20 Burst results for "MMT"

"mmt" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:30 min | 3 weeks ago

"mmt" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Year and a half is a junior and another hedge fund before she assumed this role of significant responsibility. And she has to understand the basic principles of risk management. I mean, it's a joke. And it, in my opinion, it's the natural outcome of too much free money, too much liquidity that's been pumped into the global financial system for too long. And it's flown to its flowed to these frankly ludicrous endeavors. I mean, you've no doubt seen this whole thing about these people at Sequoia being blown away by old Sam, while he's playing a video game. I mean, Kimmy a break. I think it is in fun thought exercise to think, would this all be happening if the fed weren't hiking our faces off right now? I mean, if the line was going up, I think that the business of FTX, perhaps we wouldn't be having trouble. But Cameron, you're saying this happened because the fed was cutting, had cut to so low. And because we were spending trillions and trillions of dollars in fiscal, it's just sort of passing it out with a helicopter. And the quote unquote geniuses who have disrupted things. I mean, I thought this was supposed to be decentralized finance and yet funny enough end up with a huge concentration of risk and wealth in the hands of a few people and a few institutions who are committing the same mistakes that quote unquote tried by have been making over three or 400 years and have not entirely learned their lesson, but learned they're left in to some extent or at least had regulation to prevent the most egregious of these misdeeds. I mean, taking client money and spending it on something else is just you can't do it. And I think that's under investigation right now. Yeah, just to be clear, we're not exactly allegations. That's the allegation. But to my mind, the appropriate analog is not Lehman, because none of this crypto stuff is a systemically important enough. As I said, to be to be Lehman, but it is more like MF global. Where John corzine took client money and bought two year BTPs, which went horribly wrong and as global blew up. Yeah, I mean, I don't think the Lehman analogy is not that this is a Lehman Brothers moment for the market writ large, but just for the crypto industry. The concern is this has shaken confidence so much in what you clearly view as a con game. And now they're going to have to do something about it to try and get. The irony is that the whole philosophy behind crypto is trustless finance, right? And yet how much trust was implicitly placed in the centralized exchanges, which are actually half exchange in app broker. I mean, if the whole point is that you get out of traditional finance and yet you introduce counterparty risk to the centralized exchanges, it's kind of counter to the underlying ethos, isn't it? It's a good question. I mean, to your point that it's supposed to be trustless, when you introduce centralization that trustless goes away, it's not the same as trusting a piece of code trusting a smart contract to execute. You actually have to trust other humans. Again, I think you also have to differentiate between the asset itself and the businesses that now have been built around it. Yeah, but I would say this to deny the likelihood that you're going to get centralization or a concentration of ownership and wealth in some large institutions to deny human nature. And it reminds me a bit of the MMT people that say, well, if we get inflation because of MMT, while the government has to do is tighten fiscal policy radically and that will get rid of the inflation. Okay, fine. But in what real world is a government going to tighten fiscal policy when inflation becomes problematic and starts to hit growth. I mean, maybe the UK is going to do it. Ironically enough after the loose trust budget blew up. But I mean, do you really think that the U.S. government is going to engage in an explicit and massive fiscal tightening for the sole purpose of controlling inflation? Of course. Absolutely. It's politically. That's not the way human nature works. Cameron, are you surprised though that are you surprised in that case that even after this, you know, the tide has gone out and we've seen that SPF is not wearing a bathing suit. Nonetheless, one Bitcoin is by the way. One Bitcoin is still worth $17,000. It's a lot of money. I mean, it's still worth a lot more than it even costs to mine a Bitcoin. Yeah, although I gather that calculus has narrowed quite substantially. But it's a lot of money for a line of code that the only thing really that gives it value is the belief of the group that it has value, even beyond something like gold and certainly far beyond something like the dollar. Yeah, I mean, listen, if even after all this, there is a significant cohort of people that collectively agree that the emperor's new coat is actually still pretty stunning, then it is pretty stunning. Unless a critical mass of people say actually he's not wearing a gun at all. He's wearing he doesn't have the bathing suit on to mix metaphors. But listen, the entire crypto, again, I think all comes razor, why do you see crypto doing what it's doing today? Why do you see people saying what they're saying? It's because they benefit. And there's a vested interest in keeping the ball in the air. As high as possible. A micro strategy, for example, obviously they pivoted their entire company to being essentially a Bitcoin ETF. And I mean, I've looked at some of the sailor guys tweets. I mean, the guy, the

Lehman Brothers John corzine fed Kimmy Sequoia Cameron MMT Sam U.S. government government UK
"mmt" Discussed on The Café Bitcoin Podcast

The Café Bitcoin Podcast

05:23 min | Last month

"mmt" Discussed on The Café Bitcoin Podcast

"I just think it's really interesting. So I was actually having a call. I was talking with Chloe TRE cross the other day for a while. And we were speaking about a bunch of stuff and the topic of MMT came up. And something that hit me that I realized during that conversation is and I don't know how interesting this is going to be to everyone but me. But if you really look at the assumptions of MMT, you can't separate it from the sort of like branch of postmodern philosophy that has decided that the constructs of society have no inherent reality or that the institutions, the things we create that are kind of socially generated. Basically lack any inherent tether to anything real, which is like not how money was viewed before, but the MMT is basically just saying, it works on the underlying assumption like, hey, money's just points. It's not in any way indexed or related or representative of the real economy. It's basically just like an arbitrary accounting system. Ergo, like, you know, printed, do whatever. It doesn't matter. We're just balancing fucking scorecards. And that's just so a contradictory with earlier epochs of monetary theory where the money is in like an intimate symbolic representation of real world capital and real world economic activity, which is the view I subscribe to. But you almost, it's almost this way that postmodern philosophy has infected monetary theory. And I just thought that was very interesting. Yeah, right on. What I take away from that is a lot of people, you know, not maybe not a lot, but some people, there's two different ways to go at MMT. You could say it's morally wrong and I would agree with that because it's a centralized entity just manipulating people as wealth and saying, we're going to create new monetary units. We're going to give some to these people and take away wealth from other people. I think that's morally indefensible.

Chloe TRE MMT
"mmt" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:43 min | Last month

"mmt" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is listening. Market analysis that goes beyond the ordinary. Again, I learned another function from Matt Miller today. Bloomberg markets with polls weenie and Matt Miller. Why is this stock so unloved? Weekdays at 10 a.m. eastern on Bloomberg radio. Day as we are seconds away from the opening bell lower that is the direction of travel, not much. This is an afterthought considering the political news of the morning. And that's to me, really notable considering where yields are. We were talking about the shift upward, lower we could see right now at the ten year yield 4.15% almost 4.16%. And to go off script here and our special coverage, we forgot claims it was right when the prime minister came out of the door of 10 Downing Street. We see him with mister Cameron and miss May and with Boris Johnson and claims gave Jerome Powell a 75 basis points statistic. Yeah, which is not exactly what he wants. And there is this fiction. A good number. Good news is bad news, and that's what we're seeing on Wall Street very much dominated right now by the United Kingdom and Liz truss stepping down a really highlighting though. The tenuousness of an inflationary environment for political parties globally. And our special coverage we're on until taught him wins again, right? So then we're going to schedule to the right now. We want to just get a sense so honestly. It is important to put this into perspective and Michael purvis can help us do that. Just briefly, before diving back into the political fray in the United Kingdom, Michael purvis, of top capital, as you've been parsing through, all of the political discussion, how much of a message you take back to markets, to this idea that they are in charge, and they're imposing fiscal discipline. Well, I think there's a really important overarching theme here that we can divine from this whole trust episode here, which is that, look, the fed has been on this sort of America first monetary policy that has been of course very hawkish as it needs to tamp down inflation here in the U.S.. But when you have fiscal experiments overseas that are put forward and that are that are not sensible policies, what it means for global risk assets is really, really sort of magnify here. So you have a collision. What you're saying here is that the range of big weird outcomes for the markets is much higher and you have this collision of bad fiscal policy with what that is doing right now. And I think that's very very, very important. I mean, I think it's a fair statement that central banks generally like low currency balls here. It just makes the job easier. And we're in a state of where we can talk about rate fall, being super high and of course equity falls high. But FX balls are super, super high here. And it ultimately makes the Central Bank, you know, we're all grappling through wind central banks are going to be more sort of not let around the nations by inflation and hydrocarbons. And when they can actually lead as opposed to reactive. And these types of situations only make central banks, whether it's the BOE or even spillover to the bed more reactive. Michael, that's right where I wanted to go. You know, sharing to join us later in this hour with a real focus on the United Kingdom economy, but as mister pervis folks talks about in the course of his careful study of the Pacific Rim and ADX, it is thrilling to bring you this morning Nick Bennet Brooke. He is Wells Fargo international economist, but he viscerally understands a Pacific Rim with his heritage of New Zealand and far more is the only person on the planet who has been award winning and foreign exchange in back to back years. Nick, I guess it's good you're not an FX strategist this morning. Pervis talks about FX vol give us the vow we're gonna see on British pound Sterling. Well, I think certainly for the next few days, we can expect this volatility to continue. It might actually be in the upwards direction because you could argue that political and policy uncertainty is reducing in the United Kingdom. And so we might see a bit more of a relief and go back towards the sort of even up to the one 13 one 14 level. So I think we're going to see some further up move. Over the months ahead, I think is the settles will start to see markets calm down a little and we might actually start to see the pound when it's faced with the reality of the UK economy, the pound might start to go back some of those gains. Nick, to what Michael pervis alluded to. And if it is Britain in crisis, maybe it's hungry and crisis, maybe it's Thailand in crisis, will Jerome Powell need to blink because of the international economics and politics. We observe. No, I don't think you will have to blink. I mean, we would still expect the 75 basis point increase at that November meeting from the field. And as one of your I think we still look for 50 and eventually getting to 5% on the fed funds rate. I think the UK events are instructive in the sense of it does come back as one of your previous gifts. Unorthodox or unusual out of the fiscal policies. And we are fairly unorthodox in the case of the UK just in terms of the magnitude and the way that they were delivered. And it doesn't look like here in the U.S., for example, or even across the Eurozone in general that we're going to see such expansive fiscal policy. So for the major markets, I think it won't be an issue. But for the markets that you mentioned, the likes of Hungary and Thailand, they may face some challenges. Michael purvis still with us and Michael, I'd love to get your take on what Nick is talking about, that there is some more stability, but the stability speaks to a more significant downturn, at least in the short run based on the lack of borrowing. How much are you factoring that into some of your outcomes in your thesis? Well, look, I think what this whole trust episode really sort of reiterates is that we need kind of boring policy, if you will. And I think there's this inevitable tension where a politician's biggest and one of their biggest enemies is surging food and energy inflation. And there's always sort of a temptation to put in novel novel fiscal policies when they're not when they're actually the worst things for the situation. So we kind of need to see things get a lot more boring. But I agree with my co guest that I think for the major markets here, if things can be a little bit more static and stable, then more of the blow ups will be relevant relegated to more than niche, the niche markets here. But I think if the takeaway here from this trust situation is that she's gone and we're going to go to a much more technocratic and less quote unquote innovative fiscal policy. So responses to this high inflation, that's going to be. Enhanced market stability here, which is sorely needed. Perhaps another way of saying talk of MMT might have died a very rapid death over the past few months. Nick Ben and brook is still with us. I'm wondering what this means in terms of energy policy for

Michael purvis Matt Miller Jerome Powell Bloomberg radio mister Cameron Liz truss miss May Pacific Rim mister pervis Nick Bennet Brooke Wells Fargo international Boris Johnson Pervis U.S. Nick fed Michael pervis ADX
"mmt" Discussed on The MMQB NFL Podcast

The MMQB NFL Podcast

02:16 min | 3 months ago

"mmt" Discussed on The MMQB NFL Podcast

"NFL podcast is counter ore and me Gary gramling. We are produced by Shelby Royce and SI's executive producer of podcasts as Scott Brody and our senior podcast producer is Dan bloom. Mark ravik is emeritus editor of the MMT Super Bowl champion and manoj. Is the founder of the MMT NFL podcast. Be sure to subscribe to this feed on Apple podcasts. And once you do, please leave a rating and review because it really does help other people find the show, which is also available on Spotify, stitcher, and SI

"mmt" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

05:12 min | 4 months ago

"mmt" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"The right to as much education as one needs to succeed in our society. The right to a good job that pays a living wage. The right to affordable housing. The right to a secure retirement. And the right to live in a clean environment. And that is what I mean by democratic socialism. All right. That crops gold. The right to have one type of pudding. It's not very good, but we'll have a lot of it. The right to stand in the red line, many things, many things. And the crowd goes wild. Well, the question, of course, is how you pay for all of these magical rights. Well, first of all, you have to force people to do things they don't want to do, because if you have a right to a service from someone else, they now have a duty to provide you that service. So that is problem number one. But from a fiscal point of view, the answer is somebody has to pay for it. So you're going to have to radically raise taxes, which is something that Bernie Sanders has indeed proposed, or you're going to have to print an enormous amount of money. And it is no shock that The New Yorker ran a piece, August 2019, titled The Economist who believes the government should just print more money. Stephanie kelton, a senior economic adviser to Bernie Sanders and Professor of economics and public policy at stony brook university, is popular in a way that economists almost definitionally are not. Filmmakers trail her with cameras. She goes on international speaking tours. And once it sold out a basketball arena in Italy, kelton is the foremost evangelist of a fringe economic movement called modern monetary theory, which argues in part that the government should pay for programs requiring big spending like the Green New Deal simply by printing more money. This is a polarizing idea. This spring at kelton spoke at The Wall Street Journal's future of everything festival on the day as a journal staffer introduced kelton as an economist with an idea that will either solve the world's problems or send it into ruin. She made a face and then walked on stage. So what exactly does she say? Well, adherents of MMT imagine a world built on MMT principles in which the government provides guaranteed jobs, healthcare affordable college, launches clean infrastructure projects to replace crumbling highways airports and bridges. Kelton, who does at least 5 interviews per week, plus lectures speaking gigs in conferences, is more than anyone else responsible for building MMT's digital army. So what exactly is MMT? Well, it means that we just spend money, and don't worry about it. Okay, so kelton, here's a lot of concerns about MMT. The basic idea of modern monetary theory is we spend a lot of money. People continue to buy our bonds because we're still the best bet on the block. And until that ain't true anymore, we can just continue to spend money and there will be no effect on inflation. So according to The New Yorker, again, August of 2019, she is the chief economic adviser at Bernie Sanders. Quote, kelton often hears the same concerns about MMT. Most are about inflation. How soon will we become Zimbabwe, which printed so many Zimbabwean dollars that inflation peaked in 2008 at an annual rate of 96 million %. Never according to kelton. Under MMT the focus is sustainable inflation, whereas fiscal traditionalists worry about the deficit and don't consider inflation at all. Doesn't MMT then require accurate forecasting of inflation risk? Yes, and Celtic conceded at the festival, the models aren't perfect, but we can do a pretty good job. Anyway, government spending she believes is responsible for just a small part of inflation. Kelton believes that MMT is a new framework, but is buried, is founded on old ideas buried and forgotten in the work of foundational economists. Okay, so she was pushing. The idea that you could just basically spend money, no problem. This is, again, 2019, quote, the currency economic conditions look pretty good for MNT. In Japan where deficits are high and the interest rate is set at less than zero, the economy is met with no calamity. When Congress passed a tax cut in 2017, the CBO predicted there would be a jump in interest rates caused by that deficit. This has not happened. Still, most mainstream economists view MMT as the cult of the magic money tree. Okay, well, even Paul krugman had thought this was a bad idea. But most Democrats had started to kind of circulate around these ideas. Elizabeth Warren, who was sort of a warmed over Bernie Sanders, devotee. She gave a speech in December of 2019. And a college called saint anselm. And she said a couple of things. One, she said, the same stuff that Bernie said, we should spend an awful lot of money. It was Elizabeth Warren, circa December, 2019. Reagan had it wrong. Our problem isn't big government. Our problem is a government that has been captured by the rich and the powerful. Government could help grow the economy. Could create opportunities. Could support small businesses in entrepreneurship. But instead, we have a government that works only for those at the top. Reagan liked to talk about freedom, but real freedom isn't living under the thumb of a handful of billionaires and giant corporations.

kelton Bernie Sanders Stephanie kelton stony brook university The New Yorker Kelton MMT The Wall Street Journal basketball Italy Zimbabwe Elizabeth Warren Celtic saint anselm CBO Paul krugman Japan Congress Bernie
Bernie Sanders's Economic Advisor Wants to Keep Printing Money

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:20 min | 4 months ago

Bernie Sanders's Economic Advisor Wants to Keep Printing Money

"Is no shock that The New Yorker ran a piece, August 2019, titled The Economist who believes the government should just print more money. Stephanie kelton, a senior economic adviser to Bernie Sanders and Professor of economics and public policy at stony brook university, is popular in a way that economists almost definitionally are not. Filmmakers trail her with cameras. She goes on international speaking tours. And once it sold out a basketball arena in Italy, kelton is the foremost evangelist of a fringe economic movement called modern monetary theory, which argues in part that the government should pay for programs requiring big spending like the Green New Deal simply by printing more money. This is a polarizing idea. This spring at kelton spoke at The Wall Street Journal's future of everything festival on the day as a journal staffer introduced kelton as an economist with an idea that will either solve the world's problems or send it into ruin. She made a face and then walked on stage. So what exactly does she say? Well, adherents of MMT imagine a world built on MMT principles in which the government provides guaranteed jobs, healthcare affordable college, launches clean infrastructure projects to replace crumbling highways airports and bridges. Kelton, who does at least 5 interviews per week, plus lectures speaking gigs in conferences, is more than anyone else responsible for building MMT's digital army. So what exactly is MMT? Well, it means that we just spend money, and don't worry about it.

Kelton Stephanie Kelton Stony Brook University Bernie Sanders The New Yorker Basketball Italy The Wall Street Journal MMT
"mmt" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

Bitcoin Audible

04:57 min | 4 months ago

"mmt" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

"Back described this succinctly a while ago. Quote you see that with other commodity money, like physical gold. It's a system that works because money has a cost. I think money that doesn't have a cost ultimately ends up being political in nature, so people closer to the money, the so called canon effect are going to be advantaged. In digital systems specifically, another challenge is that proof of stake as a consensus model is a lot more complex than proof of work. And prone to more attack surfaces. If a proof of stake chain gets split or maliciously copied, it's not self evident which chain is the real one. And it becomes a human political decision among oligopolistic participants to canonize a chain. However, in a proof of work system, the real chain is instantly verifiable, because by definition, the chain that follows the node consensus rule set, and that has the more work is the real one. In other words, what makes proof of stake blockchains inherent equity like is that they require some form of ongoing governance, whereas proof of work blockchains, especially ones decentralized enough that they can't really change their monetary policies, are more commodity like. These differences can be benefits or drawbacks depending on what participants want out of the system. The collective existence of both digital commodities and digital equities in my view represents a novel new era for asset classes, and we'll see where they may be successfully applied. I have a long form research piece that includes an overview of proof of stake here. Link will also be in the show notes. Proof of force. As described by Warren mosler, a founder of the MMT school of economic thought mentioned earlier in this article. Fiat currency is basically proof of force, which is why it can win out over proof of work money for long stretches of time. Demand for government paper or digital equivalents is created by the government's taxes on the population, which can only be paid in units of that paper.

canon MMT school of economic Warren mosler Fiat government
"mmt" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

Bitcoin Audible

05:55 min | 5 months ago

"mmt" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

"Guy. There's a reason why I've been chilling these guys for I don't even know how long they're just, I don't know. It's just the easiest way to know that you're not leading somebody astray. You just tell them to go to swan Bitcoin. Check them out. Again, that swan Bitcoin dot com slash guy. All right, let's jump back in on this section. Rhinestones. Inhabitants of a South Pacific island called yap, used enormous stones as money. These rhinestones or phase stones as they were called were circular disks of stone with a hole in the center, and came in various sizes, ranging from a few inches in diameter to over ten feet in diameter. Many of them were at least a couple of feet across, and thus weighed hundreds of pounds. The biggest were over ten feet across and weighed several thousands of pounds. Interestingly, I've seen this example used by both an Austrian economist, and an MMT economist, Warren mosler. The reason that's interesting is because those two schools of thought have very different conceptions of what money is. Anyway, what made these stones unique was that they were made from a special type of limestone that was not found in abundance on the island. Yap islanders would travel 250 miles to a neighboring island called Palau to quarry the limestone and bring it back to yap. They would send a team of many people to that far island, quarry The Rock in giant slabs and bring it back on wooden boats. Imagine bringing a multi thousand pound stone across 250 miles of open ocean on a wooden boat. People died in this process over the years. Once made into rhinestones on yap, the big ones wouldn't move. This is a small island, and all of the stones were catalogued by oral tradition. An owner could trade one for some other important goods and services, and rather than moving the stone. This would take the form of announcing to the community that this other person owned the stone now. In that sense rise stones were a ledger system, not that different than our current monetary system. The ledger keeps track of who owns what, and this particular ledger happened to be orally distributed, which of course can only work in a small geography. By the time this was documented by Europeans, there were thousands of rhinestones on yap, representing centuries of quarrying, transporting, and making them. Rhinestones thus had a high stock to flow ratio, which is a main reason for why they

South Pacific island Warren mosler MMT Palau yap
"mmt" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

The Pomp Podcast

05:13 min | 5 months ago

"mmt" Discussed on The Pomp Podcast

"It would be like, I mean, that's my guess. And that's a lot of runway for something like Bitcoin to appreciate in the long run. So Brent, when you start to think about Bitcoin over, let's call it the next couple of years. Is the macro kind of story just your hedging against MMT, your hedging against a continuation of the fiscal policies, almost more so than the monetary policies or how do you balance kind of monetary and fiscal policies in relationship to Bitcoin over the coming years? Well, I think you need both turned on in order for the trade to really work. Obviously the empirical evidence suggests that. But I think logically as well, you know, what you're looking for is debasement of the currency and that really is fiscal spending that's monetized or aided and abetted by monetary policy. So if they're pushing an opposite direction, that's not really, that's not really the prescription for extreme debasement. The debasement prescription is spending money and printing it to cover it. And like there's a whole debate, just so people don't at me. There's a whole debate about whether it's printing money or whatever, but increasing M two or increasing the monetary base to me is essentially the denominator in the fraction. And if the denominator keeps on getting bigger, then there's going to be a reaction in assets. And to me, you can argue that there's definitely an argument to be made through my framework that something like NASDAQ is like or levered NASDAQ would be similar. And I agree somewhat, but there's a lot more stuff and going on with NASDAQ in terms of like you got to worry about earnings and all that. To me, Bitcoin is just a lot simpler in terms of it has one thing that it's doing in my mind and it's good at that thing. And so I don't want to screw around and worry about whether apple's buying back stock or not buying back stock and whether iPhones are going to get beaten out by some other competitor and all that. And whether the mega caps are overweighted in the index and all that, I just feel like even if you can argue that there are a lot of similarities in terms of the purpose of these some of the assets other than Bitcoin, I just feel like Bitcoin does the job better. What do you think, I mean, when I just want to go back to MMT for set, because when you talk about that and what the consequences could be and what it might mean for the appreciation of Bitcoin, I mean, nobody has a crystal ball and could imagine what the future looks like.

Bitcoin Brent apple
"mmt" Discussed on The MMQB NFL Podcast

The MMQB NFL Podcast

07:44 min | 6 months ago

"mmt" Discussed on The MMQB NFL Podcast

"Gonna go Texas. I was just trying to start with how many states have two Major League Baseball teams. And then just kind of hope on the football teams. The Jaguars. Thank God. Exactly. Exactly. As people are saying, thank God for the Jaguars. All right, question three, the category is aeronautics. Two weeks ago, twins reliever. Two weeks ago, twins reliever, Joan Duran, through the fastest pitch of the MLB MLB season so far, a fastball clocked at 103.3 mph. Within 5, so you get some leeway within 5. Convert that number to kilometers per hour. That is not a fair question. What? Oh my God. Who could do that? That is such a ridiculously unfair. That's not an aeronautics question. That's a math question. So much ruder. Hang on, hang on, no, I'm gonna have to sit there and wait for me. Okay, we have well, we have a lot of we have a lot of listeners in Europe who does one O 3.3 mph, mean anything to them. No. It's actually a huge bummer that I don't know the answer to this because I should because we were in, I was at the Olympics in Tokyo where they also use kilometers. And so I remember this being an issue that the pitch the radar gun was in kilometers and we didn't know. I'm not even going to do the math and I'm going to guess it's like one 95 because I remember it being in the one. One 90 I say one 90. No, I'm sorry. One 66.2. She got 30, which is still amazing. I would still be so embarrassing. For our nautical Friends, that's 89.8 knots. This is such an indictment of the American education. I'm going to put it on them instead of making it. Good. What's the point times .6? Is that how you get it? That's how I always remember that. 6 miles is a kilometer. Yeah. You say that's how I always remember it like this is a thing that you do with regularity. If this had been Fahrenheit Celsius, I would have nailed it. I am great. I wouldn't have gotten that either. Double at nad 30. That one's easy. I'm not multiplying anything by .6. All right, question number four. Potent potable category. Through Tuesday's game, sorry. Who leads all American League pitchers in batter's faced this season? Oh, you know who it is? It's Jordan lyles. Yes. Whoo. It is just eating the innings up. Not really is. Do you have a good nickname? Look at it. Now. So do they do that for? Jordy. Jordy. Oh yeah. Baseball seems to be, I remember backing up the baseball beat when I worked at the star ledger and so you'd go see Joe Girardi a lot and everybody's nickname was just their name with a Y on the end of it and it seems like that's a very baseball thing. So Sam Miller, when he was at ESPN, wrote perhaps the best story on this. He went through and he did like kind of the math on baseball nicknames and then he went to he tried to figure out not even the math. I guess the linguistics on it. And he tried to figure out how they were created. He went through old clips, whatever, and then he showed up at ballparks and he asked players, like if my name is Smith, what do you call me? Smithy. Any compiled all these results, and then he did a guide to creating your own. So I would most likely be because at the, depending on, I think it's because it's a P for P they add ER at the end, typically. There's a whole process. And I highly recommend this Sam Miller story. It's so good. That's pretty great. Try to come up with a nickname for you clowns. You would probably be Ori. Oh. Or you could be steel. Oh, even better. If your first initial is C, sometimes it's sometimes your nickname is your initials. Okay. I can do that. All right, so that built up all the drama to a question 5 here. This is the money ball. This is worth two points. Your three or four four so far. Moneyball category is arts and culture. In the film Moneyball. Jonah Hill's Peter bran character is based on what current NFL team executive who did not sign off on his name being used in the movie. Paul depodesta was the Dodgers after that and I don't know where he is in the NFL, but I know he's there. Yes. That is correct. That's a fantastic. That's a 5. All I wanted to do was avoid zero. It does make me anxious. It's the pressure. I feel like I could have done the kilometer thing if you had given me more time, but everybody's looking at me on Zoom, which is a really stressful experience. While you were while you were doing the math I was actually rewatching adley rushman first career hit on YouTube. So I was looking at you. That seems right. If I had to guess what you were doing. That's probably what I would have guessed. Should we should we be springing this on people? The quiz? Yeah. No. Okay. I think of the three people that we've quiz so far, two of them have not really thoroughly enjoyed it. So I think it's something that we need to better them. I will not give it the full Jenny actually kind of fun review, but I will say it was better than I feared. Okay. That's it. That's good. That's our podcast motto. I also spent a little while being afraid that it was going to be NFL related questions. So I did feel better once I realized that I was not going to be asked to know anything about football. To be clear, before we sign off, I mean, you did a Terrell prior piece for us back in the day back in like 2015. Wow. Yes. And I would be happy to answer questions about Terrell Pryor as he was depicted in that story. Or anything that happened to him before then. Yeah. But now Saunders. I remember there was an interview. I could perhaps answer questions about stories that I specifically have written or stories that maybe fish up or store a specific stories that I have read and like, but if you are going to ask me to answer a question about football information, you're going to be disappointed. And it feels unfair to the listeners. You know, they come here for the great insight that you guys provide. And I don't want to drag the average down. Anyone's ever said about this podcast. They come here continuing to wonder why they come here. They keep coming back. Maybe it's for the Jordan lyles coverage. Yes. The MM QB NFL podcast is Conor or and me Gary grambling. We are produced by Shelby Royce and SI's executive producer of podcasts as Scott Brody and our senior podcast producer is Dan bloom. Mark ravik is emeritus editor of the MMT Super Bowl champion Andy Benoit is the founder of the MM QB NFL podcast. Be sure to subscribe to this feed on Apple podcasts and once you do, please leave a rating and review because it really does help other people find the show, which is also available on Spotify, stitcher, SI dot.

MLB Jaguars Joan Duran Jordy Sam Miller Jordan lyles Major League NFL Peter bran football Paul depodesta Joe Girardi American League Olympics adley rushman Tokyo Texas
"mmt" Discussed on The MMQB NFL Podcast

The MMQB NFL Podcast

02:46 min | 8 months ago

"mmt" Discussed on The MMQB NFL Podcast

"Think that's what you have to build around. Do you want to hear an interesting story about a pass rushing spin moves? Yeah, I do. Okay, so you and I worked on that quarterback story if you months ago, where we were talking about how quarterback were learning sort of weird outlier things from other quarterbacks and incorporating them into their repertoire. The way that Aaron Rodgers pops his foot up or the way that Lamar Jackson throws sidearm and practicing these things, now making them better. A couple of years ago, the spin move was one of those things. And so one of the guys that I talked to for this other this pass rushing story that you and I worked on together was doctor pass rush actually has a doctorate in pass rushing. And he's been a private pass rushing coach for a long time and he said like NFL coaches would call him and be like stop teaching this shit. Like stop sending my guys back to stop sending my guys back to camp with this ridiculous spin move. It's not effective. We're not going to teach that. We don't want them to do it. And it's totally different now, right? Everybody wants the spin move. It's effective. If you can pull it off, if you have the body balance and the vision to pull it off, it's great. But I love a jabo. He's got, he's got a great bend. You know, he's going to get under the arms of those kind of those longer tackles, and he's going to be able to just sort of like grind his way to the quarterback. And some fortunate what happened. To him and I would encourage all prospects to just skip this dog and pony show after you've put quality years on tape. But yeah, I would say it's going to take the right GM, right? Because if he's not going to be ready or he's going to be ready later in the season or ramped up a little bit later in the season, you have to have an entrenched GM that's probably not as worried about job security. And so it's going to take the right team, I think, for him. I think after cam Akers made it back from a ruptured Achilles in like 48 hours. That's true, too. That's just changes everything. Yeah? The MME NFL podcast that's Connor orr and me Gary gremlin. We are produced by Shelby Royce and SI's executive producer of podcasts at Scott Brody and our senior podcast producer is Dan bloom. Mark Meredith is emeritus editor of the MM QB Super Bowl champion Andy Benoit is the founder of the MMT NFL podcast. Be sure to subscribe to this feed on Apple podcasts and what you do, please leave a rating and review because it really does help other people find the show which is also available on Spotify, stitcher,.

Lamar Jackson Aaron Rodgers NFL rush GM cam Akers Connor orr Gary gremlin Shelby Royce Scott Brody Dan bloom Mark Meredith Andy Benoit SI MMT Apple
"mmt" Discussed on The MMQB NFL Podcast

The MMQB NFL Podcast

04:32 min | 9 months ago

"mmt" Discussed on The MMQB NFL Podcast

"To the MMT annabelle podcast I'm Gary grant. And I'm Conner orr. We are waiting just breathlessly for this Desean Watson decision to come down. It is, oh, it's still a little for noon Eastern Time here on Thursday, and we kind of held off as long as we could, but we just have to put a podcast out. So we are going to sort of set that aside. He's going to pick at the moment. Sounds like either the saints, the falcons, or maybe the Panthers are still in it, but probably not. And that team will get a guy who is a really good quarterback on the field who has just unfathomably bad issues off the field. Yeah, I'm going to talk about something very tangentially related to this that makes me happier. And that is the idea of a mystery team coming into play because do you remember the last great.

Gary grant Conner orr Desean Watson MMT falcons Panthers saints
Peter Schiff: Government Is Spending 55% More Than in 2019

The Dan Bongino Show

01:48 min | 9 months ago

Peter Schiff: Government Is Spending 55% More Than in 2019

"So Peter Joe Biden said this weekend the government spending basically debts and deficits have nothing to do with inflation kind of echoing the MMT people these modern monetary theorists conspiracy theorists as you call them is that true this government spending have nothing to do with it They can spend whatever they want Well no repercussions at all and the value of the dollar Of course not There's no such thing as a free lunch If you look at what the U.S. government is spending in the most recent fiscal year Not what they're projecting for the next year But just the year that just passed the governor is spending about 55% more money than it spent in 2019 So you had better than a 50% increase in the size of the government because you measure government by what is spending And every dollar of spending has to be paid for by the people Because you don't get all that government for nothing we didn't have any official tax increases to cover that 50% increase in the cost of government How is the government paying for all this stuff that we're getting if it didn't raise our taxes Well with inflation the Federal Reserve is printing the money so that we don't have to pay higher taxes So instead we pay higher prices So every time you go to the supermarket or you write your rent check or you go and fill up your car with gasoline don't think about Putin or COVID or some exogenous factor or greedy corporations You are paying a tax inflation is a tax It's the way we are paying for government So when Biden says that nobody earning less than $400,000 is going to pay higher taxes to pay for my government spending he is lying

Peter Joe Biden MMT U.S. Government Federal Reserve Putin Biden
"mmt" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

03:16 min | 9 months ago

"mmt" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"To get away with it now Then instead we said no let's leave that in the ground Let's pay Putin to do it where you can do whatever you want You could stick a nuclear explosive in a well and the environmental standards are nil in Russia and China We turned it over to him He then uses the money to attack a sovereign nation dragging the world hopefully not but potentially into World War three and the left never freaking apologizes not one time They never won time say to America we really suck man We blew it this was really stupid They never say any of that Anything And it did not absolve the swampy right either The conservatives the fake conservatives I should say out there I'm not absolving them either They'd be like hey let's spend a bunch of money We don't have every year Yeah but eventually we're going to run into a pile of debt We're not going to be able to pay off And we're going to have to print money to pay it off And if we print money it's going to cause inflation And any inflation happens we were told was never going to happen by the dopey stupid monetary modern monetary modern monetary theory losers The MMT zeros right It happens and no one ever apologizes and says hey that MMT stuff we told you that inflation wouldn't happen if we printed trillions of money Yeah yeah that was kind of dumb I'm not going to tell you what I was trying to buy yesterday But I was trying to buy something because it'll sound like I'm trying to humble brag and I'm not so I was trying to buy something yesterday and my wife She gets on the phone and the price is legit doubled And I'm thinking these people will never ever apologize Ever There is no price for being wrong I couldn't get out of my head last night Again this idea that this can't be in this country of 330 million people It can't possibly be the best we can do How is it we've been fooled by these idiots This cabal of zeros Glad handed around If it's going great what did you do How did you screw up the country today Let me tell you something hold on you got time Let me pull out my list I've got my palm pilot from 1992 Let me get my stylus Here you go Here's the 7 things I did to F up America today Here you go Step 6 step 7 Here you go buddy Led by morons Morons I'm sorry A little hostile segment I just died this All right I got more on this a little bit of comic relief coming up after the break We need a little bit of that Possibly the funniest segment to ever air on live television not just in Pittsburgh where it aired but anywhere around the globe ever in the history of TV And coming up next we'll be right back Folks these are trying times The very freedom secured by our constitution and kept safe by brave men and women in uniform are under attack by the most liberal politicians our nation has ever seen There's a concerted effort to censor us by woke ideologues and a push to replace our individual liberty with government control and allowances but there are plenty of patriots willing to stand up to the left And there's an easy.

Putin Russia America China Pittsburgh patriots
"mmt" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

What Bitcoin Did

03:31 min | 9 months ago

"mmt" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

"So he was able to observe that hundreds of years ago that the people play this role. We play an important role in preventing our government from doing stupid wars. That role has been taken from us through this Fiat currency system, this debt based system. And again, Kant spoke about this, Adam Smith, mill, tocqueville, so many great thinkers in the enlightenment and afterwards. They all saw this. They saw the writing on the wall that this would be a threat for democracies. In lo and behold, it's happened, and it's really depressing that war is just such a small part of our public discourse. Like there was some, I think there was some pew polling that was done that about ten years ago in kind of the peak of the forever wars that suggested that when Americans answered these questions, they basically said that wars never came up in their conversations at home with family or friends. And that generally speaking that they don't really impact our lives, that's dangerous. If we're going to be in these wars, it should be part of our conversations and it should be part of our lives. And if we're not willing to have a national service, then we should at least be willing to pay for them. And if we're not, that means the government shouldn't wage them. And this is pretty clear to me. MMT makes it impossible for us to have accountability over our government in war. Now it also makes it easier for the government to do entitlement spending. I understand that we can have that dialog. But it also removes this ability for us to have that constraint. If the government can just literally create the money to pay for the tank without asking us, then that's a problem in my book. But I understand there's different opinions here. This counter arguments. No, again, it's like the counter argument is that we would have less entitlement spending, right? We'd have less public healthcare and then we'd have less public infrastructure works. And less like progressive stuff, but my counter to that is like, really? Like, yes, we'd probably have in total less yes, of course. But not in proportion to the forever wars. Like those would be the if we all got in a room like a 50 Democrats and 50 Republicans in America. And said, look, we got to cut like X and it's not politicians who are bought by lobbyists, but actual citizens. I'm pretty sure we would opt to not pay for the invasions and occupations of these foreign lands. That would be like one of the top things. Certainly before infrastructure spending or healthcare or education, et cetera, et cetera. So let's keep talking about wars. Let's keep them in our dialog. I think it's very, very important. When does this work going to be finished? Hopefully by the end of the month, I'll have an essay out exploring this and going very deep into a lot of these different areas and just, yeah, again, getting people to think about the current monetary system. And as you would say, the monetary system. And the relationship to the era we've lived in, I mean, this shaped my life, right? I'm 36..

Adam Smith Kant Fiat MMT America
"mmt" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

What Bitcoin Did

03:21 min | 9 months ago

"mmt" Discussed on What Bitcoin Did

"Stronger Fiat currencies. I mean, that's why I think the U.S. government should the long-term impact it might have on our inability to fight these unethical words as sort of a secondary consideration for me. I think that the U.S. government should adopt Bitcoin now because it'll advantage Americans in the future. And it will make our country stronger and will make our currency stronger, at least in the near future. Eventually, I don't think we have the currencies. But I think there's a long transitionary period here where you have dollars or Euros or whatever they are and that we kind of enter into this exchange system where they're pegged in some way. And if you care about your country, you're not going to want your country to be late in that. Because then you're going to have a pretty weak Fiat currency. So I think that's the way I'm thinking about it, although who knows. It's Brave New World out there. The crazy part is we get to watch it all happen, which is something that people in history books in the future, if we still have them, we'll say, man, it must have been crazy to be around then. There'll be some of you that Alex threat students. No, we're talking about have you read his trilogy of books. Yeah, well, look, look, I think exploring this idea of the price of war has been so illuminating for me because I just didn't know about it. I just didn't I didn't know about the history of how we fought wars in the past and how it's actually tied to democracy and I think it's a fascinating topic that people should become educated about. And then maybe you start thinking differently about government intervention in the bond markets and I'd like to see more dialog about it basically. Like I'd like to see more and more discussed and not less discussed. In finance and economics more broadly, I mean, there's a big book called stigmas money markets. That's kind of used as like the Bible for anyone trading in the money markets today. And it doesn't mention war at all, not a single time. I'd like to see you debate Stephanie kelton, but with our unaware that this is actually really interested in because she worked for Bernie, who was against wars. So how does she square this? How does she write a book that doesn't mention Iraq or Afghanistan at all? And at the end of the book, basically says she's proud of the worst we fought by through debt. Maybe because she's a little shit. Maybe, but I actually would like to see her defend that point. So would I? That's why I think it would be an interesting debate. The discussion around M and T and his implications and then you can just slip this one in and ask it to defend this. Yeah, and the people say, no, no, no, MMT is just a framework for thinking about domestic financing. It's like, no, no, no, but what about if your country's largest single domestic financing expenditures wars abroad? Like you can't separate the two. So let's just talk more about it. We have entered into a dark age that was predicted by tocqueville by Adam Smith, Adam Smith said, I have a quote here from him that I thought was powerful. He says, the people feeling during the continuance of the war, the complete burden of it would soon grow weary of it in the government in order to humor them would not be under the necessity of carrying it on longer than it was necessary to do so..

U.S. government Fiat Stephanie kelton Alex Bernie Afghanistan MMT Iraq Adam Smith
"mmt" Discussed on The MMQB NFL Podcast

The MMQB NFL Podcast

02:08 min | 10 months ago

"mmt" Discussed on The MMQB NFL Podcast

"Pokémon, Connor. Yeah, that was my big treat to myself was so I've played every game when it comes out. So I got legend legends of arceus. That's the new one. And. Very exciting. And I love the premise of it. So you're basically dropped back into time before anyone knew how to train Pokémon. And but you're like a kid in 2020, so obviously like all this stuff is commonplace for you. And then you're dropped back into time and you are doing very basic things like catching a Pokémon with pokeballs that were just invented, right? And everyone's like, oh my God. How did you do that? And so you're kind of like the first guy, you know? Yeah, so I like it, and it's amazing, and it's also like, it makes me think of the comparable things. Like I would, I would be able to go back in time and I don't know. Like eat an entire bag of pretzels in one sitting and ever to be like, wow, like, or run like a barely a sub 5 40 yard dash and I get taken in like the first round of the NFL Draft and everyone would be like, my God. But yeah, so I like the idea of that. There's something attractive. I wrote to me about that. Throw the first forward pass. There we go. Yes. Genius. It'd be like a young chip Kelly. The MM QB NFL podcast is Connor or and me Gary gramling. We are produced by Shelby Royce and SI's executive producer of podcasts as Scott Brody and our senior podcast producer is Dan bloom. Mark ravik is emeritus editor of the MM QB Andy Benoit is the founder of the MMT the NFL podcast. Be sure to subscribe to this feed on Apple podcasts and once you do, please leave a rating and review because it really does help other people find the show, which is also available on Spotify, stitcher, SI dot com.

Connor NFL Gary gramling Shelby Royce Scott Brody Dan bloom Mark ravik Andy Benoit Kelly SI MMT Apple
Glenn Beck Describes Why No One Seems to Care About Inflation

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:34 min | 11 months ago

Glenn Beck Describes Why No One Seems to Care About Inflation

"The book is called the great reset, obviously by the great Glenn Beck, never let a global pandemic go to waste very well worded, thanks to Rama manual. Climate change, modern monetary theory, and I could talk about that for an hour, the creation of dollars on the thin air. I went on your show in the midst of all that. Like I remember two years ago, we talked about that at length, the great range. I don't know you haven't read this and I know you know this, but nobody talks about part two of modern monetary theory. Right now we're only doing the first part. Prince is much money as you want. The reason why no one's afraid of inflation is because of the great reset. If you have total control of production and spending, they believe they can control runaway inflation and MMT will work. This is why no one seems to care about inflation. And everybody else is like, wait, what are we doing? How many trillions have we spent? What are you doing? There's no way to pull this money back. They know that, but no one's talking about part two of modern monetary theory, which is coming. What is part two? Part two is you can spend as much money as you like. You can print as much money as you like. And my first reaction when I first read about this was really, because then why didn't people do that? I don't know. 5000 years ago. You're telling me no king, nobody ever went. Just keep printing money. Just do based the currency. Right. Right. Right. It never works.

Glenn Beck Prince
"mmt" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"mmt" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Messer and Bloomberg quick takes Tim Sten on Bloomberg radio I am Carl Nasser And I'm Tim stenbeck Plenty ahead in our second hour of the weekend edition of Bloomberg businessweek As we bring back some of our favorite conversations from the milk and institute global conference back in full force this year after the 2020 event was completely remote due to the COVID pandemic In just a bit in fact we'll hear from Barbara humpton president and CEO of Siemens USA who says The White House has a good plan to help relieve certain supply chain bottlenecks she should know being involved in a meeting at The White House Plus we'll talk with bright machine CEO amar Hans Paul on what the next wave of automation and AI technology means for the modern worker Maybe it's not all bad Also Scott minore of Guggenheim investments on modern monetary theory MMT becoming a reality Hashtag MMT it's happening First up the Sarah let's focus on impact investing earlier this year a company called engine number one you know who we're talking about Well they skipped up three seats on Exxon's board of directors It was a big big win for investors who are demanding that their profits come with a greater purpose The small activist fund now is the world's attention as it pushes for more emphasis on sustainability at the oil giant And it's telling what it calls a total value framework It ties progress on ESG initiatives directly to financial value creation The company's CEO Jennifer grant seo explains When we set out with engine number one to do things in a different way And so instead of what we all think of as slightly older school ES and G people aren't sure if it works People aren't sure I think it returns We built engine number one to take the data the environmental and the climate or the government's data and use it to drive returns And so as I've watched and talked with lots of people over the last couple of days large bowls of assets as well as younger people people are ready But they're ready because the performances there are just ready because it's the right thing to do What is it They're ready They're ready to have impact in their investments but they're not willing to do it with giving up returns So the way they think about it is we care we care about people and wages and workers we care about climate but we need investors to do it for us in a way where we don't give up return So Jennifer is it harder though for a company that is delivering the returns to kind of get them to make the changes and investors or maybe not going to be so supported because they're like listen I like these returns So give me an idea Yeah we think it's all we think it's all about using the data on climate or environment people using it to drive returns over time So to take an example let's take General Motors So Mary Barr has got her great business She's a great CEO She's got a strong board But they can actually make more money.

Tim Sten Bloomberg radio Carl Nasser Tim stenbeck milk and institute Barbara humpton Siemens USA amar Hans Paul Scott minore Guggenheim investments Sarah let White House Bloomberg businessweek Messer Jennifer grant seo Bloomberg Exxon Jennifer Mary Barr General Motors
"mmt" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"mmt" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Steve. Hello, Steve. How was your weekend? Sir? Hey, Alex. Good afternoon to you. My weekend was great, nice and relax and got to spend some time with my kids loved it. Hopefully, you've got to do much of the same. Well, actually, my my wife has a different different definition of labor Day, So she put me to work yard work. Well, I had to do a little bit of that myself, to be honest with you, but that's all right, though, is what keeps my Neck red, I guess. Yeah, well and and plus, it's son. You know, it's that spirit time that we all need once in a while. Um, So Phil has been talking about? Uh um, this coming market craft, and it might be the biggest in history and a lot of people are looking for clarification on that. Uh, no, of course you can't predict exactly When this will happen, But we can definitely see the signs and I was checking out. Some of the things that, uh, that I see that through the economy, it's It's a little different. Little odd and Steve are you familiar with M M T. It's modern. Monetary theory or modern money theory. I have heard it before, But don't ask me to to educate anybody on it. Well, I'm going to I'm going to do the best that I can. I'm still trying to understand it myself. But it seems that the federal government and the Fed's approach to the economy is eerily similar to M M t. Which is a, uh Heterodox. Macro economic theory. That describes currency as a public monopoly. And unemployment as evidence that a currency monopolist is overly restricting the supply of the financial assets needed to pay taxes and satisfy savings desires. MMT is opposed to mainstream understanding of macro economic theory and has been criticized by many mainstream economics according to business insider and here's some bullet points on it. MMT is a big departure from conventional economic theory. It proposes governments that control their own currency can spend freely. As they can always create more money to pay off debts In their own currency. The theory suggests the government spending can grow the economy to its full capacity, enrich the private sector, eliminate unemployment and finance major programs such as universal health care, free college tuition and green. Energy. Mm. That last statement sounds like Bolshevik, Bernie and Pocahontas. Even US representative Alexandria Osasuna. Cortez is also a fan of M M t. She said modern Monetary theories should be a larger part of the conversation in an interview with business insider in 2019, I'll go ahead and play this cut this cut one and unconventional economic.

Alex Steve 2019 Alexandria Osasuna Phil Fed Cortez Bernie US M M T. Pocahontas Heterodox labor M M once Bolshevik MMT