36 Burst results for "MSU"

Fresh update on "msu" discussed on The Paul W. Smith Show

The Paul W. Smith Show

00:42 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "msu" discussed on The Paul W. Smith Show

"Of study in 17 degree granting colleges And with the gentleman in charge just over a year. Now put in this position, August 1st of last year. What a privilege. Pleasure. An honor. It is to welcome back to the show. Dr. Samuel Stanley, MSU president. Dr Stanley. Good morning. Well, W good morning to you. It's great to talk with all those great things I said about the university all these great things that I have to say about you. Isn't it ironic? Then it all came down earlier to you. And you have M president Dr Mark Schlissel, making a decision that it probably wasn't safe to play football and all hell broke loose. I don't think it was just market high. I think there were other president you could solve the same. But we're glad we're having the opportunity to play started. Well, I think because you guys are both doctors that you guys both have experience A and Aziz, a biomedical researcher. On educator of physician on these things, that infection's disease specialist. It's why they really listen to what you were saying. So here we go. We got through all of that. We're proud to say that will have the Spartans taking on Rutgers at home with our W. J. R tailgate show with Steve Courtney's starting at 9 A.m.. Saturday. Are you Completely. Happy with football happening again? Yes, I am for sure. And I couldn't be more excited. I think for me, obviously, you know, even though I came to the plane, college football now this to me is the beginning of the college football season with big kicking off and I'm excited. It's going to be a TV experience. For most of us. I think we're gonna have the chance to watch. I'll be watching the Big 10 network to see us play records on DH. We're just having fans who are families or friends. Of the players in the stands and everyone else we're asking really, to watch at home. You know, with your family, you know, and you're in your bubble if you will, because I want things to happen safely. But end of yours. And of course, Dr. You'll permit me to remind people that not only can they watch it on television, they can listen to it right here on W. J. R. And, you know, I often do both simultaneously. So I used the radio and watched TV when the radio announcers bring so much more life to the game. I know you're a brilliant man. I knew you were a brilliant man. Thank you. Thank you. There you are, Did you You have no idea that your first year at this Great University of Michigan State University Nobody had any idea of August of 2019 of what we were all in four. How's it been for you? You know, it's been there obviously the challenges but again, the people I work with, and the faculty and staff and students have all been basing and people in the community as well. We've worked very closely with he's Lansing. What? We've had challenges. We work closely with the county. I think all of us have come together to recognize that these are impressive. Many times that things are going to be different. They're not going to be the way they were. But we have to adapt and adjust and find ways to move our missions forward for us. That's our educational mission. Our research mission with community is trying to keep the citizens safe and the business is going so everyone had to make sacrifices. But I think everybody has come together and I think it's pretty unique kind of relationships we have here amongst ourselves, and I think that's a very good thing. It's gonna be you. You mean no disrespect or harm for anyone else. But when you wake up in the morning, and you're not in this headline, it's got to make you feel good. The headline in the Detroit News Spring Arbor University tops list of new school covert 19 outbreaks you you are happily, not in that headline. I know that you feel for the folks that spring arbor but as Being the state's largest institution of higher education. You continue to have a very high number of cumulative covert 19 cases, the highest number among higher education. The 1622 among students and staff. That number changes all the time. But what are you continuing to do to try to keep that number down and not end up in the headlines as the one with the biggest largest growth of outbreaks? So I think it's very much about, you know responsibility, continuing to stress that with our students, faculty and staff, this is a time when personal responsibility really matters. It's about where in your bath. It's about staying socially distance about avoiding the guards or even small gatherings. On those of the things we're going to make a difference. You know, we do things like testing. We've increased our testing. We can do interventions that single county appropriately did quarantining and that could make a difference, But it's really Most importantly right now it's about stopping transmission, and that's about following the rules. So we had a great success and forcing that on campus. So you get to the confines of our campus number of cases. We've really have 600 research laboratories open. We have thousands of people on campus for research and some living on campus. In the cases. There have been very low, but that's because we have a better opportunity to kind of enforced and remind On campus. Getting that kind of attitude into our students who are off campus on living in those kind congregate. Housing is really key. We continue to work on that on find ways to try and educate as well as in some cases, disciplined people who don't want our tools. Dr Samuel Stanley Jr. The president of Michigan State University with US on the Paul W. Smith Show, W J R Big game this weekend, the season finally begins. And we're excited about it..

President Trump Football Dr. Samuel Stanley Great University Of Michigan S Dr Samuel Stanley Jr W. J. R. And MSU Dr Mark Schlissel United States Lansing Aziz News Spring Arbor University Detroit Researcher Paul W. Smith Michigan State University Spartans Rutgers W. J. R Steve Courtney
2 Michigan Colleges Face Coronavirus Outbreaks In The 1st Week Of School

All Things Considered

03:22 min | Last month

2 Michigan Colleges Face Coronavirus Outbreaks In The 1st Week Of School

"On college campuses continues involving Corona virus outbreaks and how to handle them. Today. There are developments from Michigan, where two big state universities are facing different difficulty challenges. NPR's elicit nad Warning has been on a college road trip as the school year begins and is just back from Michigan and she joins us now high, Elissa Hello. Let's first talk about the University of Michigan graduate students there. Another employees are striking over Coben, 19 precautions and the reopening of campus. Tell us what they're protesting, or what the advocating for So the graduate employee organization orgy EO represents about 2000 grad student instructors They've been striking since last week. Their demands include, among other things, the universal right to work remotely. They also want more testing for Corona virus on campus. I talked with a mere Fleischman He's a graduate student who teaches political theory. He was out on the picket lines this morning at 5 A.m., he said. They felt like they tried everything to get the attention of the university and it didn't work. We've held protests we held it died. We've had car caravan. It's been an impact bargaining for months. This has gotten us nowhere. We felt that we had no other option but to engage in strike. And Eliza. What do university Michigan officials have to say about all this? We'll yesterday the U of M President Mark Schlissel, ask the courts to intervene and send the grad students backto work. It's illegal in the state of Michigan for education workers to strike and that ruling is expected by the end of the week. Student workers say. Until then, they'll continue to be on the picket lines. All right, So the University of Michigan has thousands of students living in dorms and taking in person classes. But just north of there is Michigan State in East Lansing, which is all online. Tell us more what's happening there. So at Michigan State University. There's been a big jump in cases since some students returned to the town last month, and that's despite the fact that they're not taking any classes in person this weekend, the university as students living in town to quarantine for two weeks to help curb the spread. I've been keeping in touch with an MSU freshman named Sidney Harakah Veena. She's living in an off campus apartment with her roommates. I called yesterday to ask her about the lock down, and instead she told me that she herself had just tested positive for Corona virus. I was trying to be safe. My roommates were trying to be safe like we kind of avoided like the bigger scenes like I wouldn't want to go somewhere where I could get it. But like even my remains friends, they don't abide by that. And now it really just like, bit them and us in the butt because we hung out with them, and then they had it. So it really was a chain effect. All of her roommates are also positive, though none of them have symptoms, and the three of them are isolating in their apartment. She told me she's already feeling a little restless eye, but they are so how do these two schools fit into what you're hearing across the country in your reporting? Well what colleges air. Finding all over the country is that all it takes is a small all group of students going to parties for the virus to really start making its way through social circles and into the surrounding community. You know, The other thing is the high positive cases in East Lansing show us that colleges don't actually have that much control over this as they might like right because classes are already online there, So I think it's an important lesson for schools that have in person classes because it shows there really aren't that many good options. For shutting the semester down. That's NPR's Listen that morning. She covers higher and thanks for following this, we look forward to hearing more of your report says You continue throughout the fall of school continues. Thanks so much, Sasha.

Michigan Michigan State University Sidney Harakah Veena University Of Michigan Graduate Student East Lansing NPR Coben President Mark Schlissel Eliza EO Sasha
Chicago - 2 Michigan Colleges Face Coronavirus Outbreaks In The 1st Week Of School

Marketplace

03:13 min | Last month

Chicago - 2 Michigan Colleges Face Coronavirus Outbreaks In The 1st Week Of School

"Turmoil on college campuses continues involving Corona virus outbreaks and how to handle them. Today. There are developments from Michigan, where two big state universities are facing different difficulty challenges. NPR's elicit Mad Warning has been on a college road trip as the school year begins and is just back from Michigan and she joins us now. Hello. Let's first talk about the University of Michigan graduate students there. Another employees are striking over Coben, 19 precautions and the reopening of campus tell us what they're protesting or whether they advocating for So the graduate employee organization orgy EO represents about 2000 grad student instructors They've been striking since last week. Their demands include, among other things, the universal right to work remotely. They also want more testing for Corona virus on campus. I talked with a mere Fleischman. He's a graduate student who teaches political theory. He was out on the picket lines this morning. At five AM, he said. They felt like they tried everything to get the attention of the university and it didn't work. We've held protests we held it died. We've had car caravan. It's been an impact bargaining for once. This has gotten us nowhere. We felt that we had no other option but to engage in straight. And Eliza. What do university Michigan officials have to say about all this? We'll yesterday the U of M President Mark Schlissel. Ask the courts to intervene and send the grad students backto work. It's illegal in the state of Michigan for education workers to strike and that ruling is expected by the end of the week. Student workers say. Until then, they'll continue to be on the picket lines. All right, So the University of Michigan has thousands of students living in dorms and taking in person classes. But just north of there is Michigan State in East Lansing, which is all online. Tell us more. What's happening there. So at Michigan State University. There's been a big jump in cases since some students returned to the town last month, and that's despite the fact that they're not taking any classes in person this weekend, the university as students living in town to quarantine for two weeks to help curb the spread. I've been keeping in touch with an MSU freshman named Sidney Harakah Veena. She's living at an off campus apartment with her roommates. I called yesterday to ask her about the lock down, and instead she told me that she herself had just tested positive for Corona virus. I was trying to be safe. My roommates were trying to be safe like we kind of avoided like the bigger scenes like I wouldn't want to go somewhere where I could get it. But, like even my roommates, friends, they don't abide by that and now really, just like them and us in the butt because we hung out with them, and then they had it so it really was a chain effect. All of her roommates are also positive, though none of them have symptoms, and the three of them are isolating in their apartment. She told me she's already feeling a little restless, but they are so how do these two schools fit into what you're hearing across the country in your reporting? Well, what colleges they're finding all over the country is that all it takes is a small all group of students going to parties for the virus to really start making its way through social circles and into the surrounding community. You know, The other thing is the high positive cases in East Lansing show us that colleges don't actually have that much control over this as they might like right because classes are already online there, So I think it's an important lesson for schools that have in person classes because it shows there really aren't that many good options. For shutting the semester down.

Michigan State University Michigan Graduate Student University Of Michigan Sidney Harakah Veena East Lansing NPR President Mark Schlissel EO Eliza
MSU dropping name of Ku Klux Klan member from building

Mitch Albom

00:36 sec | Last month

MSU dropping name of Ku Klux Klan member from building

"Of the Michigan State University will be removed from the school's human resource building after he was discovered to be a member of the Ku Klux Klan. The board of trustees voted to remove Stephen Nesbitt's name. Their meeting on September 11th. The announcement made on their website. The building was named after Nesbitt in 1970, for he was a school principal, a superintendent. President of the Michigan Education Association, a member of the State Board of Education, a member of the board of trustees, a member of the Alma College Board of trustees and an executive with Gerber Products company. Paul High School

Stephen Nesbitt Ku Klux Klan State Board Of Education Alma College Board Michigan State University Michigan Education Association Paul High School Gerber Products Company President Trump Superintendent Executive
MSU dropping name of Ku Klux Klan member from building

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | Last month

MSU dropping name of Ku Klux Klan member from building

"State University now moving to change the name of a campus building after learning that it's named for a man who belonged to the Ku Klux Klan. Stephen Nesbitt's membership card from the 19 twenties, was discovered at a library at Central Michigan University. MSU's human resource is building is named for him. He was a member of the school's governing board from 1962 to 1970. Nisbet worked in education and private business and was chairman of the 1961 convention that produced Michigan's Constitution. He died in 1986.

Stephen Nesbitt Ku Klux Klan Central Michigan University Nisbet State University Michigan MSU Chairman
Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 2 months ago

Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

"Ah, former Michigan State University gymnastics coach now sentenced to 90 days in jail for lying to investigators involved in the Larry Nasser's Gandal in case Kathy Klages found guilty earlier this year on two counts of lying to a peace officer. Along with that jail time. Clay just will now be on probation for a year and 1/2. The 65 year old is the second person other than Nassar to be convicted of charges related to this serial molestation of young women and girls under the Geiss of medical

Kathy Klages Larry Nasser Nassar Michigan State University Officer
Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 2 months ago

Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

"The former head gymnastics coach at Michigan State University has been sentenced to jail for lying to police about what she do about abuse by university Dr Larry Nassar Cathy Clegg is said at trial that she did not remember being told about abuse by former Olympic and Michigan State University doctor Larry Nassar she was found guilty by a jury in February of lying to police and today she's been sentenced to ninety days in jail and eighteen months of probation Nassar was sentenced in twenty eighteen to forty two hundred and seventy five years in prison for decades of serial abuse to hundreds of athletes several of Nassar's victims testified the greatest knew about the abuse two of them spoke ahead of the sentencing Larissa Boyce sekaligus held up a piece of paper in front of her when she was sixteen and older if she filed a report there could be serious consequences for her voice that she was representing her sixteen year old self was silenced and humiliated and all of the hundreds of girls that were abused after her I'm Jennifer king

Michigan State University Dr Larry Nassar Cathy Clegg Larry Nassar Jennifer King Larissa Boyce
Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 2 months ago

Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

"The former head gymnastics coach at Michigan State University has been sentenced to jail for lying to police about what she do about abuse by university Dr Larry Nassar Cathy Clegg is said at trial that she did not remember being told about abuse by former Olympic and Michigan State University doctor Larry Nassar she was found guilty by a jury in February of lying to police and today she's been sentenced to ninety days in jail and eighteen months of probation Nassar was sentenced in twenty eighteen to forty two hundred and seventy five years in prison for decades of serial abuse to hundreds of athletes several of Nassar's victims testified the greatest knew about the abuse two of them spoke ahead of the sentencing Larissa Boyce sekaligus held up a piece of paper in front of her when she was sixteen and older if she filed a report there could be serious consequences for her voice that she was representing her sixteen year old self was silenced and humiliated and all of the hundreds of girls that were abused after her I'm Jennifer king

Michigan State University Dr Larry Nassar Cathy Clegg Larry Nassar Jennifer King Larissa Boyce
Michigan tries new approaches to coronavirus testing

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

09:27 min | 2 months ago

Michigan tries new approaches to coronavirus testing

"Michigan was one of the State's first at bat against a huge outbreak of corona virus. Michigan hit its peak in April reporting a high of more than eighteen hundred new cases on April. The third new cases remained above fifteen hundred for days that month Governor Gretchen whitmer declared a state of emergency by April first she closed all schools throughout the academic year hospitals were overrun even as workers faced layoffs and paycuts thousands. Of medical workers came down with the virus as they struggled to treat patients, and by the end of the month, the state ranked third for the highest number of coronavirus fatalities in the country Michigan struggled to bend the curve, but Michigan came through the curve bent. Now, the question is whether Michigan can stay out of the red zone and the state has seen a few smaller waves since the worst of it this spring, there was the outbreak last month that. Harper's bar the popular haunt for Michigan State University which reopened to an unexpectedly large crowd on June. The eighth local reporters found young patrons lining up less than six feet apart, and then packing the dance floor like they would on an ordinary non pandemic night. No masks to see in that picture state health officials later link that bar nearly two hundred new infections and today Michigan posted one of its higher totals of statewide new cases for the past couple of. Months and that's concerning especially because everywhere in the country right now, educators are trying to figure out how to get education going again it's basically every state and in some instances, every school district or even school for themselves at Michigan, State, in East Lansing, they're exploring a combination strategy that's going to be new to them, and that might be new for anyone else and it starts with a spit test developed at the university by neuroscience professor named Jack Lipton this man. The kit costs around three dollars a piece, and as you can see, it's pretty simple. You can do this in the privacy of your own apartment or dorm room you put your sample in the vial with the Little Barcode you seal it in the bag and Wallah your part is over the lab at Michigan State will take your sample and combine it with others in what is known as pool testing, which maybe you've heard about recently, the idea behind pulled testing is that it can help labs do more way more with weight less instead of having each person take their own. Separate test you pull the samples from a small number of people about a dozen and you run a single test on that pool of the pool turns up positive only then do you need each person in the pool to take a test but if the pool turns up negative, you're done the single test covered a dozen people in a place where you expect a lot of negatives. Pool testing is remarkably efficient at Michigan state. They're going to step further than that. Each volunteer who takes a spit test goes into separate pools of about ten or so people so think about it like. Two teams. You're Miami Dolphin and a Seattle Seahawk, or you're Houston rocket and in Minnesota Timber Wolves choose your metaphor. The point is if two pools come back with positive results, it can only mean one thing. The lab just finds the person who belongs to both pools using a handy grid like this one, and then recommends that that person get a follow up diagnostic test. It's like playing Bingo be six Bingo you might have corona virus. That's what Professor Lipton plans to do with samples from MSU volunteers testing two thousand of them every day and referring any apparent positives for an individual diagnostic test. Now, the third and most unusual part of this plan has to do with sewage scientists are discovering that they can spot a rising rotavirus cases early on by texting. Communities, Wastewater Michigan State, professor, Joan Rose and her team have been testing the campus wastewater. Since April she says, they noticed a peak in the virus that lined up with the news about an outbreak at a college hang out which demonstrated that there sewage diving expeditions worked I made that up I don't know if they're actually diving. For the testing this fall, the idea is to sample the wastewater from different places on campus so that they can get hyper local data if they can get good enough at sampling and turning around their result in a timely fashion, their work could act as an early alert system for Michigan State perhaps, even at the level of individual buildings. So you've got the pool testing with the affordable spit kits you've got expanded. Diagnostic testing. But literally just for those people who appear to be positive or just playing turn-up sick and then you've got the wastewater testing which increasingly looks like a functioning means of getting a warning in time to react if the plan works, it could help the university find and contain outbreaks. If it works the plan could help Michigan State and it's sixty seven thousand students stay on campus and have something like a semester. Joining us now is the aforementioned Dr Jack? Lipton. Of Translational Neuroscience at Michigan State University Dr Lipton. Thank you for being with us. We've heard about pool testing I want you to tell us a little more about it and why it it specifically helpful in this instance what what about Michigan State makes it a perfect candidate for the pooling of spit. What would you think about full testing end and Michigan state one of the things that you're that is really important to understand that the resources that we have is that university are fairly limited. Bright. But we're not a multinational corporation. So funds are limited resources are limited and pooling allows us to. have. More. More test being done with the same amount of resources or with less resources. So in this case, if we're dealing with supply chain issues with testing if we can test ten people with reagents that we would need to test one person, then we are were saving a lot in terms of of supplies, and if we don't have to run ten tests and we can run one test, we save a lot of time. So if you can save time and you can save supplies, you're going to Yeah. Ultimately conserve and that's really what our goal is and this. This works 'cause you're not expecting a large proportion of people to have this thing right. So generally speaking a bunch of these pools, we'll come out negative. Right. pools if you if you have about ten people in a pool in your expectation is maybe seeing two or three out of a hundred people. Show up positive than most of your pools are going to be negative. The more the prevalence increases the more the rates of infection increase. Then you're going to have more and more positive bulls. If one out of every ten people are positive than a pool of ten, most likely is going to have a positive individual in it. So you have to really balance pool size and prevalence together in order to come up with the right balance to save resources and save time. So the this actually could have broader implications There's a Wall Street Journal op-ed that you wrote about a previous test not this one that we're talking about, but it was a concept of pulling in you set across the United States tens of thousands of similar academic research labs have the expertise and equipment to help the country test for covid nineteen. If even one tenth of these labs joined the effort we could. Test an additional five, hundred thousand to one million samples a day. Your larger point here is that there are ways to get to more people and and then figure it out early rather than what we're in right now where there are some places where people are waiting in excess of seven days for typical test results in a in a concentrated environment like Michigan state you can. You can see things early and intervene. Absolutely and I think it's really important to note when you're talking about the pet that we put together. The vast amount of resources and know how that existed the academic laboratories universities across the country. Each one of the things that we've proposed was to develop biomedical National Guard and utilize all of these individual laboratories across the country and have them be organized through the federal government in order to be able to respond to pandemics or other natural disasters with biomedical know-how and that if we could get something like that done if the next administration is interested in doing something like that, we can be. Proactive instead of reactive in these kinds of situations. Wow. That's incredible because you just answer the question I was going to ask I was going to say, Hey, what can government do to take advantage of these kinds of resources and you just answer that I just want to say that again, a biomedical National Guard what a great simple idea resources all over the country run by different people but the the government of the United States providing the centralization for the data and the distribution. If you think about all of the laboratories and universities that were shut down as a result of the pandemic so many people were were sitting home like I sitting home on on zoom all day. If we have opportunity to come back into the laboratory and help. We can do so much in terms of trying to not only develop new new treatments and and working on new methods of detection, which is what our laboratory did during during April we can marshal all of these resources all. Know How that exists in order to to. Attack this problem in a concerted and coordinated way. Lifting. There's not a lot of great news about Krono virus, but I have to tell you after this conversation. I'm optimistic that there are people like you around this country who are actually in this moment while everything looks as grim as it is finding solutions that are going to help us see the other side of the coronavirus. Dr. Jack Lift Lipton is the chair and professor of translational neuro size. I don't even know what that is. We'll talk about that another time at Michigan State University. Thank you for all that you are doing and good luck to you at Michigan. State, we'll stay on top of this with you.

Michigan Michigan State University Dr. Jack Lift Lipton Wastewater Michigan State Professor Governor Gretchen Whitmer United States Harper Dr Jack MSU Biomedical National Guard East Lansing Translational Neuroscience Miami Dolphin Wall Street Journal Seattle Minnesota Joan Rose
"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

08:38 min | 3 months ago

"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

"This is MSU today. Here's Russ White while following a national search, Michigan State University President Samuel L. Stanley Jr. MD. Has named Dr Teresa Kay would riff as the university's next provost, an executive vice president for academic affairs. She's currently dean of the Graduate school and associate provost for graduate education. At Northwestern University. Dr Woodruff, Congratulations. And now does it feel Oh, thank you so much. It's really thrilling. It's exciting. MSU as a great institution. And I feel ready, although I probably feel feel like some of the freshmen who are also ready to think about moving to a whole new world into East Lansing. And I'm ready to get in the car with all my bags and get up there. Great Any any past experience either with MSU or the state of Michigan? Yes, I've had a number of colleagues and collaborators at MSU, particularly in the open. Do I n department I found in an area called Uncle Fertility, which maybe we'll talk about a little bit later. But I miss you and Ryan department was one of the first founding medical centers to bring this field of medicine to make it available for folks in the region. And of course, I know your great graduate Dean Thomas Ch Co. Who is just fantastic. A great leader. And Terry Sullivan is actually someone I really, really admire and have really followed her career and you know, she started as a graduate. Deena's well, so I think she's Someone toe really emulate and a term mission? Well Yep. Well, in terms of Michigan. You know, I've been in Illinois my whole life, So that means we're always coming over to Michigan to pick fruit and pick Berries, and in fact, my family has a little fishing cottage that's up in the upper peninsula. So I travel through Michigan all the time. And just love love the state. Well, that's cool. And Dr Wonderful talk Maurin a moment about your scientific research that you brought up, but just give us a little bit of your personal background. Tell us a little bit about yourself Why I grew up in the middle of Illinois in a place called Bourbon, A Illinois and my mother is a first grade teacher and my father was a a teacher of religion at the aisle, but in answering university, a small liberal arts college there in my hometown And I grew up wanting to be a teacher. I never thought about being a provost. Certainly, When I went to college, I was thinking about being a first grade teacher on my mother was the teacher's I mentioned my grandmother was a teacher of all grades on the PM handle of Oklahoma during the Great desk, pole and S O. My goal was really set in education and so in many ways have continued with that particular goal. But as I got into college, I really fell in love with research, really trying to not only understand how people derive those questions in the back of those answers in the back of the book, but really how Tio come up with those questions, And so that led me to Research and ultimately to graduate education at Northwestern, which is where I obtain my PhD in biochemistry, molecular biology and sociology. And there, I described the hormones that drive all of our reproductive cycles, both males and females and that set the course for me and reproductive health and Sex, inclusive science and medicine on and from there, I went to South San Francisco to Genentech to do Ah post. Doc came back to Northwestern in faculty at 95 I've been on faculty ever since. I moved into the Dean's role the dean of the graduate education at Northwestern about three years ago, and that's been a real privilege of my life to Ah aid and the development of that those advanced degree pursuing students who are everyday learning something new and teaching undergraduates and really are the life blood of an institution. So that you a little bit of what I've done in a nutshell. We'll and Dr Woodruff, you mentioned it before and I'll say it. You're an expert in ovarian biology and reproductive science and 20 or six you coined the term on co fertility to describe the merging of two fields, oncology and fertility. On co fertility is now globally recognized as a as a medical discipline with insurance and reimbursement available to patients and providers in many countries. In addition, You're an advocate for women in science, and you've led efforts to change federal policy to mandate the use of females and fundamental National Institute of Health Research. Just tell us the talk a little bit more about your research passions a bit right. So echo Fertility is an area that as you said, I coined the term literally helping to found the field and it really came out of work. I was doing as Thie, associate director for Basic sciences in our Robert H. Hilary Comprehensive Cancer Center, and when I became part of the leadership, the cancer Center, I told her director Im Really not a cancer biologists. I'm a reproductive scientists and he said, Well, I I just love your leadership style. So would you consider doing this? So I did, But you know, it was helping to don't deliver kind of philanthropic funding, Tio. Ah lot of new initiatives, particularly those that were interdisciplinary. You're still still ongoing today. But in addition, while I was doing that, I learned that some of our pediatric male cancer patients were coming down Teo Bank, their sperm, and this made sense because they were undergoing life preserving but in fact potentially fertility threatening cancer care. And so when I learned about that, which is kind of the early 2000 I said, that's phenomenal. I'd never thought about that even its a reflective scientist. What are we doing for the young women and the oncologist would say, Well, we don't really have to worry about them. Let's let them really focus on getting better, and that can be something we think about down the line, and that didn't add up. In fact, young women wouldn't have that option to have fertility and their future if it was lost today to that chemotherapy or radiation treatment, And so that began, really the last 15 or 20 years of Both research and the development of medical clinical practices of patient guidelines that has resulted in a true field of medicine. It's not every day that new fields of medicine or developed or the you know the fabric of how reimbursement and insurance actually gets done, but because of what we were able to accomplish, we really do have options for Most male and female young cancer patients from zero h all the way up to about 40 years of age. So really exciting work. Well, Theresa, this obviously is because you were presented with the Presidential award. For excellence in science, mathematics and engineering, mentoring by President Obama and an Oval Office ceremony in 2011. How cool was that? Oh, my gosh, That was really the highlight of my life on DH. President Obama is such it was such and is such a champion of mentorship and is a champion of science and and medicine and so standing in front of the Lincoln desk in the Oval Office. Listening to and really talk about how we have to make sure that the next generation of learners understands how science and forms their lives was so inspiring and actually that they almost didn't happen. I flew into D C with my mom and husband. They didn't get to go in the Oval Office, but they were just outside. And it was on the day that Obama was negotiating the end of the Iraq war with al Maliki just across the street at Blair House, and I thought, Well, he'll never come over for this, And in fact, he did come over and he said, You know you I know you all know that I've been a little busy today on and but the most important thing to me is making sure that We have a bright light on mentoring, and we make sure that everybody understands that mentoring is really a part of the fabric of of how America continues to grow and develop is really a very inspiring, inspiring moment..

MSU Michigan provost President Obama Dr Woodruff first grade teacher President Illinois Northwestern Northwestern University dean of the Graduate school MD Dr Teresa Kay Dean Thomas Russ White East Lansing executive vice president Samuel L. Stanley Jr Oval Office
Joey Chestnut, Miki Sudo win Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest

MSU Basetball at Wisconsin

00:28 sec | 3 months ago

Joey Chestnut, Miki Sudo win Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest

"Clearly, Nathan's famous hot dog eating contest has wrapped up in New York correspondent Steve Kastenbaum says It's not like the competition of years past the Cove in 19 addition of the Nathan's fourth of July hot dog eating contest. There's a new record set in the women's competition. Miki Sudo put down 48 a half hot dogs and buns in just 10 minutes here without a live audience, cheering her on an amazing feat here at an undisclosed location for the

Miki Sudo Nathan New York Steve Kastenbaum Cove
NBA says 16 players have tested positive for coronavirus

MSU Basetball at Wisconsin

00:36 sec | 4 months ago

NBA says 16 players have tested positive for coronavirus

"The NBA and its players have signed off on the terms to restart their season among the final details no fans will be present at any of the games that will be held at three different arenas at the ESPN wide world of sports complex in Orlando the league said it would soon release the schedule for the eighty eight seeding games eight games for each of the twenty two teams starting on July thirtieth health and safety protocols have been agreed to important as at least ten percent of all corona virus tests in Florida have come back positive for ten straight days during the first wave of testing sixteen of the three hundred two players tested Tuesday came back positive I'm John

NBA Orlando Florida Espn
Washington, D.C. Mayor Bowser in national spotlight as latest Trump foil

MSU Today Weekend

00:24 sec | 4 months ago

Washington, D.C. Mayor Bowser in national spotlight as latest Trump foil

"Trump name name DC's DC's mayor mayor after after protesters protesters toppled toppled a statue a statue of of Confederate Confederate general general Albert Albert pike pike the only the only rebel rebel monument monument outdoors outdoors in in the nation's the nation's capital capital we're not we're not happy happy that's that's going to going be to very be very expensive expensive for DC for DC they're always they're always looking looking for for money money we we need need we we always always need need more more money money and and then they then don't they don't do do the proper the proper job job she's she's not not going to going be to good be good for for I'm sorry I'm sorry your browser your browser

DC Albert Albert
Protesters Fell Confederate Monument In D.C., Provoking Trump's Fury

MSU Today Weekend

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

Protesters Fell Confederate Monument In D.C., Provoking Trump's Fury

"Is told to rally president trump went after his likely November opponent Joe Biden for the black community in four years forty seven is that also saw two tied the destruction and removal of Confederate monuments and statues to democratic leaders following the may killing of George Floyd the African American man who died while in Minneapolis police custody and trump name DC's mayor after protesters toppled a statue of Confederate general Albert pike the only rebel monument outdoors in the nation's capital we're not happy that's going to be very expensive for DC they're always looking for money we need we always need more money and then they don't do the proper job she's not going to be good for I'm sorry your browser

Donald Trump Joe Biden George Floyd DC Albert Pike President Trump Minneapolis
Trump campaign asks supporters to sign coronavirus waiver ahead of rally

MSU Basetball at Wisconsin

00:40 sec | 4 months ago

Trump campaign asks supporters to sign coronavirus waiver ahead of rally

"President trump has addressed west point graduates today and is also rescheduled his first campaign rally in months moving it from the Juneteenth commemoration of the end of slavery in the U. S. to next Saturday correspondent Abby Phillip reports details of that will take place amid the corona virus pandemic it's not clear that they are taking any precautions the message from the trump campaign appears to be rally at your own risk they have asked people who sign up to come to this rally to sign off on a waiver that essentially says they cannot sue president trump or the campaign if the contract corona virus by attending so far there are no plans to enforce social distancing at this

Donald Trump Abby Phillip President Trump
Trump welcomes reemergence of North Korea's Kim Jong-un

MSU Today Weekend

00:33 sec | 6 months ago

Trump welcomes reemergence of North Korea's Kim Jong-un

"President trump welcomed the re emergence of Kim Jong own after the north Korean dictator was seen yesterday at the opening of a fertilizer plant correspondent will Ripley says it's still unclear why the state run news service was silent over Kim's whereabouts for over two weeks three unusual that North Korea did not come out strongly and deny these reports that range the full spectrum from him was hiding out from the crowd of virus pandemic at his luxury compound to he was at death's door South Korea did say that they believed he was alive and well but the north Koreans were silent on the

Donald Trump Kim Jong Ripley North Korea South Korea President Trump
New York Mayor Says Schools To Remain Closed For Rest Of Academic Year, Governor Says Not So Fast

MSU Basetball at Wisconsin

00:37 sec | 6 months ago

New York Mayor Says Schools To Remain Closed For Rest Of Academic Year, Governor Says Not So Fast

"New York City had announced today that schools will remain closed for the rest of the academic year the governor Andrew Cuomo says that call is up to him I understand the mayor's position which is seeking school should be canceled for the rest of the year when we made the decision to close the schools we made it for the entire metropolitan region Suffolk Nassau New York City Westchester Rockland you can't make a decision just within New York City without coordinating that decision with the whole metropolitan region because it all works

New York City Andrew Cuomo Suffolk Nassau New York
U.S. House passes Coronavirus bill funding free tests, sick leave

MSU Basetball at Wisconsin

00:33 sec | 7 months ago

U.S. House passes Coronavirus bill funding free tests, sick leave

"Early this morning the house has passed a bipartisan bill to deal with the corona virus outbreak it's called the family's first coronavirus response act and it provides direct help to Americans affected by the virus first and foremost is Texas Republican Kay Granger it makes testing for the corona virus free this is the only way we can stop the spread of this virus Massachusetts Democrat Richard Neal says free testing is just one part of the bill we are making a historic emergency commitment to paid leave for the American family members affected by corona virus the bill now goes to the

Kay Granger Richard Neal Texas Massachusetts
The VW Beetle: An Evil Origin Story

Past Gas

09:09 min | 9 months ago

The VW Beetle: An Evil Origin Story

"Germany was looking for a true people's car literally translated as Volkswagen in one thousand nine hundred. Thirty one. One writer from DOS volks auto basically summed up the struggle for making people's those car perfectly quotes the van and be too heavy into expensive to produce the Hausa ill-suited in traffic an unstable in purpose but is needed is a car. Awed designed for the street offering maximum comfort but a minimum of luxury Ferdinand. Porsche realized this as well and at the age of fifty five decided to open a business himself an attempt to accomplish such a monumental task. He assembled a team of the best German. Speaking designers engineers an opened his own company in Stuttgart Germany while he didn't have much capital. He was globally known as an automotive genius so he was able to accomplish this with clouds alone own. GotTa have that clout. Yeah cloud is basically my number one currency. Yeah I think I can speak for everyone in this room. We wouldn't be where we are today without without our cloud for your appearance on two broke girls channel wouldn't exist. It does get a little though. 'cause I remember last week went to lunch and I covered you you and I was like hey. Can you hear me like thirteen dollars. Like I haven't paid for a meal since one thousand nine Hundred Ninety six on April Twenty Fifth Nineteen thirty one the company. I entered the official registry as the doctor Professor Porsche Company for the Assembly consultation and design of automobiles wheels and engines. We've wanted to call Dr Pepper but that's hardly taken. Ferdinand Porsche had made a name for himself in racing. The creation of a people's car was always a personal passion of his. It wasn't long until Porsche began drawing up designs for the first Volkswagen in nineteen thirty. He Won. He was commissioned by Private Motorcycle Company and began working on the project twelve motorcycle sales are going down and this company wanted to diversify hi there portfolio a little bit product. Twelve was the first project ever for Porsche. That was neither a small luxury wagon or a small racing car designs immediately we took on the familiar beetle-shaped and it was powered by five cylinder. One thousand. CC radial engine. That may twenty five horsepower. Radial engine like like like an airplane. Like an airplane yeah the first prototypes were road. Tested in nineteen thirty two. Despite the cars functionality the company that hired Porsche Chak cancelled the contract. As motorcycle. Sales had begin to pick up again in the entire endeavor just like they broke up with their long-term. Yeah way friend and Porsche was like finally you know we're going to get to be together and they're like. Oh Yeah Yeah. Yeah it's always been you then and turns out Dave's back. Oh cool no good for you guys so happy for you know all right so that whole thing was okay for Porsche the motorcycle manufacturer. Ns you another company immediately. swooped in to take their place at the time. Germany held the largest motorcycle market in the world but people wanted cars and Msu that they begin flirting with the idea of building true through automobiles it's crazy that Nebraska State University started out as a motorcycle manufacturer in Germany. It's incredible and then we can. It makes much more money in academia. This new project was dubbed project. Thirty two as it began in the year. Nineteen thirty two a pattern was beginning to form though and ns you started to stay purely in the motorcycle market and bailed on the project the factor. Ns you pulled out. Didn't hinder porsches spirits. It's though he seemed like a pretty a Kinda Guy Project thirty two had allowed him to alternate innovate his previous designs. Bring him one step closer to the future Volkswagen and he had been dreaming of and just a year and a half working for himself he already. He had already made more progress on designing his dream. People's car then he had made in the previous ten so overall he was pretty stoked meanwhile on February eleventh nineteen thirty three less than two weeks after coming to office Chancellor Adolf off Hitler did something no other German chancellor had ever done he attended the Berlin auto show. It was no accident that the theme of the show that year was the will to motorization cassation which now that read it aloud. Sounds very forboding and evil. Okay so Hitler had a plan quote. The motor vehicle has become come next to the airplane. One of humanity's most ingenious means of transportation the German nation can be proud and knowing is played a major part in the design and development of of this great instrument he immediately punctuated that remark by saying that Germany had fallen behind in the market. And now of course his time to fix it was actually at this auto show that one. Joseph Dan's appeared with his own prototype. Volkswagen the Standard Superior Ganz is especially unique in the story because his designs over the five years before the show helped influence both Ferdinand Porsche. And many others. With their attempted Volkswagen's Hitler himself expressed serious interest tryst in the prototype vehicle during the shell despite providing revolutionary designs contributed to all future. Volkswagen beetles just Ganz's name is almost completely absent from any history books. Due to his Jewish Heritage Ganz was arrested persecuted and forced to flee the country of Germany while his name was scrubbed from basically all records and was forbidden from being associated with the term Volkswagen altogether so porsche basically stole the design at the following auto show one year later. Hitler announced two major policies that would be enacted immediately. He called for the mass construction of roads and and highways as well as for car to be built that can finally be owned and driven by the common man quote. No country can be strong transportation as week to help push forward his dream of a mobilized Germany he promised tax relief for auto companies more money for racing more resources for motoring events less interference from state governments on the ownership ownership and production of cars. Course this was not just for the People's benefit but for militancy. Yes now this this is what kicked are like the. US's highway system into high gear to they're like. Oh we need to get you know missiles across the country chief we need to an arson. Attack on the Reichstag allowed Hitler to make a sweeping power grab. He officially made himself Germany's fuhrer he. Hurried hurried changes and transportation and pass the rash automotive law in the summer of nineteen thirty three removing German states of any responsibilities concerning the ownership and and production of automobiles and soon after the construction of the first autobahn began. So he's the site. I'm a dictator. Yeah Yeah it's like turns out. Yeah I'm king to again public support. The idea of national progress was tied directly to the innovation in transportation. It's hard to understand. Just how big the Autobahn project was. But the pure scale of road. Construction was unprecedented unprecedented at the time. Four thousand thirty four miles of road was planned for construction over the next seven years but like so many characteristics characteristics of the Nazi party it was the idea that mattered. Most the Nazi spoke with these roads. As M- court monuments in fact one announcement titled Not Roads But Works Works of art read quote. Nothing is to cramp or delay you in your swing from one horizon. To the other the highways will spark like stone an artfully rot. Ring ring the construction of these roads was essential for Nazis to gain the power. They wanted but they needed the public support behind. We'll be right back with more of this story. Okay but I learned from our sponsors. It should be obvious that the roads were really intended for an advantage during wartime but people were too busy Z.. To really think about that for a while Germany was actually looking really nice as long as he didn't look any deeper than the surface level. Surprisingly of all Hitler's rhetoric. The Volkswagen was the one that carmakers feared the most they all loved the idea of mass producing a car that literally everyone will want to buy or even better working with the governments to enforce the necessity to buy them after all who doesn't love being both supply and demand but they wanted the cars they mass-produced to be cheap like a three wheeled covered in motorcycle or something. Truly cheap manufacturers hated the idea of building a car just as good as the upper level cars for the price of an entry level car they wanted to make money and Hitler's Volkswagen plan left no room for people to even need to purchase high end models. Not only did they think selling a good car. So cheap was texting technologically logically impossible. They also feared the long term impact of direct government involvement in the automotive

Porsche Volkswagen Hitler Germany Ferdinand Porsche Private Motorcycle Company Stuttgart Doctor Professor Porsche Compa Writer Joseph Dan Dr Pepper United States Jewish Heritage Ganz Dave Arson MSU Ganz
AG: Drug law affects opioid case, clergy probe to go longer

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

01:30 min | 10 months ago

AG: Drug law affects opioid case, clergy probe to go longer

"Thoughts on the opioid epidemic and the sexual assault scandal at the hands of Michigan priests dominate the mind of Michigan's new Attorney General her first year on the job coming to an end newsradio nine fifties that Clark with the story when it comes to the opioid crisis the the Nestle says an obscure nineteen ninety five law prevents her from effectively fighting the drug makers responsible for the drugs that have killed thousands the state has not filed suit against drug manufacturers over the crisis the what is involved with multi state settlement talks with Purdue pharma the maker of oxycontin why is this even more aggressive Nestle says that law has absolutely affect our strategy to seek damages for the pain killer addiction epidemic Nestle also says there are still millions of documents to review an investigation into sexual abuse by Catholic priests in Michigan show me more time to complete that investigation that Clark WWJ newsradio nine fifty Michigan's Attorney General says here communications director was inadvertently misleading when she said our office has suspended a nearly two year long criminal investigation into Michigan state university's handling of complaints against serial sexual abuser Larry Nasser Attorney General NASA said in a statement today the investigation is ongoing Nestle says she remains deeply committed to finding the truth about who knew what about Nasser at MSU communications director Kelly Ross McKinney says she was mistaken to use the word suspended she says it was a humbling but an important lesson that words really do

Michigan Nestle Purdue Pharma Director Michigan State University General Nasa Kelly Ross Mckinney Assault Attorney Clark Wwj Larry Nasser MSU
"msu" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"msu" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"MSU Denver after some cases of serious illness at that school the school says for employees who have cancer are concerned that it may have been caused by their work environment university says result from independent tests will be finished by August eighth in the meantime it believes the area where they work is safe and summer classes are continuing their the school will hold a town hall to reassure students staff and faculty members and also answer more questions at eleven o'clock on campus this morning at MSU down from Connor Freescale a news radio a proposal that would have torn down and rebuilt Columbine high school is not moving forward jeffco public schools superintendent Jason glass just joined our show and says the district sent a survey out to the community last month asking for their input on that idea we have people that supported the idea we have people that posted we have people that came forward with different ideas and there was no clear sort of consensus glass says a big reason for the question is the number of visitors who have a morbid fascination with the nineteen ninety nine tragedy at the school they are looking to lose glass adds that the district will consider some new security upgrades like fencing or even walls around the school on the national stage Attorney General bill Barr directing the federal government to resume executions that's after nearly two decades of capital punishment being off the table are says the practice has been expressly approved by Congress as a result five executions for convicted murderers have been scheduled conservative commentator George will says if the Democrats really want to win back the White House in twenty twenty they should nominate Michael Bennett Bennett is not one of those saying if you if you like your doctor you can keep them and I feel like your public school you can keep them and no one believes either of those things will says that if senator Warren or Heris gets the nomination for president the dental like losing twenty twenty will no longer a card carrying member of the GOP although he still identifies as a conservative we'll hear more from him coming up at nine ten meantime former Colorado governor John Hickenlooper says there are compelling reason he should stay in the twenty twenty race for the White House I would argue that I'm the one person running who's actually done what everyone else is just talking about right we got to near universal health care in Colorado he beat the R. A. with tough gun laws we didn't take guns away but we've got you know universal background checks we became the number one economy in the country for the last three years on the one person who should drop I think all those other people should be dropping out the Democrat talking to reporters this weekend I weather has been talk that some of his advisers have told him to drop out of the race for the presidential nomination and instead run against GOP member Cory Gardner for his Senate seat in twenty twenty Republicans and Democrats have much different take aways from yesterday's testimony from former special counsel Bob Muller while house speaker Nancy Pelosi called a very important day there was some disappointment from the last this hearing Maulers appearance felt miles short of what Democrats were hoping for what they expected and it not only did it not advance the ball on impeachment I think it's possible may have set that because back quite a bit ABC's Jonathan Karl reporting the G. O. P. calling Muller's testimony a victory for the party and for the president there could be some jail house trouble brewing for billion or Jeffrey F. Steen he was reportedly found last night in a semi conscious state with marks on his neck investigators have not determined what happened to him but he's being kept on suicide watch Eckstine pleading not guilty to federal conspiracy in sex trafficking charges he's due in court next week Porter Rican celebrating the resignation of governor Ricardo row sale on the streets of San Juan.

Denver MSU three years two decades
"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

09:10 min | 1 year ago

"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

"This is MSU today. Now back to our conversation on our mobility future. There are going to be new jobs created we don't even know what they are yet. You know? And I'm always reminded. I can't remember the name of the movie, I think that came out last year about the three African American scientists women at NASA in the early stages of the space program, and I'm reminded of one scene in that movie where NASA gets its first IBM, mainframe, computer. And the one of the female scientists he's the computer and realizes that her group of coders that have been doing it by hand is soon to be extinct, and she adapts them to use the mainframe, computer and learn how to use that mainframe, computer. And that's you know, we don't even know the jobs that are going to be available. We do know that we're going to need people that have those skill sets skill sets to be adaptable and fly. To those new jobs. I'm looking forward to when I'm in my eighties. I might just not be physically able to drive will I be able to have a vehicle where I can get around on my own without asking somebody for help. But just by punching in some some numbers. Hopefully, so you know, it remains to be determined at this point in time. You know, I will say that one of the biggest stressors for older adults is giving up driving. Yes. Yeah. And so we need to figure out ways to make mobility easier for older adults, but we have to think about to that older. Adults often have different health initiatives that arise that may result in not driving. But there may be other health conditions to that impact. How mobile they are just in terms of getting in an in or out of the vehicle whether they're driving or not. And so one of the things that a couple of colleagues when an engineering and one in planning, and I are doing are trying to understand different groups that have different disabilities. And how that will impact the types of vehicles that they need specifically in terms of a vs because if companies aren't thinking about individuals with disabilities, they're missing a big segment of the population. I don't know if you know, but we're in what's known as a silver soon. Nami at this point in time. There are more people turning sixty five every single day in the US in there have ever been at any point in our history. Michigan. There are more people turning sixty five than there are eighteen as well. So quickly projected to continue over the next twenty thirty forty years in particular. And so if companies that aren't developing autonomous vehicles aren't thinking about this population is going to be a challenge for older adults to be able to either use their phone, or you know, have some other way that they can signal that they need an autonomous vehicle much of my work is focused on helping odor Dole's to be able to use technologies to cross the technical or what we refer to as the digital divide technology uses increasing mung odor dolls in general. So there are a lot more tech savvy than they used to be there's still a significant segment of odor dolts that don't use smartphones. If you think about, you know, Uber lift you have to hail it through your smart phone through. Through an app on your smartphone, or your tablet, and so we have to think about not just the vehicles themselves. But also about how you access those vehicles and helping older adults and people in general becomes trouble with those different mechanisms. And so you can't just put it out there and think that people will come if they don't understand how to actually use the technology to be able to reach out to the autonomous via. I think you bring up a great point certainly in terms of making sure that various segments of the population. Older Americans those disabilities know how to use the technology not just to order vehicle like and lift but to order the groceries to order every day household supplies. I knew you can now do and and get delivered to your door. These kinds of services are going to become even more important to that those populations moving forward, but they're going to have to know how to access them in that that that that's. That's going to be critical. I think this brings up another issue that we haven't really talked about which is cybersecurity, you know, and I've done some work in the past with others MSU looking at generational differences in how individuals think about and used devices for online banking online security issues, and I can tell you that there are more and more people than are trying to take advantage of vulnerable populations. And this is just another venue where that's going to be a likelihood, whether it's hacking into automated vehicles themselves, or whether it's you know, coming up with fake apps, and so forth and marketing to older adults or vulnerable groups. I think we have to do a lot of education to hope people in general understand some of the challenges the data that we have from the state of the state survey, we looked at perceived risk and benefits of av in particular across. Generational groups and one of the things that we found was that across different age groups from boomers younger adults all the way up to the silent generation does in their seventies eighties. And beyond is that there are still significant concerns about using Thomas vehicles in the future. One of the big concerns is being on the roads with vehicles who are not autonomous. And we know that people keep their vehicles on average. It's around thirteen years now. And so even if today, you know, everyone bought or leased or used and autonomous vehicle you'd still have a huge segment of the population that didn't have autonomous vehicles. And so the mixture of autonomous anonymous is worrisome for will be true for decades for decades to come other. Concerns, particularly for older dolls were about cyber security of out some hacking into the vehicle's, and how could how the carbs spont-. Are they going to be left stranded beside the road? When you know, if they're not mobile, they can't get out, you know, sometimes and they're stuck what do they do. You know? So I think there are a lot of challenges. Now, they did see certainly some benefits increased mobility potential the opportunity to stay in gauge with significant others a range of different things like that. But I think our society and the companies in particular who developing Thomas vehicles have to do some education, if they're really going to make these these vehicles appealing to generations across the life course, certainly appreciate the work that you and others across campus doing I've had an opportunity myself to be involved in. In these in these discussions from engineering to planning as you've noted to our college of law MSU presents a unique opportunity for the study of automated vehicles in particular, given what I like to say our closed campus situation, and you know, between the hours of ten to two on any given day, the center of our campus might as well, resemble midtown Manhattan, and plus plus so you have a continuum of urban suburban and even rural areas within the campus that make it a natural testbed for these kinds of things. So appreciate the work that you're doing please that the institute can be of assistance through our mapra program and looking forward to additional research from you and your colleagues thank you for being here today. Thanks so much for having me, Charlie any any last words. Well, if we've learned anything from this. We're going to have an interesting few years ahead. Of us lots of change. I mean, it's one of the big one of the big stories of our lifetime is the rapid pace of technological change. And the technology appears to be moving faster in many cases than our political systems. And our social relationships are able to keep up. So that's going to be. I think nobody believes that's going to slow down. It's going to be a continuing challenge for for the foreseeable future. And continuing opportunities as well challenges and opportunities. Well, once again, thank you dot com. Thank you, Charlie. Always a pleasure. That's about all the time. We have for today. This is Arnold wine. Felled join us next time on state of the state..

MSU NASA Charlie Thomas IBM US Michigan Nami Dole Manhattan Arnold twenty thirty forty years thirteen years
"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

"Now, MSU basketball expert analyst Matt steigenga on with us here for the segment. Matt MSU an Michigan adopt ten matchup a big ten championship senior night is this as big of. An MSU Michigan matchup as you can remember. Well, probably in the last twenty to thirty years. Definitely I just there's so much riding on this game. And what I've said the other people is now, look, you know. Yeah. It senior night. Yeah. This is a rivalry game. But those two things I think are secondary to the fact this is for a big ten championship. That's what's on the line tonight. Really at the end of the day. This is huge. And so to come down to the last game of the year. All the other stuff is special. It's extra that's icing on the cake. But man, the fact this is for a championship tonight that special Ed certainly is as you mentioned, there's there's just a lot of factors right now. The places already starting to get a Little Rock as it's it's going to be a fun night here tonight. Go at one thing we talked about too is that the fact, you know, night like this the zones a little louder the band. Just sounds a little different. You heard it when the when the team came out here. It's different. It's louder it's special. It's just something. You can't describe to someone unless you're here. This is really neat. What do our best to bring? Everybody listening. Trust me. I'll do my best. But man, it's it is some kind of environment. It's a really special evening. We have on hand for us here from east Lansing thirteen days ago when MSU played Michigan the first time this season. I had asked you what it's like to be a player. What what's that perspective that experience like I'm assuming that hasn't changed in the last thirteen days. So I kind of want to go back to just hasn't changed last thirteen years. Last thirty to ask you are the feeling still the same that you shared when you were in the green on the floor. You still have a little bit of that in your absolutely I absolutely. You know, I've often said I can remember all the games. I played in against Michigan versus any other games. I played in in my career. And it's just as a former player. Yeah. I get excited for this. You know, I love the fact I can be here to watch it and be a part of it. I just can't describe the feelings they all come flooding back or.

Michigan MSU Matt MSU Matt steigenga analyst Lansing Ed thirteen days thirteen years thirty years
"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

"Dave great to have you on the show. Thanks so much us. What is an MSU youth program must define that for our audience. An MSU youth program is any learning activity that involves the participation of minors specifically youth under the age of eighteen now that includes programs that are on campus off campus and both in and outside the state of Michigan even stretching abroad into global context events that would not be considered an MSU youth program include private events like birthday parties or weddings, and. Public events such as concerts at the Wharton center or MSU athletic events. So who is considered an MSU youth program participant anyone who's under the age of eighteen and is not enrolled or accepted for enrollment at MSU is considered a youth program. Participant duly enrolled participants that is students who are in high school. But are also enrolled in MSU collegiate courses qualify if there is an overnight component, and Dave one or to give us a little bit of a history and overview of MS us efforts to protect minors in youth programs. I think it's important to note this began long before the current climate that we're in. Yes. So there have been many ongoing efforts in two thousand twelve training efforts for MSU program directors up focused on identifying and reporting signs of child abuse and then in two thousand thirteen a policy outlining operational requirements for MSU youth programs was established. And that policy has continued to evolve over time with revisions in two thousand sixteen a part time director of youth programs at MSU conducted.

MSU director of youth programs Dave Michigan Wharton center
"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

"I'm Russ white for? MSU today Southfield native and MSU alumnus Jonathan Kirkland is playing George Washington in the Chicago production of Hamilton he was recently awarded a distinguished young alumnus award from MSU. I was so shocked when it was when it was when it. Was when I. Heard word that I be given this award because. I know, so many fellow Spartans in. Alumni and friends who do some extraordinary, things rolling in the kind of same as you come in school and you have, your your graduating classes or. Whatever and I know so many educators. And people who are doing so many homeless community service and just doing these crazy things that you heard that I was being given an award house like me are you. Kidding me but it's such an honor man is such an honor to to know that a place. That helped groom me in a place that helped cultivate really who I am. You know his follow my career in this follow what I've done I get it that is Hamilton is loud in, this all that but honestly I wouldn't, be in That show had been for my time here so is this is such an honor man I'm excited I'm. Excited for the event and? I'm grateful man really grateful Kirkland says MSU. Helped him reach his potential. Man is crazy I'm back here now this is the first time. I've been back in the least has to be at least. Five years and it just feels like home you know what I mean it's it's some different in the fabric at MSU you know I was I was blessed enough to have a lot of auditions and be recruited by a lot of different universities to sing in their programs and do all that but NS you man is. Just it's such a family feel it's such a communal feel and I think you see that represented in our sports programs music programs in education program like you see people come back you know, and people want to? Come back to talk and come back to just hang out even before we before I have you here with former professors and seizure just kind of chopping it up. And just talking about old times and what an issue did for. Me specifically was. Make it okay to be who I am you. Know what, I mean I think In. Our society especially, as an, artist, you can go through. A lot of identity. Crisis sometimes luckily I've never fought that fight at an extreme. Level you know but MSU said listen, you. Are young. At the time seventeen eighteen year old kid a. Young black man who, wants to sing opera. We want you to sing. Opera and we want you to be great I said all right cool as do it you know and and luckily you know they they walked with me. In that process and the? Discomfort of it you know what I mean at. Times going, through coming. From a predominantly black community to what MSU is the answer this is of that right but it ever feeling like anyone was trying to make me feel. Left out or cast off or whatever but actually the opposite. And inviting me in like, I'm into this world man we want we want you to, be here so that's one. Of the many, things and of, course the, training I got through the college music as an actor as a singer and then being able to translate that in the work ethic you know they told me I just I was just talking to some students and tell them how they told me flat out when I graduated they said John you have the talent. You have a gift you? Have the Charisma but you are too lazy you. Will not, make it, in. The real world, if you're, going to be, that lazy, you, need to decide if you want to do this or you don't. And that's that's a heart you know and and they told their and that's another thing I love about us we're. So honest like we're, not? Pulling punches for anybody again you see that do Okaz the are professors on campus I we're not pulling, punches we'll tell you flat out let your good, but you haven't earned, the, right to do anything and they said now. We cash on the shows and we. Do that because, we knew that eventually you know John won't be prepared day one but by, Showtime he'll give us a great show who do his thing, but it, doesn't work that, way in real life they wanted me to be ready so they just they trainee in a gloomy. In there were, patient with, me, and it was the. Perfect little bubble.

MSU Jonathan Kirkland Hamilton Russ white Spartans John Showtime Southfield Chicago George Washington trainee seventeen eighteen year Five years
"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

"I'm Russ, white for MSU today associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor of United States Supreme court will be visiting the east Lansing MSU community this month as part of the twenty, eighteen one book, one community program sorta. My yours memoir my beloved world is this? Year's. One book one. Community selection yes the one book one community is. Kind of exactly what it says it's a chance to gather that use Lansing community and the MSU student and faculty staff community around one book and kind of come together and have a conversation about these important topics as we look at one specific read and then kind of from that have different programs and activities that, engage people in conversation with people. They might not otherwise talk to that's MS us joy Shantz how? Is the book chosen each year so we have a committee made up of people that represent the university like myself and the city like. Michael and the community as well and so we try to come Together and brainstorm what are topics that people are talking. About what our topic's people should, be talking, about and how can we kind of choose a book and also an author specifically who will come and really addressed that and get students excited and get, community members excited, so we go through. Many different books and many different ideas we? Do. A lot of. Reading speed reading and come to a decision and. This year was probably the easiest ever when we were able to get the author that we have so this year we have Sonia Sotomayor coming she's a US supreme court Justice I'm we're really excited this is a pretty special thing to have a supreme court Justice coming to the east Lansing MSU community and the community, seems really excited about it too. So the name of her book is my beloved worlds and it's? Kind of coming of age it's a memoir it's a coming of age stories though she talks a lot about her childhood and her family. And and just going through school And kind of what led, her to becoming a supreme court Justice. She kind of, ends the book with you know, becoming. A supreme court Justice so it's it's it's very much about like her path to becoming Who she is today that's, Michael fry from the city of east Lansing Shantz adds that this is not a book about how supreme court cases are decided yeah I. Think that what's unique about it is she even says in the book this isn't a book to tell you how I make my decisions or why I make the choices are vote the. Way I do instead this is about me and this is about my life. And she shares the. She's much more vulnerable than many other in her, type of position who write memoirs and stories, about their lives so I think she really does open herself up to this is my family this is my life these are maybe mistakes I made on the way and I think that that really will speak especially to students as they're kind of entering their their freshman year. MSU and to the rest of campus and the community as well that just. Seeing her be open and vulnerable will hopefully encourage people to share their stories and kind of learn from from their experiences as. Well there's a number of events that, students and, community members can both at. Tons and, I think just the idea is that we're all read Reading the. Same book and it's hopefully hopefully the events are spring conversations so in that way. I, think that it helps to bring the community together and then there's there's other, smaller events so we have our author events but then they're smaller events that people can attend as well I'm kind of the big kickoff. Of that will be at the east Lansing high school on Sunday August twenty six that six PM so that's going to be a question and answer session with Justice Sotomayor and so people. Have submitted questions ahead of time and they were open to the community so. People were able to. Ask their burning questions and then come in hear, her answer them so that will be just, a conversation with her that evening on Sunday night so that's the main event that everyone is welcome to to attend the other events are on campus so she'll speak at the freshman academic welcome in the breslin center on Monday morning and then there will be a student QNA. Following that where students had a chance to submit their specific question so she. Really has made herself accessible in terms of we get to Ask the, questions and then hear her answer so it's the community kind of speaking for itself and saying. You know just as Cetewayo are, this is what we want to hear you speak to so. I think that makes it very genuine very genuine conversation between us and her, in addition to the. Events that. Joy, just mentioned there. Are also be a writing workshop I think that that's pretty much fall. But there might still be a few spots left and there's gonna be some film showings. And some other events as well at our library so lots of opportunity to talk about the. Buck and talk about Justice Sotomayor so so for the kickoff event some important. Things for people to know is that the event is going to. Be Sunday August twenty six that's, sex PM at the east Lansing.

Sonia Sotomayor east Lansing MSU community MSU United States Supreme court east Lansing high school east Lansing Lansing east Lansing Shantz Michael fry Cetewayo Russ breslin center Buck
"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

07:01 min | 2 years ago

"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

"Details and terms and conditions I'm, Russ white for, MSU, today Michigan State. University provost June Pierce you it says that MSU is holistically focused. On student health and wellbeing there is a strong emphasis in this coming year on making sure that we're thinking. Holistically about the care students we spent a lot of time thinking about academic, success and we continue to we have a number of new things, going on and NAT arena but part of student success is making sure that our, students can be fully engaged, not just in a classroom but. Outside the classroom and activities and that means making sure they Really, are healthy emotionally healthy as well as physically healthy so Dave Wiseman, lists the first director of, student health and wellness and he's house didn't what everyone knows is all in health center but it's really now the switches and on taking care of. Sick people it's on promoting the best health of students. So we have expanded the counseling, center and there's, been, a lot of. Conversation about that students now have access to counseling virtually twenty four. Hours a day but we've also expanded the person in person counselors this fall will be moving a branch of. The counseling center into the union and that will increase access we hope fairly, dramatically while we have more providers and that's important maybe what's most, important is that all of our providers have a new attitude it's not new for, most of them because most, of them were always concerned about. Promoting the health of our students But now with counseling and psychiatric services really integrated with primary, care there is kind of a new commitment on the part of, all of our providers to making sure that our students have what they. Need again to fully participate in campus life. At MSU provost you it and her, team continue to work on improving student's success at. MSU well I think the most exciting thing about the students success, initiative is that it's owned by everyone and not. By a few people whose job it is to do student success and there, are campuses where there's an. Office of student success we don't have an office we've got a. Campus of student success and so some very exciting things continue to be in. Academic departments not again not just mentor sediment tours are set a tutors the curricular reform is pretty exciting so the Get one for. This fall is mathematics and the end of, remedial mathematics not because there aren't students who need support in math they, certainly do but we spent the last couple of years experimenting with. Different models you know how to students best achieve who come with some mathematics vulnerabilities perhaps didn't have the strongest background in high school or just struggled with mathematics and so thinking about how to, pair the help they need inside the class rather than in a special class. Is, the way in which we believe students will be able to make the best progress not just progress in math but progress toward degree instead of stopping and taking a remedial. Class and then taking a course in their major where of. Course it will count for. Academic credit now that we've merged all, of that you no longer class a full year class we believe. That students, will first of. All they'll do better just generally. Do better because it's it's a. Better developed Course but also they will feel better about working towards. Something that really advances their goals so those are the kinds of things that, we continue to talk about the credit momentum project is still alive and well there are students who probably shouldn't take fifteen, credits but that's a very, small number of students most students need to be rolled in fifteen, credits and that's how you complete in four years so but we aren't just suggesting students take fifteen credits part of the students success initiative is really getting smarter about advising so. That we help students picked the right fifteen, credits not the. Fifteen credits that will crush them in their first semester Or discourage them but the right combination again that moves him toward degree but keeps. Them fully engaged we have some very very bright students who come, here and many of, them come and say oh my goodness I'm only in class twelve hours a week. And then they spent those other hours in ways that are not nearly. As productive so making sure part of students success, is there's two pieces of that it's increasing expectations, but for every time where every notch you. Increase expectations you also increase student support so we've, paired the high expectations with high student support. And, we think that's why students are becoming more students. Are becoming successful and we're really starting to see that turn around the number of students on academic probation the first semester, has dropped the number of students graduating has increased particularly in PA Where MSU and most of the public institutions in. This country have lagged to our dismay and probably to our shame, in some ways Students of color underrepresented minority students in this country do not graduate at the same rate as majority. Students and we know, all the reasons for coming. From schools where there may be fewer resources and and fewer academic, supports and communities those are, all reasons but they, can't be excuses so what we have, done is, really try to think about what how. You put support surround not just underrepresented students but students who generally come from backgrounds educational backgrounds where there may have been less support and so last year we saw our graduation rate, of African American students increased by six percent Our graduation rate of Hispanic students, increased by. Just one percent but that's in the right direction and I have said to many groups okay so that was the easiest six percent the next six. Percent will show us where we're challenged because we still have about a ten percent, camp and, that's just not acceptable it's not who we are, it's not what we were created to be and we. Have the capacity to do better and in our students deserve this MSU today my conversation with MSU provost June you it continues. In a moment choosing, an energy company raises.

MSU provost Dave Wiseman June Pierce Russ white director Michigan State PA six percent twelve hours one percent ten percent four years
"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

"Twenty seven MSU. Youth programs that serve over sixty? Thousand youth each year Dave great. To have you on the show thanks so much what is an MSU youth program let's define that for our audience. An MSU youth program is any learning activity that involves the participation of minors specifically youth under the age, of eighteen now that includes programs that are on campus off campus and both. In and outside the state of Michigan even stretching abroad into a global context events that would not be considered, MSU, youth program include private events like birthday parties or weddings and Public events. Such as concerts at the Wharton center or MSU, athletic events so who is considered an MSU youth program participant anyone who's under the age of eighteen, and is not enrolled. Or accepted for enrollment at MSU. Is considered a youth program participant duly enrolled participants that is students who are in high school but are also enrolled in MSU collegiate courses qualify if there is an, overnight component and Dave one or to give. Us a little. Bit of a history and overview? Of MS us efforts to protect. Minors in youth programs I think it's important to note this began long before the current climate that we're in yes. So there have been many ongoing efforts in two thousand twelve training efforts for MSU program directors up focused, on identifying and reporting signs of child abuse and then in two thousand thirteen. A policy outlining operational requirements for MSU youth programs was established And that policy has continued to evolve. Over time with revisions in two thousand sixteen a part time director of youth programs at MSU conducted a survey of MSU youth programs and facilitated a youth protection workshop to. Train an issue youth.

MSU director of youth programs Dave Michigan Wharton center
"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

"This is msu today my conversation with msu journalism professor steve lacy continues and steve one of the things you suggest for those who consume journalism in this day when you can consume only what you want to increase in media literacy can you talk about that yes there was this first of all there was a study that just came out two days ago from american presses to then they basically find the public and journalists share the same expectation sixty three percent of the people prefer news coverage it's mostly packed with facts and analysis sixty six of the journalists degree so we really two thirds of the people want the same thing but you have to be able to understand it and that's one of the things that they discovered is for example fifty percent of the public don't understand what an op ed pieces and that is a an editorial position by someone who's not on the editorial board it's pinon it's the opposite opinion to the newspaper fortythree percent did not know what the term attribution means so that when you said when you right in your story the mayor said according to sources that up forty two percent did not understand how anonymous sourcing works so they see that and they're they're a bit mystified and they don't trust it so part of it is people don't understand the nature of journalism they can't often separate propaganda from factual independent reporting which is why of course the we have the russian hacker story going on and i suspect the russians are not the only one anyone can take advantage of the internet and mobile communication if they have the technical skills so so a lot of it comes down to just learning and teaching people what journalism is supposed to be and how to differentiate between propaganda and journalism so what do you see is the future steve where are we headed are you optimistic you know the old saying is the glass half full or half empty will because i'm a researcher i would report how many milliliters there are the glass and let it go with that so i would say again the majority of people actually want good journalists and they want to trust so journalism has to regain that trust so that the journalists and the public need to communicate better part of the it's really interesting 'cause once upon a time not that long ago i was born in the in the late forties we really didn't have journalism schools in journalism programs to the degree that we have now so people had to learn on the job as a matter of fact e w scripps who started a group of newspapers back at the turn of the nineteenth and twentieth century that were aimed at the labor groups told his editors hire young man and don't pay them very much so we'll have to live with the people they write for and so to some degree this college education that journalists started getting tended to create somewhat of a division between the average person in the average journalist it doesn't have to be but both sides have to try and figure out how to communicate better about what's going on i think that we're going to have to get used to paying more for our journalists advertising supports not there if we want the journalism we have to accept that fact and actually it's cheaper now if you take digital than it's ever been to subscribe to newspapers so so people should be subscribing to two or more news news organizations rather than newspapers of course because no longer print paper we do have to recognize that the numbers of jobs that were lost are not all going to return but i think if news paper organizations news organizations can rebuild the trust with their community and have them attending to the website eggs that advertising can come back a lot of people realize probably half of the ads on the internet and mobile are really not looked at i remember reading a story about a large corporation i think it was proctor and gamble but i'm not sure it was a about a year year and a half ago and they had been buying forty thousand impressions a day on lie they cut back to five thousand impression today and their sales figures didn't change so a lot of of what's going on now is not really working but it's not been demonstrated one way or the other why and how advertising on mobile and online will work but if news organizations are central to their community and that's what they have to be we need journalists we we did.

steve lacy msu professor steve one sixty three percent fortythree percent forty two percent fifty percent two days
"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

"In the fall of twenty eighteen in it's great to have jim quarterback an msu today to talk about this gym is admissions director at msu jim good to see you good to see you really pleased to be here today so what do you want us to know about that class and i imagine with some of the turmoil we're going through that's not a surprise to anybody you must be heartened at so many kids still see the value of an msu degree oh i don't think there's any doubt about it is a tremendous tribute to michigan state university in who we are as a world changing institution you know i often think about the fact that this incoming freshman class joined by another fifteen to sixteen hundred transfer students is really historic in many ways it's a it's a unified voice that can bring change to a campus that needs to i think look at itself and ask some tough questions and and make some changes much like we do in society today i think we continually have to evaluate ourselves and say how can we be better and what other institution has the opportunity to bring in ten thousand fresh minds fresh perspectives to have an impact and so when you think about the diversity of this class a fact that racially this will be the most diverse class at michigan state university has ever brought to campus the exchange of ideas the exchange of experiences and perspective it's what makes us an incredible place to learn and to grow so i i'm really excited about this fall cohort it's it's historic it's true i think measure of success and moving forward it's a chance to build on a new foundation and jim one thing that's changing it msu is you will be going to the common app correct what is that and what should people know well you know the reason to go to a common application is just to to to provide students with an opportunity to apply for higher education with a degree of ease that hasn't always existed you know michigan state's application has always been a pretty easy one to fill out but it may be wasn't as far reaching as we wanted it to be so a year ago we went to something called the coalition application which is about one hundred and thirty schools that have similar accomplishment rates in terms of retention and graduation but the common application is even broader it's it's several hundred institutions where students can fill out one singular application and apply to as many as ten institutions and we think that that really does give us a bit more of a broad base in terms of attracting interest so we know that the applicant pool next year will grow significantly the the challenge that we're going to have the opportunity maybe is to determine amongst that increased application who's really interested in who was maybe just a passing fancy so we're excited about the common application we're joining virtually everyone in the big ten will go common app by the end of next year with exception to the university of illinois but penn state and michigan state or joining this year and we're excited to kind of compare notes work together as sister institutions do and and learn from this new process jim uniter both biased towards the green and white but what do you tell people when they ask why msu when they're considering a college well if you're a young person looking for a place to stand where you can make a difference where you can be heard where you have a voice where you can change the world michigan state unit versity gives one that platform you know you and i were smiling a bit earlier i i'm oftentimes quoting archimedes in in the fact that you know he wants said give me a place to stand and i will move the world young people wanting to move the world who have big dreams and huge aspirations this is a place to learn to grow and to build that ability to change the world and when you look at the diversity of major some two hundred areas of study things that range from packaging to supply chain management to mechanical engineering to social work you know we're we're very much in tune with the hard sciences but we don't ignore the people sciences and the fact.

msu director
"msu" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"msu" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"The larry nassar scandal at msu as made headlines across the country for several months now larry nassar in prison man the board at msu has agreed on settlement with his victims but according to some the true story doesn't end there attorney karen truce kaczynski who represented the victim in a separate sexual assault case involving msu football players spoke live with wwf jason jackie page just disappointed more than angry i may be both but the story doesn't end there there are still a lot of young men and young women that are waiting to be heard at michigan state and i don't want this settlement was the nassar women to be the end of the story and we made to give these other people a forum because there are still a lot of people out there that have been hurt and you didn't you did release a statement earlier this week that says that it that there are other people that are involved that are higher than larry nassar can you explain a little bit about that well i have other clients i've had many phone calls from other people that have gone through similar things that the young women with with dr nassar went through with other individuals at michigan state that are admittedly more powerful and in the upper echelon shall we say i'll be university and do have more power than than dr nassar dead and in terms of that will we be hearing more about those stories in the upcoming months do you think oh definitely yeah definitely we'll be hearing more about that sooner than later there's a culture at michigan state university that has allowed this type of thing to happen and do you think it's continuing with the current board and the current interim president well i mean we certainly seem the length of the university goes to sensually smear some of these victims and to the point of ignoring federally federal privacy laws disclosing confidential information about their students so yes i think there is a culture that they're trying to protect their trying to continue and i am concerned that that pattern of behavior is going is going to continue if we don't continue to stand up and you know stand up for the rights of these young men and women and in terms of going forward from here what do you think the next steps that should be taken well i certainly think that the i think that the board needs to continue to examine what's happening and i think they are taking steps to do that but for some reason they are reluctant to really move forward and take the necessary steps i i mean i i don't really understand why they are so reluctant to really take a hard and fast look at what's going on they're saying that they are but i don't see that that's happening so they really need to take a look at everything that's attorney karen travers.

msu larry nassar
"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

"Time here at msu whether you're take a leadership position on campus whether it's the supporting a student a colleague of yours who are going through a hard time who is is is facing a challenge in their lives what does it mean to put your deepest values into practice in a meaningful way that's what we envision for the chair spirituality to think about and to help put into practice in an educational way and also to research and study because we're going to get a world class scholar who thinks about these various us and and we're going to be able to put them in a classroom with students that will expose them to world class research world class education around what it means to live a meaningful life and that's going to inspire them to put that to put those values themselves into practice as they move through the curriculum here at msu but then make the transition from their their time at msu to the to the life that they are prepared now to live father jake believes the chair of spirituality is consistent with ms use land grant mission and so i believe that what we're doing here is nothing new but it's a continuation of what was as happened with our land grant philosophy him with john hannah to prepare people for life to live life more fully by being people of principle and determination to not succumb to the normality our instincts and that's not that's to behold mystic and we fought all our lives over the idea of duality that we can separate body and spirit we can't spirituality is the spirituality the body and the spirit it's wall together and it has to be applied in different ways well i do think that at the heart of the michigan state land grant mission at the heart of the moral act itself is this idea that you that that we create spaces around the country to advance the liberal and practical education of our students and this is this is exactly what the chair spirituality is designed to embody here at msu there was a moment in the eighteen sixties where there was a real push from the state to.

msu jake john hannah michigan
"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"msu" Discussed on WJR 760

"Student experience is actually coming through so the challenge for us is we are no longer now looking for faculty with the kinds of skills that we typically look for or the kinds of skills that they get trained for in doctoral programs but instead there is now a whole new set of skills a new set of attributes that we need to be able to blake bring in that's a big challenge for us how do we source that talent that is going to be helpful for us to make sure that we do what's right by the students and the college will no doubt be a leader and all that was signed to summarize then for our listeners what would you like them to know about the broad college you know this is a very exciting time for the collagen all summarized in the following way we are one of the largest business schools in the country if you look at the undergraduates i we've got over six thousand five hundred undergraduate students that includes business preference students coming in as freshmen we have over twelve hundred graduate students that makes us you know one of the largest business schools almost as big as some of the universities around the country yet our undergraduate program is ranked in the top twenty five overall our mba program is ranked among the top twenty among public universities in all of the major mba program rankings to have this perceptions about quality to be able to deliver yearonyear out on this high level of excellence along with serving as many students as we do that to me is the heart and soul of the broad college that's the key strength and we take pride in the fact that we provide access and yet are really focused around quality and excellence sanjay thank you so much for joining me an msu today.

msu blake
"msu" Discussed on WWL

WWL

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"msu" Discussed on WWL

"And say hey i got lower back pains who did that lady turn out to be it was tiffany lopez who then became tiffany thomas when she got married she was just a young kid in the nineteen nineties and she had a lower back injury so we have teknor hulk standing by as larry nassar starts to rub her through her private parts to manipulate he says the bones which would be injured in her lower back excuse me how in the world did he get to her lower back by penetrating her private parts it is utterly ridiculous and yet teknor halt watched as this happened she was the female present who was supposed to be protecting tiffany lopez she not only didn't protect her but when the police interviewed her in two thousand seventeen she says oh no athlete ever expressed discomfort with nasser msu interviewed her in two thousand fourteen and said no athlete ever expressed discomfort with nasser excuse me four tiffany lopez says i cry to her over and over this isn't right he shouldn't be doing this to me over and over i cry and yet this is what we have and she's still working at msu today well and then also we find out that michigan state spent five hundred thousand dollars on public relations for crisis counseling team and looking into the backgrounds of all the people who were victimized by this monster and maybe trying to find a way out of this you bet you bet i mean what are the hypocrisies here is that william stamp who is the boss and the former dean at msu college aboard the pd he got charged this last week with being an eight or and a better to larry nassar he is the boss he is the one who these complaints filtered up to but hold on a second destiny teknor hulk and leanna hayden were present they saw the girls came to them crying this isn't right they got all red in the face and their tears just wold up and said why i don't wanna be here that's that's what lopez said i don't want to be here i don't want him to touch me why is he doing this to me and destiny teknor hawks as well.

tiffany lopez tiffany thomas back injury larry nassar nasser msu msu college leanna hayden michigan five hundred thousand dollars
"msu" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"msu" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Facebook story for us thank you very much the sexual abuse scandal at michigan state widened today at university is where former sports dr larry nassar worked he is serving a long prison term for abusing young women now dr jon lapook reports a former dean there has been arrested as well williams trample the very person responsible for supervising larry nassar is accused of inappropriate sexual behavior himself according to the complaint nassar's exboss youtube is office to harass discriminate demean sexually proposition and sexually assault female students by groping making sexual comments to students and possessing nude and semi nude photos of women many appearing to be self of msu students pornographic videos were found on strapless work computer strangle is also accused of neglecting his duty in supervising nassar who is now in jail for sexually abusing more than two hundred and fifty young women including olympic gold medalist aly race man this tragedy could have been avoided i couldn't have imagined that he was also a predator himself but i knew he was definitely an enabler in two thousand fourteen michigan state university student amanda thomas show filed a complaint against nassar for sexual abuse but an invest gatien cleared him i personally was not only victimized by that man i was revictimizes by msu when they had the identity to tell me i didn't understand sexual assault strip did establish guidelines for nassar to follow during exams but today's complaint states strangled did not actually enforce or monitor these protocols had a strangles arrest change the big picture here i think that it just shows that this was a systematic problem an institutional problem not just one bad guy that's sexually abused at least twelve more women after thomas show lodged a complaint today through his attorney strangled denied sexual misconduct and the active duty.

Facebook larry nassar assault amanda thomas msu attorney michigan dr larry nassar dr jon lapook
"msu" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"msu" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Williams trample the very person responsible for supervising larry nassar is accused of inappropriate sexual behavior himself according to the complaint nassar's exboss is office to harass discriminate demean sexually proposition and sexually assault female students by groping making sexual comments to students and possessing nude and semi nude photos of women many appearing to be selfish msu students pornographic videos were found on strapless work computer strangle is also accused of neglecting his duty in supervising nassar who is now in jail for sexually abusing more than two hundred and fifty young women including olympic gold medalist aly race men tragedy could have been avoided i couldn't have imagined that he was also a predator himself but i knew he was definitely an enabler in two thousand fourteen michigan state university student amanda thomas show filed a complaint against nassar for sexual abuse but an investigate nation cleared him i personally was not only victimized by that man i was redick demised by msu when they had the identity to tell me i didn't understand sexual assault strip did establish guidelines for nassar to follow during exams but today's complaint states strangled did not actually enforce or monitor these protocols tramples arrests change the big picture here i think that it just shows that this was a static problem an institutional problem not just one bad guy that's her sexually abused at least twelve more women after thomas show lodged a complaint today through his attorneys trampled denied sexual misconduct and neglect.

larry nassar assault amanda thomas msu Williams michigan redick