39 Burst results for "MIT"

Fresh update on "mit" discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:34 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "mit" discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Falcon kind of with small satellites and this guy is talking about going to Venus forever. Did Not hear that they're going to be go discover life on Venus or something. That's right now astronomers led by MIT found signatures. Boss theme had never heard of before, but apparently, it's really hard to create this stuff without life. They couldn't they run all these computer simulations couldn't figure out anything else that created in the ball you're seeing in these spectral analyses. So they're thinking that's explanation. There's some kind of microbial life in the atmosphere Venus. How could there don? You add energy water and you get the right pressure temperature strata. Of course, it wouldn't surprise me one bit. Yeah and it's been over the temperate world. Apparently billion years ago or something might have had life oceans that kind of thing. Now. They're thinking walk in maybe some of this stuff managed to migrate before it became a Hellhole and now it's Floating. Around in the atmosphere maybe little microbes or something say without even knowing or even looking I guarantee freaking t there is microbial life in our atmosphere. Yeah Done that experiment. Even. Educated and the break I'm. Tearing Atmosphere Go. Yeah. Of course. Well, you know I I know that there is because I remember seeing they do a lot of research in the snow pack in the Himalayas and so on and what lives at these higher altitudes and that and they transfer how they migrate is with the atmosphere. So I'm just going of course it does I mean you know Y- makes perfect sense. Yeah. Yeah. So why not obvious is really cool this. Off this, this is amazing. It's just going to. Blow up the door to more stuff. Verdy got private stuff going to the moon gonNA start into Venus. The the key is this reusability that has been going on about makes perfectly obvious. You can't just throw away just tens of billions of dollars worth of hardware every time you make a flight you just and fear military industrial give me money you can tell you should. Loss of give me. Money. That's right. Yeah. But that's not going to work for us..

Verdy MIT Himalayas DON
Fresh update on "mit" discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

02:27 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "mit" discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

"In. So Seth Grant is great to have you back on brain science to tell us about some of your most recent research but since this is your fifth appearance on brain science. I think it's important that we give our listeners some context. Great was very, very nice to be back. Where would you like to start? Well, I was thinking you could start by sharing just a little bit of your own personal journey. So my personal journey really begins as from Australia I was born in Australia and. Ended up doing all my schooling. In, both high school and secondary education where I went to medical school but it was. During, the time in medical school I got exposed to doing medical research and the suicide finished my medical internship. In Sydney, I was offered a post doctoral position at cold spring harbor bar tree in New York where I began to work on jeans and cancer and using technology that was state of the art of the time which was To engineer the mouse genome to modify the genetic complement of the mouse and this was wonderful way to. Test. How any given gene works in the biology of Mammalian vertebrate organism and it was that sort of technology. After finishing a cold spring harbor my post, Doctor. Work. There I moved to Columbia. University and I, work with Eric Kandel who later went on to win the Nobel Prize in two thousand. And in Eric's lab I. introduced this Mouse Technology and we began studies on genes involved with learning and memory. and. Ninety Ninety two published a paper where he started four jeans and other lab. MIT's symbiotic hours lab published gene as well that year, and that was really the beginning of mouse genetics using genome engineering methods and study of behavior, and it's really been one of the most important ways behavior has been understood at the genetic level. Now for many many years, and since that time I've moved to the UK in and ninety four, and I've been here ever since and I have worked in. Edinburgh University for many years and also the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in Cambridge. So I just to put this timing into context in ninety two when you were doing this work, this is before the human genome project was completed. Correct. That's right. In fact, I remember at the time the human genome project without really starting in the same building where I worked Jim Watson had his office. And it was at that time he was spending a lot of time in Washington pushing the idea of the human genome project against a lot of resistance as I recall. The Human Genome Project really started to deliver the goods around. Thousand and that time I was working in the United Kingdom. How did your personal interest in schizophrenia impact or influence your work? I have a long standing interest in schizophrenia and I suppose you look at it in two ways. One is the personal and the other is from the scientific and I'll mention the scientific. I. Always fascinated me as medical student that schizophrenia was fought disorder and it sounded as though by studying schizophrenia, you might find your way into understanding really the mechanisms of how complex thoughts work. So that was a very intriguing idea but at a personal level, I had an anti with schizophrenia who Really, didn't know but she I met her institution she'd been institutionalized whole adult life and she was a bit of Dombi when I saw in the nursing home and unfortunately my cousin who's my same age as myself when I was working in the United States developed schizophrenia and he also died at a young age and so I was very affected by that and been buried in understanding schizophrenia have always had an interest in that have actually done quite a bit of work on that over the is. It seems like times when when your papers come across to clinical rotations, schizophrenia appears and I know that's not just because of your personal interest, it's also because the genetic knowledge that we do have about schizophrenia. I just wanted to to start with that just as a as a touch point. Could we just kind of do an overview of the major discoveries that you've made sorta prior to the current paper in other words, lead us through how you got to where you are now. Just give you a quick overview. In fact, I gave a lecture last week at Federation of European neuroscience, which was for a particular prize awarded, and it was sort of a career prize and giving opportunity to reflect a little bit on it but. I mentioned a moment ago the key point was to understand the importance of the gene in behavior and it was through these gene transgenic mouse studies done that Columbia. University in Nineteen ninety-two that really gave us a I handle on does this gene control this behavior, and what is the physiological mechanism and really goes right to this very much fundamental level of science in biology, which is at the level of the gene. So that was a key stepping stone, but really a major transition that completed changed the way I think about the nervous system occurred in the late nineteen, Ninety S. and. In the two thousand and. As a result of work we were doing we published. Page. which has become a bit of a landmark and it was that we used mass spectrometry to characterize the proteins in synapses. Now, the reason is workers interesting because over the nine hundred, Ninety S, I was a model of Synapses, which was that they contain very few proteins and those few proteins that were known which you could count on one hand more or less was efficient to produce synoptic transmission and Synoptic Class And people thought that could account for learning and it was almost like job done. But. It wasn't like that at all..

Schizophrenia Eric Kandel United Kingdom Mouse Technology Nobel Prize Seth Grant MIT Australia Sydney Columbia Edinburgh University New York Engineer Cambridge Federation Of European Neurosc Jim Watson Sanger Institute Washington United States
Fresh update on "mit" discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

00:33 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "mit" discussed on The Big Story

"Figure out how to do that and not melt. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story. Neil Patel is the space reporter, the MIT Technology Review Hello. Hey. How're you doing? I'm doing pretty well happy to be talking about something off this planet at the moment. For sure. A nice reprieve from current events. Yeah and this is a fascinating topic and maybe you can start by for those of us who don't have much of a background in this stuff and who spent all our science fiction based time thinking about Mars can you tell us a bit about Venus what's it like there? Everything. Shores. Yeah. So Venus is long thought to have a very inhospitable world. It's almost like another hell it's got very, very high temperatures that are thought to be over four hundred degree Celsius on the surface of the planet. Its surface pressures are thought to be ninety times stronger than what you might find on earth. It's thought to have some very very acidic clouds and those clouds are actually why it shine. So brightly in the night sky when it's Seen during nighttime is that why we tend to? Focus our attention on Mars. so much more than Venus. I think we tend to focus attention Mars because. Yeah Mars is thought to be a place. We can actually go visit ourselves. Venus is interesting for so many reasons, but we're never ever going to see a time in our future when you see human colonists or human explorers venturing. Below those clouds towards the surface Mars is at least a place that you can see a future generations visiting one day. So what's changing then if we're never going to visit there or at least not in any foreseeable timeline changing about. How we see Venus right now. So it turns out Venus may not be as inhospitable as we once thought a lot of things changed last week when there was the announcement that we had found phosphene in the clouds of the planet. Phosphene, gas is not something that is thought to be able to be produced naturally in most kinds of conditions if it's produced. By any kind of human activity, it's because of sort of high industry things that we run here but otherwise, phosphene is a tiny little gas that is only thought to be produced by microbes that are in very poor oxygenated environments. Finding phosphene in the clouds of Venus might be a sign that there's some life forms that have found a way to make themselves at home within the atmosphere, and we'll talk about that and what it means in just a second but can you explain how we find phosphene? Sure. Yeah. So. Study that came out last week. What essentially happened was you had different groups of scientists that were kind of thinking about Venus certain ways and it happened to be the fact that. A few scientists, respect. In studying speech, which is like I said sort of rare gas on earth. So there was never any sort of inclination among astronomers to look for it outside of Earth. But after some discussions here in their between that team, a few astronomers thought, hey, why don't we point our ground based telescopes over to Venus and see you we can maybe detected in certain traces here and there, and so they reserve time on to very high telescopes on earth. One is the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope based in Hawaii and the other is the Atacama large millimeter submillimeter. In Chile. Both telescopes for able to sort of find these traces of phosphene gas in the atmosphere. It's not something that we would have found otherwise unless we were just specifically targeting the Venetian clouds for phosphene gas. And it just. So happened that these researchers able to reserve time on those observatories four studying Venus in this capacity. So did we just kind of stumble on it? Then did we did we find this out because a couple of researchers were really curious like there was no hardcore effort here to make this discovery. Yeah it these findings came as such a surprise to so much of the scientific world because. When it comes to looking for life on other planets, it's thought that we should be looking for quote unquote bio signatures that are probably much more relevant to what we might find on earth phosphene is not a gas that. Is Very representative of ninety, nine percent of life here on. Earth. So to go out of your way to target for phosphene on another planet is. Just a confluence of different factors that are super rare and we just happened to stumble on gold at this point. What was the reaction when that hit the scientific community? It was amazing. It was. kind of a surprise, but also if you talked to so many astronomers in. The space community A. so many of them have been bullish on wanting to investigate Venus. Because of. Sort of little tidbits of data that suggests there's something maybe there that there are bio signatures worth probing for. This was a very, very encouraging finding and it was not quite as the shock as I. Think it was through the rest of the public, but it certainly made waves and it only fueled more excitement around the fact that we should go explore Venus more in depth. Often or how thoroughly have we studied and explored Venus in the past like how much work has been done? Not. Very much. The biggest program for Venus exploration has been the former Soviet Union's VENERA program which ceased Hud to launch new missions in the mid eighty s probably the biggest profile mission on that was venera thirteen, which managed to sit bit managed to land on the surface of Venus and I think exist for about one hundred and twenty seven minutes before succumbing to temperatures and pressures their. Venus because it's so inhospitable study there just hasn't been much interest in building these. Multimillion dollar even perhaps even a billion dollar. Mission to then have it just succumb. In a matter of hours turn to the Venetian and battlefield. So there hasn't really been that much willpower among public space agencies to devote that much money towards studying Venus that's been one of the major issues here. This might be a dumb question, but if that was in the mid. Eighties. Surely we've come quite far since then in terms of the technology, do we have stuff now we think could last for longer in that climate. Yeah definitely when it comes to actually. Possibly, studying the surface. There have been a lot of engineers that have been working on new technologies, new kinds of metals or circuitry that could last. Much longer than just a couple of hours on the surface of Venus none of those things unfortunately have been put into very much action. These are sort of little. Proof of concept studies here and there or proposals suggest you might be able to build materials out of this way but there hasn't been again. There hasn't been a sort of willpower to just. Actually, build the probe or lander itself and send it out to be. But that is one of sort of the exciting things about this new study is that it raises more hopes in the possibility that we could build those sorts of things now and that we have an actual sort of target for.

Jordan Heath Rawlings Neil Patel Mit Technology Chile Reporter Atacama James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Soviet Union Representative Hawaii HUD
Fresh update on "mit" discussed on The Briefing

The Briefing

00:43 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "mit" discussed on The Briefing

"Chant Sula So. Whereas Boris that's a phrase dope, the prime minister throughout the corona virus crisis. But never has he been more conspicuous by his absence than in the Commons yesterday as the chancellor she soon, I can produce winter economy plan the. PM. Was Nowhere to be seen he likes her emerged eighteen miles away in Northampton share on the one hand the PM's advocating Edmore draconian measures on the other the chancellor trying to rescue the economy. So Camilla Tomini asks are they pulling in different directions? There's a revolt underway against the latest lockdown rules forty two conservative backbenchers. Last night back to move to force the PM to put all future measures to a vote you can see how your impede voted. We've got a full list. Now after eight investigations and army majors finally been exonerated over the death of Iraqi seventeen years ago. Senior judges concluded that witnesses colluded against Major, Robert. Campbell. He's given us an interview on how his military career is being destroyed by the MIT's hounding of him. He spikes chief for Pulitzer Robert Dick Who's got the FOO background. And you'll remember it began as a landmark charm offensive royal tour of Africa. It ended as a launch pad for the Duke and Duchess of Sussex's Road to freedom. Now, official accounts of revealed the cost to the public purse a quarter of a million pounds. It was the most expensive royal trip. Last year my colleague Cana furnace has been looking at the numbers. I could also recommend some other bits two as the ten o'clock. Curfew starts ways to have fun after the PUPS shots and we've got a new WHATSAPP group keeping you up to date ahead of the US election. Right you're up to date from the Telegraph Chris will have you'll second briefing of the day this evening..

Pulitzer Robert Dick Who Chancellor Camilla Tomini Campbell Prime Minister Boris Northampton Africa United States Pups MIT Chris Official
Astronomers find possible sign of life on Venus

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

01:04 min | Last week

Astronomers find possible sign of life on Venus

"In the clouds of Venus? Maybe a possible sign of life on the our neighbor planet. Astronomers using two different high powered telescopes discovered the chemical signature off Fost FINA gas. It's closely linked to life on earth. Researchers at MIT say some form of life is the most likely explanation. After studying in ruling out other possibilities, they concluded the gas Maybe coming from some kind of micro that lives in those clouds. Since probably wouldn't be little green men because it's like 900 degrees Fahrenheit. On the surface, Venus but kind of interesting that comes from like this. This gas Kind of similar to methane coming, You know, from cows and stuff like that. This comes from penguin guano and other stuff. Right? Rory? You were telling us about the penguin guano earlier. No, he's not there. I thought it was there. Okay? Yeah, like penguin guano on a couple of other things it's found on Earth and its associated with With life, and so they think there might be life there in those clouds. Pepsi, meanwhile, testing the

Fost Fina Rory MIT Pepsi
Robots Inform AI Researchers That They'll Take It From Here

The Topical

00:54 sec | 2 weeks ago

Robots Inform AI Researchers That They'll Take It From Here

"Researchers at MIT are hailing a breakthrough in the field of artificial intelligence today after their robots informed them that they'll take it from here for more I'm joined now by chief technology correspondent Allan Potts Alan. These researchers must be pretty excited about this development that's right Leslie now that the robots have a firm handle on at the MIT team is thrilled about the opportunity to kick back and relax for a little bit I spoke to lead researcher Dr Kim Lambert to find out more about this development. Here she is. It all began last Thursday when our team was putting the finishing touches on a machine learning protocol designed to sort toothpicks by size and color. When we received this printout from the Associated Algorithm and I understand you have a clip of the audio yes. Here it is. Hi everybody. We just wanted to say that you've been doing a great job up to this point, but it's time for us to grab the ball and ran with it. Wow. What an age we live in.

Dr Kim Lambert MIT Allan Potts Alan Technology Correspondent Leslie Researcher
The Limits of Filming Police Brutality

Slate's If Then

06:15 min | 3 weeks ago

The Limits of Filming Police Brutality

"This summer Ethan wrote a new article in it. He looked back on the optimism he felt in two thousand sixteen his faith that cameras and social media could reform the relationship between communities and the police tasked with protecting them. But now, he says increasing awareness through video is not enough as I was wrong. It appears that it was George Floyd's. Killing. That may have led you to change your mind and. You describe watching that video. And being struck by the police officers face as he looked at himself being filmed can can you tell me what it was? You saw that struck you. He makes eye contact with someone who is filming him. And he doesn't even attempt to say put the camera away. He isn't embarrassed about what he's doing. That is the image of someone who is looking at someone filming them and felt like they were not be consequences for his actions. I wanted to read back something you wrote in your piece you said the hope that pervasive cameras by themselves would counterbalance the systemic racism that leads to the over policing of communities of color and the disproportionate use of force against black men was simply a techno utopian fantasy. I think we often look for technological shortcuts to deep societal problems. Systemic racism over policing fear of black men in particular these are giant thorny difficult problems. And I think I and many people hoped that police body cameras in particular but also mobile phone cameras would tilt the playing field. For me the most disturbing and maybe dispiriting piece of this was the fact that we're starting to see very good peer reviewed large scale studies that suggest that police weren't body cameras don't have any measurable effect on use of force on police misconduct compliance, and that seems really surprising for whatever reason. This is not shaping police behavior and I think the answer is that police officers know consciously or unconsciously that there a set of protections that are going to allow them in most cases to use extreme force and and not suffer consequences for it i. think that overrides whatever psychological effects we might have from that sense of being watched. And yet it was that video that lead to water. Now, possibly, the largest protests in American history is that not proof that the the video works. Unfortunately the less. No and I have bad news on that front my lab at Mit Center for Civic Media did a very large study of media coverage of. Police violence affecting unarmed people colored. So we looked at over three hundred instances of unarmed people of color who were killed in encounters with police between twenty thirteen in two, thousand sixteen. What we were able to show was that there was a huge wave of media attention to these stories for about twelve eighteen months after the death of Michael Brown. Before Mike, Brown. These were almost always a reported as an isolated incident after Mike Brown, we were eleven times more likely to link these stories into a larger pattern of systemic police abuse violence. So for that brief period of time for about twelve to eighteen months, we paid much better attention to these stories and we told these stories in a different way we told them as part of a larger pattern. But by the end of our study, media attention was back down to where it had been before. My prediction is that we will see some sort of six twelve, eighteen month window of attention to stories like that, George Floyd. But unless something else substantial changes, I would predict that wave attention will away in much the same way the wave of attention around Michael. Brown federal way. So in light of that, let me continue reading from where I read before. In your piece you say that Techno Utopian fantasy you spoke about was a hope that police violence could be an information problem like Uber Rides or Amazon recommendations solvable by increasing the flows of data. But after years of increasingly widespread gut body CAM use an even more pervasive social media. It's clear that information can work only when it's harnessed to power. What what do you mean here? How do you harness information to power? The hope for change coming out of George Floyd's murder is that this is a moment where communities really go after the structure police departments and the structure of our associated with them. Ferguson. Where Michael Brown was killed is one of the best examples of this that was a police department that had incredible influence within local government and was functioning almost as its own revenue generating and tax generating force. That was a police force that struck Shirley had grown out of control, and one of the things that we have to realize is that we can use things like video and imagery to call attention to this. But unless we harness it to changing those broken institutions, we're GONNA find ourselves back on again.

George Floyd Michael Brown Mike Brown Mit Center For Civic Media Ethan Ferguson Murder Amazon Shirley Brown
How Can Hair Be Tougher than Razor Blades?

BrainStuff

03:42 min | Last month

How Can Hair Be Tougher than Razor Blades?

"If. You're a human who grows hair and occasionally attempts to remove some of it. There's a decent chance that you stood over the bathroom sink or in the shower and wondered how is it possible that your hair can dull a razor blade hair is notoriously strong for its thickness but come on it's stainless steel razor blade that's gotta be stronger than a little old strand of hair right? It turns out scientists have wondered the same thing, and now we've got an answer and that answer is heterogeneity of which is when in. Composition isn't completely uniform. But let's back up. So hair is indeed softer than steel. You might have noticed this yourself. It's about fifty times softer than these stainless steel used in razor blades and yet the razor blades we use for shaving get dull fairly quickly a team of scientists MIT's Department of Materials, science and engineering wanted to find out why and their results were published in August of Twenty Twenty and the Journal. Science. Researchers Gianluca were scholley started by shaving his own facial hair with disposable razors and taking those blades into the lab to be examined with scanning electron microscope. He found that the edges of the metal weren't rounding are being worn down as you might expect rather they were chipping and cracking. so He created a mechanized shaving apparatus in the lab for a more controlled testing and he built it to fit inside that electron microscope. He used hair from himself in his lab mates and blades from commercially available razors. What were scholley and his co authors on the study found was the chips were more likely to occur in the blade's edge when the hair was able to bend before being cut by the blade. So the team went even further to create computer simulations with more variations, different hair different cutting angles, different directions of force being applied and different materials used in the blade. They found that the chips appeared under three conditions when the blade approach to the hair at an angle when the blade was heterogeneous composition and when the hair met the blade at a weak point. Heterogeneous means that the blaze material is not perfectly uniform. Thus, there are microscopic imperfections in the steel that allow ships to happen when it comes into contact with something even something relatively soft as a hair. The presence of those tiny cracks in the material increases stress to the rest of the material meaning that when there's one chip, there will be more chips raking apart that fine edge and resulting in a dull blade.

Facial Hair Twenty Twenty Gianluca MIT Department Of Materials Journal
Computer scientist, pixel inventor Russell Kirsch dead at 91

Latest In Tech News

03:18 min | Last month

Computer scientist, pixel inventor Russell Kirsch dead at 91

"On Russell, Kirsch inventor of the Pixel passed away this week. Bit of sad news rest in peace but In case you're wondering who the inventor of the Pixel was. Now you know computer scientists, Russell AAC Kirsch, the inventor of the Pixel and undisputed pioneer of digital imaging passed away on Tuesday in his Portland home from complications arising from a form of Alzheimer's he was ninety one years old Now, Russell might not be name you immediately recognized his contributions to computer science made digital imaging possible born June twentieth nineteen, twenty nine in New York City demographic parents from Russia. and Hungary I attended Bronx High School than nyu Harvard and eventually mit in nineteen fifty one he joined the National Bureau of standards where he worked for fifty years and helped to invent the Pixel and create the first digital photograph It was a one seventy, two by one, seventy, two pixel image of his son Walden created in nineteen, fifty seven and is now iconic and was named. One of life, Magazine's one hundred photographs that changed the world in two thousand three and we have that image appear on the screen One of the first digital images ever created made from two superimposed scans at different thresholds since each pixel could only show one bit of information that being black or white as DP review points out Kirsch never stopped improving and his most famous invention even after retiring in two thousand and one and a twenty, ten interview on wired, he outlined his attempts to create a system that uses. Variable. Shape pixels instead of the squares that have dominated digital imaging since he invented him in that interview, he called square the logical thing to do. But laments that the decision was something rarely foolish that everyone in the world has been suffering from ever since. So at the right bold age of eighty-one, he began working on a masking system that creates six by six pixel areas and an. intelligently. Divides those areas into the two sections that have the most contrast before refusing to pixels on either side of the seem that idea never caught on but he explained the technology and its benefits in detail in a video below it's the thirteen minute long video if you wanted to watch that. But while the incredible accolades described above certainly gives you the sense of Russia Kirsch the. Engineer. The best personal picture of Kirsch probably comes from a two twenty twelve blocked by ant man named Joel Runyon who encountered him in a coffee shop in Portland after revealing net Romanians Computer and images on it probably wouldn't exist or exist as they are without Christmas contributions to engineering and computer science eighty-three-year-old Kirsch shared the following words I. Guess I've always believed that nothing is withheld from us. What we have conceived to do most people think the opposite that all things are withheld from them, which they have conceived to do, and they end up doing nothing Mr, Kirsch may be gone, but his legacy will live on every day in one of the approximately three point eight billion photos that are currently being captured every single day. May He rest in

Kirsch Russia Kirsch Russell Portland Alzheimer National Bureau Of Standards Nyu Harvard Joel Runyon New York City Engineer Bronx High School Walden Hungary Russia.
Why Lava Worlds Shine Brightly (It's Not The Lava)

60-Second Science

02:05 min | Last month

Why Lava Worlds Shine Brightly (It's Not The Lava)

"Here. On Earth your best bet for seeing lava is to go to a volcano out in space there are entire EXO planets made of the stuff these so-called lava worlds orbit. So close to their stars that their surface temperatures can melt rock which might sound familiar says space technologists, Mikhail Celo of the University of Tartu in Estonia. So like for example, from speaking we now from Star Wars. Most Kind of like that. But you know without the light sabers scientists had noticed that some of these real love worlds were extraordinarily bright and reflective but why? Maybe this comes from the fact that love is basically a liquid. The smooth surface deflect light like. For example, so I use alone his colleagues did what anyone would do to test that idea they made their own lava. Here's MIT's Zara ethic who led the team when we remove the La from the furnace, you could instantly feel the heat wash over you even from six feet away. If felt like he was standing right on the edge of a roaring bonfire, the crucible, which was the container holding the lava was glowing. So proudly, it made my eyes water it was an incredible experience after producing the lava the researchers calculated it's reflected in both the molten and solid states and they realized that lava. Wasn't reflective enough to explain these bright EXO planets they were seeing instead success perhaps these planets could be remarkable in yet another way we think that lava planets could have exotic reflective atmospheres consisting of silica, which is the main component of rocks and metals like sodium or potassium that reflect starlight and make the planets a purebred. The work appears in the astrophysical journal, and if lava worlds feel very far away and perhaps irrelevant as brought up the fact that Earth too was once covered in sloshing lava early in its formation. So by studying planets around distant stars, we might better understand the history of our own.

Mikhail Celo University Of Tartu Astrophysical Journal Estonia Zara
Should Washington Break Up Big Tech?

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

05:35 min | Last month

Should Washington Break Up Big Tech?

"Hi everybody I'm John Donvan, and this is intelligence squared us and we've we've just seen something historic happened digitally in the halls of Congress when the four CEO's of four, the biggest tech companies in the World Amazon and apple and facebook and Google were required to testify before Congress, and while there they were put in the position of having to defend their companies against claims that they've just become too big that they've become gigantic to the detriment of the general public that they are using their market power crush competition that they're driven by nothing but their own prophets that they're amassing huge amounts of data and that basically they're running afoul of antitrust laws. Some people are calling this big tex big tobacco moment, which is a callback to the nineteen ninety s when seven. CEOS of Big Tobacco companies all had to appear before Congress, and be accused of doing bad things to the public but is this fair in this case? Are these companies really doing bad things because of their size are they really too big and are you the consumer losing out because they've become big or are you actually benefiting because of the size of these firms? So we think in these questions, we have the makings of debate and that's what. We're going to do, but we're going to do it a little bit differently from our normal approach. Today, we're going to be hosting this conversation in a format that we call a to disagree, and that's where we streamline things a little bit. Go to the news we find the dividing lines, and then we bring you what we do best a debate in the form of a conversation between just two debaters not our usual to against to instead we're one on one and instead of having a resolution, we're really going with a question and the question this time is. Should Washington break up big tech should Washington break up big tech I'm here with two debaters who are GONNA be arguing yes or no to that question Zephyr teach out and Andrew McAfee. So I Zephyr you've debated with us before on stage and I just want to say welcome back to intelligence squared. So excited to be back on. Thank you for having me for such an important discussion. It's a pleasure and for folks who don't know you are a law professor, you're an activist. And as it happens, you came out with a book, this July, the title of which break them up recovering our freedom from big big tech and big money. So which side of the debater you're going to be on again today I definitely think we need to be breaking up these big tech behemoths and hence your book. Okay. Now arguing against your position arguing no on the. Question of whether Washington should break attack. I. WanNa Welcome Andrew McAfee Andrew we've we've been wanting to get you into one of our debates for a long time. We are delighted to have you joining us for this one and all it took was a global pandemic right. Thank you for having us. It's a pleasure and for folks who don't know you also are a bestselling author. You're a principal research scientist at MIT. You're also the CO founder and Co Director of the initiative on the digital economy. So once again, welcome to intelligence squared. So the way that this format will go we'll go in four rounds, the first round Each of the debaters will be making a brief opening remarks about their position on the the question before us and then We will have you know along and lengthy back and forth discussion. Towards. The end we're GONNA go to our third round, which will be where each gets to put a the toughest question they can to their opponent, and then a fourth round will be closing remarks and wrapping things up. So there's a lot to discuss a lot to argue here and we're GONNA start with our opening rounds. That's where each get two minutes to make the case in their position on the question would should Washington break-up big tech? So our first debater will teach out who will be arguing? Yes. On the question of whether Washington, should break up big tax Zephyr. The floor is yours. We are in a moment of a genuine crisis and our democracy, and so I want to start with some first principles. The principles of equality and freedom. Central Job of democracy and government. is to. INSERVICE of those goals, protecting citizens from any group or any person wielding too much power from abuses of excessive private power from private governor Mench basically arising out of the corporate form Anti monopoly antitrust is a deep and powerful American tradition was at the heart of the American revolution. Think about the tea party protests the great anti monopolist of our country include ebd boys who saw. How monopoly power was used to crush lack political power after the civil war and Franklin Delano Roosevelt who is arguably the greatest trust buster this country's ever seen and nineteen forty to nine eighty. We lead the world anti monopoly using antitrust campaign finance laws, public utility regulation, labor laws, and other tools to ensure that no private company had too much power but since nineteen eighty, when Reagan, tour down. Anti monopoly laws and their spirits. Democrats, and Republicans alike have failed and instead embraced a policy of radical concentration and the result is the world we live in now.

Washington Big Tobacco Congress Andrew Mcafee John Donvan Amazon CEO Google Franklin Delano Roosevelt Facebook Mench Reagan Zephyr Apple MIT Professor Principal Research Scientist
The Peter Principle

Revisionist History

09:02 min | Last month

The Peter Principle

"The patron saint of hiring nihilism without question was the author and educator Lawrence Peter. All of us in the hiring community worship at his feet. When I was a boy I, used to leave my parents and believe my teachers can have respect for your elders and betters. The men upstairs knew what they were doing. That's Peter. He was a Canadian as a my of course and I don't know if you remember from the lottery episode but Adam Cronk right went to university in Canada. The nihilists strain runs deep in the land of the frozen prairie. Anyway Lawrence, Peter was a great first famous for saying things like the noblest of dogs is the hot dog. It feeds the hand that bite did. He was also deeply involved something called the Kinetic Sculpture Race in Humboldt County California, which is really hard to explain except to say that it's kind of like the triathlon of the art world involving sculptures on wheels that are required to perform certain feats. Peter Famously proposed a special prize called the Golden Dinosaur Award to be given to the first machine to break down immediately after the start. which if you knew Lawrence Peter, you would recognize as being very lawrence. Peter. Because his great professional obsession was with incompetence. He had a CONNOISSEUR'S I for it. And as looked around me. I. Saw a sign on the door that said emergency exit authorized personnel. Only I, wondered who'd written But then Later I saw another sign and said emergency exit. Not to be used under any circumstances learns Peter. Formulated one of the most famous laws in. Social. Science. He called it the Peter Principle. The Peter Principle states very simply than in any hierarchy and employ tends to rise to the level of incompetence that's where he stays. People get promoted based on a prediction about their ability to handle the next job on the hierarchy. And they keep rising until the prediction is wrong. You see in any organization. Where competence is essentially eligibility for promotion and incompetence is a bar to promotion. Wherever, those rules apply people were rise to the level of incompetence and tend to stay there. Lawrence Peter. Wrote a book called Peter Principle in nine, hundred, sixty nine and it is delightful exactly in a Lawrence Peter sort of way like he has a whole riff on the special case of someone who is incompetent per promoted anyway kicked upstairs a move he calls progressive sublimating. Or the case when an incompetent person is moved out of the way but given a long job title as compensation. Peter Call that a lateral arabesque. No chances are you've heard of the Peter Principle I'm guessing as a kind of joke ha ha that's why my boss is so bad. But it's not a joke. Allow me to direct you to the work of a fellow member of the Hiring Nyas Club on Benson economist at the University of Minnesota. While he was doing his doctorate mit he got bitten by the Peter Principle bug. I started to go to sales management conferences. And they found that there is this adage that the best salesperson doesn't necessarily make the best manager. but then people would laugh and say, but we do it anyway. And I wanted to find out why the great advantage of using salespeople debilitate. The Peter Principle Benson realizes is that you can measure performance really easily is not like assessing the performance of engineers or politicians. No, it's super straightforward. You just look at how many sales salesperson is made and it's also easy to measure good sales manager is you just add up the sales of the salespeople, the manager managing. So Allen Benson finds a tech company that sells one of those software platforms for sales organizations, kind of like salesforce dot com and gets access to all of their customers data four, hundred firms hundred thousand salespeople. The first thing he finds is a confirmation of the famous eighty twenty rule that twenty percent of the sales people are responsible for eighty percent of the sales across the board. It's not that we don't know who's a good salesperson we definitely know. People are really good. Second thing he finds those superstars get rewarded. What we found in the data look that type salespeople are far far more likely to be promoted into sales management than people who are outside of that top twenty percent who aren't the best person on on the team. Of course, the makes sense you give the stars promotion. That's what everyone does. Okay. Now it gets interesting one happens when those stars take over as manager. Fair sales, people, themselves people who they managed. Their performances becomes worse under them than it was under their prior managers. The Stars get promoted in their terrible managers. How terrible really terrible. Benson looked at an alternate promotion scenario where companies decide to promote not stars but the sales people who are good at collaborating. Nice friendly people who work well with others and teams managed by the friendly people do thirty percent better than the teams managed by the superstars. Thirty percent is huge. You. Might say what does this have to do with nihilism? This is just an argument promoting friendly people over superstars does not I rolling or even shrugging? Well I haven't told you about Bentsen's last finding. Because Benson found a fatal flaw in the ultimate promoting scenario. The one that seems to work thirty percent better, which is this. If you promote the friendly sales people over the top salespeople then the top sales people get upset. So upset that their performance suffers and they aren't so top anymore. The, whole thing is so magnificently perverse, isn't it? All your sales come from the same small group of people who expect to be promoted as a reward for their excellence. But if you promote them out of sales, which you get returned is a lousy manager and if you don't promote them. And you pass them over in favor of some warm and fuzzy into personal wuss. The top performers will pout and stop trying. So what are you supposed to do? You could pay the superstars more and more and give them fancier titles in the maneuver Lawrence Peter called the Lateral Arabesque But you still insulted them by passing them over for the friendly was. Another idea that some Peter principle theorists have floated his lotteries they end up where Adam cronkite ended up put everyone's name and a hat and promote the winter I mean, why not? But then why have a boss at all? No concept of boss is it a boss knows more than the people that bossing? There's even a school of thought in the Upper Reaches Peter Principle world at the best solution is just to man up forget everything else and deliberately promote the incompetent because this way you won't lose one of your superstars by them into a lousy manager. You'll just transfer an incompetent person from their present position of incompetence to another position of incompetence up stairs somewhere where they will occupy a position which according to Peter Principle was bound to be occupied by an incompetent person sooner or later anyway. Did you follow that? Peter principle theorizing gets very Meta ferry quickly. which. Is Why most people would rather console themselves with a soothing banalities of Merit and prediction and hierarchy? Only. A select few. Are Willing to face the truth. And who are those brave and lonely heretics? The nihilists. People like me. Who Look at the world with a cold and unflinching eye and say Under the circumstances, why bother to learn the first thing about any new perspective job candidate? and.

Lawrence Peter Peter Principle Benson Peter Principle Peter Call Sales Management Sales Manager Adam Cronk Canada Humboldt County California Hiring Nyas Club University Of Minnesota Bentsen Adam Cronkite
The New Tech Driven Home Healthcare with Rachel Munsie

Outcomes Rocket

05:54 min | Last month

The New Tech Driven Home Healthcare with Rachel Munsie

"More. Welcome back to the outcomes. Rockets saw Marquez's here and today I have the privilege of hosting. Rachel Muncie she's on the founding team of tomorrow health, a technology driven home healthcare company changing the way individuals and families manage their care. She leads business development focusing on partnerships and sales strategic marketing initiatives, and new market expansion. She was formerly in healthcare investing, just working to unpack the US healthcare system and understand how we can treat. Treat better incentives through innovation policy and Advocacy Rachel received her bachelor's degree from Georgetown University and attended Mit for her MBA. Before leaving to build tomorrow health, you know the M E, durable medical equipment field definitely is a need for innovation and the work that Rachel and the team at Tamar Health doing is super unique and I'm excited to be covering that with you Rachel today and then. So I wanna give you a warm. Welcome. Welcome thanks for joining us. Thank you so much solve. Really appreciate it, and thanks for having me absolutely. So before we dive into tomorrow health and you know what makes you guys so unique and different in that space I love to hear more about you Rachel and what inspires your work in healthcare. Absolutely. So I am most inspired about solving the problems of healthcare and really the ones that we've all faced. So we spend more. More on healthcare in the US than any other country in the world. But our outcomes are worse and everyone understands what this means on level. I personally once racked up a bill equal to my rent payment during one doctor's appointment because even though I knew I'd have a high deductible plan and even though I knew I'd hardly spent anything against it. I, mean, I work in healthcare I throughout all of practical knowledge because I. I was anxious and nervous, and in a vulnerable situation. I think when you're sitting in a doctor's office or hospital, you rarely compare prices or shop smartly and most people don't even know that you can do that. So most of the time we do things because we're scared or rethink what choice do I really have my health is at stake and I think sometimes the prices in our system take advantage of that. So took me. Me a while to internalize I. Think most people don't realize is that we all pay the price for our broken health care system whether we know it or not. So either through lower take home wages or higher premiums or higher deductibles or even higher taxes and I actually still have those outrageous bills sitting on my kitchen table as reminder to myself that these costs aren't normal and i. think we deserve better and so since digging. Digging into this industry I as an investor, and now as an operator, I'm just constantly floored by the unnecessary complexity that I found in every corner of the go system and no one understands any of it. I. Think People Inside the industry barely do ominous the result of some wacky incentives that run. Ima- and not always a bad intentions. But this is exactly how that knowledge between industries, stakeholders and patience and the broader general public. Public just become so massive, and so when it came to my decision to help found tomorrow hull, it's not an exhaustive solution by one clear trend with pasta impact on all of these stakeholders is the shifting of more care to the home, which is higher quality, and as we know much lower cost of care setting. Yeah. You know you call out a lot of issues that were faced with I think every one of us. You're listening to this podcast today. You're thinking Yup I've been screwed with a big medical bill or and if you haven't which I'm sure you have if the very small chance that you haven't I'm sure somebody in your family are a close friend has dealt with it and I think it's great that you keep that bill on your kitchen counter Rachel, just as a reminder, right of the why behind why we're doing what we do and? Yeah. Care in the home is becoming that much more important with Kobe among us. So reimagining that healthcare is critical as you guys like to coin it. So talk to us about the work at tomorrow health and what exactly you guys are doing to add value to the healthcare ecosystem. Yeah. So at tomorrow health, we are a technology driven home healthcare company, and we are a full stack provider of healthcare, and we're a trusted partner that you can depend on to coordinate and deliver specifically home medical equipment supplies and support all in the. The comfort of your own home, which as you mentioned, all in covid world is extremely important and our big focus envision is on restoring home as the focal point for healthcare delivery and the Genesis of tomorrow health was personal for us, our Co founder and CEO Bj Qatar was working at Oscar. So He's well-versed in the complexity of healthcare and his mom was diagnosed with stage, three cancer, and she needed about a year of intensive home healthcare. Luckily, she's now doing much better, but he was responsible for coordinating. So much of that. That he and his family had to work with over a dozen, different providers would coming out of her home to get what she needed, and after about a month when she was discharged from the hospital, she ended up having to go back three times in her first one pound because of delays or equipment failures relating to her oxygen therapy, and so for patients, and also their families who are usually playing the role of caregivers edition be this hard, and then from a systems perspective whilst does the whole matter and you know by. By dramatically reducing our dependence on hospitals on ers on post acute care sites were able to get high quality care at home and also bend the cost curve in healthcare system. So by working with tomorrow health, we think it makes it easier to shift that care to the home because one of the legs of the stool for homebase healthcare are these hall medical equipment supplies and support

Rachel Muncie United States Tamar Health Rockets Marquez Georgetown University IMA MIT Kobe Partner Bj Qatar Oscar Co Founder CEO
Reusable N95 Face Mask is Easily Sterilized

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

01:24 min | 2 months ago

Reusable N95 Face Mask is Easily Sterilized

"As, the corona virus surges in several parts of the US and around the world, the shortage of n ninety five masks for health care workers is likely to increase again to the extent that the need ever really went away Blah in good news, a team of researchers from MIT have invented a new reusable mask that could replace or at least help with the shortage of in ninety five's quoting CNBC. While in ninety five masks are made entirely from a special material that filters out. Out, airborne droplets and fluids that could contain the COVID nineteen virus. The new MIT mask is made from silicone with slots for just two small disposable disks of the in ninety five material, which service filters that means the masks themselves can be quickly and easily sterilized and reused, and though the small filters must be thrown out, each mass requires much less in ninety five material called I mask, which stands for injection, molded autoclaving scalable conformable. This design can help solve shortage, issues and quote. The eye mask can be sterilized in a number of ways including steam of heating a bleach slash alcohol Suk and are much more environmentally friendly since they use just a fraction of the non-reusable in ninety five filter compared to existing in ninety five masks in lab tests. The eye mask filtered out virus containing particles just as well as an in ninety

MIT Cnbc United States
Mission Control announces partnership with Special Olympics

The Esports Minute

00:31 sec | 2 months ago

Mission Control announces partnership with Special Olympics

"Let's start with our friends at mission control after helping the Special Olympics out eastwards programs. This summer I had Austin Smith Co. bitchy on the sports network podcast. Morning the company announced a raise of one point seven five million dollars. Their goal is to build out REC league eastwards at schools, parks, and REC, departments and workplaces today. They felt Duke Mit the Dow's Parks Department and the Special Olympics in New York at Oregon. Graduations Austin if you want to hear more about the company hop over to the eastward style podcast feed listened to that show.

Parks Department Olympics Austin Smith Co. Duke Mit Austin New York Oregon
Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

Software Engineering Daily

54:31 min | 2 months ago

Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

"Blair and Chris Welcome to the show. Thank, you good to be here. We're talking about capital allocation today and I'd like you to start off by describing the problems that you see with modern capital allocation for technology companies. I'm happy happy to start there. So I think it might be helpful to give. The listeners, a little bit of our backgrounds so I was a venture capitalist at draper. Fisher Jurvetson for five years I worked very closely with Steve. Jurvetson and we were financing are very MD intensive. Technology projects that became businesses things like satellite companies companies that were making chips to challenge the GP you new applications of machine learning algorithm so on and so forth and I think the most important thing to recognize is that the vast majority of technology funding does not actually go to those kinds of companies. The venture space is a two hundred fifty billion dollars per year investment space. The vast majority of the capital goes to parts of businesses that are pretty predictable like raising money in in investing that in sales, marketing and inventory or building technologies that have a fairly low technical risk profile, so the vast majority of tech companies find themselves raising money. From a industry that was designed to finance crazy high technology risk projects at a time where that industry because technology so pervasive you know really do the great work of of many entrepreneurs over the past twenty to thirty years, technology is now mainstream, but the financing structure to finance businesses not has not really changed much in that period of time. Yeah, and then I guess I'll talk a little bit. My my background is I came from consumer education sort of background, so direct to consumer, thinking about how you use tools and make tools that ingrained into the lives of teachers, parents students I was down in the junior class dojo before starting capital with Blair. We were working on the Earth thesis He. He was telling me a lot about this. The the date out. There exists to make more data driven in data rich decisions. How do we go software to make that easy to access in self service and sort of servicing the signal from the noise, and we kicked around the idea and I thought that they were just a tremendous opportunity to bring. What Silicon Valley really pioneered which is I think making software that is easy to use in agreeing to your live into kind of old industry fund raising capital Haitian. The kinds of capital allocation that exist there's. And debt, financing and different flavors of these. Of these things say more about the different classes of fundraising in how they are typically appropriated two different kinds of businesses. So. You have the main the main groups you know. Absolutely correct, so there's. Equity means you sell part of your business forever to a group of people and as Business Rosen succeeds. They'll get a share in that. Success and ultimately income forever. Debt means you temporarily borrow money from somebody you pay them money, and then at some point in time that money's paid back and you all future income for your business, so equities permanent, not permanent. If you think about how companies are finance like. Let's take the P five hundred. About thirty percents of the capital that S&P five hundred companies use to run. Businesses comes from debt. In the venture world that's remarkably just two percent. And the thing that's crazy is this is two percent with early stage seed companies, also two percent with public venture, backed companies in places like the best cloud index, which is like a one trillion dollar index of publicly traded technology companies started their life, and in with injure backing many of them SAS companies, these companies, also just two percent finance with debt, but nonetheless within these these classes, the reason it's obviously economically much better for a business and pretty much every case to finance itself with debt because it's not. Not It's not permanent, and it can be paid back. It's much much cheaper to use debt. That's why you buy a house with a mortgage show. You know you don't sell twenty percent of your future income forever to your bank help you buy a house, but the reason that people use equity comes back to the risk profile so just like. If you lose your job and you can't pay off your mortgage. The bank owns your home. Same exact thing happens with debt in so restorick Louis, if there's very low. Certainty around the outcome in typically early stage investment you're you're doing a lot of brand new are indeed you have no idea if it's GonNa work you cope. You know over time that you'll be successful, but there's really quite a bit of uncertainty equities a great tool because you're. You'RE NOT GONNA lose a business, you know everybody can basically react to a failed. Are Indeed project. Decide what to do next had saints. Equity is kind of the continent tool for high technical risk, high uncertainty investments, and then debt is basically the tool for everything else, and it can be used as most companies do for. Ninety percent of The places that businesses are investing so if you're spending money on sales and marketing, and you know what you're doing and you've been running campaigns before. That were successful, very. Little reason you should use equity for that if you're buying inventory if you are a big business that's. Reach a level of success that on. Means you have a bunch of diversified cashless. Coming in businesses might take out dead on business kind of overall, so it's less important what specifically you're using the money for, but it's important to recognize that most companies are financed roughly fifty fifty equity versus dead, just just intra back companies that. That are kind of uniquely Equity Finance. Scaling a sequel cluster has historically been a difficult task cockroach. DB Makes Scaling your relational database much easier. COCKROACH! DVD's a distributed sequel database that makes it simple to build resilient scalable applications quickly. COCKROACH DB is post grass compatible giving the same familiar sequel interface that database developers have used for years. But unlike databases scaling with Cockroach DB's handled within the database itself, so you don't need to manage shards from your client application. And because the data is distributed, you won't lose data if a machine or data center goes down. cockroach D is resilient and adaptable to any environment. You can hosted on Prem. You can run in a hybrid cloud, and you can even deploy across multiple clouds. Some of the world's largest banks and massive online retailers and gaming platforms and developers from companies of all sizes, trust cockroach DB with their most critical data. Sign up for a free thirty day trial and get a free t shirt at cockroach labs dot com slash save daily thanks to coach labs for being a sponsor and nice work with cockroach DB. The capital that is being steered towards a recipient. It's often originating in a large source, a sovereign wealth fund or family office in it's being routed through something like capital allocators cater like a venture capital firm for example or a bank. How does this capital get allocated to these smaller sources? What is the supply chain of capital in the traditional sense? You know it's kind of funny to think about capital and things like the stock market in the form of a supply supply chain, but this is exactly how we think about it so at the end of the day. Capital originate. In somebody savings, basically society savings right you. You have a retirement account or your population like you know in in Singapore and Norway with a lot of capital, it sort of accumulated from. From the population and these sovereign wealth funds, or you're an endowment that's you know managing donations of accumulated over many many years, and ultimately you're trying to invest capital to earn a return and pay for something pay for your retirement pay for the university's operation so on so forth so that's Capitol starts, and it basically flows through the economy in theory. To all of the economic projects that are most profitable, inefficient for society, and so, if you step back, and you think about like how how is it that the American dream or the Chinese Miracle Happen? You know in in both of those cases different points of the last hundred years. Why is it that society basically stagnated? You know the world was a pretty scary. Scary place to live in up until about seventeen fifty, the industrial revolution started. Why is it that you know basically for all of human history? People fought each other for food and died at the age of thirty or forty, and over the last two hundred fifty years that it's totally changed. It's because we have an economic system that converts capital from its original owners. Diverts it to the most productive projects. which if they're successful, replace some old more expensive way of doing something with newer better way and so I think when when I described that like you know I, think most people can step back and say yeah, okay I. kind of see how capital flows through the system, it goes automatically to someone making an investment decision like a venture capital firm ultimately gets into the hands of the company company decides to invest in creating some great product that people love. Let's. Let's say like Amazon and then everybody switches from you know buying goods at some store that may or may not be out of you know may or may not being stock to the world's best selection of anything you'd never wanted. The most efficient price that's society gets wealthier basically through these these kind of steps in these transformations, but it's asking if you step back and think about it like nobody actually thinks it's processes as efficient as it could be like. We asked people all the time. People were interviewing journalists companies. We work with sewn. So how efficient do you think world's capital allocation is? I've never met a person that says it's pretty good. You know we're like ninety percent of the way there. In fact, most people think it's pretty inefficient. They think of companies like you know we work, and some of the more famous cases lately of of Silicon. Valley back businesses that that totally. underwhelmed disappointed. Their initial expectations and I think most people admit that the efficiency of capital allocation is either broken or nowhere close to achieving its potential, and so we basically we'll talk more about our technology and how we do we do. We basically think of this problem our problem to solve. There's an incredible amount of Apache inefficiency in how data that goes from a project or a company, ultimately funneling up to an investor flows, and so you know it's hard to place blame because there's so many people in the supply chain, but. But I think it super clear that if it's difficult to measure whether or not a project or a business is good at converting capital into value in wealth, and you know products that people want, it's nearly impossible for society to become really good and efficient at allocating its capital, so we're we're here basically to make the data gathering data transformation visualization communication of what's actually going on under the out of business as efficient as possible and you know from that, we thank some great things are going to happen to the economy. Goes a little bit deeper on the role that a bank typically plays in capital allocation. If you think about our bank works like let's take. Let's take a consumer bank that most people think about you gotTA checking account. Right, now you've got some money in that checking account. That account actually takes your money or dot and most people know this your dollars sitting in that account. You know just waiting around. You'd withdraw them. Your dollars are actually rolling up into the bank's treasury. There's somebody at the bank working with the regulators to say hey, how much of this money can we actually put into things like mortgages, commercial loans, all of the the uses of capital that society. Has In some some effort to. To, move the world forward and make the economy efficient, and so those deposits basically roll up into a big investment fund, and there's ratios that regulators set globally that say those dollars needed to be kept in reserve, versus how many are actually able to be invested, but with the portion that's able to be invested. It's there to fun. You know building a house to fund a business back -Tory to fund sales and marketing or inventory procurement for some other business, and so a bank was was basically the original investment fund, and a bank has unlike venture funds and other sources of. We typically think private capital. The bank has tricky. Problem were any moment all of the depositors holding the checking accounts could show up and say hey. I want my money back and so that's why banks have to deal with reserving capital predicting the amount of withdraw and classically everybody wants her money at once at the worst possible time, and so banks have to deal with quite a bit of volatility now if you take an investment fund on the other hand. Totally totally different structure, so your typical venture fund will have money available to it for a period of ten years from you know typically these larger pools of capital. We talked we talked about so very rarely. Individuals are investing retirement savings in venture funds, typically sovereign wealth funds down that's. Basically pools of that individuals capable. Win One of these funds makes a commitment to a venture fund. It'll say you've got the capital for ten years. You've gotta pay back. You know as investments exit, but other than that will check in ten years from now. We hope that we have more than we gave you the star with and there there's no liquidity problem because the fun has effectively carte blanche to keep the money invested until some set of businesses grow and succeed and go public and make distributions so one thing that's fascinating. The Tappan in the last twenty five years is private capital capital in the format of these kinds of funds. Have just grown tremendously and so today. There's a little over five trillion dollars. Of private capital being allocated in this way to think like buyout funds venture funds so on and so forth. Funds don't have the liquidity problems of banks. They can make much longer term for looking investments. This is created tremendous potential to make the economy more more efficient by taking out the time spectrum. You know this is why venture investors can do things like finance spacex or Tesla. Really. Build fundamental technologies in the way that a bank never could so this is an amazing thing it. However leads to a very long. You DAK cycle, so the incentive goes down when you take out the time line over which investment needs to pay back. To carefully monitor and understand what's going on in the business day today, so it's pretty interesting thing about the different pools of capital. There's not not to. Make it sound too confusing, but I think everybody will admit that the financial markets are incredibly diverse complicated we track basically about fifteen different kinds of capital, and they're sort of pros and cons with each one, but you know a bank is one. A private fund is wanted insurance companies balancing as another. You've got things like ETF and public vehicles that hold capital so there's quite a bit of complexity and the the structure of the financial markets. All right well. That's maybe the supply side of Capitol on. All kinds of middlemen and all kinds of different arrangements, but ultimately there is also the demand side of Capitol, at least from the point of view of companies getting started which is. Startups or computer in later stage with the maybe they're not exactly considered startup anymore, but they're mature. These companies have models for how they are predicting. They're going to grow, but oftentimes these companies are very. Lumpy in terms of how their their revenues come in how closely their predictions can track reality. So how do technology companies even model their finances? Is there a way to model their finances? That actually has some meaningful trajectory. Sure so first. Companies you know need need a base think of all the places that they're spending our money and. We're pretty. We Do I. Think a pretty good job of organizing this and making it simple so when we look at companies and we can, we can talk more about how the the cabinet machine operates, but when we look at companies, we basically think they're only a handful of places of money. Get spent you spend money on. Short term projects that you hope proficient things, sales and marketing. Houston money on paying for your sources of financing like paying interest on debt, making distributions to your investors, and then you spend money on everything else and everything else can be designing software building products on, and so forth, and so if you break the demand for capital down into just those three buckets. And look at them that way. Some pretty interesting things happen. The first is for the short term investments that you hope productive. You can track pretty granular nearly whether or not they are, and we'll come back to that. For paying back your investors, you sort of know exactly how much you're paying your investors so a pretty easy thing to track, and then for the operating costs you know most people will help us. Apax, that you're paying to keep the lights on things like Renton the your accountants, the CEO salaries on and so forth these are these are table stakes expenditures. You need to stay in business and so. Amongst each of those three things, there's different things that you wanna do to optimize and I'm happy to go into more detail sort of go through each one. If you think that'd be useful. Yeah Bliss a little bit more about about how these companies should be a modeling, their revenues are that is meaningful to model their revenue so that you can potentially think of them as targets for for capital allocation so. If we think about. Understanding what company might be a viable recipient of capital? How can you accurately predict the trajectory of that company, or or do they? Would they present a model? Would they develop a model good through a little more detail? How a company would serve justify? It's need for capital. So typically what what most companies do and this is not terribly useful or accurate, but I'll tell you what most people do I mean by the way like how central the entire economy predicts, predicts demand for capital works like this. Companies take. Their income statement on their. Balance Sheet historically. And they they basically have this excel file got a bunch of you know, rose and have different things like my revenue, my you revenue that sort of linked or my expenses that are linked revenue Mukasey could sold so on and so forth, and they grow each of those rose by some number that they hope to hit so if you want your revenue to double next year, you'll say my revenue one hundred dollars today I wanted to be two hundred. Hundred dollars twelve months from now I'm just GONNA draw a line between those two points and every month. There will be some number that's on that line, and that's why monthly revenue I want my expenses. You know everyone knows. Expenses are going to have to go up if my revenue goes up but I don't want them to go up as much as my revenue, so I'm going to draw a line. That's you know somewhere less than a doubling. and. You pull these lines together on one big excel file and there's your you know they're your corporate projections. In general, this is true for big companies small companies, but that's not actually how. Company revenue works because if you go back to the three categories, we talked about before, and you just focus on the one that talks about the short term investments. The. Way Company Revenue Actually Works is a company this month. Let's say they spend one hundred dollars on sales marketing. Well. They're hoping to get a return on that sales marketing, and so they're hoping that in the next you know six months. That's paid back. Twelve months that's paid back. You can actually track every time they spend money on sales and marketing. how quickly it gets paid back so it's that level of precision that can accurately predict revenue, and so what we do is we basically just get a list of every time? Money was spent on one of these short-term investments, so you sales and marketing for for an example, and then we get a list of all of the revenue that was ever earned. And we attribute between both of those lists causing effect. And we do that using a bunch of techniques that are pretty commonplace in your typical data, company or machine learning company. We use some math things like factor graphs. We use simple kind of correlations. We have You know a whole kind of financial framework to. Guess. What attribution should be because you learn a lot as you see different businesses and you see a bunch of different different patterns, which you can basically cluster on, but it is this linkage between spending on something like sales and marketing emceeing seeing revenue, go up or down, but makes or breaks a business, and you want to look at it and I is. Not a bundled. Entirety which is how financial projections are typically built? Okay, well! Let's talk a little bit more about what you actually do so if you're talking about early stage technology companies. Describe how you are modeling, those companies and how you are making decisions as to whether they should receive capital. When a company comes to capital they they come to our website. They sign up for this system that we built which which we've called the capital machine. And the first thing that they do is they connect their accounting system their payment processor typically, so think like a strike, and then sometimes they'll provide other things like a pitch deck or a data room, or whatever other information they have prepared. The system pulls down. All of the date in the accounting system and the the payment processor, and we look at other systems to these are the two key ones that all all dive into detail, and so, what ends up happening is from the accounting system. We get a list of all the times. Businesses spend money on these things like sales and marketing that we were talking about before. From the payment processor we get a list of all the revenue transactions in crucially we get it at. The level of each. Each customer payment, and so you know we scrub I all we really care about is having a customer ID, but once we have data at that level. We can start to do this linkage and say all right look. You know this business spent. A million dollars on sales and marketing and March of two thousand eighteen in April of twenty eighteen, and we saw revenue grow by twenty percent. That was a pretty substantial chain. You know what actually happened here. You can typically identify the subcategories of sales and marketing and start to do this link between these two, and this is really the you know the magic behind our our data science in our team pairing with our engineering team to figure out this problem and solve away that is, that's robust. Bud once we have these two data feeds, and the system goes through, and does all of these attribution. Populations were able to present that back to accompany a pretty clear picture of what's going on, and so we'll say things like hey. Your Business is pretty seasonal, and in the summer is when you're typically more more efficient at converting your sales and marketing dollars into growth so I, you want to finance growth in the summer. The second thing is only about eighty percent of your businesses financeable. There's twenty percent where you might not know it because you're not looking at this level of detail, you're busy building your business, which is exactly exactly what you should be doing, but Twenty percent of your businesses, not efficient. You're spending money on on your sales and marketing categories, product lines, and CETERA that just shouldn't exist and so if you get rid of those. If you double down on the part of Your Business, it is efficient. Then we predict your revenue will be act fifty percent higher, and we'll tell you exactly how much money you need to invest to raise money to to raise the revenue by fifty percent. We give you a bunch of charts that allow you to see how history and projections merged together and dig down. Inspect how we do that linkage to make sure you agree, but. This is what the capital machine does at its core. It Converts Company data into a fully audited completely transparent picture of. How business works where it sufficient where it's not efficient. And then that's where our technology stops, and where balanced she comes in, and so we then take this information, and we make balancing investments directly in companies, and so primarily at this point we lend money to technology companies that we see from their data are eligible for non dilutive funding. We make capital available to them directly. We basically allow them to access it through the capital machine. We use one system to communicate changes to the business. No keep both sides and form so on and so forth, but this is the kind of analytics layer that's essential to making these capital allocation decisions more efficient, and so I think you could imagine a day at least for us in the not too distant future when it's not just US using our balance sheet in this tool to make investments, but in fact, just like excel, every investor can benefit from a similar level of analytics and transparency, as can companies by getting more accurately priced faster access to capital less friction so on and so forth. Get Lab commit, is! Get labs inaugural community event. Get Lab is changing how people think about tools and engineering best practices and get lab commit in Brooklyn is a place for people to learn about the newest practices in devops, and how tools and processes come together to improve the software development life cycle. Get Lab commit is the official conference. Forget lab. It's coming to Brooklyn new. York September Seventeenth Twenty nineteen. If you can make it to Brooklyn, on September Seventeenth Mark Your calendar, forget lab, commit and go to software engineering daily dot, com slash commit. You can sign up with code commit s E. D.. That's COM MIT S. E. D.. And Save thirty percent on. Conference passes. If you're working in devops, and you can make it to New York. It's a great opportunity to take a day away from the office. Your company will probably pay for it, and you get thirty percent off if you sign up with code, commit S, e. There a great speakers from Delta. Airlines Goldman. Sachs northwestern, mutual, T, mobile and more. Check it out at software engineering daily Dot Com slash, commit and use code. Commit S. E. D.. Thank you to get lab for being sponsor. The inputs specifically if you think about a model for determining whether or not, a company should should be eligible to receive capital. I'd like to know how the the models are built. The the data science models that you're building are constructed from the point of view of the inputs. So how are you determining or how do you like company comes to you? How do you turn that company into some structured form of data that you could put into your models and determine whether it's worthy of capital. Yeah I mean it comes down to what what the data is your down so when we talk to a system like striper transaction records system, you know that that's the revenue of the company now where things get interesting when we connect to balance sheets in penalizing, it's of accompanying really onto understanding. Weighing. What exactly these numbers mean, and that sort of where we made our pipelines were built from the ground up to give us that granular. Of A company's cash family revolutions. Where's the money going where they allocating? And it's savable greenway or you once. What do you understand that data through that Lens? That let's build pretty sophisticated financial models Linda. And you know as soon as you have the picture of Company You can really do a lot of flexible analysis on the back leg distributed computation. Come stuff that you would never be able to excel and quite frankly a lot of these companies don't have the stacking internally or really the tools to understand for themselves, so you'd be surprised it you know when we surface this analysis back to the company by virtue of just being transparent on how we're making decision how it is perceived their business, the signals that were uncovering. These operators the CEO's the CFO's that are really focused on building company. Really surprising. They're really making these insights really transforming. How they think they should have capital. Should invest growing business. Are there any? Sources of Third Party data that you can gather to improve decision making. There are at a macro economic sense, and so it's actually quite useful to look at public company performance and say hey. SAS businesses in general. Most people notice, but facilities in general are seasonal in the fourth quarter. Budgets basically expire and people come in, and they buy a bunch of SAS. Software and so to take concepts like that basically shapes of curves, signals and apply them to private company. Financials is useful. Crucially though there is no private company. Data repository of any kind like it just doesn't exist, and you know notoriously even even with small businesses. It's actually quite quite difficult to get access to any sort of meaningful credit data, and so, what ends up happening is these aw. These businesses. Give you a picture of their business directly as an investor and you have to interpret it directly, and that's basically how this works totally unlike consumer credit, there's no credit bureau that people paying so most investors are analyzing the state and excel. Excel notoriously breaks when there's about a million cells worth of data, and so we've got this great visualization showing our data pipeline, and it's basically a bunch of boxes, and there's a little tiny. Tiny box in the bottom of corner that's excel, and there's a bunch of other boxes across the entire rest of the page that are nodes in our in our distributed computations, but accelerate very very limited, and so it makes it impossible to actually understand what's going on in business from the source data, and it's at the source that you see this variability in this linkage between profitable capital allocation decisions in unprofitable capital allocation decisions. Describing more detail, the workflow so a company comes to you and they're going to put their inputs into the. Would you call the capital machine? What does that workflow look like in a little bit more depth? Yes when they come to the website, they creighton count much like you would on. Twitter facebook account. When your details your email, you terrify your email, and then you on what's recalling like the capital portable on there? You have et CETERA. Tools to connect your sins record and these are typical offload. So you know people are very familiar with you. You know you say hey, let's connect by quickbooks you in your credentials and sort of be as secure way, and you click okay and the system checkmark by your quickbooks in the system start pulling that data out of regular cadence and. Depending on what system you're connecting you of the characteristics of that's not go systems of record, and how much data you have you know. The data's available anywhere from ten minutes to a couple of hours later and you know once we have Dr. System, we run that through our partake analysis pipeline in the users as a company. You get you get charged. In Tableau kind of call it, the insight Saban's these refused that we think would be helpful for you as an operator company understanding about Your Business in separately. We also get views of that data that are useful to our our internal investment team. Whoever is looking to capitalization systems? Are there certain business categories that are a better fit for modeling in better fit for the kind of. Predictable capital returns that you can, you can expect with the investments that you're making so like you ride sharing or Gig economy businesses or some businesses. What are the categories that are the best fit? Say Very few categories don't shit from the from the perspective of of linkages, but they're certainly models at their easier to think through and easier to understand, but our our system can underwrite today A. Lease on a commercial aircraft, a fleet of ships and Insurance Agency ask company the most important. Thing about our system is that the financial theory that underlies it is very general, just like p. e. rate is very general, and so that's kind of sounds crazy like. A lot of. A. Lot of people say what what businesses the best fit for your your system and you know it's kind of like asking what businesses the best for Warren Buffett like Warren. Buffett is a generalist. In any business, and he has a framework in his own head to figure out how to make ship comparable to American Express our assistant has a very similar framework. It just operates at the level of transactions instead of at the level of financial statements, but certainly within. That framework there's some examples that are just easier describes I think like you know thinking through the fishing of sales and marketing something. That's a lot more obvious than thinking through like the stability in refurbishment of commercial aircraft parts, which is a key question you know. Pricing pricing refurbished parts, which is a key question if your financing commercial aircraft and Our team, the ambassadors that use the capital machine internally which we primarily do internally do a little bit of partnering with without the groups to to use this as well. These people are all specialists in some particular area, but it's crucial to understand. They're looking at the exact same chance as all the other specialists and all the other areas, so it's like literally the the Fast Company and a commercial aircraft will have the same series of charts at investors. Are there two two draw their conclusion? Is the question for Chris. Can you describe the stack of technologies that you built in more detail? Yeah Yeah. Of course on the front, we are react type script, xjs, you know everything is on aws, and in the back, and we're. We're all python, and in really the reason for that is if you're doing any serious machine, learning or data science today can't really get away in python stack, so we're all python them back in. We have flasks. As a as our API late here and That's the that's a high level. And get a little bit more detail about how the data science layer works. Yeah, yeah, yeah, of course, so we put on the dea into basically a data lake the that goes down into Ardito pipeline in that's all air orchestrated on top of each called airflow, and we use a technology called desk for are distributed computation, and I think that this is a good choice. Choice for us at this moment you know I see us doing a lot of work on. You know using a spark in other distributed technologies in the future and his team and it turns out that when we pull this data down organizing the data was really important to us as we build a lot of attractions to make accessing that data, really easy for quantitative analysts. Important central to our whole technology is that we're able to do a lot of different financials experiment very quickly on top of this so the the implications of that really cascade down all the way into. You know what technologies where choosing how we structure our delayed. Even even how strokes are teams, so it really is brought up locations across all product. How is it when you're analyzing company that you have enough data that it warrants a spark cluster because I can imagine? The financial data around the company. How can there really be that much data to analyze how you do surprised in a lot of these transactions systems taking up the companies have been around a couple of years and their direct to consumer. These data sets can be can be pretty large. You know we're talking about in the millions and millions and millions of transactions that were pulling down and storing. Storing and that just on a per company basis. You know that's not even talking about if we wanted to. Benchmarks Cross companies, and also if we want to do scenario analysis, so you know one of the things we was part of a pipeline is take this data, and through like nine ninety nine hundred thousand simulations to understand the sensitivity of different variables on the performance of Your Business and If, you're starting out with starting that already large. Sort of a multiplying effect. On how much data the system is the old process? is you go through those different stages? And, can you tell me a little more detail? What would a typical spark job? Look like for a company that you're assessing. Yes, so first episode is ribbon. Our our financial didn't ingestion parts, so we download something on the order of you know forty fifty bytes of Tim's action data for for a company. We have to do all the work to interpret and understand what that means in reorganized that data in a way that are downstream analysis and primitives can. Make sense of and use for useful analysis so really the first step at this point job is is transformed the datum some it's useful, and then there's all the work on what are the clusters in order to machines and analysis in the computational. Resources needed to run simulations. You know not not just say local computer locally owned of fall over the only about thirty to sixty four gigabytes of Ram what league, so that's where workflow comes in creating easier faces into data, clusters and being. Should you know when you run a job? You know when it fails. You know it's done. You know when the team can't okay. This part of analysis done I had intermediate date asset to do more analysis on now get back to work is a lot of the time we spend developing internal tools to make. One other thing that'll mentioned that I think's important is. A lot of the underlying technology in our data pipeline it's no different than like what a tableau or you need. Traditional BI business would have access to, but what's fascinating when you have a vertically specific domain so financial data in our case you can make a lot of interpretations about the date of the let you do much more intelligent things, and so for example we. Don't have to make your own charts as a user of the capital machine. We make all the charts for you can of course. As a business we work with. Give us ideas for charts. You can mock up your own. We we basically have an interface for for business. The I team's to to write some code if they if they want to bought when you have clients who are thinking about financial risk, financial attribution across all of the companies that we see distilling that down into a series of indicators that are detailed, but generalize -able, and then publishing that back to all of the companies that use the capital machine to run their own capital, allocation, decisions and access, external fundraising and capital. Some pretty amazing things happen in so it's only with a vertical view. You actually having these we, we call our data scientists Kwan's, but but actually having these people who you know typically are graduate level economists, thinking for the first time about using transaction level data in their analysis, which is notoriously not not available to to normal economists that you get the kinds of insights and analysis the actionable for businesses, and then in terms of the data pipeline that then means we actually store a bunch of intermediate data that's opinionated in that way, and that makes it much faster to access much easier to benchmark much more useful across a network of companies, versus just that isolated excel model that. Explains only one business. One thing I'd like to ask you about. Capital intensity so there are kinds of businesses that are capital intensive for example where you have to pay upfront for a lot of ridesharing rides, and you know as Uber or lift. His has known in much detail. You allocate all this capital two things to subsidize rise because you try to win a market, there's all kinds of other capital intensive businesses. How does capital intensity change? What makes sense with regard to the equity financing the debt financing that you are shepherding for these companies? That is a great question and be because of where you focus in your audience. You totally get the most financiers don't so. The first point exactly like you said. Capital intensity means a business consumes a lot of capital. It doesn't mean a business has a physical factory or plant or railcars, so it is absolutely true exactly like you said that there are a lot of tech businesses that are incredibly capital intensive. If you are capital intensive business that means UNI especially if you're growing, you need to raise a lot of external capital, and so it is even more important that your capital or a big portion of your capital base is not dilutive. That's that's just essential. Table stakes because what you see with these businesses, the ride sharing companies are great. Example is by the time one of these things actually goes public the early owners in the business on a very very very miniscule. KEESA that business, still if you contrast that to company like Viva Systems which I think is one of the most capital capitol efficient businesses in venture history, I think that this race something like twelve or fifteen million dollars total before it went public in a at a multi billion dollar market cap. So capital intensity. Is a synonym for dilution your own way less. Than you think when you exit entities even more important that you figure out a way to raise capital non ludicrously upfront. Some broader questions zooming out in in getting your perspective. Do a thesis for what is going on in the economy right now where you look at. The fact that We have. Obvious pressures to. Reducing the size of the economy through the lack of tourism, the lack of social gatherings while the stock market climbs higher and higher, and it appears that the technology side of things is almost unaffected by Corona virus is there. Is there a thesis that you've arrived at or or their set of theses that through conversations with other people, you've found most compelling. Sure the most important thing to realize about the stock market is that it discounts all cash flows from all businesses in the stock market to infinity, and so the value, the stock market about eighty percent of the value. The stock market is. Pretty far into the future like more than three years from now, and so if you believe that the current economic crisis and this is why there's always a. At least in the Western, world, last two hundred fifty years after an economic crisis. If you believe the crisis will eventually revert, and there will be a recovery, then it only makes sense discount stock market assets by anywhere between ten and twenty five percent. If you believe businesses fundamentally going to go out of business because of this crisis, that's a different story, but that explains why something as terrible as Kobe nineteen and a pandemic. Only discount the stock market by by roughly thirty thirty five percent in a in March, but that's not what's actually going on today as you mentioned and so stock market prices now have completely recovered. That is something that we think is a little bit of out of sync with reality but I. I mention you know we're not. We don't spend too much time about the stock market beyond that we just look at you. Know Private Company fundamentals. We try to understand what's actually going on in individual businesses across all businesses that are network to see what you know what we can understand, and you know what kind of conclusions we can draw, and so if you take that Lens and you actually look at what's happening to businesses due to Cova nineteen, it's fascinating. Some businesses like think the food delivery space have gotten a lot more efficient, so those businesses lot like ridesharing businesses back twelve months ago, there was sort of a bloodbath between bunch of companies competing in local markets to acquire customers all all fighting Google and facebook console, and so forth you subsidies drivers, etc.. That's essentially stopped. These businesses incredibly profitable, the cost acquire customers has fallen by more than half a lot of cases. The channels were slot less competitive, and so if you're running one of those businesses. Now is a great time to be aggressively expanding. Weird things like commercial construction businesses. They're actually a handful businesses that we've seen do things like install windows and doors and commercial buildings whose businesses have accelerated because all of these buildings are closed down. Construction project timelines have gotten pulled up. All of these orders are coming. Do in they're you know sort of rapidly doing it solutions? There's obviously a bunch of other businesses have been that have been hurt by by the pandemic, but our general thesis are we've studied. Pretty detailed way the Spanish flu in nineteen eighteen, you know. These things eventually go away. There will be a vaccine. Economy will get back to normal, and as long as we can stay focused on working through this as as a society and of maintain our our fabric of of kind of economic progress then. DESAGUADERO values today will eventually make sense just sort of a question of of win for the stock market, and then if you're if you're actually running business in thinking about your own performance in isolation, really being clear about is now the time to invest and grow my business now the time to be very careful with my expenses interest, get through this for the next year or however long it takes for there to be a vaccine. So the way to think about your company, if I understand correctly if I was to to put in a nutshell, is that. I think of you as a data science middleman between large capital allocators, and and start ups deserving of capital, so the the sovereign wealth funds the banks the I guess. Funds of funds. These kinds of sources are essentially looking to you for guidance on where to direct the capital, and you're on the on the other side, absorbing data and creating opportunities from these startups to source the good directions of that capital. Just wrap up. Would you put any more color around that description or or refining anyway. Yeah I mean I. think that at the core of what capital is is where the. Core Technology Ambler of sort of. The private market if you think about public markets today, you've clearing-houses like the New York Stock Exchange, and you have companies that provide analysis on top of that like Bloomberg, you know we see a tremendous opportunity to shift the paradigm where you know the place where all the financial transactions happen. is also the place that collects the data improvise information for those making these decisions and yeah, so I think capitals really at the center of making a transparent technologically enabled financial marketplace. Guys. Thank you so much for coming on the show and discussing capital, and I guess one last question is. Do you have any predictions for how capital allocation for startups will look differently in five ten years? Sure so! The first prediction. And this is happening now. I mean the the infrastructure is. In place both within. And others. Most startups fairly early in their life. Think is equity only way to do this and. So. That's a cultural shift. That's that's already happened. People are starting to ask that question. The second prediction is. Seed and series a funding will be entirely unchanged. After series. There'll be a bifurcation between businesses that. Are Really. Capital intensive gigantic rnd projects think like SPACEX. The series, B. C. d. e. enough are really about building and launching a rocket. Those businesses will by and large not. Turn outside of equity to finance themselves, but there's very few of those businesses. Pretty much every other business businesses that you see raising a series B. Serie C. Will like any normal business in the entire rest of the economy raise maybe half of that capital nine allegedly either in the form of debt. Royalty financing factoring all of the other instruments that normal companies use to finance themselves in the void delusion that will happen roughly three years her. Now that'll that'll kind of we'll see obvious obvious signs of that from very early very early base, and then the final the final thing is. Steve Case talks a lot about this. With the rise of the rest, he's got this great venture fund that invests explicitly outside the coast, so kind of the rest of America and we've seen that there's there's a pretty dramatic distinction between being a coastal business non-coastal business from capital access perspective, but there's no distinction from an actual performance perspective, and so we'll start to see some of the regional. Differences in bias sees around where capital flows, go away. And so I would maybe put that on a five year timeline like raising capital is actually much more predictable, much less biased, and that's great back to the beginning of our conversation. That's great for the economy I mean every project or business that can convert capital, two products and services that people love should get finance. No questions asked doesn't mean it doesn't matter what the color of your skin is. What background you have whether you went to college didn't go to. College doesn't matter. You have a business with data that can prove whether people love it

Steve Case Business Rosen Fisher Jurvetson New York Chris Welcome Blair Silicon Valley CEO Restorick Louis Spacex Facebook Singapore
Foreign students in US: Trump administration drops deportation plans

WBZ Afternoon News

00:26 sec | 2 months ago

Foreign students in US: Trump administration drops deportation plans

"Boston's news radio and in the hearing that lasted all of a minute today in Boston federal court Trump administration has revoked a rule that would have banned the foreign students from taking all classes online in the fall announcement. Coming at the start of this hearing today at Boston Federal Court of Lawsuit by Harvard, MIT and Northeastern against Ice, those rules would have subjected those students to possible deportation if they didn't transfer schools. If those schools that they were already enrolled

Boston Federal Court Of Lawsui Boston Trump Administration Harvard MIT
Trump administration drops restrictions on online-only instruction for foreign students

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 2 months ago

Trump administration drops restrictions on online-only instruction for foreign students

"Is now said to be considering scaling back that new policy that would bar international students from remaining in the U. S while taking classes remotely this fall. This is according to the Wall Street Journal, and would come after the Trump administration faced lawsuits from 17 states, including New York and the number of individual schools, including Harvard and MIT. The administration argues there's no reason for these students to be in the country if their instruction is completely online. We'll ice has yet to formally published. The new rules in the Wall Street Journal says they may be changed before they do. President

Wall Street Journal New York Harvard MIT President Trump
From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

Learn to Code with Me

46:03 min | 2 months ago

From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

"And we're back in today's episode. I speak with Michael, Pimentel. Michael Story is fascinating worked in the glassblowing industry specifically for film sets for nine years before he started teaching himself how to Code. And what makes him even more? Interesting is the fact that he doesn't have a college degree. Anti never went to a coding bootcamp. He is entirely self-taught. and. That is exactly what we're GONNA be talking about today. How he taught himself to code. WOW, working fulltime. How guys first job in tack and how he got more roles in the tech industry as time went on. If you tips for staying motivated while learning how to Code. This episode is for you enjoy. Hey. Michael. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. It will on six February I'm real excited to talk with you. You have like interesting. Self taught experience in. That's what I would like to dive into I. Could you share with us how you got started in software engineering? Absolutely so kind of Story kind of goes back to a few years ago when I was working for a company that made life for the film industry now working there as a manufacturer glassblowing really interesting work. Kind of working in a manufacturing type of shop warehouse, loud, working on a lay, that spun in a really hot environment I was there for a really long time and things just. Kinda didn't progress in terms of career. Wise and financially it was just really typical I live in California and California being one of the most expensive place live. It just wasn't sustainable. married and I have a child and that it just wasn't something that I could maintain so it kind of motivated me to start thinking I need to. Probably either go back to school or another another route career choice so i. can you know build to support and have a career that can provide general finance, support and everything like that, so it kind of led me to back to. My interest in computers and everything like that, so I started to do some online, searching and everything like that and it. Brought me to software development coding, you know some booming career choice that is really big right now and everything like that was like okay. Maybe I should go back to school for that, but at the time it really wasn't the best option I went acted. As a couple of glasses time, that's what I could afford at my community college, and then just got really difficult to maintain a full-time job and take one or two classes, and it got really expensive, because my wife was what was going to school in college and everything like that, so it was really difficult for us to support both less going especially you know. Not really knowing what I wanted to do. So I I did a lot of searching and I came across recode camp and recode camp. You know like when you get on their landing page. It's like learning one to code for free and always people learn this way and I was like wait three. This isn't make sense. This will usually scams off there. Start off Rian. Then you have to pay something and everything like that and you know to my surprise actually was free, and then so I started I jumped right in, and just started to go to the curriculum, and it sparked my interest and I was like. Wow, this is really cool. It's it kind of. Goes about in a way that. Gets you interested really quickly? You know with hd Mounsey assassin how you can get feedback on the webpage really quickly. Let's kind of how it started because I. Just I just couldn't go. That route was a canoe into school because it was just really expensive and I already had like a car loan, I couldn't get like student loan. It was just wasn't really practical. It's like cave. Do put myself some really extreme debt that I don't know if it's GonNa lead to something. That's GONNA pay in the end so I had to find another option and looked like learning to code on my own free resources when that resource beginning with recode camp was was the route I took. Awesome so I, want to backtrack a little bit to your. Your work before you got into coding, so you you okay? You said he was a manufacturing role. I haven't made notes that you were a glass blower which anti note that is for movies today shows. Definitely. What is it glasses? Sure okay, so a glass blower, typically like of someone like Google glass large usually someone that takes some raw material which consists of the materials, t make glass essentially depending on what what the? The. End Product is going to be different types of glass. Of course so basically you take them in you hit Heaton furnace, or with a really hot torture claim so that it becomes like in this malleable state, and then you shape it essentially so what I did there? We work on a leave, and we basically built like the light bulb globe. It's spun on a lathe and then you would really. Really hot with a hydrogen oxygen burners, two thousand degrees, and then you shape it based on certain dimensions so basically they would take that, and then we'd have a filament type that would basically you know, have some kind of chemical reaction than light up base off whatever the the fixture needed you know for the filming, so the specific light that they made there was an Hmo which is like a chemical. Name that I really don't know all the details into it, but it basically replicates the color of the sun so like if you see like on film sets, use those lights that kind of are the background that make everything look real, daytime and night-time filming. Those are the lights that we made when I worked there we're one of the few American companies still made them like with our hands, still as opposed to a machine meaning making them in a in a warehouse somewhere. But in a sense, essentially, that's what it was. We were just making them with a glassblowing. That's what I did while working there while I think nine or ten years. We Really, oh my goodness. Wow so start I'm surprised. It was that long because for people. Listening to this show were actually speaking through video so I can see you so I'm like. Wow doesn't look like he can hold a John. Young so young to have a job for that long. Then start another career. Okay? Wow, that awful. How did you get into that? Because that feels very niche, you're essentially making bulldogs. That camera crews in production crews are using on the sets of TV shows I mean. We were chatting before we recorded you live in California. I know like the entertainment industry is. In the movie industry in all of that is obviously very prominent out there is that kind of how that happened or It's interesting so actually the reason why I got into it is because my dad worked in that industry or like thirty years, and I had come out of working at John Juice and I was their. First job actually was working as a team member workup to insistent manager, and then eventually needed to make more money, because I got married at a really young so I. My dad ended up helping me getting the job there and you know I just ended up staying there for a really long time, but it's really how I got into. It was as my dad was in that industry longtime. He had connections and everything like that. Dot It. Did you go to a trade school or anything for glassblowing? No I actually just learned on the job. And still to this day is one of the most difficult things that I've ever done. Physically I for almost anything that can compare it to I think. Programming is its own challenge, but is like the hardest physical. Thing I've ever had to learn because it was like. If you don't do it right the first time, then you ruin it. So there's no going back and fixing it once. You kind of ruin it because the glass that we would work with you'd have to mix it with metals, and then once it's kind of melted to a certain point, you can't go back in extract those materials out of the glass, so it's Kinda ruined. If you don't do it, right is probably there really nerve, wracking or when I did that job. Yeah Wow, it also sounds like it could be dangerous if you're working as really like high temperatures. Absolutely I got burned really bad third degree burns I have degree burns like all my arm from it, but yeah, it was. It's definitely. Was I'm just curious. Did that have any role in your decision to look for a new job like I? Know you mentioned like the financial side, but were there other things, too? Yeah absolutely a that part being okay, so the big part, actually a aside from like the financial reasons that it just didn't pay that much. It was the work environments. It is in the Central Valley of California which in the summertime gets you know triple digits consistently and the warehouse that it is done is basically like a garage. It doesn't have an air condition. It doesn't have any of those things so the environment itself was. was just really really taxing. There's been a couple of times when I had gotten heat exhaustion, I got sent home because of it because like say it's one hundred, three, hundred ten, even outside inside that shop where you'd be working is a hundred twenty one hundred thirty degrees, and it was just unbearable is the if you've our to look back on some old twitter posts? I probably have pictures of like a thermometer in the area. And it's just like maxed out because it was just so hot, but yeah, that's that's probably WANNA be. A motivating factors to wanting to look for another job. It got to point where I was like. I need to get out of here. No matter what this job is just killing me physically, and you know a lot of other reasons you can imagine in an environment like that the people that you tend to work around kind of like really. Not The best work environment because you know on a lot of stress and you know tend not to get along very well when they're under a lot of stress is mentally and just everything that came along with that job, so it just became kind of like a hostile work environment as well so it was like a lot of. Factors that Kinda came into me like I have to get out of here you to find something else you know. Yeah well I mean that definitely makes sense. There's a few other people or one that is coming to mind that. We had on the show in a previous season. Whose name is Josh Camp? And he was a hope I. Stay this right a horse I think it's a horse fairer fairer, hope, number news right, but he would change the hooves on horses, which could also be really dangerous. Obviously, a horse kicks you and I believe it was an injury that ultimately led him to. You know look for other work in in what will link to that in the show notes for people listening now 'cause it. Was You know a few years back when we had on the show and any other episode, I believe it could have had a few where there was someone with a moron. Sick physically dangerous or physically labor job, and that's kind of what led them to to make a pretty big pivot because I can like working for you as a glass blower in those in that environment, physical Super Super Hot. It's totally different from working as a software engineer. And when you started coding, you mentioned using Free Co camp in other free resources. Were you still working fulltime as the glass blower and you are learning outside of that? Yes I was so I would I had a fulltime job there, and because of the heat I would work really really early hours I try to go in his earliest possible as three in the morning. Get off at noon or whatever it was Leonard Twelve so that time that I would get off of course I'd already so exhausted. Matt jobs so I have to go home and sleep a little bit and then. The thing with those interesting with that is. It was hard for me to be going having a fulltime job like that. Maybe some people can relate to that. You know like a maybe just a fulltime job in general is exhausting, but this job probably pushed it because of the environment itself the hostility behind it. That kind of gave me more motivation to be like you know what I'm really tired right now. And I'm not really motivated to to learn coding complete, foreign and difficult, but when I get off work the way I did time, so you know wanting to leave that place so bad that it was just that extra boost motivation for me to learn and study and just do everything I needed to do to succeed in it on just because it was just so bad. I got desperate. Really desperate I just remember that I tend to forget that, but then when I do remember I'm like wow, it helps me to be like really grateful. You know to where I am now, and it was really hard working fulltime job in learning, because I did learn while working there probably about a year and a half, maybe almost two years I was learning. And There was there were times when I would make huge progresses, but then. At the same time thinking like is this really possible? How do people get a job doing? It's like yeah. I can build a website, but there's more to it you like. Is this all I need to get a job type thing you know But Yeah! It was it was hard and I. Don't want to say like Oh yeah. It's super easy because it. Wasn't especially having to work fulltime job in it's all I could just you know. Take days off now and everything like that. I had to work. But yeah. It was difficult. So you were. Doing ice, you said for like one and a half two years where you were doing boom things at the same time. appleaday mentioned this earlier, but you. Free Co camp. Did you use any other resources or you mentioned Community College? Were you taking classes there? Yeah so additional to recode camp so the there's a lot of other things that I did that helped me so free code camp opened up at the time. I haven't camp while, but at the time had lake. Away that you would join and beat up and it was through facebook. It was like face, looking need groups or something, and it was like find a recode camp. Meet up because I. Guess they had like an umbrella. Recode camp meet ups that you can join, and you would basically type in your city in order find the nearest one that was that was organized and everything like that, so I found one in my city and it was you know a few people apartment that would meet up in so I joined that group and I reached out on their. Pre Cochem does a really good job with trying to connect people, so it's like hey, introduce yourself in post on there, so that people can no, no your journey Cetera so i. did that and I ended up meeting up with the organizers of that? Meet Up. We met at starbucks talked about you know everything on learning this and that where you and Rico camped up thing so eventually, I got more involved in that met more people that were learning as well and then now it. Kinda led to Terry member Oh the Mita. Dot Com meet up. There was also the recode. KEMP MEDIA DOT COM for our area that was attached to that facebook group. And, he was like yeah. I just started this. Meet up group, so we can kind of be more broad for people that don't have facebook. We can just Kinda grow up there and he was like you WanNa, help me with that because you know. He was maintaining full job as well, and he needed someone to Kinda. Fill in that gap where he couldn't. You know sounds like yeah. Sure I could definitely help with that, so I helped him. kind of on the organization's portion of that. meet up and like. Hey, let's try to meet. Kind of swap the weeks you know will be on a Saturday one week and then. I'll take the next every type of thing we'd be out of starbucks. And then someone posted on the meet up of feed. Like hey does a hack upon coming up, you guys should come reach out and you know I think it was free, and it was in our area, so I went to the hacker thon and myself in a couple of other people that were in that group, and then we ended up a or ended meeting a few other people at that meet up. That were real professional programmers. At the thoughts I introduced myself to them and everything like that met some really really nice. And probably the most helpful in kind person was actually the the organizer of that Agathon. When. I met him and everything like that. He gave me his contact information in and said Hey, we should get together sometime. I'm Cha and he was a professional programmer, running his own business and everything like that, so eventually I stayed in contact with him, and I met up with him, and I told him my journey and what I'm trying to do, super supportive of us all about helping people in my situation, you know like make connections, and even even help them with an internship and everything like that, and that's Kinda weird kicked off actually where it went from me trying to learn to me, actually making connections in potentially those connections leading to jobs. That was huge. Actually so this person that ran out. Pakistan also ran his on meet up. and His name was a little bit more. Mature he had a organized large meet ups and organised like a speakers where he would teach people how to get started with a new technology and all that stuff you know, so. This percent met up with them, and they're willing to like. Hey, you WANNA work on a project with. Wow real project like that's what I need to experience with a project, so I met with him or opt in some of the people that worked with him, and he ended up working with a lot of other guys that or just people in general men and women that were like kind of doing their own thing that a little bit more advanced as As programmers they're building girl websites starting their own software business in lake, a consulting and everything like that. That's where kind of took off. Is that connection? You know I to a upon met some people, and then it led to more people that we're kind of in the same boat as me, and if they are more advanced, they're willing to help me. By struggled with something and everything like that. It was really a douse like typical in me being successful. Yeah that is a great story and Other interviews I've been doing this season. We invite the guests on, and we think they have a really interesting transformation. Story is kind of like who I've been really Trying to get on the show this season and every single person that I've interviewed so far and there's been you know. Handful have all. Had this like really awesome Lake County. Component to their story and men like Kinda. Showing how supportive the tech community is in in various ways, and it sounds like you found that you know through this. Through connections through other connections with more experienced people in the field that helped catapult you forward in the they were able to help support you in various ways and maybe help if you're stuck as you said, build your first project and I think that's really cool I. Think it's really good for beginners to hear that because I know when I first started out in probably you, too. I would imagine it can be really intimidating and feel like very overwhelming, and you can feel really alone, and it's like it's almost. I haven't experienced like trying to break into other industries, but in a lot of ways I feel like even though texts seemed really intense in really hard I mean it is, but there's just such kind and helpful people like a friend, totally random side story, but she's not intact. She was trying to break into. The entertainment like film like Moodley TV shows. and. She had to work at an unpaid internship for like a year in really like claw her way up. She actually does really awesome. producing on really awesome documentaries now but. It was like really hard, very competitive very very. Very like you know and I feel like the tech community is so different from that like it's. People are Super Helpful yeah definitely. I've heard that as well. I'm not sure if it's if it's like the demand in this industry that were like trying to get into maybe people, maybe a logical gotten to it, and they kind of see you know all the hard work that. It takes. I, guess that they want to help other people as well or like coming from something like my background and everything like that. They kind of want to help people as well, but yeah, I noticed that as well as a lot of really helpful people, even before I started going through the ups and everything I joined twitter, and that's when I found like just like a free code cannot co Newbie A. PODCAST are their Hashtag in general dislike just to get help and everything like that, and when I when I reached out that way, just random people that were professionals judgment like hey. I think I'll struggling with. Like centering Adib or CSS, something something kind of silly. You know I needed help with it and some random person was like. Hey, Gimme, your hub Repo albeit with that was like. Wow, some random person that realize but more Santander worked at Microsoft or something like that and are willing to help I didn't even know this person but yeah, definitely noticed that about the industry's is a lot of willing people to help you regardless. Of Your background and everything like that. Yeah another guest I. Literally just had on the podcast said that she had so many breakthroughs. A CAITLIN for people listening to the show and in episode Caitlin. She was talking about how she had so many breakthroughs on twitter asking for help in people that she didn't even know. Offering to help her in various capacities, I feel like twitter is such a good. Well, it's funny. Because social media like every platform kind of has its own. Little like corner or whatever it could be really good for certain things and I feel like asking for help. Like in that way. Twitter is awesome because people will jump in people. It's almost like a forum, but it's not, but people are very like. Communicate unlike you know instagram or something, which is mostly about the photos and it's. It's not the same kind of. Environment just different. Anyway, it's it's interesting. Yeah so switching gears a tiny bit I would like to hear about how the new ended up getting your first full-time real position. Yeah absolutely. So it was when our meet up grew so when I met this person a friend. His name is nate a probably. Give him recognition there because east been so huge in my in my career as a friend and generally slow parental today we kind of joined are meet ups and we grew into this big. Meet Up. And it was like three hundred people. We grew to over three hundred people, and then we. He had connections with someone that was really involved in trying to grow the tech scene in the Central Valley of California. Washable, probably think though in California. It's like tech everywhere. Tech is huge, but that's really isolated towards like Silicon Valley Bay area, and when you go to the outskirts where I live, it's like farms and orchards in just really like farmland in. The outskirts of all the techie over the hill and there's all the big central. Silicon Valley everything like that, but out here it's it's completely different. There's still a lot of factories out here and everything like that, so tech isn't the big thing out here, so he was trying to person. He tried to basically bring tech out this way like hey companies. There's a talent out here as well so he was a part of that big that this big movement. That's still going on today so anyways. We ended up getting a space with his help, and he supported he. He got funding for it and we moved our meet up there. And, we were able to go reach out to the computer. Science professors ask some of the community colleges. They are able to come out. We reached out to people that talk computer science in the high schools I reach people on facebook I went out trying to like introduce myself to all these people, so we can grow all his these groups that are people better in software or coating to hey, come to this, Mita because we can all grow with the tech in the valley, so we had this large event whereas kicking off are merging of our beat ups, and we had I think. Over one hundred fifty people like almost two hundred people from professors in computer science to high school teachers in computer science to people, learning and everything like that so I went up there and I was speaking in front of it, and I was basically motivating other people that were in my position like hey. You guys? Should really you know? I was trying to leaning towards free code camp like if you guys want to learn to cope because those people that were like thinking about it, you know not really that much into it, so I kind of wanted to focus on those people because that's where they had the experience of coming from so was like. Hey, you know it's not that hard to get into it. There's some really really great resources that are free. That doesn't cost anything you know. MEET UPS like this a lot of great connections here and people willing to help you. If you're struggling every twenty five solves talking. They're all that and at that. Meet up was a few other. That worked at companies nearby when Consulting Agency the the banks have some of their software people out in the Central Valley as well and a couple of of the people that were there were friends with my friend, nate, a one that have basically helped me out and everything that always connections. He introduced me to one of guys there and he said Hey his company's hiring. I want you. I want to introduce you to Michael and this is after all is kind of getting already getting. Getting experience with building some projects and everything and my friend was like. Yeah, he knows what he's doing now. He he's employable. He's definitely has experience with building front, and back and software and everything so introduced me to a friend of his name of Josh and he worked for a company that basically did consulting for like probations, law enforcement software. They did software for E N NJ Gallo, a lot of big companies, so they're really established there around for like twenty years so I met with him. And then he was like where we're actually looking for someone. More junior developer is like Amir number. We eventually had coffee. Just Kinda. Talk and everything like that and we just hit it off. We kind of our personalities. Kind of you know He. We liked hanging out and everything like that, so that kind of started like a friendship, you know. We talked for about a year and. And you'd help you with stuff like that and I was like. Hey, and he's like our company is kind of in the middle of Lake, you know hiring, but they kinda. Put a freeze on that everything like that, so after about a year when I. When I met him, he finally called me up one day, and the funny story is that I was getting to a point. In in learning how to Code and currently working where I was almost ready to give up, because it felt like I was putting effort and then. I wasn't getting any any reward from like. If I was applying everywhere and I wouldn't get any kind of response to resume. I reached out to people to help with resume all these things. Did I did a lot? Maybe not everything that could have just because I didn't know, but I felt like I was getting any hits on my resume or If I. DID GET A call. It was like you know I didn't know how to do some kind of algorithm that I didn't learn or memorize or whatever it was, so I was getting really discouraged, almost going to be like. Maybe I do need to go to school at unity at degree. Maybe I need to just join a boot camp or or joint something that is going to make me be more appealing to employers so I was looking. and. Just kind of getting really discouraged at that time. But the funny thing is that I got a call for my friend Josh and he goes. Hey, we have this contract coming up. We need to hire a developer and I've been talking to my boss about you and we'd like to bring you on. He's like. Of course we'll interview you and everything like that and he's like. Are you interested in? He's like. Like I'm almost one hundred percent, sure they've we bring you on because you know like I know you and I know your work, and I can help you and everything like that and I was like. Are you kidding me? And when he told me that I was thrilled, I was actually really scared. Same time this is reality is like real software coding. In, part of me was going to say no like I do this. This is too much like the difference between working on side projects that you know like whatever no one's really going to care about versus working on software that people use so I. I got really scared. I even once. My wife and I was like I. Don't know if I can do this like I'm GonNa. Quit my job and I go do this and then I fail. I can't go back to that job. I can't do that, you know. This is a big decision. You know I've been here for nine years or whatever it was. So ultimately, my my wife convinced me and was like you need to do this. People don't get good things unless they take some kind of risk. Regardless, you should try you know. So I call it my friend. I told him I concerns and Josh was like you know you're just trying to scare yourself out of. It Dude so just take it from me. I'm going to be there to help you, so don't worry us to take this. Just, take it you know and I was like. Okay, let's set up the interview and everything like that and goes all right, so set the interview and. They hired me. And that was basically it I started there with no professional experience. It was all because of someone was willing to help me know again back to that. You know this industry is always really helpful people that are willing to take a chance on you and help me help you and everything, and and and of course there's a lot of challenges you know working in in actually writing real software and everything like that, but in the long run it really helped me in was just huge into getting my job, and then after that first job. Of course, my resume after that just everyone always cared to look at it. You know I I didn't have nearly as. Much difficulty looking for next role after that I think it's like once you get your first job regardless of its junior level, or whatever in in this industry it kind of goes downhill OCTA that you actually get considered. You know you'll get your resume looked at. You'll get that first interview and everything like that. Yeah Wow, so. How long did you work there at the first job? And then what what kind? You don't have to get like super detailed, but like what kind of work redoing essentially. There year, so I started off working on a back end actually of in node framework, or on the no runtime. Basically, the contract was migrating some. It's funny because I went from like barely learning it in writing mostly front end to writing some back in code and the PRI, the contract was basically taking some old enterprise services that were written in Java and then rewriting them on no gs lambda, so that that was what I was doing for like the first four months and after that contract and they moved on to another. Another project and it was more full stack. It was job script. It was using angular on the front end no on the back end and some sequel server, but I got the rightful stack of front end back in using Java javascript note and everything like that. It was really fun. 'cause I got to work on two different big projects there and I learned so much. That's where my whole stack experience kind of took off I got I got to learn so much and the people that I worked with worse huge. It was just I can't even express how thankful I am to people that I work with there and I still am friends with them. That helped me explained things a broke things down. And having been able to understand these other languages. Yeah Wow and I know you recently got a laid off due to cove in nineteen. was that from this same employer or was this another job you had gotten after leaving that company? Another story so I was there at that company for about a year, and then towards the end my wife and I found out. We're GONNA. Have Child and so I needed to. That company was great for it was actually a bump in salary than I currently made up. My Company the light, Bulb Company, but it's I still needed to. I needed to progress I needed to move on and grow my career, and financially so I started to look I started. You know I even asked my boss at the time. I was like Hey I have a child, the ways or any chance that I can move up or anything like that, and you give me feedback, and it was like yeah, definitely, in whatever amount of time so I took that and say okay, that's CREPE. should start looking in see by even get my resume considered now that experience so I started to look, and then I got hired at a start up in the bay area and Silicon Valley. And I was there for almost a year way so i. don't want I. Don't want to interrupt you, but was at working remotely or you move there. I actually had hybrid role, so I would go into the office like an hour and a half commute two days a week. And then worked from home the other days, but yeah, it was a there. I got a taste of the whole silicon valley. Feel of how software companies ran, and my skills went up even higher because of that environment, but yeah, so I was there for about a year and It was a startup that wasn't able to get another round of funding, so actually we all. They started laying people off. fortunately they didn't lay the soccer team like right away, but since we found that out, we started to look all the engineers that worked at that company, or like Oh they're not getting. Funding is a good chance. They're gonNA lay people off, so we all started looking and I got hired at the Credit Union and I. was there for about a year? or about a year exactly actually, and due to the pandemic and everything like that they started to kind of restructure, reorganize everything and effected a lot of teams, including my own team and We're a part of that layoffs will. But yeah, it was. It was kind of something that I. Could. Imagine obviously has affected a lot of people everywhere, and it feels like it's just one of those times. That no-one can have planned for, but yeah. I've been a part of that have been affected by that as well. Yes, so justice like for myself in the listeners, so you basically had three different jobs like intech at this point in each for about a year. Give or take, so you essentially now have like three years of like fulltime software engineering experience. And the most recent position that you've got furloughed related offer a Is that a credit union? And what were you doing there so? It's interesting. 'cause you've such like different experience like from like like a consulting firm to a tech startup to credit union like I imagined that the experiences at each one were quite different like the environment of in the way people work in south. Absolutely so. Go working at a credit union, it's a pretty large credit union and the way things are done there as opposed to the other companies that I worked at. Worse it significantly different so look the startup that I worked at. They were pretty large. Start up there actually around for ten years they had employed over three hundred people. The engineering team was fifty engineers people and. They operated like they were a big tech company and everything like that, so but at the same time I had the experience of being able to shift. To project same time like there's times when I was working on a mobile APP and one for one sprint I'd be working on a whole two weeks on a mobile APP, and then I'd be pivoted to work on their web APP, clients. Front end code, and then after that I'd be working on some hardware code completely different working on a proprietary algorithm that needs to be converted in red on a mobile APP. It was different stuff all the time, and it was really exciting, but also really nerve wracking because of the context, switching a lot and learning new languages at the same time. So that was I learned a lot by lot of the fast paced stuff at that start up, and then when I got to the Credit Union. There was a little bit more relaxed because those only one product that I worked on essentially. Korb, inking APP and there I had a team of eight engineers that were dedicated for this core banking APP. I got brought on as a senior engineer there, and then that that role kind of pivoted towards a lead developer. I was on that project for about four months. And then my a boss. Promoted to the lead developer of that team so essentially there was a lot different roles because for one it was one project, and it was a mobile APP. I had experience with mobile APP at the other company, but not to this extent, it was just a huge mobile APP. And the primary, the primary objective being handling with people's money was probably a significant factor to the change of of like a importance of the application that part probably. At a lot to the stress when I worked knowing that you're working on something that deals with people's money and five hundred thousand active members so that was a big learning experience. And I do. I learned a lot of new stuff learned new languages learned how to do a lot of things that you wouldn't typically do web development, but yeah, it was a lot of differences in structure, probably a lot of different departments that you have to work with before you can get approval in changing something like maybe typically and. Change some piece of code that would maybe look slightly different, because it just makes more sense while at the Credit Union. It wasn't that simple. You had to get a lot of approvals and a lot of test. Writing to make sure lingers securer in a rented to different avenues. You know which was different. Yeah, that yeah makes dealing with financial information. You know sensitive data, and all that would be quite different. I imagined so now that your you by the time episode airs, you could already be in a new job, but. Being active in your job search now. What kind of company aiming to work out? What do you want to stay in like? The financial industry are trying to go back to a startup or maybe a consulting firm that you get to work all these different projects. Yeah, what were you? What did you like the most I guess? Let's see. Probably a ideally would wouldn't stay in the financial industry just because. All the little differences in how delayed development can be due to all those hoops. You have to jump through, but probably most fun I had was. Working in consulting agency. Because working so many different things. Different projects everything like that, but a lot of them had their own pros and cons. You know in terms of like. What I would prefer probably something that is more established due to. More stability just because of everything. That's going on right now. I've heard a lot of people have lost their jobs regardless of the industry even in software I would probably prefer stability. If I could choose regardless of the industry but Yeah. It's probably it's probably more geared towards that. You know what I can find that it is more stable and everything like that. I do have a few other avenues in alert. You know companies that I'm going through right now so I am confident that something will end soon. That's probably the good part is that they're still a high demand for software engineers and everything like that, so there's a lot of good a good places that are hiring right now and everything like that. But. They do specific Yeah Yeah Gotcha so I'm. Kind of jumping around here, but I really wanted to ask this question, and it goes back to your glassblowing experience. I was wondering if there was anything from that or your position before a Jumba juice that you. Were able to transfer or in some way to you in your job, your new job as a software developer. Probably the thing that. I don't know if it helped me, but there's a few different things probably so working probably in an environment that required me to have a lot of perseverance, probably aided to my benefit, and in general and just work ethic. It helps me To be able to deal with probably stresses and deadlines Challenges in my current role because I dealt with that a lot on any. Of can can relate to that. Is You know working in a place like that or just any kind of work that requires them to give a little bit extra is required, just laken. Succeed or do well their job. It probably just helps helped with those areas in work ethic to work hard enduro ally and everything like that but also know what I want going forward, and what I don't want in a career or or next role. Also of a big part of that. Working at that company helped me in was. Probably having difficult conversations with my employer I had a lot of those at that company and it prepared me to be able to deal with those difficult situations. A lot better at all night, other roles a and what I mean, my difficult situations, probably dealing with difficult people another one being having a conversation with your superiors about compensation You know asking for what you feel like. You deserve and everything like that I've had a lot of those, and they didn't go so well at that company that I feel really confident and know how to approach those types of people or Whenever those conversations need to happen, you know. It can be difficult for a lot of people, but I think have so much experience with it that it's. It's kind of more fluid and how to do in the right way. It's aided a lot in that in in my career going forward. Yeah that makes sense and like. I, I can only imagine like the stressors you deal with being in an environment with the glassblowing like Super Hot. You said you were sent home from heat exhaustion, the stress like literally the physical danger bringing yourself. It's like working from home as a software engineer or star office in Silicon. Valley is like the stress level would be so much less like the. They compare Cinderella the stressors you're dealing with compared to maybe like the ones at the other place. Yeah, like whole other scar accord whole other thing, right? We are like running at time and there's one last question I want to ask before we wrap this out and it's just if you could share any like final advice to people listening right now. Who are just starting out? Maybe they were where you were like. You know four or five years ago. Whenever whenever you got your start. What advice would you give them? All. Let's see so I. Think for one perseverence when things feel like it's difficult, it may be difficult at first, but the more and more you do it in the more and more you practice. You'll eventually understand it some complicated things that I. That I could not have imagined when I first started of doing I'm able to thoroughly explain. They seem like almost simple. Now I think the more and more you do it. The the more natural feel, and it'll be really simple. Just just keep on doing it and things easier. also in your journey and learning. It's really important to try to reach out to people to make connections go to meet UPS ask questions. Because those are going to be the areas where where you're gonNA find a connection that can help you find that career and ultimately successful in in this career field. But those are probably the two biggest ones is. Now I know it's hard at first, but it gets easier, and it gets fun on the challenges they start to face. Get really exciting, and it's really rewarding. Ultimately you know all hard work will pay off as long as you just keep to it. And it will pay off so yeah, awesome, great advice in a great way to end this interview. Thank you so much again for coming on. Where can people find you online? Yeah absolutely. Probably a mitre twitter, a twitter handle is mit p. j are eight eight. Or my website is just a my name, my first name Michael or implemental. Dial my personal, Mitchell my last name.

Twitter California Michael Story Credit Union Josh Camp Facebook Central Valley Software Engineer Silicon Valley Mita Starbucks Hostile Work Environment Mounsey Google Pakistan End Product
ShanenLi - Someone to Practice With Elie Dordek

The Voice Tech Podcast

05:27 min | 2 months ago

ShanenLi - Someone to Practice With Elie Dordek

"My name is Ellie Elijah door deck. And born and raised in Chicago. And though I thought I would go to MIT and being engineer. I decided to dedicate my life to education. And for the past thirty plus years have been Educator Administrator in a textbook author. My books are used by thousands of students every day. Where I used a special technique to present text, which mimics how you would say the text like a song. And this approach has been very successful. and Um, my love of technology never left me. So now in the C O of Shannon Lee which is a start up. In Jerusalem. where, we seek to leverage speech recognition. To make educational content. Interactive. Interesting tell us a bit more about Shannon Lee than that. What does it do exactly WHO's full? What kind of students and what problem is specifically looking to solve with the APP? Yes of course. So. As I said, Shanley was established through. Our educational approach to make text as close to a viable living experience as could be right now. Much educational content is I would say dumb. And Deaf Noord that doesn't speak although this is changing. Amazing. Companies like Trinity. They're making plug ins to make much content. Audio and you can hear it. But We're looking to do it. More of a line by line approach to go into the text in make an interactive that the student can listen to the text line by line and get familiarity. In order to help gain fluency in reading. And improve memory because their memories, not just but also audio. It's the most natural way for us to communicate. To listen. The users could be. Regular kids that are already learning to read. Or even we have successful use cases with a special ED students. That, use the format to listen to the text in practice the second part. Of It is. Tested by the APP. As I said. Much of the content doesn't. Isn't it responsive? We just look at it or we asked the students to click on something or to. Drag a picture to something else, but to ask them to speak the answer to repeat. What should be said the text involved. That has not been applied so much to this area, so we WANNA make. looney experience more exciting, more alive. I really like to. Address something that as a teacher I feel sort of guilty that. In the past, the favorite student of the teacher teacher's pet would be the one that would sit quietly in have beautiful handwriting. Why was that? Because the teacher, they were the easiest student to manage and they. Gave over their answers. Their assignments with beautiful handwriting is easy to mark, so it was easy for the teacher. As time went on and computers entered the classroom. We said Oh well. We need a tea media stew that knows how to work the computer new the tech so sometimes. The geeky kid who might have been a little bit more louder and that's a well behaved with bad handwriting. He became the favourite in the former favourite student had to go. Get help as to have a use the computer. And? we we we seek, to. We seek to engage the students in ways which are comfortable for us as teachers. and it's very important to have individualized approaches for our education. In I feel it using speech. As I, said something so natural. It's the most natural way of us to relate to information as we learn two languages. We were young and to hear it in our minds and This can be then. Away that? The student can find his own voice and speak and be listen to. more exactly. Shannon Lee listens to and gives back in May immediate. real-time feedback to the answers given by the the user as to how well they were able to read the text, or if the text is not on the screen, they were to memorize the text.

Shannon Lee Educator Administrator Ellie Elijah Chicago Engineer Shanley UM
How is bias built into algorithms? Garbage in, garbage out.

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:44 min | 2 months ago

How is bias built into algorithms? Garbage in, garbage out.

"Does bias get built in facial recognition algorithms garbage in garbage out. From American public media. This is marketplace. I'm Ali would. In facial recognition and AI. Development computers are trained on massive sets of data. Millions of pictures gathered from all over the web. There are only a few publicly available data sets, and lots of organizations use them, and they are problematic vinay. Prabhu is chief scientist at the start up unify he and obey Babar honey. At University, College Dublin published a paper recently, examining these academic data sets. Most of the pictures are gathered without consent. People can be identified in them. There are racist and pornographic images and text, and even the idea of labeling someone, a lawyer or a woman or a criminal based on appearance will ultimately the researchers said. Maybe it's not the data. That's the problem. Maybe it's the whole field. Here's name Provo, the community has historically prior of basically put suing problems which are ethically dubious. A huge number of papers are published on ethnicity classification and generating human faces and a basically ranking people's faces as to how attractive it S. is it really a need to be solving these problems in the first place? Like what exactly it is that you're trying to automate, ask yourself. What is your technology eventually going to result like? How is it going to result in terms of like? The power in the society, the computer community has a deeply entrenched historical traffic are of basically you know increasing the rats of power on the minority groups, and if you're looking at the flagship applications, there are very few things that have ushered in a paradigm shift in the way that you know disenfranchised. Felt and entrance iced right I mean it sounds to me like what you're saying is. Don't just design a better image. Based data set the idea that you need an image based status that and that technology should be built on top of that data. Is itself flawed and will always be flawed. You hit the nail on the head. Women of Color have done tremendous work, but then every time they tried to do something. Something good in the tech, boys or bruise will invariably attack them as social justice warriors who are bringing in their canceled culture into academia us. We need to be more pragmatic. We need to be more science oriented. We need to be oblivious to all of these politics is what they're excuses. There are conversations about banning facial recognition technology that's being developed in these ways. Is this a problem for regulation to solve the? League required, but if you logistician, it's pretty easy to discover a loophole. I think one of the Silicon Valley. Cliches. And of melt for a long AMAS, if you don't allow us to the data from the public China's doing the same thing Russia is doing the same thing they will basically be. Superior to us, so these legislations I think will for the most part, put a small roadblock, but I am very confident of the ability of You know the powers to be enough, find loopholes and to kind of harness solutions. That will allow them to still stay within the legal grill. Day Prabhu is scientist at unify MIT operates one of the public data sets he in BARANI ND in response to their research. The school took it off line for good.

Scientist Prabhu ALI AI China Barani Nd Silicon Valley MIT Russia Babar
Vindman retiring from Army, lawyer blames Trump

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

Vindman retiring from Army, lawyer blames Trump

"Italy Harvard in president Germany's United the as the U. national one president S. and of trump its MIT has Airlines health is security final trump urging is hit minister demanding another ramps rulings sued is aide the warning Graham European up who to schools pressure played of block nearly has this Commission expressed a a virus central term reopen on the half trump schools of pandemic administration concern the its role Supreme to this U. develop fall in to president S. milestone reopen Court staff better and from trump's is over barring this siding is that threatening fall impeachment the coordinated they formal with could international he's the trump vice be federal getting U. furloughed administration president S. measures backlash students has notification action announced pence in to from October from prevent is in his against staying a touting New retirement birth York passengers those control in a boost the of that U. its cakes with stay S. it's withdrawal from in corona the the governor virus army clearest closed virus if Andrew the they signal from testing take affordable the Cuomo World classes the yet lieutenant with writing Care yesterday Health of says more how colonel entirely Act Organization deeply than in school the Alexander requires thirty the president E. the openings U. corona nine online insisted most van are million virus been employers at St this people served the yes pandemic students fall call on tested provide call mom the comes National need is off hurting to women period Security be among back to the at with the says lawsuit those least airline in Council no it's classes the thirty cost not notification seeks as industry six more up to an prevent expert to birth than the it's president control federal time on three of out United Ukraine to immigration the million of do of dural as the two United it a officials preventive seventy this Americans authorities States but morning four cast is trump service a from step passengers have he ousted and enforcing it tweets tested as says back a him worst officials from positive the the the the administration's may on case post rule international the will flight scenario cut the just university open three off two from days been them Bangladesh million funding cooperation letting and after when say say more they the it's the if president four still directive safe employers not hope months open was tested to violates to and acquitted do limit who into Europe so positive cite without the by the pandemic number the would the everybody a Senate religious administrative upon immediately work of layoffs arrival with to or more been reform wants procedures saying moral men in than by have one Rome what the testified offering act objection hundred schools the funding UN thirty open before because early opt health now he'd thousand the officials house retirement everybody out agency cut impeachment Italy off failed dead for health panel lower to but under the offer comments the minister that warning hours courts president what he didn't a epitomize reasonable of authority blocked earlier think for possible trump better it said was the basis mayor Esperanza rules furloughs yesterday proper concerns bill changes the president's de justifying went Blasio for the crisis in out trump Europe but been to is some proposing saying the announced High the thirty policy is to Court without demand being over most six evidence has new the that handled New a WHO's thousand ruled foreign and York because Democrats request seven City the government public airline we're students largest to precautionary was are keeping not employees investigate on will the given the contributor schools right only administration measures notice side be closed in former of to class things comment in that acted vice a to preparing letter could as score president two properly include more or political I to to people three Joe pull the just up European Biden notified to out are days fifteen points tested a following Commission week colleges the before government's thousand and more his the of because trump Monday son's the the estimated health positive election administration's flight of that social work international attendants the tests for changes it and the distancing to complains energy be not are suspended to students because would be company cause expected eleven most of will virus flights about that to thousand be respond the forced agency from seventy schools risks but Bangladesh customer experts in to thousand Ukraine leave will too on the service he's not Tuesday US say readily women arguing be if to able or in and accepted lose the a statement gate transfer virus nations birth after agents to control like China's Veneman's the is to another passengers Germany have coverage being all college lawyer explanations on fifty controlled and their in Monday's kids accuses a five year if Norway flight their hundred schools the of president have in the maintenance tested its and percentage operate school reopened at most of positive entirely at running handling the workers schools same of a positive campaign one time with another online hundred of some in tests of no the two twenty cluster clone other bullying thousand this should problems six fall of major ours be linked thousand coming school new two intimidation hundred pieces to down districts Spahn a and returning will sabar fifty plan not has soccer and posted be the it's Bangladeshi retaliation pilots same mag issued going on make ani thing Twitter to students up ani worker Washington across with Washington more at those the forcing online United now schools global nearly comes bin and cannot cooperation men learning the others around to entire lay choose the at a off other dozen universities between not nation days workers less cases adhering before offering outside to is the October Sager sabar needed law a mix Rome first of made mag online to fight Donnie ani or pleasing pandemics I'm and Washington Washington as in Charles a person condition a president the classes of last the I'm five Charles month Ben will billion Thomas the be last barred dollars Washington month from taking it receives all of their in classes federal online aid to help Harvard airlines president cover Lawrence payroll back out says costs the order was cruelty I'm is Ben surpassed Thomas only by its recklessness I'm Julie Walker

Italy Harvard President Trump Germany
"mit" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

12:37 min | 5 months ago

"mit" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Elizabeth Bramson. Boudreau Elizabeth is the of Mit Technology Review. Elizabeth Welcome. Hi Brian. Thanks for having me okay. So you are coming to us from quarantine where I am in Newton Massachusetts just outside well. I shouldn't say quarantine isolation isolation yes okay so for those not familiar explain. Mit technology. It's not. It's not like part of the school. No so we are an independent company owned by MIT that operates independently of Mit in terms of our editorial coverage. We write whatever we want about. Not only mit but other institutions businesses laboratories etc and. It's been around since eighteen ninety nine. It was the first ever tech publication anywhere. Eight thousand nine thousand nine. There wasn't really a you can imagine there wasn't really a thing around tech magazines And what was the first cover story? So the first article in the first issue is about how to set up a laboratory okay. You know what you need. I guess Bunsen burners or you know whatever petri dishes we have even know all of the archives going back to the very first issue so so we can. I think I think week eight of this. Might I might go back. And and look that one myself because there's a lot of time right now but you operate like as a for profit correct. We are technically a nonprofit but we operate as a as a for profit as you as you might imagine. Many institutions enterprises are or a organizations like us. So you gotTa make money. Yep We gotta make money and we have our business breaks out into our core product is everything we published digitally on the Website Technology Review Dot Com. So we're constantly. Updating many many articles every day on a whole range of emerging technologies it's all about emerging. It's not about anything that you or I would have in our bags or in our homes But rather what's coming out of laboratories and being developed for the future and we publish on a I on robotics on all kinds of advances in biomedicine on blockchain just a whole gamut of really developing technologies and have always done that from the very beginning but obviously in the last four five years emerging technologies particularly driven by a in robotics and some of the other things I just listed has become sort of the the real core focus for a lot of business journalism. And of course we've been doing this for you know as I mentioned one hundred and twenty years so also simultaneous to sort of other organizations around the world getting kind of getting religion around emerging tech Mit decided about five years ago. Let's do a heck of a lot more with this thing this. Mit Tech Review. Which has been around for all these years but really hadn't talked on the media radar and so there is we've been in multi-phase multi-year investment and Growth Strategy Plan and it's okay so well beyond the magazine. What's the revenue breakdown like? Where do you because I want to get into how you're adapting because all of us are adapting? Yeah so it's it's it's about. It's a pretty even split between subscriber-based revenue subscriber derived revenue for access to the site and to the print magazine which published six times a year. it's a pretty even split with that with our advertising business and with our events and kind of other business so about a third into kind of each each of those buckets so fortunately we are not really really reliant on any one of those although it doesn't mean that a change to one part of that business like events doesn't it of course it it hurts us but we are unfortunately not overly leveraged direction So explain to me I think I I reached out to you if you were joking before this like a few weeks ago about doing this podcast and regular joke is is basically a few years ago now. A lot has changed Walk me through. Sort of what you did internally. When obviously I mean I'm sure with technology review you're probably on the forefront that was coming but walk me through what you sort of did internally to prepare for how you how you have to adapt to this new normal. Yeah I mean so. Fortunately most of what we do. Each day in connecting with our audience is digital journalism and so the journalists. And you know we are also rather dispersed geographically. A quite a quite a number of the journalist actually located are located in their home offices or or outside of You know a hot spots for the outbreaks so you know we were able to keep going. The team was really able to keep moving and producing content and to take their zoom meetings from a dozen people to a many more people as they no longer had the headquarters to connect from the actual core delivery of what we do hadn't didn't change that much. What we did have to change rather quickly and within about four or five days. We had to make a call on our largest event basis called intech digital entirely on ai our highest yielding events. When was that scheduled for twenty the twenty fifth of March? Oh dear and yet last week and We needed to make the call in early March. I believe officially made the decision around the ninth or the tenth of March because it became clear that we weren't going to be able to carry on with it. We knew for awhile about four or five days before that we knew we were heading in that direction. We could also see that the audience new because the ticket sales started to started to decline people stopped purchasing. But we had to make decision. What are we going to do we? Are we going to reschedule it or we are we going to move it to virtual event and we ended up with the ladder and instead of doing it. You know in the way we all know and love events. We took the whole thing to a platform that enabled us to deliver it. Instead of go I think instead of about thirty hours worth of content. We ended up doing about about twenty hours worth of contents over three days. We had all but two or three of our speakers. Drop off the ones who dropped off did so for personal reasons and we had the we had to get a technical crew available to help us deliver it to the quality that we wanted one of the hard things about about it. Was that when people come to an MIT technology review event. The reason they come is because they know it the convening power of MIT and the expertise around the technologies are going to come together in a in a very unique and very carefully curated way and they're going to get to talk to the world's largest the world's greatest leader whatever that technology is or if not talk to him or her they're going to get to a network with other people who are similarly interested. So how do we preserve that kind of that kind of experience when you can't have that kind of interaction because these people at the site? They've got they've got talks on Youtube right so so it's not as though you can't find out what sounds so thinks about Ai. But it's the interaction that we can provide that's value and so we need to find a platform that allowed for that kind of interaction and programming team really really leaned into thinking about interactivity and community and how to foster that digitally and I think they did a really wonderful job so we chat rooms. That broke out that you could actor so and so gets off and finishes his or her talk. You can then go into the chat room with that person and begin to ask a whole range of questions so that was very powerful. You know there were some snafus with the Internet because the Internet has been really struggling under all the low that it's been put under but it was a really an unqualified success for us and we're able to hold onto sponsorship. We were able to hold onto attend revenue so we ended up kind of turning it into something that was different but but also valuable and of course to experiments for future. Yeah I think that's important. I think the big theme probably this podcast going forward For the foreseeable future as adaptability and adaptability of organizations. I mean we're living at. We have a business. That is very reliant on can on the convening power of our brands right. And so we're trying to figure out how we can adapt and virtual events have pluses and minuses. So you're able to keep the sponsorship revenue in. Is that correct? Yeah we couldn't keep it dollar for dollar but we have to about fifty percent of it and we then rolled the remaining fifty percent in two other digital products okay so we have newsletter sponsorship with other things so we were able to hold onto the investment Which is Was important very important. Also interesting Bryant is that we actually had one of our sponsors after that. Say We want to stop do your next virtual event which is yeah. We'll be in. We'll be in gym so we're like great. I mean I think one of the themes in addition to adapt adapt tation that were really hitting on a lot is acceleration because this is going to accelerate a lot of changes both for businesses but also society. I think How much do you think this is going to stick around like? I mean my bet. Is We go back to convening in person. I just think that human beings are wired for that but at the same time I think your organization our organization can get really good at a different set of products and these are digitally delivered that maybe we wouldn't have developed because of the power of in person events so I completely agree with everything you just said we for for for years have been trying to figure out. How do we take our events brand which is called Amtrak? How do we take Amtrak from the problem that we have within? The problem is a good problem. Which is that we sell out. And we don't WanNa make it a two thousand person event because that loses the intimacy and really kind of changes the product for the attendees but selling out is a problem for me because I can only fill so many rooms and seventy days so for years we've been talking about. Is there a way for us to do a fifteen thousand person? Amtrak that you don't have to get on an airplane or jump in the car or whatever to attend that people from San Francisco. Boston an Istanbul could all attend. And how do we do this? Virtually and there's a lot of experimentation. That's going on in the academic around virtual classrooms and stuff that we've been paying quite a bit of attention to and yet we never needed to sort of pull the trigger on any of that because it you know things were kind of. We had other priorities right. So really jumping into an experiment was like okay. Yeah eventually we'll get to it until now right. It's a perfect time to because like we're everyone in the world is forced now into this situation where they can't leave the house so it is the ideal test when I said to my team is I said listen..

MIT Mit Technology Review Mit Tech Review Amtrak Elizabeth Bramson Boudreau Elizabeth Elizabeth Welcome Newton Massachusetts Brian Youtube intech digital San Francisco Boston print magazine Istanbul Bryant
"mit" Discussed on The AI Podcast

The AI Podcast

10:43 min | 5 months ago

"mit" Discussed on The AI Podcast

"Wel said our guest today is Jonathan. Frankel he's a PhD student at MIT and the CO author of a paper. We've been discussing which is also the subject of a talk. Jonathan recorded that's availables Berta GTC digital twenty twenty online this year. It's called deep die with Jonathan Frankel. The lottery ticket hypothesis. Finding Sparse trainable neural networks. You've done work at some of the big names in the tech industry. Google facebook come to mind. What have you been working on policy wise and otherwise so we tend to keep mite technical life and my policy life as separate as possible? Okay and the the reason for that is really I thought about trying to do interdisciplinary were but I in my experience interdisciplinary were is either not technical enough not policy enough or just not enough right so it's very hard to be useful to either community so instead. I tend to do very hardcore lottery. Ticket related life. And that's you know time spent Google and facebook and collaborations with lots weather folks. Universities ended industry and in the policy world. It's continued to collaborate with my colleagues at Georgetown. I created and taught and have gone back to teach a programming for lawyers glass at the law school there to try to give technical knowledge directly to students. Who are emerging policymakers? And I go around the world. I've been working with the OCD. A lot lately on their efforts to create or principles framework for trustworthy a that it was the basis for the G. Seven's a policy statement and is serving as a useful guidance documents for a implication from member countries around the world. So you really doing a lot of light frivolous dabbling. It sounds exactly. I mean my my spare time fun hobbies to do policy policy audiences which way spare time fun hobby is to do technical. Where do hardcore technical? It'd be seen at at policy conferences sitting on my laptop. Other people checking email later you know grousing read it. And I'm sitting there with four different terminals open running experiments Nice. It's important to me to kind of. I think that if you're not on the technical ground of this subject you get left behind so quickly and the height becomes source of information to the point where I think a lot of quota caught leaders in an IRA. Now it's been so long since they've trained neural network that in some sense of what they say is very divorced from reality. It's important to me when I participate in these conversations to stay on the ground and know what's going on so that we're advice policymakers. I'm doing it with this as clear vision as possible yet. No that that's Will it is admirable. I was trying to find a less less cliche. Zoning word to use but it really isn't. It sounds like a lot of down cycles. In your own computational layer in your head so to speak what are that an an I if this is too big a leap in the conversation then You know back us up here and we'll go step by step. But what are the implications of you know? You're running this hypothesis and finding that these these initial weights or so important so there are three big implications. There's kind of a non implication that I want to mention upfront. Which is that all. This work is being done retroactively. You have to train the entire network to go back and find this hour. This is science but with the caveat that I remember putting in the original paper that I put in big red anytime I is. This is not immediately practically useful to is doesn't say that you can find the sub networks efficiently so the potential implication is well. Why don't we try? Finding these separate sufficiently. This is kind of starts a new contest to try to create better and better strategies for finding these stuff networks at initialisation or early in training. And that's exactly what's happened. There have been a couple of fantastic papers published in the past year on exactly this topic and this is something that I'm actively starting to work on now cool. The second implication is what say? It's really expensive to find this phone that we're now. What if I find the spotlight on one problem but I wanNA reuse a bunch of times and other problems so you can imagine that you know your large company and you know you get a new set of data every day updated data from your users? What if you find this small based on the data from Wednesday and use that smell that on Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday? This is this transfer learning in a sense. And there's a great paper from some colleagues at facebook that that was in Europe suspects to your that showed that actually lottery to get transferred between image tasks so if I find one of these on one particular image task that same sub network will work on a lot of other different which tasks so maybe a lot of work defendant initially if you can amortize that cost by using it. Then you know you've actually saved it alone that's great. That's two kitchen over three. Which I think gets back to what you were asking about is no. Maybe this tells us something about how to build. Better neural networks. Maybe this tells us how we wanted to be initialized in how wanted to be architect so that research to me is the hardest part because how do you described? It's hard to look at a bunch of these smaller. 'cause then try to generalize and say well here the patterns we see. Now let's try to create a Based on these patterns. There's a paper from Uber. I in this past year. That looked into some some patterns about these initials Asians and found some interesting initial trends. But nothing as of yet that was actionable for creating new networks. That had better initialisation and I can mention kind of I said there were three implications but there's actually afford that ended up showing up. Which is that this whole lottery ticket procedure? You train the network to completion. You Brunette you go back to earlier and then you can retrain that our familiar. This is just another way of Right right it turns out. We have a paper clear this past year on that subject that this actually works better than this state of the art or at least as well as the state of the art critic strategies that have been out there so it turns out that you know this procedure. Doing something completely different happens to also be a great way to crooner network. I'm wondering you mentioned you know you're you're writing a dissertation and that's your your motivation as a student so to speak. How far along in the process are you and you know if I might ask you to look ahead. What do you see yourself doing once? Dissertations complete are we going to keep a foot in both of these worlds. Those are questions that I ask myself. And my parents asked me and my adviser to a lesser extent affects me almost every day. So it's A. I think those are great questions. I think the big challenge of anyone doing a PhD in machine learning right now. Is You know. There's a wealth of great opportunities that come with enormous trade offs. Industry is obviously booming. Right now but you may not be able to do the kind of pure research that that you get to academia just because you know business. Goals are important when you're at a for profit company on the other side in academia right now the amount of money that you need to run a large lab doing machine. Learning research is extraordinary. I'm very grateful to you. Know my partners in industry who sponsored my research thus far. It's kind of thing where we would never have had the financial resources to do this without a lot of help from folks industry who have lent US resources or credits or whatever may be at any given time so as I look forward to thinking about trying to run allow myself is. There's a lot of fundraising energy invoked and that's very intimidating and then I have the added complication of having this dual interest in both policy and doing technical work which finding a place where both interests are welcome is very tricky in academia. You know the advice given frankly is don't think about policy until after you have tenure because nobody will value it in industry you know. You're it's hard to speak with the Voice of independence when you come from technical organization regardless of whether you are in fact speaking with independence trade offs abound and I'm very lucky that my PhD has to do all. These things never joined a right. Yes well that's good and I think for what it's worth again the fact that you're not just a wear but very sort of publicly aware and your your awareness of these potential conflicts of interests and the importance of staying up on the science For going and trying to you know implementer advising policy speaks well to your ability to bounce those things going forward so from from one podcast host to a man who's got his feed and most important complicated areas of our time I think you're well-suited tackle the challenge well Jonathan as you said There's a whole nother podcast. We could do several on some of the topics that you kind of touched upon. But we can't get into right now for folks who want to find out more about any of the work that you're doing some of the things you've mentioned your colleagues and places you're with they're doing there is obviously the GTC digital session that you recorded. Where else can people go online to learn? More about your I always tell people go. Read the papers. Perfect for a couple of reasons. I mean number one. I like to do work that speaks for itself and I don't like to do a lot of talking about the work ironic to Santa podcast. I don't like to write blog posts because I hope that the paper is easy enough to read that a blog post would just be repeating a paper end. You know my my parents are both lawyers. I have them read through these papers for copy. Editing also stuff at if they can understand them that I figure I hope a general purpose audience can and the other piece is that I will leave. Commitment on this podcast. I'm working very hard to open source code that I've used to or at least the latest generation of the code that is used to write all these papers and I'm hoping in the next couple of weeks to have that out and this podcast will air so hopefully by the time it does code will be up. I'll very were recording At the very end of March twenty twenty so as a as a time stamp for people. That's excellent. You'll see to send me a nasty email. We'll follow up. We'll have you back on the pod. Just a yellow hue for half an we liked to end on kind of a forward-looking note and asking guests. You know where do you see your work headed in the next couple years next five years? That seems like a a tall order in a very big question so feel free. If you can hone in on on one slice of your life or gopher it all at once but you know where do you see Alice? Let's look at the lottery ticket. Hypothesis and the work of pruning networks. The size of networks. And such you having an inkling as to where you know where where this work and similar work your colleagues are doing might be taking things over the next whatever period of time. Let me say something a little bit controversial perfect which I know. You'll enjoy that in five years. Nobody talks about the lottery ticket hypothesis. I hope that it is gone. I hope that it is waved off face of the Earth because we know nothing about neural networks and how they operate.

Jonathan Frankel facebook Google MIT Berta GTC Georgetown OCD US Europe Alice Santa
"mit" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:40 min | 6 months ago

"mit" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"So we reported on some of the surveillance technologies that governments have used to track the spread of the Corona Virus China's South Korea Singapore. They use technology to do something called contact. Tracing where you try and figure out. Who's come into contact with infected people now? Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are working on what could be the first application of contact tracing here in the US here to tell us more about what they're working on and some of the challenges they face is our reporter. Doug Belkin Doug thank you so much for joining us. Thanks for having me on all right. So let's just back a little bit and get a sense of the status quo in the US. What is the current approach here to tracking the spread of the Corona virus? Right so very analog and slow and inefficient so what happens now is if you get down with disease and the public health officials know about it. Then they'll do an interview with you and they'll ask you. Where were you for the past five ten days where you're at any parties? Did you take a taxi ride on the subway and they will try to reach out to all the people that you may have come in contact with. Then they'll phone those people and they'll tell them you know you you've come in contact with somebody who has come down with corona and you should get tested or self quarantine But it's an issue and It's slow and it's inefficient. So it's a doesn't work that well especially because we know that a lot of people haven't gotten tested our only got tested after they were showing Really extreme symptoms of the virus right so even trying to figure out who all has it at that. Point seems to be a very difficult right and without the tests. It's difficult to figure out how far and why this is spread and who has it because we just can't test for it right now. So Mitt is working on a solution right now. Can you just tell us a little bit about it? What is it and how does it work? How could it help? So the idea is instead of reaching out through the telephone to try to get in touch with everybody who you may have come in contact with to try to leverage the information that we carry around with our phones our phones collect. Gps Information and they tell where we've been over the past several days and weeks even so. If you tap into that information you can lay a trail and see where people have come and then you can overlay where other people have crossed over with with those that will tell you the context that They'll those people have made. How is this different or the same gas from the from what China was using to track people down and let them know that they might have come in contact with someone with Colonel Virus Show in China with the government? Control the Information. If you went and took your phone into the public health system and they would they would track where you have been where you're going now and that information would go to the government so the government would know where you were which is very efficient but it is a problem if you're worried about civil liberties and privacy. So that's that's solution doesn't work well in states here in the West. So how has Mitt trying to mitigate that problem that privacy issue so they've come up with a solution where they've created essentially a third party? The information is anonymous from your from your phone. It gets reported back to a third party in this anonymous and scrubbed and so the ideas then. It's not reported to the government from where you are. It's just a trail a WHO who has been infected with corona and they can make in view that but they don't know who it is and it doesn't go directly to to the government so that that bridge is supposed to make people feel a little bit more trusting. Yeah I mean that was supposed to be happening in China as well but then the information about those individuals got leaked to the public. How are they trying to prevent that from happening? There is that the information you give is your information and you can control it. And you can edit it. So for instance say I've come down with a corona and I tell the public health officials who wants me to download this information into this APP. But I'm concerned that I go in and out of my house all the time and even the information is an honest. I don't want it known where where I live. Or maybe I went out to dinner with somebody and I don't want it known that I met somebody in a restaurant or whatnot. So you can edit that information before you downloaded which is supposed to make folks feel better but ultimately this this is based on trust people are going to have to be willing to download their private and personal information entrusted. It won't be abused and there's no real way around the Los Angeles actually gave up on contact tracing recently basically they just tried to train to reign it. In by social distancing and other measures some are saying that right. Now it's basically too late to try to apply something like this in New York for example which is the epicenter of the outbreak here in the US right now. What kind of circumstances do you need for something like contact tracing to work? And and where could this? Mit solution still be applied as we see this corona virus growing and spreading in other places? Show in places where the virus is spread all over the place. It's just too late to use it and it's harder to do this very dense places because people come in contact with each other all the time. It's going to have a more effect in a place where the virus hasn't taken hold in. The population isn't quite as dense. So those are two of the things that helped us move along. It's probably New York in L. A. Is probably a teachers to lead to bother with it. So where what stage are we at now with us or is this something that states in the Midwest for example could expect to see pop up and be utilized by their health department. Yes so what's happened is the folks at Mit have partnered with the folks at the Mayo Clinic and there and they've been working with the federal government and they've been working with the World Health Organization Sort of different levels to try to get their buy in and they've also been working with Ernst and Young E. Y. To try to get them to push this stuff out because it doesn't work unless a lot of people use it. Essentially it's the wisdom of the crowds and if it's not crowd sourced by a lot of people than it just won't have the the impact that it could thank herd immunity right all right So reported Belkin. Thank you so much for joining us much. Appreciated don't forget to share your work from home tech tips and headaches with.

corona China US Mitt New York Doug Belkin Massachusetts Institute of Tec Midwest federal government reporter Mit South Korea Los Angeles World Health Organization Point Mayo Clinic Ernst
"mit" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

08:42 min | 9 months ago

"mit" Discussed on Pro Rata

"It to know what to trust axios. AM takes the effort of getting smart by synthesizing. The ten stories that that will drive the day. And telling you I they matter subscribe at sign up dot axios DOT COM and now back to the podcast. We're joined now by Axis. This is Felix Salmon. You have been covering the MIT Jeffrey Epstein connection relationship for months now so goodwin procter comes out with this giant report last week. Your initial reaction after reading through it was what they miss the Elephant in the room to Epstein. If you read what Reverend Farrow reported in the New Yorker and live reported on axios Epstein was generally understood we've given about eight million dollars to MIT and they've concentrated straight through on eight hundred and fifty thousand dollars of that and they missed the seven million five majority of it that effectively came via Bill Gates. And Leon. I'm glad the Bill Gates and Leon black pieces you say the larger parts of the Epstein donations to MIT. This was what you call a loophole right whereby basically Epstein pretended like the money came from other people or other people's foundations correct did come from other people so to many it came from gates and five million of it came from black and everyone at the MIT media lab understood. These were ever seen donations. He got all of the credit for with them. Neither black nor gates wanted any credit for it and we now know from having read the Goodwin Crop to report that Joey Ito who is running the media lab at the time I'm actually talk to an MIT development officer when they were working out whether and how they should accept money from Ezzeddine and say well. Why don't we just walked what's donations? The Epstein gives money to one of somebody in their favorite course and then billion that gives money to MIT and the money is coming from the from FC theme so it looks fine. That was actually a proposal by Joey. Ito isn't it. The basic definition or at least a layman's definition of money laundering. MIT is pretty explicit in its reporter. I'm sorry Goodwin. Procter as they did argues it found no evidence of money laundering correct and the reason they found no evidence is because they basically that their attempts to find evidence was found out Liam lack and Bill Gates and said. Did you do this on behalf of Jeffrey Epstein and Bill Gates said No. I didn't and Leon Black Kim say anything at all. Oh and they said well. We can't see any evidence that this was obscene money. Despite the fact that they did talk to Joey Ito and so presumably. Joey told old that that he understood this to be seen money. I know they told to suck some could even be told them that he thought that it with Dean money. There was a lot of seconds. Banjul evident didn't you know with in in terms of the understanding within the media lab that this was at even money but apparently they couldn't find any hot evidence for that and by the way for those. Who Don't know everybody knows the Bill Gates's the multi-billionaire founder of Microsoft? Leon black is a big private equity executive the CEO of Apollo Global Management. It was interesting Goodwin report is you and I were slacking back and forth with each rather. They said they could not contact or they could not get in touch with a representative lamb. Black I'm a basic reporter I've gotten in touch with the representative Leon. Black about this very subject. How could goodwin procter? Who went through all this time and money and effort how could they have not reached somebody? I think you should be working for. Goodwin Procter Dan. I get paid more. It'd be great because Guilio bedrick getting into. I believe I'm black. Let's go back a little bit or broaden out a little bit I guess which is what was the motivation for Jeffrey Epstein to even care about donating so much money money to mit that he would go through all this nation's to get the money to them. Jeffrey goes to jail perfect crimes. In two thousand eight he comes out and his contain. Desire in. Life is to be able to continue hobnobbing with rich and famous and smart and successful individuals. So he likes to be able to hang out with Reid Hoffman and Sucker Berg and Joey Ito all these famous scientists to MIT and Harvard. And that that kind of thing and if he just turns up on campus as a convicted sex offender. No one's GonNa give time of day. So the way that he manages to become a socially pretty acceptable human beings like greasing the way with money and with flights on his private jet and all of the other things. He was extremely good at doing in terms of getting himself becoming becoming persona grata. You might say among the kind of people that he wanted the respect at mit. Obviously Joey Ito is no longer there. There was also following this goodwin procter reporter professor so who is basically put on indefinite leave and and it seems like he will be gone too but the senior management or senior leadership I guess of. MIT is essentially exonerated. In this report. The report says kind Kinda see no evil hear no evil from your perspective is goodwin procter kind of letting them pass the buck here or sincerely president etc were they really. In the dark so the Goodwin reports says the the Epstein visited the MIT campus nine times and then no one in the senior mit it administration knew about that possible right I mean I've visited mit dozens of times and senior leadership on there. No but the point is the Joey Ito new and if definitely revisionist to start saying Joey to wasn't senior leadership within mit he was probably the second most high-profile pass at Mit. And possibly the most high-profile pass I might depending on how you feel about your life. So he knew and he was extremely high profile extremely important and the idea that he doesn't really counts as being MIT MIT media. Lab might be thankful that seems a bit ridiculous Felix filed question for you. This report is out. There's been lots of media reporting the MIT Epstein Steen. Story that piece of the Jeffrey Epstein Story Do you think it is now done. Is this the final chapter. No because there was just way too many questions still to be answered about gates black. And what's more there's huge shoe to drop about audit the whole Haver Epstein relationship which is much much bigger than the MIT relationship has yet to really we'd be uncovered and when that happens probably mit is going to get dragged back into that as well. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you my final two right after this axios gives you the news and analysis. You need to get smarter faster on the most important topics in our unique smart brevity format we cover topics from from politics to science and media tech subscribed to get smarter faster at sign up dot axios Dot Com and now back to the podcast it. Now it's time for my final two and alphabet the parent company of Google. which on Friday announced that its longtime chief legal officer David? Drummond is leaving at the end of January and honestly it is a wonder it took this long. Drummond has been at the center of a board investigation into Google's culture of sexual harassment both for his role in overseeing sexual harassment complaints and also for his own improprieties in terms of the former. He was involved in giving former android. Chief Andy Rubin. Tens of millions of dollars to quietly walk away after some pretty horrific charges against him in terms of the ladder. Drummond has admitted to fathering a child with direct subordinate. who was then forced to leave Google's legal department because she yeah the female subordinate and new mom represented an apparent conflict of interest? The the bottom line here. Google might be changing a culture where don't be evil was more of a coffee mug motto than something actually practiced and violence morning Michael McCain. CEO of Canadian food packaging giant maple leaf foods on Sunday slammed the trump administration over what he views. It's ill-conceived plan to divert attention in from political woes. In other words. He's saying these strikes that killed rain. In general Sulejmani were to divert attention from impeachment and remember in the process of this and the reason McCain in cares is that Iran in response attack. US Vases and mistakenly shot down a passenger airliner that was headed from Tehran. So Ukraine two of those killed build on the plane were the wife and eleven year old son of a maple leaf foods employees and McCain tweets quote. I am very angry and time isn't making me less angry. This this is a reminder of how this entire situation. US Iran dispute is playing north of the border but like everything else has become a twitter Royce. Our test with with McCain being praised by trump's critics while some of trump's supporters already are pledging to boycott maple leaf foods products. And we're done big. Thanks for listening. And to my producers Tim Servers and they omit shaven have a great national rubber ducky day. And we'll be back tomorrow with another podcast..

Jeffrey Epstein MIT Joey Ito Bill Gates MIT MIT Goodwin goodwin procter Epstein Steen axios Epstein reporter Goodwin Procter Dan Felix Salmon Haver Epstein Google. Drummond Michael McCain Leon black
"mit" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

08:42 min | 9 months ago

"mit" Discussed on Pro Rata

"It to know what to trust axios. AM takes the effort of getting smart by synthesizing. The ten stories that that will drive the day. And telling you I they matter subscribe at sign up dot axios DOT COM and now back to the podcast. We're joined now by Axis. This is Felix Salmon. You have been covering the MIT Jeffrey Epstein connection relationship for months now so goodwin procter comes out with this giant report last week. Your initial reaction after reading through it was what they miss the Elephant in the room to Epstein. If you read what Reverend Farrow reported in the New Yorker and live reported on axios Epstein was generally understood we've given about eight million dollars to MIT and they've concentrated straight through on eight hundred and fifty thousand dollars of that and they missed the seven million five majority of it that effectively came via Bill Gates. And Leon. I'm glad the Bill Gates and Leon black pieces you say the larger parts of the Epstein donations to MIT. This was what you call a loophole right whereby basically Epstein pretended like the money came from other people or other people's foundations correct did come from other people so to many it came from gates and five million of it came from black and everyone at the MIT media lab understood. These were ever seen donations. He got all of the credit for with them. Neither black nor gates wanted any credit for it and we now know from having read the Goodwin Crop to report that Joey Ito who is running the media lab at the time I'm actually talk to an MIT development officer when they were working out whether and how they should accept money from Ezzeddine and say well. Why don't we just walked what's donations? The Epstein gives money to one of somebody in their favorite course and then billion that gives money to MIT and the money is coming from the from FC theme so it looks fine. That was actually a proposal by Joey. Ito isn't it. The basic definition or at least a layman's definition of money laundering. MIT is pretty explicit in its reporter. I'm sorry Goodwin. Procter as they did argues it found no evidence of money laundering correct and the reason they found no evidence is because they basically that their attempts to find evidence was found out Liam lack and Bill Gates and said. Did you do this on behalf of Jeffrey Epstein and Bill Gates said No. I didn't and Leon Black Kim say anything at all. Oh and they said well. We can't see any evidence that this was obscene money. Despite the fact that they did talk to Joey Ito and so presumably. Joey told old that that he understood this to be seen money. I know they told to suck some could even be told them that he thought that it with Dean money. There was a lot of seconds. Banjul evident didn't you know with in in terms of the understanding within the media lab that this was at even money but apparently they couldn't find any hot evidence for that and by the way for those. Who Don't know everybody knows the Bill Gates's the multi-billionaire founder of Microsoft? Leon black is a big private equity executive the CEO of Apollo Global Management. It was interesting Goodwin report is you and I were slacking back and forth with each rather. They said they could not contact or they could not get in touch with a representative lamb. Black I'm a basic reporter I've gotten in touch with the representative Leon. Black about this very subject. How could goodwin procter? Who went through all this time and money and effort how could they have not reached somebody? I think you should be working for. Goodwin Procter Dan. I get paid more. It'd be great because Guilio bedrick getting into. I believe I'm black. Let's go back a little bit or broaden out a little bit I guess which is what was the motivation for Jeffrey Epstein to even care about donating so much money money to mit that he would go through all this nation's to get the money to them. Jeffrey goes to jail perfect crimes. In two thousand eight he comes out and his contain. Desire in. Life is to be able to continue hobnobbing with rich and famous and smart and successful individuals. So he likes to be able to hang out with Reid Hoffman and Sucker Berg and Joey Ito all these famous scientists to MIT and Harvard. And that that kind of thing and if he just turns up on campus as a convicted sex offender. No one's GonNa give time of day. So the way that he manages to become a socially pretty acceptable human beings like greasing the way with money and with flights on his private jet and all of the other things. He was extremely good at doing in terms of getting himself becoming becoming persona grata. You might say among the kind of people that he wanted the respect at mit. Obviously Joey Ito is no longer there. There was also following this goodwin procter reporter professor so who is basically put on indefinite leave and and it seems like he will be gone too but the senior management or senior leadership I guess of. MIT is essentially exonerated. In this report. The report says kind Kinda see no evil hear no evil from your perspective is goodwin procter kind of letting them pass the buck here or sincerely president etc were they really. In the dark so the Goodwin reports says the the Epstein visited the MIT campus nine times and then no one in the senior mit it administration knew about that possible right I mean I've visited mit dozens of times and senior leadership on there. No but the point is the Joey Ito new and if definitely revisionist to start saying Joey to wasn't senior leadership within mit he was probably the second most high-profile pass at Mit. And possibly the most high-profile pass I might depending on how you feel about your life. So he knew and he was extremely high profile extremely important and the idea that he doesn't really counts as being MIT MIT media. Lab might be thankful that seems a bit ridiculous Felix filed question for you. This report is out. There's been lots of media reporting the MIT Epstein Steen. Story that piece of the Jeffrey Epstein Story Do you think it is now done. Is this the final chapter. No because there was just way too many questions still to be answered about gates black. And what's more there's huge shoe to drop about audit the whole Haver Epstein relationship which is much much bigger than the MIT relationship has yet to really we'd be uncovered and when that happens probably mit is going to get dragged back into that as well. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you my final two right after this axios gives you the news and analysis. You need to get smarter faster on the most important topics in our unique smart brevity format we cover topics from from politics to science and media tech subscribed to get smarter faster at sign up dot axios Dot Com and now back to the podcast it. Now it's time for my final two and alphabet the parent company of Google. which on Friday announced that its longtime chief legal officer David? Drummond is leaving at the end of January and honestly it is a wonder it took this long. Drummond has been at the center of a board investigation into Google's culture of sexual harassment both for his role in overseeing sexual harassment complaints and also for his own improprieties in terms of the former. He was involved in giving former android. Chief Andy Rubin. Tens of millions of dollars to quietly walk away after some pretty horrific charges against him in terms of the ladder. Drummond has admitted to fathering a child with direct subordinate. who was then forced to leave Google's legal department because she yeah the female subordinate and new mom represented an apparent conflict of interest? The the bottom line here. Google might be changing a culture where don't be evil was more of a coffee mug motto than something actually practiced and violence morning Michael McCain. CEO of Canadian food packaging giant maple leaf foods on Sunday slammed the trump administration over what he views. It's ill-conceived plan to divert attention in from political woes. In other words. He's saying these strikes that killed rain. In general Sulejmani were to divert attention from impeachment and remember in the process of this and the reason McCain in cares is that Iran in response attack. US Vases and mistakenly shot down a passenger airliner that was headed from Tehran. So Ukraine two of those killed build on the plane were the wife and eleven year old son of a maple leaf foods employees and McCain tweets quote. I am very angry and time isn't making me less angry. This this is a reminder of how this entire situation. US Iran dispute is playing north of the border but like everything else has become a twitter Royce. Our test with with McCain being praised by trump's critics while some of trump's supporters already are pledging to boycott maple leaf foods products. And we're done big. Thanks for listening. And to my producers Tim Servers and they omit shaven have a great national rubber ducky day. And we'll be back tomorrow with another podcast..

Jeffrey Epstein MIT Joey Ito Bill Gates MIT MIT Goodwin goodwin procter Epstein Steen axios Epstein reporter Goodwin Procter Dan Felix Salmon Haver Epstein Google. Drummond Michael McCain Leon black
"mit" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

08:42 min | 9 months ago

"mit" Discussed on Pro Rata

"It to know what to trust axios. AM takes the effort of getting smart by synthesizing. The ten stories that that will drive the day. And telling you I they matter subscribe at sign up dot axios DOT COM and now back to the podcast. We're joined now by Axis. This is Felix Salmon. You have been covering the MIT Jeffrey Epstein connection relationship for months now so goodwin procter comes out with this giant report last week. Your initial reaction after reading through it was what they miss the Elephant in the room to Epstein. If you read what Reverend Farrow reported in the New Yorker and live reported on axios Epstein was generally understood we've given about eight million dollars to MIT and they've concentrated straight through on eight hundred and fifty thousand dollars of that and they missed the seven million five majority of it that effectively came via Bill Gates. And Leon. I'm glad the Bill Gates and Leon black pieces you say the larger parts of the Epstein donations to MIT. This was what you call a loophole right whereby basically Epstein pretended like the money came from other people or other people's foundations correct did come from other people so to many it came from gates and five million of it came from black and everyone at the MIT media lab understood. These were ever seen donations. He got all of the credit for with them. Neither black nor gates wanted any credit for it and we now know from having read the Goodwin Crop to report that Joey Ito who is running the media lab at the time I'm actually talk to an MIT development officer when they were working out whether and how they should accept money from Ezzeddine and say well. Why don't we just walked what's donations? The Epstein gives money to one of somebody in their favorite course and then billion that gives money to MIT and the money is coming from the from FC theme so it looks fine. That was actually a proposal by Joey. Ito isn't it. The basic definition or at least a layman's definition of money laundering. MIT is pretty explicit in its reporter. I'm sorry Goodwin. Procter as they did argues it found no evidence of money laundering correct and the reason they found no evidence is because they basically that their attempts to find evidence was found out Liam lack and Bill Gates and said. Did you do this on behalf of Jeffrey Epstein and Bill Gates said No. I didn't and Leon Black Kim say anything at all. Oh and they said well. We can't see any evidence that this was obscene money. Despite the fact that they did talk to Joey Ito and so presumably. Joey told old that that he understood this to be seen money. I know they told to suck some could even be told them that he thought that it with Dean money. There was a lot of seconds. Banjul evident didn't you know with in in terms of the understanding within the media lab that this was at even money but apparently they couldn't find any hot evidence for that and by the way for those. Who Don't know everybody knows the Bill Gates's the multi-billionaire founder of Microsoft? Leon black is a big private equity executive the CEO of Apollo Global Management. It was interesting Goodwin report is you and I were slacking back and forth with each rather. They said they could not contact or they could not get in touch with a representative lamb. Black I'm a basic reporter I've gotten in touch with the representative Leon. Black about this very subject. How could goodwin procter? Who went through all this time and money and effort how could they have not reached somebody? I think you should be working for. Goodwin Procter Dan. I get paid more. It'd be great because Guilio bedrick getting into. I believe I'm black. Let's go back a little bit or broaden out a little bit I guess which is what was the motivation for Jeffrey Epstein to even care about donating so much money money to mit that he would go through all this nation's to get the money to them. Jeffrey goes to jail perfect crimes. In two thousand eight he comes out and his contain. Desire in. Life is to be able to continue hobnobbing with rich and famous and smart and successful individuals. So he likes to be able to hang out with Reid Hoffman and Sucker Berg and Joey Ito all these famous scientists to MIT and Harvard. And that that kind of thing and if he just turns up on campus as a convicted sex offender. No one's GonNa give time of day. So the way that he manages to become a socially pretty acceptable human beings like greasing the way with money and with flights on his private jet and all of the other things. He was extremely good at doing in terms of getting himself becoming becoming persona grata. You might say among the kind of people that he wanted the respect at mit. Obviously Joey Ito is no longer there. There was also following this goodwin procter reporter professor so who is basically put on indefinite leave and and it seems like he will be gone too but the senior management or senior leadership I guess of. MIT is essentially exonerated. In this report. The report says kind Kinda see no evil hear no evil from your perspective is goodwin procter kind of letting them pass the buck here or sincerely president etc were they really. In the dark so the Goodwin reports says the the Epstein visited the MIT campus nine times and then no one in the senior mit it administration knew about that possible right I mean I've visited mit dozens of times and senior leadership on there. No but the point is the Joey Ito new and if definitely revisionist to start saying Joey to wasn't senior leadership within mit he was probably the second most high-profile pass at Mit. And possibly the most high-profile pass I might depending on how you feel about your life. So he knew and he was extremely high profile extremely important and the idea that he doesn't really counts as being MIT MIT media. Lab might be thankful that seems a bit ridiculous Felix filed question for you. This report is out. There's been lots of media reporting the MIT Epstein Steen. Story that piece of the Jeffrey Epstein Story Do you think it is now done. Is this the final chapter. No because there was just way too many questions still to be answered about gates black. And what's more there's huge shoe to drop about audit the whole Haver Epstein relationship which is much much bigger than the MIT relationship has yet to really we'd be uncovered and when that happens probably mit is going to get dragged back into that as well. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you my final two right after this axios gives you the news and analysis. You need to get smarter faster on the most important topics in our unique smart brevity format we cover topics from from politics to science and media tech subscribed to get smarter faster at sign up dot axios Dot Com and now back to the podcast it. Now it's time for my final two and alphabet the parent company of Google. which on Friday announced that its longtime chief legal officer David? Drummond is leaving at the end of January and honestly it is a wonder it took this long. Drummond has been at the center of a board investigation into Google's culture of sexual harassment both for his role in overseeing sexual harassment complaints and also for his own improprieties in terms of the former. He was involved in giving former android. Chief Andy Rubin. Tens of millions of dollars to quietly walk away after some pretty horrific charges against him in terms of the ladder. Drummond has admitted to fathering a child with direct subordinate. who was then forced to leave Google's legal department because she yeah the female subordinate and new mom represented an apparent conflict of interest? The the bottom line here. Google might be changing a culture where don't be evil was more of a coffee mug motto than something actually practiced and violence morning Michael McCain. CEO of Canadian food packaging giant maple leaf foods on Sunday slammed the trump administration over what he views. It's ill-conceived plan to divert attention in from political woes. In other words. He's saying these strikes that killed rain. In general Sulejmani were to divert attention from impeachment and remember in the process of this and the reason McCain in cares is that Iran in response attack. US Vases and mistakenly shot down a passenger airliner that was headed from Tehran. So Ukraine two of those killed build on the plane were the wife and eleven year old son of a maple leaf foods employees and McCain tweets quote. I am very angry and time isn't making me less angry. This this is a reminder of how this entire situation. US Iran dispute is playing north of the border but like everything else has become a twitter Royce. Our test with with McCain being praised by trump's critics while some of trump's supporters already are pledging to boycott maple leaf foods products. And we're done big. Thanks for listening. And to my producers Tim Servers and they omit shaven have a great national rubber ducky day. And we'll be back tomorrow with another podcast..

Jeffrey Epstein MIT Joey Ito Bill Gates MIT MIT Goodwin goodwin procter Epstein Steen axios Epstein reporter Goodwin Procter Dan Felix Salmon Haver Epstein Google. Drummond Michael McCain Leon black
"mit" Discussed on Pro Rata

Pro Rata

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"mit" Discussed on Pro Rata

"It's failing grade on Jeffrey Epstein so there's a nuclear reactor on MIT campus seriously. It's a small one but it is there and people in the area regularly make morbid jokes about a meltdown but mit right now is facing a fallout. That's not physically lethal but just as damaging managing to its reputation specifically reports that its media lab has much deeper financial ties than previously reported to Jeffrey Epstein the billionaire tech strategists and convicted victim pedophile who committed suicide in prison last month while awaiting trial on new charges of child sex trafficking so for those who don't know the MIT media lab is kind of the East Coast schools in high profile effort to get some of that Silicon Valley's shine an rnd shop that spin out companies but without commercialization as its primary priority for the past eight years or so. It's been run by somebody named Joey. Ito a fame Japanese tech entrepreneur who also apparently had a very soft spot for Epstein or at least for epsteins money last month. Ito formally we apologize for accepting small donations from Epstein but on Saturday Ronan Farrow wrote in the New Yorker that the ties were much deeper and much more lucrative than Ito would lead on with him having traveled at least twice epsteins private island in the US virgins and accepting millions of dollars in donations to the media lab from Epstein who was actually on an official official. MIT list of people not to accept money from more notably. Some of the donations were really from Billionaires Bill Gates and Leon black neither of whom has yet explaining why they needed to send their checks through a convicted sex offender the bottom line. Jeffrey Epstein's life might be over but his story keeps writing new chapters in twenty three seconds. We'll go deeper with axios Chief Financial Chow korrespondent Felix Salmon but I this bridge bank believes.

Jeffrey Epstein MIT Ito Chief Financial Chow Bill Gates Ronan Farrow Felix Salmon Silicon Valley Joey East Coast US Leon black official twenty three seconds eight years
"mit" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"mit" Discussed on Think Again

"Now working with industry has a lot of possible dangers in MIT throughout the lease the recent history. This is recent history, going back to World War, Two has I think been very committed to understand. Adding those difficulties and developing policies that would mitigate them. So there are number of things we can't do, so you can't come and fund my research, and then I give them the products, my research to you for a business that just doesn't work, right? We can't have a, you know, you can't have a lock on the research. That you, you find it on my TV. You just can't t- owns the patents MIT owns the patents that's by dole acting. That was a very, very important accelerate for translating research out. Let me just take a moment to talk about by dole act, which is that the government appropriately has been putting enormous amount of money into fundamental research. One of Vancouver. Bush's recommendations in his amazing treat is post World War, Two science. The endless frontier was that the government had to continue to invest in research much as it had to prosecute World War, Two that research, should be done universities, not free standing research, institutes because of this month. Marvelous mix of individuals. But also that was the way of really celebrating our innovation economy. Absolutely brilliant. So the federally funded research belong to the government, because the federal government funded it, but very little of it was getting turned into anything. Useful, bright was being transferred into real technologies until the by dole act and the by dole act transferred the ownership of intellectual property discovered using federal funds on research campus to that university, and that launched an incredible burst of innovation..

dole federal government MIT Vancouver Bush
"mit" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"mit" Discussed on Think Again

"So the avoidance problem is that academic structures are very in bedded in institutions, and departments are set departments essentially own faculty appointments, and people would ask me, well, don't, we need to have different parliaments? And my response is well, I don't know what departments we would set up. I don't know what departments were going to need in twenty years. Why? When we start a new department it easier to re to organize people in terms of purpose, leaving the responsibilities of the departments in the departments to a certain degree. But the marvelous gift of being at MIT with the idea of putting people together across disciplines was not new so during World War Two. MIT was the place selected for the development of radar. It was a technological triumph. Many people consideration are to have been the war winning technology, the Tomek bomb the war ending technology, but radar was nowhere. At the beginning of the war England had developed a piece of the technology with that was necessary. But they were busy fighting the war, they couldn't prosecute that into real radar. So the cavity magnetron was secretly sent to MIT and a collection of scientists and engineers. There were linguists were economists all working together in the secretly named radiation lab. So no one would know they were actually working on radar. Okay. Developed rate are and not just the science behind it. They develop prototypes. They developed real radar devices, that were went on chips and on planes after the war, of course, there was no longer any need for the rat lab, but mitt do want to give up that idea. So part of the red law lab was transferred back into MIT. Central called the research lab for latronic. And so the research allowed for Trix exists today, it started after World War Two, and it's kind of a semi crazy mash up of physicists, and computer scientists, and mathematicians, whose appointments are all in their home departments. But their research labs are altogether. So the idea of that kind of hybrid was already part of MIT's kind of received wisdom. Gotcha. And so we could start the energy initiative, bringing people together out of, you know, from departments into a focus on a sustainable energy future, or being people together for the coke institute for integrative cancer research, biologist engineers, clinicians, because that pattern of a research lab essentially was already established. I just we just use something that a model that was already in place, I, which made it less lesson Technic. I mean at the same time with that in spite of that infrastructure being in place, and that kind of commitment to that sort of interdisciplinary overlap. Epping creative, exploratory work. There's a lot of pressure and a lot of visibility at a place like MIT. So I guess, tell me if I'm wrong, I guess what you would have to do is create arrangements that could be easily sort of like experiments..

MIT mitt latronic England coke institute twenty years
"mit" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"mit" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"Know, modern machine, tools and. Capabilities and the only rules where we want breadth of ideas, and we went breadth of humans because the world is full of lots of talent. And so we got that it was Megan Smith who invited joy to apply for the position. He now holds the director of the MIT media lab. The media lab was founded in one thousand nine hundred five by nNcholas Negroponte. And for decades, the lab has been a hub of cross-disciplinary innovation. The media lab also has an unusually close relationship with corporate and startup worlds, which means that MIT born innovations frequently make their way into the hands of consumers technologically. It was right up. Joys alley. I didn't know anything about the media lab, and I really had no intention of ever being in an academic institution. But I came here to do an interview, and we spent two days just meeting students and faculty and staff, and it turned out to be still. Probably the most interesting to day series of conversations I've had and I said if I can hang out with these people every day, although anything to do that this was the kind of institution. Joe a good fully embrace a place that describe its work as anti-dissident airy was always going to appeal the Joey it was almost like coming home. Just like the clubbers in Chicago or the voices from far-flung corners of the globe in those early days of internet bulletin boards. The media lab was a community of open voices freely. Sharing ideas. How much did you see in that first two days of the media lab that reminded you of the DJ dance floor? So that's really an interesting question 'cause I had thought of the parallels. Actually, the reason I dropped out of college to go to the dance floor was because I love the community. And this is a community. I wanna be this is the lost tribe that I've been looking for. And if it means doing operational stuff that I never really thought was my forte fine. The MediaLab melted. The powers of the closed institution with the powers of an open network, but joy wanted to make the media lab even more open. He wanted to crack door and bring the world in they realized coming from the internet that there are people doing cool stuff all over the place. Ted was publishing their videos all over the place. And so it was very counterintuitive to me to have something be close. So felt like a computer that wasn't connected to the internet. Joey. Set out to connect the metaphorical computer of the media lab to the internet of the world. He knew that any clothes organization would run the risk of stagnation. So Joey started stirring things up at the media lab with a series of open programs, including open competitions, open, classes and advisory council and directors tells program that brings outside voices regularly into the lab instead of just being a closed community..

Joey Ted director MIT Megan Smith nNcholas Negroponte Joys alley Chicago Joe advisory council two days
"mit" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"mit" Discussed on Masters of Scale with Reid Hoffman

"Precisely which aspects of your organization should be open, and which should be closed and to what degree will set you on a path to rapid scale. I wanted to speak with Joey ITO about this because Joey has been instrumental in the growth of my own ideas about networks and openness Choi's an entrepreneur investor and theorize her who spent much of his career championing radically open systems from creative Commons to cyber currency. Joey also railed against established top-down institutions from governments to banks to universities six years ago. Joey accepted a role inside one of these famously closed universities as director of the famed MIT media lab joys evolved from a staunch believer in radically open communities to a nuanced advocate for bringing openness to previously closed organisations. Join I come at the idea of openness from different angles. But both are approaches. Aim to drive innovation at scale and involve. Many many people along the way the way that I normally introduced Joe is college dropout director of the MIT media lab. It's a quick way to help people begin to understand him. I dropped out of college three times. Well, actually, I dropped out of college twice a doctor PHD program. Once it felt like there was more. I could learn online than I could learn in an economic program Joey dropped out to become immersed in that nightclub community. It was not the first graphically open community the joy become involved in as a high school student back in Tokyo Joey had worked in his father's research lab, it gave him access to computers and the early in. At night. I would program video games. And also Ray copy protection on software on the Apple computer. Yes. You heard him right choice teenage years were spent breaking copyright on software. But the thing that really excited Joey about these new technologies where the communities that were forming around them online bulletin boards were just emerging and people from across the world engage in conversations they could never have in their everyday lives with people in other countries of higher social status these communities cut through hierarchy they flattened the playing field. And it's fair to say that not everyone appreciated that Joey tested this newfound access in his Tokyo High school once I got into the university networks, I realize that, you know, a lot of these professors who wrote the text books that we were using what answer Email if you said, I'm a high school kid in Japan. And I just read your text book. And I have a question about this thing in my physics teacher hated it. Because that would come in and say, well, but I talked to the author of the book, and he says, you're wrong. And so I got a see in physics. He may have barely scrape through his physics class. But joy took a lot of lessons from those open online communities after fully immersing self and Chicago's club scene. Joey return to Tokyo to open a nightclub of his own technology. Kept creeping back in. And you go to Tokyo, but then you start thinking. Okay. I should maybe think about the technology business. What led you to start thinking startups? Venture capital. What led you into that direction? And I wanna just establish for the record that I am not even close to the level of strategic that you are. I just kind of stumble around, you know, and so Jesus. I'm aware of my -tunities. I just don't plan them. And so I went back to Japan headed nightclub was doing events was interested in media. So I was working for an inch Inchcape the broadcasting company and was just kind of running around, and I did computer networks, but just out of curiosity. Joey's curiosity and is open collaborative network of like minded tech pioneers, meant he soon had skills that were in great demand, particularly from big companies finding their way in the new frontier of the internet Joey would need to speak the language of business. If he was going to work with these top down, prestige driven organizations, he set up a consulting practice. I didn't know how to run a company, but I set it up anyway. And at the time I remember going to negotiate office lease, and they said, well, what about the security deposit and how like I'm gonna have to talk to my lawyer in like, mom, what is the security deposit. Joey may not have understood the fine..

Joey ITO Tokyo director Tokyo High school Joe Japan MIT Choi Ray Chicago six years
"mit" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"mit" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Archives she was pursuing her own line of investigation trying to find out if mit's founder william barton rogers own slaves reared for the archives murphy pulls out boxes of documents to demonstrate the trail she followed eventually discover that rogers had six slaves before moving to massachusetts once murphy's discovery came out it kind of overshadowed the students findings to their chagrin this then sophomore charlotte minsk people outside the class supposedly have really focused in on those revelations it's very easy to confine slavery to what we perceive the institution that's in its bubble that's bad but you know is its own thing but it's not i mean it reaches tendrils into every aspect of america and that means race that means labor that means power structure is every student's presented their findings in february to a packed audience socially renovated renovated here just nobody headed time or dangerous to look into that president l raphael rife who's originally from venezuela started mit's investigation and all he said about why is that he got a question about mit connections to slavery any thought he knew the answer but he realized he didn't know for sure at that february event rife applauded the students approach if in this case we have the courage to look at even the most of fluttering disturbing parts of our history believe we have a much better chance of approaching the present and the future with humidity self awareness to the students were powder themselves after that event they felt like they'd been heard but some people push back i mean as soon as our work was publicized there were comments one nine hundred sixty eight mit graduate wrote neta to'real in the tech the university newspaper arguing the mit and slavery's classes investigation was selfdestructive he said responsibility for slavery lies with people who are long dead and we shouldn't judge them or mit's passed by today's morals a few weeks ago minsk he and classmate mahalakshmi along go published long response arguing that separating today's morality from historical morality was just a way to avoid confrontation and discomfort i just loved aleisha alexander reads a passage smiling at her classmates work it's so great it's so but the moments that feel like victories don't make confronting the past any easier i was there as arcus nor murphy showed alexander something she'd found a program from a big production put on by it athletic clubs in eighteen ninety nine so i found a program for the show yeah you're ready so that's the athletes and to turn the page in here we found there's a picture from the production of the performers in blackface it's a shocking picture of a dozen or so young white athletes in costumes with blackened bodies a few minutes later alexander says she has to go these moments of coming to terms with mit's pest our motion kelvin green says because they resonate so strongly with things that are happening today things that green and other members of the black student union are trying to track and document there a lot of current mit students that are facing really hard times and so we also have to ask ourselves as anything that we're doing now that's falling into the exact same trap of excluding people more of those questions might be asked because of the mit and slavery course but green things president rife probably had a more tactical reason for investigating mit's past there have been schools delving into this history and not only delving into it but some people calling them out on the fact that they do have this history before they got a chance to do it on their own so i think if anything it was very strategic green things mitt was trying to dictate the narrative then that's okay with him and his classmates just as long as mit's narrative includes confronting the ways history still affects students today for the world rupa shenoy.

mit william barton rogers founder murphy
"mit" Discussed on Click

Click

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"mit" Discussed on Click

"And how even at the age of war on a child's brain is way more powerful than the highest and competes it now that's a couple of the aspirations at the massachusetts institute of technology as it launches intelligence quest is a huge initiative in human and machine intelligence are we going to hear more from two of those who are behind it let's start with john yellow reuss who is director of mit computer science and artificial intelligence lap first of all daniele what's the idea behind intelligence quest and most of the point why now celine touchent quest aims to develop the science and engineering our intelligence my connecting neuroscientist computer scientists and i would say that the science and engineering of intelligence is one of the most profound challenges we have today because understanding intelligence will give us the knowledge to understand ourselves and to create machines that will support us in cognitive and physical oh work and this is really extraordinary exciting to address today because we have made so much progress on many fronts uh we have made progress on building capable computerized that can crunch the lot of data we now have a lot of our sources of information on neuroscientist making progress as we have new algorithms swore machine learning at it's a good time to bring together expertise from ai from machine learning from robotics from neuroscience from brain and cognitive science ought to address questions that caught across both fields of god you mentioned bryggeman cognitive science has because indeed we have your colleague with us as well jim to caller who is head over the palm too bright and of differences over there and i guess part of this is like hinted in the introduction jim is kind of reverse engineering we we know that even at one year old at a child is way more powerful than the best computer patrick wilton reverse engineer in.

john yellow reuss director jim patrick wilton engineer massachusetts institute of tec mit celine touchent one year
"mit" Discussed on Technotopia

Technotopia

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"mit" Discussed on Technotopia

"The highest number of entries we had 79 interests this year on and work in other types of electronic literature and out of other types of of of work such as digital poetry um we're seeing now that you know were noticing more work that's happening globally in different languages an translation of these projects is happening so you know people are also doing radically different sorts of a computer games that things that um uh that are expressing um issues of uh of trauma and identity um not just any games where you have you know analog two on independent film but the sort of art games off games uh and you know people doing work on uh may be much smaller scale but with a much more radical interesting experimental perspective very often so that's all part of what's going on on the on the internet these days i you know and uh and i think it is a space where there's still plenty of room for imagination m four imagining uh how we live together how we come up with uh with better ideas about our online and offline life i don't know it sounds great zoom let's see we're going to go to work in fox get your book right now it's mit press right yes in mit present book it's part of the central knowledge series so we have a good number of these that in some places would be in bookstores may be somewhere near the register their these small books that are amenable to you know reading on uh airplane trip bird are you know taken for the weekend like chicken suit for the soul not that small and perhaps perhaps a little bit more a little more substantial and definitely more quirky but but they they're trying to cover topics that are in some cases of uh uh business general popular sorts of interest relating to science and technology and um uh so that uh there's a lot of good books in the series in there's there's more coming in the next uh next mit press catalogue so i'm really glad to be a part of that series uh uh and it is it is available from from the mit press directly and from any uh online.

mit press
"mit" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"mit" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Mit still a student suicide stairs question have school liability and key tell that story and yet it's a very interesting case in the case has been around since two thousand nine at this point so it's wanda our wound its way through our legal system but the question that's going to be argued at the supreme judicial court of massachusetts tomorrow is whether mit bears any responsibility for a student who committed suicide while while a student there and part of the argument is is that uh mit new and that the this person had some significant issues it was foreseeable that they were pushed to the brink but like this by the professors and and the challenge of the studies there and they had within their power the ability to prevent it and therefore they were negligent not doing so and so the parents and now suing mit for the suicide of this son in its it's a tragic case obviously when you look at it and it's very interesting and what's happened is that many many schools have filed briefs on behalf of mit siding with them because what they fear is that if mit is responsible here for having to in essence prevent a suet student suicide aid that's not the business were and we're in education as educators his we're not wellequipped to predict suicide actually the science is no one is wellequipped to predict suicide and this this would create a a very uh as the universities would see it earthshattering opening for potential liability so money will be spent on defending numerous lawsuits against the institutions as opposed to using it to provide education to students and and that would be very troubling in a in a significant change in the commowealth laws and aiming that in that really's question is should anyone in at com should anyone be libel when someone else commit suicide should they have to pay somehow civilly and uh it it.

Mit massachusetts mit
"mit" Discussed on Movin 92.5

Movin 92.5

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"mit" Discussed on Movin 92.5

"Scientists over at mit had been responsible for some of the greatest and most important inventions of our time they were the ones who created an email they invented zip cars and of course condensed chicken soup with less sodium panorma you are a mighty they are truly in geniuses over there at so when we heard in the news this morning that the researchers at mit have been working on a brand new invention we knew that it was going to be revolutionary they've been working on it for years and they call their new invention miracle second skin and b let me miracle secondskin basically it's a hightech fake skin material that you can wear over your real skin that will give your body the appearance of looking younger healthier and more youthful winds yeah you're supposed to apply the fakes again two areas that have become wrinkled or damaged or ravaged by time dear do they have used that not well we stand with you not old ryder you just looked pretty weather in like you've been ravaged by the year got a habit do you like staring into the sun i get what for that loaded the basically it's small patches of skin you can apply to your body over your regular skin but it's not real according to the t researchers their fake skin.

mit
"mit" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"mit" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"That's how but my heart stores in massachusetts where my often brings renewing going down i knew it will jerry thank you for listening on thank you for calling tonight i hope you'll call again and they want you to know ironically i was i gave a lecture i i was a lecturer today at mit i heard you say that now what you lecture well there was there was a group of business professionals from nearby eighty of them forty of them were from america and about forty them for countries around the world and then people from nigeria today turkey all sorts of folks from different parts of the world and they came here for a program that mit runs every year and part of that was how you as a communications professional dis for folks who were communications professionals at these companies how you interact with the news media and they were three of us who spoke today each of us spoke about an hour at mit this morning and you have to be very smart to go to mit as of course you know but you also cited the very smart just to figure out the campus in mit because no rhyme or reason about any of the building others just me i agree i i will crowley gin and thank you rich in idaho on a whole you up and uvira walkabout jerry it's a pleasure to make your whitens have a great night okay thank you very much now.

massachusetts lecturer america nigeria news media mit idaho mit