new people you don't know eagle village he says is nothing like that this site is made up of modular trailers with four part and send them each with their own private bathroom and kitchen at their colorful for two people thirty people live here full time all of them are indigenous peoples a group that housing advocates say have been largely underserved by social services like in most of the country native people in king county make up a disproportionate number of people experiencing homelessness make up less than one percent of the total population of make up over ten percent of our homeless population Colleen echohawk is executive director of chief Seattle club the organization that runs eagle village echohawk says because of the history of mistreatment by the US government a lot of native people don't trust traditional shelters if you attend a boarding school for instance were you are I'm in the foster care system or you were one of those folks who have been forcibly sterilized the likelihood of you going into a shelter which has same kind of systems that same kind of feel it's unlikely because of how much it will trigger your trauma I **** describe eagle village as culturally responsible housing she says the term village is intentional it has community meetings drum circles and come spring time a new medicine garden before anyone ever got there we have traditional medicine people come through and they prayed they offered songs they smudged and cleans the entire place residents also come up with dinner ideas and cook for themselves Donald alliance the site manager at eagle village says the food is one of the biggest differences here say there are look cold and they're like oh we like this you know this is type is it we do you know and if we can purchase the stuff here okay well you know this is a traditional color to suit you know or even from my own as if there's something that I would like to share with them the cost to build eco village was a little over three million dollars paid for in part by the county and state calling echohawk says the government is long over due to pay for homeless services for native people I see this as sort of a a way for government officials to fill those old obligations that have been you know forgotten by most part a few years ago echohawk helped launch the coalition to end urban native homelessness at the time it was just based in Seattle and now she hopes to partner with other cities to build similar shelters or looking for best practices are looking for what other cities have done so we'll we'll collaborate that's it's gonna just be this amazing time to to say all what are you doing in Minneapolis and they're doing great things in the apple so what are you doing in Seattle and in New York eagle village president Gary Fisher says this is a model not just for native shelters but for all shelters homeless shelters are I'll see rotten places for a human being in this one look around you there's three million dollars with a brand new stuff all around you and I'm part of it so I'm enjoying it I'm loving it Fisher thanks if NATO homelessness can be solved then all homelessness could be solved as well for NPR news I'm Casey Martin in Seattle this morning edition from NPR news.

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"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:46 min | 8 months ago

"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KCRW

"Macarthur foundation at mac found dot org it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king and I'm David green seven members of Eritrea's national soccer team have disappeared after playing in a tournament in Uganda they are believed to have defected and if so they're among many thousands of Eritreans who found ways to flee their homeland and here's a abroad to has been following this from his base in Nairobi in joints hater Hey David merry Christmas merry Christmas to you too thanks for thanks for working doing reporting today yeah so what what do we know about this this this incident of of more Eritreans peeling off from the soccer team so the train team was at a regional tournament in Uganda and authorities there say that seven players did not make their plane they say they are looking for them but a bit later a group that works with Eritrean refugees said that the seven are not missing that they say that the soccer players have defected in that they didn't return home because we will be seeking asylum and this is not a first I mean there were five other soccer players who disappeared in you got in October back in twenty twelve another fourteen members of this team defected what what's going on I'd look the story of Eritreans football teams is the story of air trail I mean it in short Eritrea it is one of the most repressive countries in the world and ever since it had a very deadly border war with Ethiopia has been ruled under state of emergency and that means that every Eritrean has to do military training at the end of high school and at the end of that many of them are conscripted into civil service indefinitely and that means for example that the government can make you become a teacher for very little pay and they can post you far away from your family and this government is so controlling that even if you want to leave you have to ask them for permission I've spoken to many Eritreans who are fleeing and they say that they just don't see a future in that country and so they're willing to risk their life I I many of them travel through Sudan and Libya and they get on boats to travel through the Mediterranean in recent years Eritrea has lost ten percent of its population and thousands of them have drowned making that journey across the sea well well to what extent is the soccer team like a symbol I mean you did did people follow soccer there and seeing those players leaving I mean that the homepath was that they love soccer I mean both Eritrean Ethiopian I mean they they love it and and look they actually did really well in this tournament they were the underdogs the beat Kenya four to one in the semi final they lost against Uganda and ended up in second place but here they are once again rebuilding and this as you know what it is not new in the last ten years they have lost fifty players to defections thought we were in kind of a hopeful moment in this part of the world I mean you're the president of neighboring Ethiopia winning the Nobel Peace Prize right for for really trying to end the conflict with their traces is that changing no I think everybody expected that this would be a hopeful time here I I mean remember this state of emergency this forced conscription was instituted because air trail was at war with Ethiopia the government has always said look we have to do this because we are at war so when the two countries officially ended this Cold War one of the first questions was will president they say has a four key who has been in power for almost three decades loosen his grip and we saw some pleasant positive signs but you know the border has once again closed and I think what these defections tell you is that not much has changed in Eritrea but just leave you with some hope on Christmas are you know one of the promises that Ethiopian prime minister Abby happened made after he received the Nobel Prize with that he would reach out once again twice SO four keep and as we speak the two men are meeting at the in the.

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"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:16 min | 8 months ago

"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Macarthur foundation at mac found daughter work I mean you're a Laxman on back now to our conversation on the treatment of Turkic and Muslim ethnic groups in the Xinjiang region of China we're speaking with New York times correspondent Austin Ramsey salary who die are who is the prime minister of the east Turkestan government in exile and founder of the east Turkestan national awakening movement and Louisa griva director of global advocacy for the weaker human rights project someone who die are your non profit seeks to break away from the Xinjiang region as an independent nation of or east Turkestan what would it take for that to happen Wall first I would take the you know the United States government to another world powers to recognize that east Turkestan is an occupied territory like they recognize to but it would also tank the U. N. to implement the the colonization laws from nineteen sixty eight I believe granting independence to colonize nations we see ourselves as they colonized people we don't see ourselves as a part of China therefore we don't see it we don't see ourselves as separate just because you can't separate from something you're not a part of it's an interesting argument for sure and they're important parallels I've heard those same arguments from independence activists into back both Xinjiang and Tibet are vast strategic land masses at the western edges of China populated by ethnic groups that in the context of larger China are minorities and many of whom have been not only persecuted but would prefer independence in both regions the Chinese government has a long history of surveilling and repressing the residents I myself was a resident correspondent in China for seven years and you had to get permission special permission to go to either Xinjiang or to bat and generally could only go on a government sponsored and escorted trip so what I'm wondering in this case is our Chinese leaders actually worried about it because Islamic extremism which is what they say or is the real fear an uprising in Xinjiang and what date what the Chinese call split tests separatists so the real fear that not just the Communist Party but this is the fear that the Chinese have had since you know on the mantra Ching dynasty over to this region they fear the separation of east Turkestan in fact if you look at China's two thousand nineteen national defense strategy one of their top defense national defense goals is to prevent the creation of the star because that so that is probably what is behind it more than the so called campaign against terrorism is what you're saying exactly so Austin from your perspective there in Hong Kong where your base tell us about the comparison you covered a rally in Hong Kong this past weekend where people were supporting Uighurs and you tweeted about some of the parallels that Hong Kongers see in their protest for greater rights and dissent in sheen John tell us about that right there's there's a protest movement in Hong Kong it's you know been going on for more than six months and yesterday there was a protest in support of the week here's another Turkic people in Xinjiang and it was interesting to talk to people at this rally because they they said that the you know they are also in part a part of China and they realize that well you know from the perspective of of activists and protesters here they feel that they're a white sedan intention on in recent years and things have been quite difficult over the past six months of their knowledge that what is happening in Xinjiang has as much more serious and they see this as sort of the worst case scenario and the reason why they need to fight for their rights in Hong Kong so there were a few thousand people who came out for for that protest on Sunday it seems as if in the United States although neither of them are getting a tremendous amount of coverage the Hong Kong protests are probably getting more coverage overall then the weaker issue has over the.

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Sesame Street to launch Arabic-language show for refugee children to help them deal with trauma

People of the Pod

03:03 min | 9 months ago

Sesame Street to launch Arabic-language show for refugee children to help them deal with trauma

"When you're talking with your family and friends at your table this weekend. What are you GONNA be talking? Yeah well I have a three year old daughter and a five year old son and so we will be talking a lot about sesame street this week which celebrated its golden anniversary anniversary. Did you watch this mystery as a kid I did. Yeah Jessica what about you absolutely. And who are your favorite characters. I was always partial to Mr snuffle up this big bird's imaginary best friend and go what about you. I did love big bird a lot. And Ernie and Bert really really were probably my favorites. Though actually wonderful and I was dismayed to find out recently watching it with my children that Mr Smith Aleph guess is no longer I quote unquote quote figment of big birds imagination. Everyone sees him. It was very disappointing to the ranks of the real monsters. Wow that's like saying the tooth fairy doesn't exist well. My favorite character was kermit the frog especially his portrayal of TV news reporter which should come as no surprise But I might soon have a new favorite character and his name is John. John has been introduced to children will be introduced to children in Syrian refugee camps as has one of them he is the Star of Alan Simpson or welcome sesame an Arabic language version of sesame street that has been co produced by sesame workshop and the the International Rescue Committee it teaches letters and numbers. Yes but it also teaches emotional coping measures for the millions. Yes millions of children who have been traumatically they displaced from their homes and may remain displaced for decades especially as countries like the United States. Continue to cut the number of refugees at allows in twelve million Elian refugees. Twelve million six million of them are children and those are the stats get this only two percent of humanitarian aid for education in For refugees two percent and so once again sesame street has come to the rescue just as it did in the late nineteen sixty s when it first debuted John his friend Bosma and Friendly Goat Maza debut in twenty countries across the Middle East in February twenty twenty via satellite dishes in the refugee camps. And from time to time there will be guest appearances by Cookie Monster Grover and elmo. I have to say cookie monster was one of my favorites as well. The project is funded with a one hundred million dollar grant from the Macarthur Foundation and the grant also covers direct services to the families whose children have never been outside the camps and therefore they don't know fundamentals that we take for granted such as imagination or basic information like fish. Come from the sea while the focus will be more on emotional tools these fundamentals annals will also be covered as well and I really do applaud sesame workshop for taking this project on and I say. AJC is also exploring new ways to reach out to The era world in the Arabic language. And we'll be hearing more about that in the months to come but this project in particular is just really fascinating to me. And that's what we'll be talking about at our Table

John Mr Smith Ernie Macarthur Foundation United States Jessica International Rescue Committee Reporter Middle East Alan Simpson Bert Two Percent One Hundred Million Dollar Three Year Five Year
"macarthur foundation" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"macarthur foundation" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Macarthur foundation at mac found dot org this is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Mary Louise Kelley and I'm ari Shapiro in Russia a prominent gay rights activist was found stabbed to death last weekend now Russian LGBT Q. people are afraid that others could be in danger Yelena Grigor you if I told friends before her death that she had received violent threats I spoke with Moscow based journalist Anna Nemtsov about the activist earlier today and I asked her to tell me about about Grigoriev was work well you lend the Grigorieva was an activist few years ago she came out and said that she wore as Sam okay woman and began to defend the L. G. B. T. rights in Saint Petersburg and they the community of L. G. B. T. here in Saint Petersburg is quite vibrant their victims almost all of them I think sums of violence they get attacked during their rallies the received or appalled nasty threats and you land the Grigori are shortly before should test received a photograph of the night so your friends say they can be just a coincidence that she receives a photograph of nice and then she gets that in the US not a local news site reports that a suspect has been arrested what what is known about the crime and and the man has been arrested on it is a is a national who in fact did meet twins Grigore on on that day but he denies he killed thank you land now he denies they have any argument all of your lands friends trying to use a set that that must be the reason for the murder once your exit is she was an activist for so many things beyond L. G. B. T. rights from pro democracy movements to Russia's annexation of Crimea how confident are people that she was targeted specifically for being vocal about gay rights I she actually shared to earn your concerns with your friends home for the night had been attacking car a lot not just threatening her but physically attacking her physically attacking you've been talking to other activists how afraid are they for their safety right now one man was speaking with me his voice was shaking you know he was really a very very scared and done and saying I have two options one is to leave the country scape the country or to state and continued to protest and struggle for more rights well to be TN and he chose the second option at least for now he's being sent that's what is important for all I she shows today to realize is that record von deeds as long as your friends across she tried to attract attention to that issue that somebody is sending terrible terrible threat speeches of nice and nobody was there to to help her nobody came and said we're going to protect you also she's a Russian citizen so now there is no record options that how do you think Illinois Grigorieva will be remembered she will be home that said the least of victims who were killed gone done by some converts so this is a horrible horrific marker wishes has shaken a lot of people but what I see in Moscow L. G. B. T. and celebrities sense people Sirius the bark human rights I'm going to open big discussions and round tables so Grigorieva is not going to be forgotten people will can sing it talking about this terrible murder and some they say that's the time to speak that's Moscow based journalist on attempts of us speaking with us on Skype about the death of LGBTQ activist Yelena Grigory of a thank you for speaking with us today thank you think about a job that's hard to get and maybe CEO comes to mind maybe movie star well how about ticket collector on a train in India India state rail company often gets tens of thousands of applications for a single position it's the same for Indian street sweepers and software engineers the reason and cures Lauren Frayer reports has to do with India's population boom and its economy hundreds of millennials and starched shirts form a line down the block in the swanky business district of by their interviewing for jobs on a cruise ship a difficult to get a job and this is my fourth time I'm trying.

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"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Macarthur foundation at mac found dot org this is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm ari Shapiro and a merry the res Kelly the Federal Trade Commission announced today that Facebook will pay a five billion dollar fine for rampant privacy violations CEO mark Zuckerberg will have to answer directly to regulators as part of the settlement for some perspective though the company's quarterly earnings were also announced today and Facebook made sixteen point nine billion dollars well here to talk about the dealers in Paris are Fisher Heine higher thing hi all right so give me the highlights what is this deal that has now emerged between the FTC and Facebook yes it was filed today and it's kind of a follow up back in twenty eleven Facebook promised the FTC it would stop sharing user data with third parties outside apps and according to the FTC's head of enforcement the company broke its promise while the ink was still drying on that deal Facebook had turned users into the product what a person clicks likes to their friends are he's got packaged and monetized advertisers another app developers liking Regionalligas would pay for access promise the government it would stop harvesting and sharing data so liberally but it did ends Facebook also trick users into handing over phone numbers in theory it was for security for password resets in reality the company use those numbers for advertising to add regulators say Facebook lied about facial recognition about sixty million Facebook users can expect to get a note telling them the company was tracking without proper permissions miles so that is the quite staggering context sixty million users gonna get a note what in the steel will come how Facebook to change its ways so now going forward Facebook needs to spell out exactly what data it's collecting and what's sharing the government has imposed limits from outside Facebook will decide for itself but it'll have to give quarterly reports to the FTC and its own board Zuckerberg has to sign man and of beast but gets caught violating Zuckerberg would be subject to civil as well as criminal penalties I also note Facebook which is an NPR sponsor disclosed today that the FCC has begun a separate anti trust investigation stick to your point that you just made about mark Zuckerberg and that he will be personally accountable with Facebook does not follow the rules going forward that was kind of a big win from the point of view of the FTC yeah so the three Republicans at the FTC who approve the deal say yes they are getting way more money from Facebook and litigation whatever gotten and sending a strong message to other CEOs abuse user privacy and will make you pay but one FTC member Democrat or hits Chopra who dissented he thinks like a bird got off the hook and yes to the CEO was supposed to make sure his company complied with the original settlement order okay he did it the FTC could have slammed them with a civil suit now regulators would not need to prove that soccer Berg lied it just that he failed in his duty and there is that's a much lower burden with with plenty of evidence so chopper wanted to seize October deposed in court and forced to disclose what he knew now that opportunity is gone well what what is Facebook saying about all this at the CEO issue to post today and I gotta say it's classic rocker Berg spin the embarrassing development into another example of Facebook's desire to do good and go above and beyond what he wrote quote we already work hard to live up to this responsibility in protecting privacy but now we're going to set a completely new standard for our industry he said hundreds of engineers and more than a thousand people across the company would implement this privacy focus vision what he didn't mention is that the his legal team fought tooth and nail on every aspect of this deal that's according the FTC as one regulator regulator put it Facebook settled and didn't go to court because that would have been quite embarrassing company documents that have been been revealed yeah now Facebook ads to break the bad news on the same day as the Mauler hearing NPR's RC sure honey thanks so much thank you importer Rico tonight thousands of protesters are gathered in the streets of Sam Hawn waiting for a promised a dress from governor Ricardo row seo nearly two weeks of daily demonstrations were sparked by the publication of private text messages between the governor and his inner circles messages that offended many and may be grounds for impeachment and Paris Adrian for Rideau has been covering the protests and joins us from San Juan and Adrian tell us what's going.

Macarthur foundation mac NPR ari Shapiro nine billion dollars five billion dollar two weeks
Paris assesses damage from the city's worst riot in a decade

Latino USA

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Paris assesses damage from the city's worst riot in a decade

"The voices of John C Reilly and Sarah Silverman has made two hundred seventy two hundred seven million dollars worldwide in second place. Universals the grandch- brought in seventeen million dollars in its fourth week in third place creed to brought in sixteen million dollars in its second weekend and fantastic beasts crimes of Griswold fell to fourth place. He's your markets are trading higher at this hour, the Asia Dow is up just over two percent. The Nikkei the main market in Japan is up one point three percent. And the Hang Seng in Hong Kong is up. Two point one percent. I'm Janine Herbst. NPR news in Washington. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the corporation for public broadcasting and the estate of Joan Kroc whose bequest serves as an enduring investments in the future of public radio. And the John D and Catherine T MacArthur foundation at macfound dot org. Welcome to letting USA. I'm mighty Hassan. And he grew up in a small town outside of Mexico City when she turned fifteen she had Kenyatta and one of the members of Raquin sick court was a local boy, she didn't know him. Really? Well, he's name was one Carlos, but he started showing up early for her cels. And then he didn't stop showing up even after the party had passed. He kept

NPR Griswold Carlos John C Reilly Joan Kroc Janine Herbst Sarah Silverman Hang Seng Hong Kong Nikkei Japan Mexico City Kenyatta Catherine T Macarthur Raquin Washington John D
How can we eliminate the plastic waste clogging our oceans?

FT News

07:20 min | 1 year ago

How can we eliminate the plastic waste clogging our oceans?

"At plastic pollution in oceans, which is now so bad that plastics have entered the human food chain by the fish that ingested Ellen MacArthur. Four around the world, sailor turn campaigner tells Leslie hook companies that create the packaging a starting to understand that a big part of the solution lies in their hands. I I just like to ask how did you go from being a yachtswoman to being an environmental campaigner, and how does your work as yachtswoman inform your work? Now. It's an interesting question because I never thought I would leave sailing. My life was sailing from the age of four all I wanted to do was sale and one day somehow I wanted to sail around the world. So I really was living the dream when I was undertaking the records and transatlantic races. It was everything I'd ever dreamt off. But when you set set on the boat around the world, you prepare for months, you design a boat you build a boat you prepare the boat and you put on that boat. Everything you need for your survival for two or three months of trip. And when you're two and a half thousand miles away from the nearest town deep in the Southern Ocean. You really begun to understand what the definition of the word finite means, you know, those resources you have with you on that boat. What you have available to you know, to eat and fuel for the generator. It's all you have. And I'd never translated that definition of the word. Not anything outside of sailing. It was my world at C, which was almost entirely separate from life on land. But at the end of the round the world record when I broke around the world record. I began to realize that actually our global economy is no different. You know, we have resources which are available to us once in the history humanity. And yet we use them up. It was a question. It was a real question that was the back of my mind, and I just couldn't get rid of it. I couldn't forget it. I couldn't ignore it. And I began to learn and study and speak to experts and scientists and chief executives to understand, you know, how resources used in our global economy, and and what's the future look like and so much of the narrative by then was around using less and doing less than being efficient with I use of resources, and no, that's obviously vital. What struck me? Was it wasn't the solution? It was vital in the transition to what. And what fascinated me was what I comic model can work in the long term. And that's where I began to come across ideas of the secular economy. Now, the word circular economy wasn't a very popular term. When you founded the Ellen MacArthur foundation. I think in two thousand. Nd and ten in a nutshell. Can you explain what the circular economy is? And why it's so important the best way to describe a circular economy is to look into Konami, which is predominantly linear. You know, at the moment, we take a material out of the ground. We make something out of it. And then ultimately a lot of it not all but a lot of it gets thrown away within a secular Konami. You move that line to become a circle and you look at regenerative economic mechanisms by designing out the concept of waste and pollution. You keep production materials and components in use and you regenerate natural systems and the issue of ocean, plastics, it's one that's really been in the headlines in a tremendous issue of concern. What do you think is the answer for ocean, plastics? I mean, designing outweighs altogether. Sounds great. But how do we get there? And what can we do about plastics in the ocean? Now what obviously plastics notion is the result of a broken system. Plastic should never be in the ocean. The fact is that many of those plastics will never design to. Anything else within waste at the end of their life. There are many efforts globally never enough. But there are many cleaning the beaches and looking at how to extract the plastic we have in the ocean out. You know, how do we remove it? But the fact is we produce seventy eight million tons a year and thirty two percent of that leaks out into the environment. We reckon about eight million tonnes ends up in the ocean every year and that figure gets greater and greater as every year passes. So the work of the foundation is to go to the beginning of the pipe of plastic packaging production, and indeed design and say if we shift the plastic packaging system to be one which is regenerative restorative with the principles of a circular economy, one whereby no plastic would ever be designed or made whereby it didn't have value. And today a lot of the plastic packaging. That's produced. It has no value. It's not recyclable. It's designed to keep some washing powder. Dry or keep a chicken fresh, and we don't worry about what happens after if we can design for a system, we can design all plastic packaging. So it's recyclable Compostable over us. Sibal, and we can make that recyclable Compostable and reusable fit within a system. So it never becomes waste. And if you seen firsthand the impacts of ocean, plastic is it something that struck you when you were out there sailing, actually when I raced around the world, I went down the Atlantic, right? Random talk, ticker effectively, and then backup the Atlantic home. So I didn't really see that much floating in the ocean. At all it was a long way from the Pacific gyros that we now know so well to be harbors of millions of tons of plastic and my interest in this comes from how we use resources, and the fact that we have so much plastic packaging leaking the ocean is the result of that broken system. So what can individuals do in their daily life who want to be part of the circular economy? I think one of the challenges is a lot of the pressure around ocean, plastics has been on the end of the pipe on those who have them, you know, in our homes, particularly in emerging markets. But the fact is that if that plastic is designed so that it becomes waste if it's designed to it's not recyclable. What do we do with it? You know, I've been working on. This subject for four years. And I don't know what to do with all of us can my house. I really don't. I don't understand it. It's not marked. It says check with your local recycling facility, but there's no number on there. So actually the system doesn't work. So we're working on at the foundation is changing the system. So that all packaging is recyclable Compostable over usable that then enables the consumer to do the right thing. Currently we actually can't because the system doesn't unable to do that. If we, you know us general products in general life. So you're going to the view of things in that way. Go into the records. And I think what's been really interesting on our journeys is it began four years ago at the World Economic Forum. We got together with many of the biggest brands in the world in the plastic packaging space and said, currently what are the numbers? We did a report look at the numbers we found that two percent of seventy eight million tonnes actually gets recycled into the prospect of the same quality eight percent gets down cycled thirty two percent leaks out in environment. And actually when you look at the numbers, it's quite horrifying. For a world where we feel. We're doing quite well at recycling whereas globally, those the ticks don't really add up and we sat down with the company's. Once we had those numbers within started to say, well, if the situation as it is doesn't work, which clearly it doesn't what could. And that's where we came along. With fifty percent of plastic packaging should be desirable to be recyclable twenty percent should be entirely reusable. So it goes many many many times before it gets recycled, and thirty percents is the thin film kind of small format packaging, which really is never really recyclable. But it's not designed to be recyclable. And it's much of that that leaks out in environment. Particularly emerging markets that needs to be redesigned either a different material or different distribution method to enable those people to be lifted out of poverty and Avak says to those really important materials foods powders as we have. But in an accessible way that doesn't involve creating waste, and we now have a significant proportion of the global companies working in the plastic packaging space signed up to say they will Adair to one

Southern Ocean Ellen Macarthur Ellen Macarthur Foundation Konami Leslie ND Avak Adair Sibal Atlantic Thirty Two Percent Four Years Seventy Eight Million Tonnes Seventy Eight Million Tons Eight Million Tonnes Twenty Percent Eight Percent
Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel not seeking election to third term

Morning Edition

01:24 min | 2 years ago

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel not seeking election to third term

"Mayor Rahm Emanuel shocked Chicago when he said yesterday that he will not run for re election next year, the former congressman and Obama White House chief of staff has served two terms as mayor, but it was far from certain that he would win. Here's NPR's David Schaper Rahm Emanuel has long had a reputation as a ferocious campaign animal someone who eats drinks and breathes politics. In fact, he'd already raised ten million dollars for his reelection bid. And at fifty eight seems far for being ready to retire. So it shocked many here when manual announced at Chicago city hall that after two terms he would not seek a third. This has been the job of a lifetime. But it is not a job for a lifetime. Standing next to his wife. Amy rule in holding hands. Emotional Emanuel noted that all three of their children are. Are now away at college. We look forward to writing the next chapter in our journey together. Emmanuel gave no reason for leaving job. Some predecessors held for decades. But his first seven and a half years in office have hardly been smooth sailing bitter, teachers strike in two thousand twelve the closing of fifty schools. The very next year and persistent gun violence in some neighborhoods lead many residents to sour on his tenure instead of cruising to reelection in two thousand fifteen Emanuel was forced into a runoff by progressive county Commissioner

David Schaper Rahm Emanuel NPR Chicago City Hall Emmanuel Catherine T Macarthur Foundati Rachel Martin David Greene John D Chicago Emmanuel Administration Barack Obama White House Congressman AMY Chief Of Staff Commissioner Officer Ten Million Dollars Fifteen Minutes
U.S. Treasury's Mnuchin says he sees at least 3 percent growth for next 4-5 years

Hidden Brain

05:16 min | 2 years ago

U.S. Treasury's Mnuchin says he sees at least 3 percent growth for next 4-5 years

"Powerful man brought down by accusations of sexual harassment and assault. The description of what he did to them was exactly what he did to me. We take a closer look. At one of these stories and ask a simple question why now first this news Live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jim hawk the deadly northern California wildfire. That is forced tens of. Thousands of people, to flee their homes slowed down Sunday after days of explosive growth but Cal fire deputy chief Brett Gavia says the fire is fire from contained. The fire does continue to grow on us in some remote inaccessible areas were making our way into those areas. The positive thing about that is that we are out away from many of the residents structures and. Critical infrastructure the, so-called car fire has now consumed one hundred thirty nine, square miles. Of land in northern California meanwhile officials said a. Second firefighter died fighting a huge boys near Yosemite national park there are currently seventeen major. Fires, burning, in California Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin says he believes the US economy will continue. To see, strong growth, for the next several years NPR's merit Kennedy reports second quarter growth came in at four point one percent the latest growth rate is the highest one in nearly. Four years and on Fox News Sunday Treasury. Secretary Steven Mnuchin, said to expect more of the same we can only project a couple of years in the future but I think we're well on this. Path for several years he. Predicted four or, five years of sustained three percent growth many economists are sceptical that current rates will continue though Federal Reserve officials told congress this month that they. Project GDP growth rates of under three percent next year and lower in twenty twenty and the ongoing trade fight. Also has the potential to limit growth Mary Kennedy NPR news Washington Israeli authorities have freed a Palestinian. Teen activist who, served eight months in prison for hitting as rarely soldiers, outside her. Home in the West Bank as NPR's Daniel estrin Reports the case has. Drawn widespread attention seventeen-year-old ahead TIMMY me spoke to reporters and activists. In her, village of, Nabi solid power to the people she said the people can decide their way of resistance with her long frizzy blond hair I had to me became an internationally. Recognized symbol She was, recorded kicking and slapping two Israeli. Soldiers outside her home in the Israeli-occupied West Bank after. The video went viral angering many Israelis she was. Arrested she and her mother who posted the video online served eight. Months in prison for assault and encouraging violence asked. If she'd do it again hits soldiers the way she, did she said she couldn't say much for fear of rearrest many Israelis see to me as a violent provocateur. Many Palestinians say she represents a defiant young generation of Palestinian youth one of. Many who have been jailed. By Israel Daniel estrin NPR news. Nebi Saleh. In the West Bank the average price of regular grade gasoline in, the US fell three cents. A gallon over the past two weeks the average price still fifty nine cents, higher than. It was a year, ago this is NPR news Fifteen. People have been taken to hospitals after an ammonia leak bird's-eye food, plant in southeastern Wisconsin a total. Of one hundred forty people were working. The overnight. Shift at the factory when alarms and sensors started going off besides the fifteen people taken to. Five area hospitals around Darien Wisconsin another seventy. Five workers were. Checked at the scene and released as NASA celebrates sixty years since its creation by congress its new leader is putting a focus on returning, to the Mon for member station. W. m. f. e. Brendan Byrne reports the agency continues. To explore space eleven years after the founding of. NASA a Saturn five rocket launched Apollo astronauts on a mission to. Walk on the moon now NASA wants to go. Back the space agency is developing its next big rocket, the space launch system to send humans back to the moon a test launch of that rocket is scheduled in. About two years followed by a fully crewed mission shortly after NASA is also. Exploring Mars Rovers curiosity And spirit, are active on the red planet and another Rover is set to join the pair watching twenty twenty the agency is also. Helping scientists discover Exo planets planets outside our solar system by developing space, based telescopes, to search for other worlds for NPR news I'm Brendan Byrne at the. Weekend, box office mission impossible fallout easily took the number one spot on the, domestic charts second place went to mama Mia here we go again. Which fell fifty seven percents in its second weekend in theaters the, equalizer to slid the third and. Hotel Transylvania three summer vacation took fourth. I'm Jim NPR news. In Washington Support for NPR. Comes from NPR stations other contributors include the Walton, family foundation, we're opportunity takes root more information, is available at Walton, family foundation dot org and the John D and Catherine t. MacArthur foundation, at macfound dot org.

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Natural and cultural sites added to the World Heritage List

Marketplace Weekend

02:01 min | 2 years ago

Natural and cultural sites added to the World Heritage List

"This is npr news republican senator susan collins a key vote on president trump's pick for the supreme court said sunday she would oppose any nominee she believed would overturn the landmark roe versus wade decision that legalized abortion the maine senator said she would only back a judge who would show respect for settled law such as the forty five year old road decision the united nations cultural organisation unesco is adding more landmarks to its world heritage list npr's laura and freyre reports from one of the sites the indian city of mumbai it's mumbai architecture specifically its victorian gothic an art deco buildings which unesco has awarded world heritage status saying they bear testimony to the phases of modernisation that mumbai underwent in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries back then it was called bombay the gateway to india and one of the biggest ports in the british empire the victorian buildings are suited to the steamy climate here with balconies and verandahs they're colorful old art deco oh movie theaters who style became known as indo deco this is the third unesco recognition from by the city's train station and nearby cave temples dedicated to the hindu god shiva are also world heritage sites as such they get special protection under international treaties lauren fryer npr news mumbai at the weekend box office jurassic world fallen kingdom was the top draw for a second weekend in a row the animated family flick incredible to now in its third weekend in theaters took second place the action thriller sequel sicario day of the dada was third i'm jim hawk npr news in washington support for npr comes from npr stations other contributors include the walton family foundation where opportunity takes root more information is available at walton family foundation dot org and the john d and catherine t macarthur foundation at macfound dot org.

President Trump John D Walton Family Washington Jim Hawk Lauren Fryer India Unesco Maine Wade Donald Trump Senator Susan Collins Catherine T Macarthur Foundati Walton Family Foundation Bombay Laura NPR United Nations Cultural Organi Senator Supreme Court
Senate Democrats who voted for Gorsuch meet with Trump

Morning Edition

04:01 min | 2 years ago

Senate Democrats who voted for Gorsuch meet with Trump

"The john d and catherine t macarthur foundation supporting creative people ineffective institutions committed to building a more just verdant n peaceful world more information is at macfound dot org this is morning edition from npr news i'm noel king in washington and i'm david greene in culver city california the white house says president trump has already dug in he is thinking seriously about who he might nominate to replace retiring supreme court justice anthony kennedy the president met last night with a group of key senators both republicans and democrats to consult with them now one big factor in the decision making and the nomination battle that will follow is abortion and the potential that a more conservative court might one day overturn roe versus wade the nineteen seventythree case that legalized abortion nationwide and prayer ceremony common has been recovering this and she joins us this morning hi sarah hi there so you've been talking to activists on both sides of the abortion debate since this big and surprising retirement i mean what are they talking about putting their energies now well both sides are definitely mobilizing their activists and the grass roots they see this as a really important moment and one that they've been preparing for on the antiabortion rights side you know there's been a lot of work over many years to sort of incrementally restrict abortion rights but they see this as a much bigger opportunity here's what kristen hopkins have students for life had to say our goal in the prolife movement has always been to make abortion illegal and on thinkable and so we want road to be overturned and we expect that and her group was out with a video david the day of kennedy's resignation saying this is our moment we have to seize it and urging activists to lobby lawmakers abortion rights supporters on the same token are taking this very seriously in reaching out to their grass roots i've heard kennedy's departure described as devastating and extremely concerning because he was the swing vote and on abortion had often voted to uphold abortion rights in some really key cases so of course now this fight goes to the senate confirmation process will be intense and senators on both sides zina's potentially vulnerable or likely to to be open to to crossing party lines will be getting a lot of attention but it's almost like we're getting ahead of ourselves we don't even know who the president's name yet right i mean so how where is that process right so during the campaign trump you know in an effort to reassure social and religious conservatives released a couple lists of likely supreme court picks and that became a really big issue in the campaign he added a few names to that list last year people seen as socially conservative likely to vote with conservatives on issues including abortion abortion rights opponents were very happy with his first pick justice neal gorsuch those i've talked to say they're largely pleased with the list they've seen and they hope he'll he'll pick from them or something along those lines but of course one of the questions is if and when an actual case would come before the court that would give the quarter an opportunity to overturn roe versus wade how likely is that to happen right well during the campaign trump did promise to choose justices who would oppose abortion rights and he said that as he put it in in the last debate row would automatically be overturned that is not true it would not atomatic automatically be overturned it would have to go through the court process and that would likely come through a challenge to a state law there are a number of state laws out there that could that could be the first sort of test case for the new court when it's configured a couple of states have passed fifteen week bans on abortion in iowa this year a law was passed banning abortion after a heartbeat can be detected in the fetus so that's usually six to eight weeks before a lot of women no they're pregnant that one abortion opponents said they intentionally they believe in the law but they they want to force go to the supreme court to consider this issue at the same time there's no guarantee that trump nominee you know on the court would mean the end of roe versus wade justices sometimes surprise us but at that is the goal so what.

Catherine T Macarthur Foundati John D Fifteen Week Eight Weeks One Day
"macarthur foundation" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"macarthur foundation" Discussed on From Scratch

"But you're you're never aware of it and in the meantime the macarthur foundation is doing a whole lot of research on you and what you know whether you should get one of these or not and at some point you get a phone call saying hey i got the macarthur award i'm but they're a little sneaky the bef before that the do they do contact you in in ways that you don't realize for example in my case there was there was somebody who was supposed to be a student's collagen who was very interested in my research and i'm an actually that that was that was them and one of the things they needed to make sure of is that when i got the phone call i was there in in my office and this person said i'm gonna i'm gonna come to come on that day and so i was in my office waiting for this person and i just got a phone call so so they are their bids niki like that who nominated you ultimately you never find out you were less than thirty years old you were what twenty eight years old when you won the award give or take in this you know five year period you get the macarthur genius award develop capture you're working with companies like yahoo how did you go about commercializing cap show with your who for example the first session of that was not commercialized that all we just give it to you for free we're super happy for them to use it we were academe ix and we were just happy that that somebody was using what we were doing later i did start a company related to capture but it was kind of that was in two thousand six where where i started this other company called recap shin that that became a commercial venture but that was that was much later and prior to recapture your first company was called esp which was matching images where to users from in two different geographic locations are using their computers to identify images and they're playing a game they have to match their description of the image the founders of google sergei brin and larry page got wind of this you give speech google where they met you where the founders met you describe that.

macarthur foundation yahoo google macarthur sergei brin larry page twenty eight years thirty years five year
Five New York doctors charged with taking kickbacks from Insys

Q

02:28 min | 2 years ago

Five New York doctors charged with taking kickbacks from Insys

"Premium classroom five others the airlines eleven airlines surveyed south west got top overall satisfaction rating among the premium level travelers hawaiian airlines in alaska airlines scored the best on wall street today the dow closed up seventy two points the s and p five hundred gained four points you're listening to npr this is wnyc in new york i'm lance lucky saint patrick's day is tha tomorrow and today jersey city paid tribute to one of its beloved irishman wnyc's rebecca ibarra was at healy's tavern where the ashes of former governor brendan byrne will have a temporary home burn was born in west orange but frenzy he had a soft spot for hudson county with all of its well known political shenanigans former jersey city mayor jeremiah healy says the running joke was he wanted to be buried in hudson county so that he could remain active in politics so for a few days part of burns ashes will stay at this irish saloon and his wife ruth he says he wouldn't have had it any other way i know he knows he's here and it's wonderful burns final resting place is still to be determined five new york doctors have been charged with taking bribes and kickbacks from an arizona based pharmaceutical company to prescribe large volumes of a highly addictive painkiller prosecutor said today the men collected tens of thousands of dollars working for the speaker's bureau of insys therapeutics which has not commented prosecutors say the doctors prescribe millions of dollars worth of a potent feno based spray and use their patients as instruments for profit two muslim women say the new york city police department forced them to remove their he jobs while they were being arrested they're suing the city to change the policy the lawsuit comes after the city settled a similar suits with three women a few weeks ago the nypd revised its policy over the course of that litigation so people can request to be photographed in a private room by an officer of the same gender the lawsuit alleges that police don't regularly follow that policy wnyc at ten six support for npr comes from the john d and catherine t macarthur foundation supporting creative people and effective institutions committed to building a more just verdant and peaceful world more information is at macfound dot org this week secretary of state rex tillerson was voted off the island back when he was hired the president chose him in part because he looked the.

New York City Police Departmen Rex Tillerson John D York Jeremiah Healy Saint Patrick Alaska President Trump Catherine T Macarthur Foundati NPR Officer Insys Therapeutics Prosecutor Arizona Ruth Hudson County Brendan Byrne
"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Catherine t macarthur foundation at mack found dot org this is morning edition from npr news i'm noel king then i'm steve inskeep turkey's foreign minister is offering reassurances that his country intends to remain part of nato and has not drifting away from europe some veteran observers of turkey save almost the opposite they say the country's relations with the west and particularly with washington dc are the worst they've been in decades and peers peter kenyon as covered the story for years who's based in this ball high peter i state you know i think if you have to say things are good sometimes it's indication they're not yeah exactly and i've been talking to a lot of folks recently diplomats politicians ordinary turks on the street analysts and only enters on getting our negative it's bad it's getting worse why isn't it being turned around and i talk to one analysts in an old and he adds a thinktank thank here in istanbul and he says this doesn't feel quite the same as the past crises that they've had and there have been a few over the decades but this he says is a little bit different here's how he put it the relationship is indeed very bad there's a very significant erosion of trust which haven't witnessed in this relationship over the past many decades now what he's talking about is this rising antiamerican sentiment in turkey you hear it all the time it's quite regular for people on the street to say yes of course america was involved in the school we had attempted coup last year i wanted to be very okay yeah well exactly an and possibly even the cia was involve all kinds of stories you can here and the reason the us denies it of course but the people here say why else would you not give us back this cleric fethullah gulen who turkey says was behind the coup and then you look at it from the other perspective if washington looks at turkey sees state of emergency still ongoing tens of thousands arrested a lot of people sacked from their jobs they watch turkey buying russian missiles instead of from a nato country storming out of recent nato exercises there's also a lot of anger a here in turkey over trials going on in the us including one about alleged evasion overrun sanction okay one is that what are these trials were describing well listen in particular its now here's.

Catherine t macarthur foundati mack foreign minister nato istanbul america us washington npr steve inskeep europe peter kenyon cia
"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The john d and catherine t macarthur foundation at macfoundorg gene good morning as 406 now kqed and coming up on kqed science difference between a bully bagged through alpha male humans have the same jokes about twowheel power as he they impulse nissho both of these can be traced to our primate genetics what are the top of the world and one of the world's top researchers of april behavior will tell us what we can logged chimpanzees of the politics of power and you'll find out about that it's six twenty two of eight twenty two this morning gene shall forum it's a national big president trump's trade talks of china possible action on the senate and house tax adding alabama senator candidate roy more form discusses the lay the lake this political news with a panel of experts you'll hear that at nine o'clock this morning and we'll continue till eleven he wasn't coming it hours light later today it'll be lights temperatures will be in the lower 60s southwest winds 10 to 20 miles per hour and showers will continue through the cloudy skies for tomorrow 40 seven now outlook radio eighty eight twenty five uh uh it's morning edition from npr news good morning i'm steve inskeep and i'm david greene alabama senate candidate roy more says he isn't going anywhere the republican is vowing to stay in next month's special senate election despite allegations of sexual misconduct with minors decades ago one woman who spoke out says she was fourteen years old when uh t two inappropriately but has more fight the allegations many national republicans say they want him to drop out here's pennsylvania senator arlen pegged meet the press for the weekend at the accusations have more credibility than the denial i think it would be best they're probably would step aside now missed all this many alabama voters are saying they still back kgb your name dean your to ghg david so what did from various republicans over the of course your gene i've seen media rushed to distance themselves from roy more from senate majority mitch mcconnell cinema jogged mitch mcconnell john down but a lot of the.

alabama mitch mcconnell kgb senator arlen pennsylvania roy more david greene npr senator catherine t macarthur foundati president kqed john d dean steve inskeep senate trump fourteen years
"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The john d and catherine t macarthur foundation at macfoundorg archaeological evidence shows the first humans in california came one hundred forty thousand years ago historical record show the first european arrived in the steve in fifteen forty in news accounts show guru was founded in mateen ninety seven the point being the each day history is made in california and every weekday the california the report follows the evidence the record and the news to bring it to you as it happens i'm john sepulvado listened to the california report right here on kqed coming up at nine this morning scott schieffer will be with form live from washington dc at nine in the wake of the las vegas massacre lawmakers have rekindled the guncontrol debate more on that in the first hour of the program then attend the supreme court's hearing arguments today on the wisconsin gerrymandering case and a 1030 the high court stick at the california case about whether immigrants who are legal permanent residents can be called in detention indefinitely by the federal government wildly fight deportation scotch afer again live from washington dc on forum later this morning it begins nine we have a serious collision on the san mateo bridge at this hour it's westbound after the high it's a big rig fire and it's causing lane closures in both directions in some delays as well ted anthony will have an update in a few minutes from now the time is seven after four at kqed public radio here's more morning edition for a tuesday by michael stich this is morning edition from npr news i'm rachel martin in washington dc and i'm steve inskeep in las vegas where the traffic continued all night last night along the las vegas strip many of the brilliant lights for which the strip is known burned all night although the replica i full tower of the paris casino which is visible out a window to my left here when dark all night to mark sunday's mass shooting the fountains of the balaj yo hotel when still for the first gunshots on sunday night police faced a series of questions about the shooter first how to stop him next why he did what he did and pierce law enforcement correspondent martin kosti is here with us in las vegas good morning mark good morning so what more is known about steven paddock.

steve inskeep law enforcement paris npr washington kqed macfoundorg archaeological john d steven paddock martin kosti catherine t macarthur foundati rachel martin michael stich ted anthony san mateo bridge wisconsin las vegas scott schieffer john sepulvado california one hundred forty thousand yea
"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"macarthur foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The john d and catherine t macarthur foundation supporting creative people and effective ins to to sion's committed to building a more just verdant and peaceful world more information is that mac found dot org and by the listeners of kqed good afternoon the time now is five twenty from npr news this is all things considered i'm kelly mcevers and i'm robert siegel many of those who support the deep cuts to medicaid called for in the republican healthcare bill say it's simply to expensive but some health insurers say if medicaid shrinks that could lead to higher costs for everyone eric whitney reports from montana one of the last stage to expand medicaid under the affordable care act the republicans who make up twothirds of montana's congressional delegation say a big reason they wanna repeal the current health care law is because it's causing health insurance markets to quote collapse but the insurance companies that saw policies year see that's not true in montana and they're concerned about gop repeal and replace plans i don't think that their plan is going to improve health care in the state of montana jerry wardak is the ceo of montana health coop advantages fiat chrysler have really do think a lot of people are going to get hurt the coop is one of the three insurance companies this been selling montana's coverage on healthcare dot gov since it started in 2013 with no plans to leave they say collapse is a real possibility though if the deep medicaid cuts republican health bills call for actually happen toddlers sheen is a vicepresident at pacific source insurance he says medicaid expansion means montana hospitals are now getting paid for taking care of more than seventy thousand montana's who got medicaid in the expansion all of our hospitals have it any patient big i'm dan and took them that i read it somewhere right and if we're not paying that you're medicaid expansion does not have to be borne by someone in there that will increase the overall cost of medical expenses when hospital see their unpaid bills stack up lucian says they'll have to charge patients who have insurance more to stay afloat john dorin degrees with that analysis dorin is the vice president with blue cross in blue shield of montana the state's biggest insurer dorin says that problems would likely get worse if the individual mandate goes away that's the requirement to have health insurance the republican healthcare bills do away with if there's no mandate and there's no incentive for them to buy health insurance plan then maybe they won't and again.

lucian john dorin fiat gop eric whitney medicaid npr kqed john d health insurance dorin vice president catherine t macarthur foundati montana chrysler ceo jerry wardak insurance companies montana robert siegel kelly mcevers mac sion