3 Burst results for "Maasai Girls"

"maasai girls" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

Breaking Green Ceilings

17:36 min | 3 months ago

"maasai girls" Discussed on Breaking Green Ceilings

"Poisoned. Vultures and the conflict has led to this outcome. It was an absolute pleasure having her and breaking brings ceilings and I hope we get to see more women like her and Kenya and Africa. I hope you enjoyed this episode. So we with Valerie Nessa. If I'm saying that correctly it's December the team at three fourteen pm and we're having our interview here in Nairobi Safari. Thank you so much for having us. Get some insight into your life. I read an article about shoo in amazing area too and I was completely fascinated that a woman is dedicated to saving. The lives of a lot of people think are very ugly. Birds and people think that they are vultures are amenities but a lot of people. Don't know that there are critical to our ecosystem. And you'll tell us a little bit more in detail about that so I thought it would be helpful for us to just get started about telling us a little bit about yourself and we'll take the conversation from there can thank you for Mitchell and Maine said relatedness lead in. Sat Book in the Church born and raised in Nettle County. And also I grew from manuals by life so interacted tree they on the matter and also tiny wildlife management. Get now Alexa. This training institute and when I was growing up a came through legged animals that is way came to study wildlife management and also the book which that is actually Real Ms Luke when you go to Stati colleges or universities so we have a moustache already so the most level for those who study and for US GUS IT IS HORRID. They do not that is it. True Grind studying colleges are invited to come really then parents actress to study in College Green. Yeah and tell us when narrow is for those people who are not familiar with Kenya and explain to us what the environment looks like. What's the geography could not be very rarely what people know mass mother? It's the country. We must name nationally. Service is them and to from narrow Kombi pastoralist must have for money. Diaz in my mind is commonly called for Lynch trade is on Tuesday kids. It was founded for the pastoralist grant static so Ben. Their parents taking counsel alleged. Talk to look forward or faster than I used to be left in the school so the parents designate friends in school and do to also among counties in cancer the Damasio Culture. Even most of them might say are located most of them. Do not forget the cancer because this is one of the things that gives them jobs in the Mara. Singing dancing in dose of these towns. Messiah so it is among the trees that trek Sunday in Kenya country And you're part of the Maasai community but we have several subgroups under the Maasai community. Which one do you come from? A Momma sign up but BUCO young. I've never heard of that. I'm just only familiar with guess. There's some burro are the SS through from some kind of course and then Who were the other people from Kilgore Gorey's okay people from me not account and there are people from this call? Syria then saw leandro scientists from Soussan Lodonga landing saw. There are many of them really hard for me to even try to think how to pronounce it. Yeah but it's ONS beautiful kids growing up in Nairobi. Heard we were taught in. So Healy in primary school and then it as well as in English and most of the tribes that we had an opportunity to interact with were wouldn't quit the more common tribes like book coup. Luhya Luo so Casey try and so we were more familiar with hearing their languages around us but with Maasai. It's not very common language that you hear what's the lifestyle of the Messiah Community. In general Jabri tribe has different cultural uniqueness but the Maasai as they are an indigenous tribe. And they're one of the last few tribes who are actually a migratory tribe right. What was your experience growing up as a Maasai girl in your culture is fun on this same time telling you code there that time we were born like people were still not so interested with the location so pledge talk was only leading that say people while after clay pastoralists when is time legs. Dry Season approach they. We have to make rich to find their past ten daughter for their lifestyle. So you see people used to jen places you can find lake now. There's so many people using this same sanding and that is that is on being when people were migrating place to find. I tend whatever the alleged talk they used to like. When you go to a place one of your election remain there. That's one they need. So he didn't trusting but the might say demanding Educational Notary. Western culture is now in the massive community that let's talk is still picking. Their livestock is a big part of the culture for sure. One of the things that you mentioned is that Western culture is starting to influence Maasai culture. What are some of the ways in which Western cultures impacting your communities changing the content? Like most of the children nowadays they come from their homes and come through the tomato and the closest to standing and from there. The concert changes like a must. They used to dress nowadays. It's only a few of them. Were dressed like that and also for the gusts are now indicated not lake before they used to neglect -cation what words a common. I guess gender roles that women played and men played in Maasai culture like menus to make this also they used to bring now updates and Graham that they will not go in their governments. Desta bring up kids today little goats and she was their menus too when Luke after. Let's talk when it's not brain? They used to check the alleged friend. Faster order to challenging life experience when me don't have water and you have to travel for miles for your livestock to get access to that. Never remember leaving in Nairobi. Our houses right at the edge of the Nairobi National Park. And so when we used to have droughts often we would see the Maasai Hood's men with all of the cattle on Mombasa roads and sound looking for water and then the grass was green on that part of Nairobi. So but I know that. They traveled for miles just to be able to feed their livestock. But I thought that was the unique experience growing up in Nairobi to actually see traditional ways of life so being practiced in city or a culture that is increasingly becoming westernized so. I really appreciated that. One of the things that you said is when you grew up in narrow You had an opportunity to observe nature and so you saw love animals. And that's what got you interested in wildlife but also because there's an opportunity for you to get a job in doing life conservation and your father encourage you to do that. Which I think is awesome. So tell him thank you when you got into doing a diploma in Wildlife Conservation. What did that experience look like what you guys learn? And then how did you end up becoming a vulture liaison lemming so many things you know? Now unless salvage called the in school you have to lake extending the units so there was a unique for balance memorials titles. And the you had to choose specialize in one of the union's so I used to like him and lands 'cause I hoping to be unnatural list in one of the comes in Mara silence studying mostly bats and when they went to my attachment in one of the consequences no matter conservancy. After finishing I got an internship with Muslim conservancies and the match one of the guys was during a period in inventory that child South Africa music creation. So sometimes we used to go with him to feel less kness and the names of their one chance this species and most of the animals so from there that is then I developed interest after I came to New Orleans on and when you was bringing the recites he told me to be one of the that so elected then I started watching not on the walls. How many types of cultures do we have in East Africa or I guess Kenya but start with Kenya can not? I'm not sure about change. I can't say name name not some much so in our county. What are the most common vultures that we find the metro repels that have been Balsam? The love CT fifth won't tell their back there. Watch headed and they were dead. Mostly those are the ones who can watch. And why are vultures important to our ecosystem according to the important to the environment because they help to clean the environment and also when they like ledge talk like she forum account days do and a deceased contracts that there was the only one that can killing the carcass so that they claim their what they do is they spread the diseases to the people and also the alleged? What is it within the anatomy of the vulture that allows it to be immune from anthrax? I think it's only they're strong. Immune that's cannot kill or ret- is only able to date through a poisoning. It could you cannot get a studying because of a disease. Nope so if in the natural lifeline of vulture they would die out of all aid. Okay it's natural causes. And how old do they get like their lifespan? Yeah maybe that yen's years. Wow that's really cool but vultures are endangered in Kenya and also for the most part in East Africa because for some reason. We think that they're pests. They're ugly animals and our communities aren't fully aware about the importance in the ecosystem which you explained to us what those are. Tell us about how they get poisoned. Must of they will tests that points on the retaliation lake people in traditional kisses or conflicts between an alleged talk people retaliate lake. You can't find somebody during the name China breaks into the Boma to kill day sheep or even the cows so like this to those kids over monastic veteran. A guy who is that she she watching in one night and count sold through that. Shame Lake. It's so painful for lose all those places so people retaliates they just have on what take one they save save points on each and they leave it for the islands of their lands. Tweet and you mentioned what Bomas Bomas are the enclosed with which the mice I congratulate violates of where they keep the lifestyle okay and what did they used to poison the sh they can use pesticides or revenge. The this medicine that people use to today on the animals. These one is no me made the looks. So it's red in one like the last incident their caucus. That tree saw the reg tallied so meaning that they was so strong. That is why in less than ten minutes more than four or six months did. What is the psychology behind agitating in the sense? That are they thinking that okay the Hyenas and the Lions are going to learn that the livestock are poison. Therefore they're not going to get the the predators are not going to attack them again or is it just ought to pure anger. What is it just a few long? Then maybe some of them you know they're compensation because some of the consequences combined sage and even can alleged obvious compensate but it's texting some of them event. They stay for years with and they forget about it. So it's like Chunga and then there's no it's better for them to voice on and also killed their life than just getting on nothing and Let's talk on wind chill. It's definitely an emotionally driven reaction because these livestock are the livelihood set is what most of them need. Docket the accused through Ledge Dog. They feed their families relates. Talk so you can imagine if you had taken the leg stock market in central that that she in and then you might that huge it is. Yeah and then you said that the Kenya Wildlife Service time to give them and then even the compensation is not necessarily equal to the amount of what they can get if they sold the livestock in the local market. So you work with the Berggren but before that you worked for about four years with Kenya. Wildlife Service steadied in Canal Allege Service Institute much. I stayed in the rough from when I was in attachment okay so after attachment than you internship with the say let consequence. It was the intention for one one year and then after that you join the pedic than front care so you're still fairly young in your profession. I've just been with the big in fund for two years later so in total you've had two years. I guess fulltime work experience but one year internship. How are.

Kenya Nairobi Nairobi Safari Wildlife Service Valerie Nessa East Africa cancer Alexa Nairobi National Park Mitchell Jabri Church Kombi pastoralist Nettle County Damasio Culture Maine Stati Kilgore Gorey Messiah Community College Green
"maasai girls" Discussed on GSMC Book Review Podcast

GSMC Book Review Podcast

10:50 min | 6 months ago

"maasai girls" Discussed on GSMC Book Review Podcast

"And welcome back to the and the book of You. PODCAST and the continuation of my interview with Juliet. Cutler what would you say The biggest learning learning experience was for you in those two years. Well I think there are a couple of big takeaways as for me One I alluded to earlier. That as an out I I. I sometimes say change doesn't come from the outside in. It comes from the inside out and so as a foreigner coming into place with good intentions. I think I learned that. It's always our role to follow rather than lead and I think that's not always easy for Westerners because we're used to coming in with that's our plans and our timelines and our budgets and getting everyone in order and sort of moving toward a goal but that's not always helping operate great and other places and so really to come in and take a step back and listen rather than lead and so that was sort of a big piece of learning from mm-hmm and also just a recognition that there are many Tanzania Maasai people who intimately know the issues that they face and how how to solve them and our leaders in their communities already and so really we have to empower those folks to solve the problems that they alrighty know how to solve but sometimes lack the resources to solve and so we're really there as as helpers and supporters of those local people so that was sort out of one big takeaway and then I think the other takeaway for me was. I think it was the first time in my life that I had really been confronted with my own privilege and just the opportunities that I had simply because I was American I was white. I was you know relatively affluent compared to the rest of the world and it never had really occurred to me that all of that was just kind of a given and for a lot of people around the world like eighty percent of the rest of the world. They just don't have access to the same things that I have access to just because of where I was born and so that was something that should've squarely hit between the eyes many times while I was living in Tanzania. Yeah yeah and I can only imagine that it was just an incredible Two years there's Full of a lot of Learning and You know amazing experiences but also difficult experiences. I know you have had a relationship with the school there since you left teaching so Can you talk a little bit about that relationship. And how it has evolved. Sure so so I think one of the realizations sort of came from those two pieces of learning that I just talked about was that Those of us who who have some privilege and have some power have a responsibility to wield that privilege and power responsibly and to empower and give back to to those Who who are looking for those kinds of opportunities and so I think coming back I really felt that it was important to maintain this relationship with the school and to continue to support the work of local leaders there and so I go back almost on an annual basis now Largely my role now is as a fundraiser here. In the United States there are a couple of organizations nations that continue to support the work in Tanzania I smoke about one earlier operation bootstrap Africa. They provided all the funding to construct the school. Oh but also scholarships for all the students who attend that school and they've been doing that for twenty five years now so along deep connection there and then what are the other pieces of learning. That came out of my time in Tanzania is that sometimes it's not enough just to give a girl a scholarship colors ship and get her to school because if she doesn't feel safe at home or in her community than she may not finish school and I talk in the book about a couple of young women who face issues of violence at home and the effective active that ultimately on their lives and their education and so doctors and Julie who was a mentor of ours there he he started a safehouse shortly after we left and the safehouses a place for young women who aren't safe at home To be during school breaks so that that they don't sort of face the risk of not being able to come back to school for for whatever reason whether whether it be that they're forced into a marriage or In Tanzania this law has changed within the last six months but it used to be that It was illegal to readmit a young woman to secondary school. Once she'd had a baby and so that that law has fortunately just changed. I but so for a young woman who might go home during a school break get raped. She's pregnant that sort of immediately then answer education. And that's still a pretty prevalent practice in Tanzania but fortunately it's no longer the law and so you know he would create the safe house He created the State House. Where are young women could go and have a safe place to be so that they could finish their educations and that work has been funded Largely largely through Luther partners in global ministry but also is partnered with a local. They call them NGOs in the international community but non-governmental organisation which is what we call nonprofits called One Gaza and Gaza is led entirely by Tanzanians and they. They're focused on how to make school safe places for kids. But also on empowering women and girls through community based education programs around so those are the ways that I remain connected there in supporting those organizations in the work that they're doing By raising money here among Americans by by writing this book. All proceeds from the sale of the book are going back to support these two organizations. That are just spoke about so the impetus for the book really came about. I think on the one hand. It was an effort for me to sort of process what this whole experience had meant to me but it was also meant to be a tool to raise awareness about the issues that young women and girls face not only in east Africa but around the world and the ways in which we might support an uplift. These young women. Thank you for that. I really appreciate it what would you hope that readers would take away from the book I think the biggest takeaway I would have for. Readers is the profound effect that education has on women and girls who live in poverty It really does have the power to transform lives Research in the field of international development sort of bears out that the single most effective intervention for poverty alleviation is the education particularly for women and girls in the developing world. And so I think the the book really paints that picture of how Young Maasai Women and have benefitted from education. One of the really great things about twenty years of retrospect is that I know what's happened to many of my students percents No graduates of the Maasai. Secondary School for girls are now in all sectors of Tanzania. They are Leaders within is in their own communities. But they've also started nonprofit organizations that are addressing some of the most pressing issues for the Maasai which are landing water rights rights access to education and healthcare They are teachers pastors attorneys We have one graduate WHO's spoken at the United Nations Nations Permanent Forum on a digital issues a few times now and so These young women have come from very very humble beginnings to it really be leaders not just among the Maasai but internationally in some cases and so that's really the way's education then makes a difference. I think you know. Readers may not have a particular affinity for supporting Maasai Girls' education. But what I would say as Airways to support the education of women and girls where you live and this is the need all over the world and so I I hope readers there's will be inspired by the stories of these young women in the ways that education can transform lives. Yeah Thank you for that. It's obviously Something that is very near and dear to your heart in Europe passionate about it so I appreciate that. And it's it's time for our final break of the podcast when we come back Before we get to the conclusion of this interview we will get my normal random question. Awkward Heard Interview Question. You know how it is so you won't you won't WanNa miss that stay tuned you're listening to the MC Book Review Podcast and I will be right-back pep springs such joy to our lives and the MC pets podcast is here to a share in that joy. We'll tell stories of pets finding their forever homes acting in unexpected ways being helpful or just being silly whether you love dogs cats llamas reptiles fish or you'd never met an animal you didn't like the MC pets podcast is for you..

Tanzania Young Maasai Women Secondary School Maasai Girls MC Book Review Cutler Juliet Europe United States Gaza east Africa United Nations Nations State House Tanzanians Julie
"maasai girls" Discussed on GSMC Book Review Podcast

GSMC Book Review Podcast

10:27 min | 6 months ago

"maasai girls" Discussed on GSMC Book Review Podcast

"Welcome back to the MC book. Review podcast I am speaking today with Juliet Cutler about her memoir among the Maasai. And let's go ahead and get back to that interview. Yeah and There is a young woman in the book. it. It feels like you kind of tell her story in parallel with yours and Please pronounce her name for me. Because I don't want to butcher it starts yet. It's the Nita and I do. The book starts really with with her story of what it means to grow up being Maasai aside and the the challenges that she faces as a young woman trying to find her way in the world and and that leads her to more or less run away from home to this school and it traces her story sort of what she faces related to things like arranged emerges. And the Maasai. Still Practice of female genital cutting as part of a coming of age ceremony and then and then traces her all the way through college education and Well my story obviously is radically different from hers. And that I come from a very different place in a very different culture I also left home to explore a big broad world and learn from that process and so there are some parallels in the ways in which ninety two and I come to understand that the the world is a lot bigger than we thought. It was at the beginning of the book and one thing that really appreciated about the book. Especially your time I am teaching. There was obviously you went over with you. Know your experience your life experience and encountered a vastly different culture alter some of your students that were also encountering a different culture than what they'd grown up with. But what I as I said I appreciated about the book. Was Your your your struggle your journey however you want to describe it with figuring out what your role. was there how you could help without bringing I mean so much cultural baggage in terms of being. Oh wait person in an African Community CETERA. Can you talk a little bit about That process for you and and what you learned from the experience absolutely So as I said earlier earlier I grew up in Montana and a crow Indian. Reservation is not that far from where I grew up so I grew up understanding the long history of of white intervention and indigenous populations. And how that's led to a lot of challenges for American Indian communities here in the United States and so. That was the lens that I brought with. When I went to Tanzania certainly I wanted to help I went there because because I thought I could help but I didn't want to inculcate my own ideas or cultures on on a different culture church and so I was very careful in terms of doing my homework about the school? It was established by a group of Maasai elders who really saw the ways in which their culture was being stressed and threatened as a globalization approached. When I was there we didn't have any telephone service? But now if you go to Tanzania you'll see them aside still hurting their cattle and goats while talking on cell phones and so you know sort of this global culture was approaching and So these Maasai elders saw education as a pathway forward to develop new leaders that would face new new challenges in the twenty first century and in their wisdom They saw that girls had traditionally not had many opportunities that all for education right and and so they really needed to create a special place for girls. workers could thrive and and gain education in order order to sort of develop a balanced leadership for the future and so those are really the roots of the school in terms of The idea and the inception exception for it. Of course those Maasai Elders partnered with a nonprofit organization here in the United States called operation bootstrap Africa that provides most most of the funding for the school. So the roots of the school really are coming from Through the Maasai request for assistance in doing this work doc. Certainly one of the things I learned as part of being there is that we always come with our culture that sort of impossible to leave behind and and so now I did my best to sort of follow the lead of local people and Rather than sort of coming in and saying you know I have the answers and I'm here to save you Sort of saying I'm here to help please guide and direct me in the ways. I can be most helpful to you. Yeah and you You went with your then boyfriend fiance. And now you're married. You went with another person. Did you A and he worked at another school close by. But did you have have a lot of. What Am I? Trying to say. I would imagine that your conversations on all of these topics were a huge part part of your lives and your relationship at that time Did you find that it helps to have someone that very close to you. to have those conversations nations with the clarify or two or Did it help give you any different perspective. How with that in terms of that? That's a pretty Incredible label relationships steps. So how would that for the two of you I think this experience in Tanzania really defined who we who we are individually and who we are as a couple it shaped the way we view the world and our role in it it And so all of those things are sort of foundational ultimately to marriage that you have a similar outlook. But I think it wasn't just mark. Who's my now husband who I shared this journey with? I think whenever you have a big experience in life that that challenges you and shapes you it's important to have friends and mentors along the way and certainly mark was then then. Is that to me but there were also some key people. I talk about in the book. who were a bit older than us and served as mentors or one of those was a Tanzanian educator named Doctor Geely he served as a local mentor to both of US guiding us as we navigated our way in a different culture and then we had some Americans who were there who also served as mentors to us and resources just in in in dealing with some of the things that you deal with when you're when you're in a different culture and also when you live in a place of of deep poverty and so I talk in the book a little bit about out to Jean and Marv they were a couple that were placed at the same school that I taught at and then there was another couple Doug Again Linda. Also Americans who served as volunteer coordinators in Tanzania and they also served as a resource to us. So I think you know for the people who might be considering undertaking of volunteer excursion and another place. Finding a support system is important into whether it be amongst local people amongst the people you go with or or even amongst sort of resources that maybe foreign but familiar on the ground there And how was it to be in a relationship and get married need From your own cultural perspective well living in a place that has very different understandings of marriage and gender roles so that was a little nervous for us at first you know we went into the experience so sort of having been coached that courtship looks a lot different sprint in Tanzania than it does your in America among the Maasai there. There isn't really courtship marriages are arranged. And so how how you behave as a young couple in a context where the rules are different about how you relate to one another that said I think we were granted rented a lot of leeway because people understood that we were different and we came from a different place and so once we got there. It wasn't as awkward as we thought it might be and the local schools that we taught at their As you said earlier I was at the Maasai Girls. Secondary School and mark was at Marine Gays Acquaintance Secondary Mary School so both are boarding schools as are most secondary schools in Tanzania. Because there aren't the resources for a robust system of public like high schools anyway and These schools were only about a mile apart and the staff came together to throw us a wedding shower our when we when we came back from getting married and so it was really delightful to be welcomed in that that way as a couple and To be part part of their culture cultural sort of celebrations related to marriage. But then we also had a wedding here in the states and I talk in the book a little bit about about how that was a sort of odd experience to have been living in Tanzania and come back home and sort of walk back into your own culture. Sure which now seems somehow a bit foreign as if you don't altogether fit and also to come from a place of deep poverty to.

Tanzania Maasai Girls United States Juliet Cutler Marine Gays Acquaintance Secon Montana Secondary School African Community Africa Doctor Geely America Doug Jean Marv