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Scientists Find The Biggest Soft-Shelled Egg Ever, Nicknamed 'The Thing'

Environment: NPR

02:30 min | 2 weeks ago

Scientists Find The Biggest Soft-Shelled Egg Ever, Nicknamed 'The Thing'

"This next story is about a strange fossil found in and Arctic as NPR's Nell Greenfieldboyce. Report scientists were astounded when they finally realized what it was a couple years ago, a paleontologist named Julia Clark was visiting a colleague at a natural history, museum, and Chile the two were chatting about fossils SINISA. Hey, you know you should see this thing we collected. And he said we call it the thing. The thing wasn't a bone, but what was it exactly? No one knew it was about. The same size and shape is a deflated football. I just take one look at this thing, and it's the thing and. That is a giant deflated AIG a soft shelled egg to be precise, the biggest one ever found now today some snakes and turtles and lizards lay eggs with soft flexible shells, but they're rare to find in the fossil record. We did not realize said soft shelled eggs could even get this big Clark who works at the University of Texas at Austin collaborated with her colleague from Chile and. And other researchers to study this egg in the journal Nature. They say it was likely laid by a Moses Sore, a twenty foot, long marine lizard that lived some sixty six million years ago. The enormous egg thrilled paleobiologist like yaws Meena Vamon of university, I mean just thought Oh. This is fantastic. That's because she was making her own discoveries about ancient soft shelled eggs from dinosaurs in. In the past scientists assumed that dinosaurs had hard shelled eggs like their living, relatives, Crocodilians and birds, now in the same issue of the journal Nature Vehement and her colleagues described fossils from two very different dinosaurs. We're definitely here dealing with the very first evidence for completely soft-shell non mineralized shells. Their chemical analysis shows that the young dinosaur offspring were surrounded by soft shells much like the. The shells of turtle eggs, vitamin says it looks like the earliest dinosaurs started out with soft shelled eggs hard shelled eggs evolved later. The dinosaur calcified egg is something that is not ancestor that is not set of primitive feature of all dinosaurs, and now that researchers have shown how to find soft shelled eggs in the fossil record. Scientists will likely start finding more Nell Greenfieldboyce NPR

Julia Clark Chile Nell Greenfieldboyce Nell Greenfieldboyce Npr Football Moses Sore AIG Meena Vamon University Of Texas Austin
Revisiting the Archive: Larry Kramer

Making Gay History

06:59 min | Last month

Revisiting the Archive: Larry Kramer

"I've talked before in this series revisiting the archive about anger. How it can fuel action? How an anger is partnered with love? It can produce a kind of righteous rage that propels us those of us who lived through the AIDS crisis. Know about it. Some of US learned it from Larry Kramer who died this week in Manhattan where he's lived for. Decades Larry was famous for being one of the first billions to sound the alarm during that last epidemic. The one that began forty years ago he was on the front lines even before aids was called AIDS and became a global epidemic at swept away more than thirty million lives before AIDS. Larry was best known for his work as a screenwriter and author but the virus that was claiming so many lives in the political indifference political negligence that greeted it turned Larry into a very public activist. His friends were dying and he felt compelled to do something more than to just bury the dead and mourn their loss in nineteen. Eighty-two Larry co-founded a gay men's health crisis now known as GM five years later he co-founded act up the AIDS coalition to unleash power. Act Up came to be known for its brilliant use of public protests to bring attention to the epidemic by early nineteen eighty nine. When I I met Larry AIDS take in more than sixty thousand lives. Most of them. Gay Men Larry quickly earned a reputation as an uncompromising firebrand with a fierce temper. I'm not proud of it. But that kind of person generally inspires me to run in the other direction. I was more than a little anxious. I approached the door to Larry's apartment in a building that fronts Washington Square Park in New York. City's Greenwich Village. As I said when this episode originally aired I got myself worked up. Nothing I brace myself for a tornado and found the teddy bear. Here's the same. Larry welcomed me into a spacious apartment and showed me into his all white book line living room and I took a seat opposite him across a broad desk as I said at my tape recorder and attach the Mike to his shirt. We talked about how we both had wanted to find a husband early in life and settle down and that led us back in time to Larry's memories as it confused and Unhappy College student in the Early Nineteen fifties. I pressed record interview with Larry Kramer Thursday January twenty six thousand nine hundred eighty nine at the home of Larry Kramer in New York City. Interviewer is Eric. Marcus tape one side one. When I went to Yale I thought I was the only gay person in the world and tried to kill myself because I was so lonely. Did try to What am I think that was fifty? Three was the year my freshman year. Yeah is awful. I mean I do want to go back that far curious because I was a college student on seventy six desperately unhappy. We're at Vassar College. There were there were a lot of gays. They weren't that many people think there were a lot if there were so many gays. Why was I so unhappy? Miserable person and And deaths seemed very appealing at moments during my freshman year when I was dating a woman in making off the man by in life and fifty three must have been much more difficult than seventy six at Vassar. You can even start in shifty. Three Easter I knew I was gay. I think from the day I was born and I think that there have been I. I now know that there were isolate. They were experiences all through before. I even got to Yale. And they were all covert in guilt. Inducing on on everybody's part so the it seemed as if all those early years were spent trying to deny these feelings the feelings would sort of get to strong erupt in and I would have an experience. Which would autumn always make me feel guilty in one way or another and then you put it you become. Sylvia's would come down for a while a week a week or two and Yale was awful. There was a gay bar called parolees. It was awful the time when I finally have the courage to go there. It was only two blocks from campus. But it was a million years away. It was very dark and grey and inside and smokey and and filled with old old older man and I only went the once and somebody picked me up. A car drove for like hours before we found a place that was quiet to do it and then he drove me back where you didn't say a word all of that list of yourself. I eight two hundred aspirin. Oh my God talk about slow and Miss. You must have been pretty miserable to swallow two hundred and yours anymore. Will after you wanted out. Was that who knows. It's a scene. I'll never forget the scene of taking pills the Yup and find you're still better. I didn't wake up. I I went to bed and I got scared and I call. The campus. Police came took me to the hospital and put myself and that was in woke then I fell asleep and I woke up in a room with bars and after grace new haven hospital and there. Was this very unpleasant hospital psychiatrist. Who said all right Mr Cramer? Why did you do it and I go fuck yourself or words to that end he said? I'm now you're not going to be let out of this hospital until you tell us why you did it. And I just had a few rubbed me the wrong way and I wouldn't have told who who knew why I did it anyway. So my brother who's always sort of looked after me came and got me out and he was friends with the dean of Freshmen. My brother had been the before me and And it was you know ordinarily when something like that happen you were shipped off to go join the army really in those days. Yeah and then you come back to Yale and you've grown up but they let me stay. If I went to the University of Coyote. Just his name was Dr Fry Clement Fry. And he was about in the sixties he had silver hair and it was a good looking man he whereas reptiles button down shirt and You just knew that. He cared more about Yale and he ever did about you

Larry Larry Kramer Larry Aids Aids Vassar College Yale Manhattan United States Dr Fry Clement Fry Greenwich Village Unhappy College New York City Grace New Haven Hospital GM Marcus Aspirin
How Do Cuttlefish Work?

BrainStuff

03:59 min | Last month

How Do Cuttlefish Work?

"Cuttlefish are among my favorite aquatic animals. Because they are smart and cute as heck. If you dig tentacles they belong to the class of molluscs called cephalopods along with squid and octopuses cephalopod meaning head foot in Latin thus named because these creatures feet arms really encircle their heads several pods have been around for about five hundred million years much longer than most other marine life including fish. And there's some of the smartest animals in the sea and even in this group of smart animals. The cuttlefish stands out for its intelligence more than one hundred twenty species of fish call. Earth's waters home. They can be found in virtually all Sion's although they do tend to migrate to deep areas during the winter before returning to shallow waters and reefs in spring and summer to mate. They're identified by their eight short arms and two longer tentacles. They also have a hidden weapon underneath. The cuttlefish is many arms lies a razor sharp beak much like that of your average parrot. This tool allows the cuttlefish to knock on crab mollusks and other hard shelled animals. And it's extra effective because it's sports a toxin designed to freeze pray in their tracks once bitten and cuttlefish are masters of camouflage similar to the Chameleon cuttlefish can change their color and texture to blend into their surroundings. But that's not the half of it. Researchers found that they can freeze their camouflage Palette by locking hundreds of tiny structures and their skin in place for up to an hour all this without consuming any energy from their main nervous system to stay in place sorta like an e reader that lasts a long time between charges because only uses juice when you turn the page. A cuttlefish only expend energy when they change the pattern. This trick allows them to hold their disguise. For long periods to avoid being detected or eaten it also helps some snatch their prey by allowing them to remain almost invisible as they wait for fish and crustaceans to come by they. Also use patterns to communicate with or sometimes trick other cuttlefish in the world of cuttlefish mating. The big brawny males usually win the female. Codfish BY SCARING OFF smaller males but every once in a while. A smaller mail gets his chance he can do this. By splitting his colors to show typically female patterns on the side of his body facing a larger male while showing masculine patterns to the female of choice then he sidled up to her and commences mating before the other male has figured out however when the odds are a little more. Even cuttlefish aren't afraid to brawl. Scientists have long known that cuttlefish are capable of aggressive behavior but twenty eleven footage captured this behavior in the wild rather than in the laboratory in this footage a male and female cuttlefish heff just finished meeting another male tries to steal her way he succeeds at first but then the first male follows them for awhile and finally strikes back. The two male start fighting flashing INC biting in showing other types of angry cuttlefish behavior. This is interesting because it confirms that. The aggressive behavior was based on mutual assessment rather than self-assessment when applying game theory models in other words. The cuttlefish didn't determine its actions based only on its own strength but also on considering the capabilities of sparring partner to that takes a lot more thought than simply throwing Braun around further. This discovery might prove to be a valuable way to learn more about the cognition and aggression of other animals. Also cuttlefish can count twenty sixteen. Study plays fifty four. Different Pharaoh cuttlefish tank along with a transparent to chambered box each side of the box contained a different quantity of shrimp to eat forcing each To choose the better deal. The two researchers changed the shrimp ratio each time and even played around with larger

Sion Partner Braun
COVID-19 Misinformation Remains Difficult To Stop

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:11 min | Last month

COVID-19 Misinformation Remains Difficult To Stop

"Fact checking organizations have performed heroics the corona virus facts alliance database now runs to more than five thousand entries. But who is actually reading it? Robin Listrik joins US now. He is a broadcast journalist. Former present of the world tonight on Radio Four Robin that five thousand debunking milestone by the corona virus facts alliance. It's organized by the POYNTER Institute. That's the reason we're talking today. They've learned something from scrolling through garbage belt. What coins stories are gaining? Traction what did we learn from that? I think we learned a couple of things I think. First of all we learn the people are desperate for explanations for something which frightens them. And that's something that goes back a very long time. I mean since the beginning of time up people have searched full an explanation things which come out of the blue. I mean you're the ancient Greeks believed in God's people later believed in witches spirits. Ghosts whatever you like. We learned people no longer believe experts quote unquote. Perhaps in the way that they used to there is a lot more skepticism out there. There's a lot most cynicism out that you yourself just mentioned president trump. I mean he has to best saga responsibility for this because he ever since she began to be active in the political arena. Talked about fake news. He talked about the lying press. He encouraged people deliberately and for his own political benefit not to believe facts but rather to believe his theories that has been dangerous. It strikes me though that some of the stories that the Poynter Institute survey has identified. Actually kind of go step beyond. I mean you know to each their own. Whatever gets you through the night I am not personally somebody who spends a lot of time concerned with what any given pope says things about anything but one of the most popular pieces of disinformation is one suggesting that. Pope Francis asked believe is to put a white handkerchief on their doorsteps to protect them from the plague. Now even someone as myself who would identify himself as pope skeptic. I can see that there is no way in a million years. Pope Francis is going to say that the people who believe that presumably big fans of Pope Francis. Why do they believe he would say something? So we'll beasley absurd. Well because he is somebody whom they respect more than they respect other sources of information they think the media light them they think politicians light of them if they are practicing loyal Catholics. They don't to believe the pope would lie to them. If you're somebody who wants to promulgate a ridiculous theory or ridiculous myth then you put it into the mouth of the pope do know that there will be some people who will believe it and there's one other thing here that's relevant Andrew. A lot of us believe things that come to us from people we regard as friends so if we are on social media we look at something that's been re tweeted by somebody who we know entrust we look at something on facebook that is being shed by somebody we know entrust we believe it. We don't often go back to the source so if you send me a tweet saying the pope said X. I'll believe it because I trust you more fool. You it might be said but is is the problem. Though beyond the disinformation itself in its beyond even people susceptibility to it's that it's that people want to believe disinformation. I'm reminded not for the first time Over quote by H L Mencken where he said the curse of man in the coals of his worst woes is his stupendous capacity for believing the incredible people. Actually want to think this stuff. How do you address that? Yeah well that is a hugely difficult issue. I mean I have an immense admiration for these fact checking organizations. I fear however that the work that they do doesn't actually have much of an impact because you've put your finger on it. People will believe what we want to believe. People believe what sort of fits into their view of how the world works and if they take the view the politicians lie to them. Look newspapers light to them. The journalist make things up then they will believe all of that and they would prefer to believe other people and now in the midst of a pandemic it is hugely dangerous. Because if people don't believe what the scientists say they then won't take the kind of actions that the scientists say we need to take to try to combat this virus and we will get us into a pretty bad place so it's dangerous. How TO COMBAT IT? I I the answer

Pope Francis United States Poynter Institute Pope Robin Listrik President Trump Facebook H L Mencken Beasley Andrew
A Simple Strategy for Rental Properties

Listen Money Matters

05:16 min | 2 months ago

A Simple Strategy for Rental Properties

"I want to ask you a bunch of things because you jumped into this head. I you bought your first rental property how much you know because sites like bigger pockets like they have a ton of content you could learn for ever and now by a single property right. What did you do like? What was your steps to learning first before you jumped into actually by. I was talking about with my friends who one had already bought one and was buying his second like talk to them for months about it. Did incessant amounts of research. What I listen to the bigger pockets. Podcast which you know. There's a lot of good stuff in there but perhaps a challenging to get through It's just a lot and then you don't know anything. What is what was the most helpful part was it. Was it listening to podcasts? Was it just like literally having sort of a mentor right? You know. He didn't he didn't know like much more than me. And to be honest I we kind of just like jumped into the fire and we learned a lot like cutting our teeth on it. I feel like you know. I learned a lot about the burr strategy and I was obsessed with the burr strategy. Before did it which is by. Rent Bob's I by rent repeat As this whole way of like putting money and pulling most of it out it's like it's the philosophy right yet and it's a really great strategy but it he infinitely complicated on top of just buying picking a property right like I just. There's so many ways to down in the right and you can And you can basically like learn forever. Yes you could just continue to learn and never actually pull the trigger on anything. It's trying to say like you're an expert in science which signs outside Earth size ever end and then you know this. It speaks to that. 'cause I'm a home brewer? I know a lot about beer to make beer. I am forever learning. It doesn't mean I'm not sitting there making beer making beer but I'm still learning every day in changing my process. The next time I make an exce batch and you know the fermentation of stuff's involved. Does that mean that you can make wine? Doesn't mean you can't make wine where you're probably not going to be that great at it because you have done it and it's not a focus now okay. I want to kind of drill into the learning process more because specifically for you because if I were to buy rental property right now and I I was part of the course I took the course essentially i. You are the person I wouldn't even. I wouldn't look up anything I would just ask you right. Is that kind of how you approached. It was with with your friend who who did. Because it's like well somebody needs on it. So yes so I worked with him but to be perfectly honest I learned the most from someone that you may remember a million years ago. Her name was Alison Carols. And she was like a real estate expert on listen my imagine the beginning. Some of her Articles are still on the site and she had owned. I think it was eleven properties of the time. Okay and she had a whole spreadsheet and process that she used and so I really adapted her process to fit my needs. I pretty much following all of her exact things and then as I went through it. I was like not this this. I don't want to do that. I don't care about this and I kind of made it more me. She wanted to be real estate. I just I just wanted to make money whereas wanted to be successful in it but didn't WanNa live and breathe. Do you think that you had to have a foundation of some kind of knowledge before even going and learning about rental properties? Yeah Yeah I definitely what is that? So I think it's just like basic understanding of properties rent and like the value of things I think a lot of people go into buying rental properties. Where like hey I heard this guy. He makes money on rental properties. This houses for sale. I think we could rent and make some money. Yes and no you. Can't you could definitely by rent it but you can make money on okay and in like all right. So what was the out of those pieces like? Yeah you you learn how to buy properties. It was it was allison spreadsheet. That really spoke to me in that it was I kind of lean towards numbers and I understand things in that context but it really set I. I liked her approach where she had Limitations on the deals that she would do based on the numbers says you put in the ramp racing the purchase. Pray send you know. She had assumptions for like vacancies. You boop boop put all these numbers in and it was like she had boxes that would be from green to Red Right. Radian of like how much you should do. This deal So Sheila Binary choices and it was you know. And then what would happen is like this? I would clone the spreadsheet into other tabs and compare these gradient numbers against each other and I was like. Oh this is such a better

Alison Carols BOB
Post Spring Garden Tuneups with Ken Druse

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

09:20 min | 2 months ago

Post Spring Garden Tuneups with Ken Druse

"Did their spring clean up or they're doing it and they're like okay. I've done that check. But that's not the end of the story so I thought we could go through sort of some of the things that you and I. After a million years of gardening have learned sort of aftercare that really help the garden to look good right into the summer and beyond so. Do you want to start with like bulbs for instance because the big features of spring? I think that your listeners know that by now that you don't cut off the Daffodil foliage during the language kind of too bad 'cause it's hard to get around it and you don't break the. When was the last time he saw braided daffodil foliage? It's been a long time but I used to see people do it but I have seen people who planted daffodils. The lawn for that lovely English look and then mowed the lawn and they wonder why they don't have any flowers anymore right right right so here. I'm in zone five fee. I don't even know. I have big amounts of them in sort of grassy areas and I don't even know those areas until around July fourth. So you know I really let them go their own all all the way down to Bauge and maybe if you have species tulips that some of the comeback every year out of most tulips. Don't come back every year for me anyway. Even the species. But if you have species tulips you leave fully it. You WanNa leave the foliage of all the bulbs and most of them will tell you is over like the album the value Mer blooming and their foliage is ugly and turning yellow at the same time. And so it's pretty much over after they bloom right right so I let them ripen as we would say I let them do their thing and take advantage of their photosynthesis process before I clean them up. So that's super important journey yellow. That's when you do it right right and one other tip I think with some of the little guy. Some of the little guys like one of my favorites is the winter ACA night Aransas high malice and tiny little. I ball to bloom with the snow drops here for me. Even March where I am. Sometimes yellow. Tiny flowers is hard to establish but when it does get established the way it likes to establish itself and get into bigger and bigger mass by seeding. And so you don't want to disturb that area when the flowers are spent you know what I mean. Make a mess cleanup to roughly. Because you'll miss out on that colonizing effect that the self sewing is going to do so the takes a long time. It does surprise but it takes a long time because I believe that those aides need to they take two years to Germany to have both through warm moist. Cold Moist warm moist. You know the whole thing like that. I think I think it is two years to germinate. So you know. It's one of those things in the garden. You don't stand there tapping your foot waiting to see the colony takeoff. You just go away. And then a scant seven years later. A nice big clump. Yeah we're colony so flowering shrubs or another hallmark of spring. And Oh my goodness I mean you know. We could name so many that we adore and the question arises you know dead had them getting from people more southern than I am. I've already been getting like do I have to dead my roadies do I'd after dead. Had My you know Fill in the blank so yeah camelias for more southerly people exactly you know. And that sort of dot dot is like also went to prune them is. When is the right time to prune them? So maybe let's talk about you if you can imagine fast forward in your garden a little bit like some things that you do tidy up. Don't tidy up in the SHRUB department Kind of pertains to their flowering. Don't tie that's that's a good one you rose by a rea- I think some Birgitta. You Know Ogun among one eighth you don't WanNa cut that back because the foliage is what you're grown at for. It has lovely white flowers early and there followed by this. These sort of needle like leaves and Ogun is the gold one and that's a terrific plant so that's actually percipient to don't come back for. I mean you you can cut out the part that's deceased but when I see a percent the ball I just think oh what is going on. And sometimes they have no flowers because the the landscaper has made them into meatballs. Yeah Yeah not a good thing for but other things I mean. Camellias are kind of self cleaning like another. The power's turned brown. And they sort of fall off but you can help that along. Just go to the flowers and just sort of snapped them off and if you need to you can put it. But you know as we're talking thinking the general rule especially for spring flowering things. Is You prune them right after they flower particularly need the whole season to prepare to flower again? Some things like hydrangea panicky. Lada make the flower. You know what they're gonNA flower with through the season but the early things they've made what they're going to use to flower the year before right rarely right after they bloom so in our northern gardens. You know one of the two everywhere. Just a tiny little different. If the best time to lilacs they say is cut some bouquets and enjoy them indoors. And that's your pruning. You know what I mean. It's at the time or right after because by say July two months later or so. They are already beginning that process toward thinking about setting buds for next year. And certainly by fall there Abud. So you don't WanNa do it then and there's a lot of should you dead head lilacs or not dead lilacs and I think i. I think that if you let the fruits develop you really don't get as many flowers at least I don't so I it's a lot of work but I I do think that you know as you said. Cut some for though by the on the on the nightstand. That's the best some things that have fragrances. During the day don't have fragrances at night. Like trigger twenty four seven So cut them and have them on the bedside and then if you haven't cut them all then go round and just you can snap off little fruit. Says they're forming very easy to see their green fruits where the flowers used to be. Or you can take your SA- caters her crooners and cut them off at. If you WANNA prove your Lilac I would prune it down to the first out facing cluster of leads so you want to encourage the Shrub to sort of get a vase shape so so that the next branch doesn't cross with an inner branch or become congested. You want to open it up. And that's that's pretty easy to see if you look at it so when you prune in any case you look to see where the direction what you're leaving behind is likely to sprout and go in right so that you're thinking of the future architecture. That's that's mostly true with a shrub that has alternate clusters of leaves because some of them have in clusters of leaves on both sides. You can actually remove one and encouraged that outpacing growth. My getting confused here. That's not so hard to understand and with the lilacs the other reason I like to Dead head them so to speak. Is that once those fruits as you? Call them those clusters of green. Things are Brown. They look like hell. Let's do you have a big flow reference. You know one that really performed beautifully and then it has this mess right. I'd rather get mother green red right because it's awful and and I don't want to look at that the rest of the season and as you say it may also reduce flowering you know. Some of the energy may be put into the reproductive those seeds but uh so the long reach prunier. I loved one by the company. I have no affiliation with them but I just love their pruning tools. Rsd Longreach Crooner. It's maybe gives gives you an extra while you can get very long ones but I have one. That's maybe four feet and another one that telescopes to six. So I can get a lot of those. Even you know eight nine ten nine feet high can get a lot of those dead heads out of a Lilac which is great.

Germany Bauge ACA SA Brown
What's the Difference Between Turtles and Tortoises?

BrainStuff

05:07 min | 2 months ago

What's the Difference Between Turtles and Tortoises?

"COM welcome to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren. Boko bomb here at some point. Let's just say around two hundred and sixty million years ago earth got turtles. They looked strange. And these our modern mammalian times when lots of things are squishy and unarmored but during the late Permian epoch. Those early turtles were dressed in all the latest fashions. A short sturdy legs bony plates and a stiff splayed crawling strapped. Shortly after turtles made their evolutionary arrival eight fairly standard earth thing happened a mass extinction event. Although mass extinctions have happened with some regularity on our planet this one was a doozy and it wiped out almost all of the life in the oceans and over two thirds of the vertebrates on land. The things that survived had to have been pretty good at survival and it turns out turtles. Were we spoke about email with Laura Smith? A research scientist who specializes in herpetology at the Jones Center each way which is an organization in Newton Georgia that promotes excellence in natural resource management and conservation. She said turtles have a really successful body form. That hasn't changed all that much over time. They retained the primitive shell. Which is a really protective safe body design. Also turtles live in a lot of different habitats. Their aquatic and also terrestrial so living in a lot of different habitats has allowed them to persist. So what's the difference between tortoises and turtles all of the animals alive today that protect themselves with a Shell? Which is basically just a modified ribcage are in the order student. He's collectively we call this group of animals turtles but individually. We might call them different things based on where they live and some morphological and physiological traits. Tortoises are a group that are generally always found on land. Smith said they say that. Not all turtles tortoises but all tortoises are turtles be turtles are organisms with. Shell which might be in water or might be on land. A tortoise is a type of turtle in general both turtles and tortoises as well as other reptiles lay their eggs on land. It's what makes them different from Amphibians which need water for egg-laying end at least part of their life cycle because tortoises are a type of turtle. It's difficult to lay down hard and fast rules about what makes something tortoise ish rather than turtles but in general tortoises are always found on land whereas turtles can be found in aquatic or marine habitats as well as Land Smith said turtles and tortoises look different because of where they live a seat hurdle is only found in the ocean the females are the only ones that come on land and that's just eggs they have four legs but the front legs are almost like wings or paddles. They're not great for moving around on land at all because they're adapted for swimming quickly. Their shells have a low flat profile for cutting through the water. Compare that to a Galapagos Tortoise for example whose body can weigh up to nine hundred twenty pounds. That's almost four hundred twenty kilos with stocky elephantine legs a high dome. Shell and big scales on their exposed skin to protect them from predators and they wouldn't last long in the ocean but luckily they don't have to. The Smith said for the most part. There's not really one characteristic that tells you whether something is a tortoise or turtle but it's pretty clear if you see a little turtle on the side of the road and it has a sort of flattened shell profile webbed feet in the back smooth skin and some brighter colors. That's going to be a turtle tortoise. Have a heavier more dome? Shell and subdued colors as usual. The terminology can be confusing Box Turtles for instance which are widespread in the United States in Central America? And don't really swim or spend much time in the water. But they're still considered turtles rather than tortoises and then there are the terrapins. Which is the name given to aquatic turtles in the United Kingdom in the US aquatic turtles are just called hurdles with the exception of the diamondback terrapin which lives in brackish water in tidal marshes in the eastern United States? Both tortoises end hurdles have made themselves at home on this planet. We find both on every continent other than an Arctic with one exception. There are no tortoise species native to Australia. Smith said

Laura Smith United States Lauren Terrapins Research Scientist Australia United Kingdom Newton Georgia Jones Center Central America
Scientific Hiccup

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

06:03 min | 2 months ago

Scientific Hiccup

"All Welcome to kiss Miss Misery. Sime your host kit chrome hoping you're healthy and staying sheltered in place today. I'm going to talk about scientific hiccups and I'll begin with the woolly mammoths arose about five point. One million years ago in Africa according to the curator at the American Museum of Natural History in New York from Africa the mammoth migrated throughout Europe Asia North America. Their evolution continued over millions of years eventually producing the woolly. Mammoth we know today. They began roughly two hundred fifty thousand years ago. Mammoths went extinct about ten thousand years ago. Hoops that's the first scientific hiccup more like three thousand five hundred years ago. Scientists now believe in isolated population of mammals persisted on Wrangel Island off northeastern eastern Costa Siberia and deep in Canada's Northwest Territory and World Heritage Site than Hani Valley. They were there until about three thousand seven hundred years ago. The ten thousand year more of extinction is in most textbooks though. But let's take a closer look at that date. The prominent theory that made it into most textbooks and the cyclopes. Pedia is ten thousand years ago because it was believed for decades at the mammoth migrated from the African continent through Eurasian orth America driven by the last ice age. What scientists called police to seen ice age following the food supply? If that's the case that it makes sense that some ended up in the valley because it was never touched by the last ice age and yes sponsor the mammoth have actually been found in that region. But this isn't the first theory published in a textbook as fact that is founded. It's been believed yes. Baited into text books that the continent of at Artika has been covered by ice for millions of years again. Oops scientific hiccup. The Perry reese map drawn in. Fifteen thirteen shows a northern coast of Antarctica. Ice-free the most puzzling aspect of the map isn't how it managed to be so accurate three hundred years before and articles discovered but that the map shows the real coastline under the ice geological. Evidence has confirmed. How could that have happened or been charted in an ice free age four thousand years ago which is what science states? That was the last time that Arctic was ice free officials. Science has been saying all along that the ice cap which covers the Antarctic is millions of years old. The Perry reese at Arctic amount shows it the northern part of that continent has been mapped before the ice covered it that could make us think it has been mapped a million years ago but that's impossible since mankind did not exist at that time. Furthermore accurate studies have proven that the last period of ice-free condition in that Arctic area the northern tip ended about six thousand years ago the question is who mapped Queen Maud Land of Antarctica. Six thousand years ago which unknown civilization had the technology or the need to do that. I want to state at this point. That the Perry map has been validated as being real and brought back to that data. Fifteen thirteen it is not a about that which made twenty years. I pushed office something true. I want to touch on just one. More scientific kick up nestled in the ancient city of Papun Kabul. Libya are stone blocks that were used to make up a series of pyramids each block. Wade from two hundred to four hundred tonnes. Nothing unusual there. The city dates back to five three six ad yet. The blocks are riddled with carved indentations and in the surrounding grasses were found giant staple liked clamps. That it in place and we're used to hold the blocks together. Wait a minute. How could the indigenous people with no knowledge of metallurgy have created these clamps and worded the metal used for them? Come from? But this isn't the only case of clamps be used to hold giants Jones together and Cambodia's Angor Watt giant sandstone blocks way nearly two tonnes were brought to the side of the temple from a nearby mountain bias. Here's waterways close inspection. The stones that are scattered around the side has revealed carved indentations receptacles for metal clamps. Says kind of interesting. How about an eerie coincidence? Just outside the magnificent ruins of anger. What Stanton Asian Pyramid temple known as boxy CAM gone now from? Cambodia travel eight thousand miles to Guatemala and the ancient Mayan city of Tacoma all among the long forgotten structures at to call is the temple of the Jaguar although the Cambodian pyramid is much smaller than the pyramid Guatemala. The similarities between the specific design features are uncanny both these ancient structures have an unusually steep slope angle that don't exist in other pyramids or temples however most importantly they both feature a stepped formation. There's a massive stairwell going up to the middle of both temples and there's a domed area located on top once there you could see. There's a small door goes inside the pyramid and there's another internal structure that looks the same basically. What you have here is an ancient civilization in Cambodia and another in Mesoamerica despite the fact that they are separated by more than nine thousand miles away featuring credible similarities that no one has been able to explain. Thus my idea of being a scientific hiccup because when you read in the textbooks is different than what facts

Perry Reese Cambodia Africa Stanton Asian Pyramid Temple Pyramid Guatemala American Museum Of Natural His Europe New York Pedia Artika Arctic Guatemala Wrangel Island Papun Kabul Hani Valley Antarctic Tacoma Canada Queen Maud Land
Is the handshake dead?

KCBS Radio Weekend News

03:45 min | 3 months ago

Is the handshake dead?

"It a symbol for the handshake is dad the handshake is not dead at least I hope not it's on hold temporarily until the world as well again welcome to the attic attrition Napier Fitzpatrick is founder of the etiquette school of New York I often say I teach knives and forks and hand shakes because that's how important handshakes are ingredients merry Jackson struggling engineering a good grip you have Danaher yes there is a proper technique when simply extends ones right arm toward the other person gripping web too well and you shake from the elbow one two two Smith pops holding firmly but not a bone crusher and not a limp noodle I once read about little remembered president Benjamin Harrison of the late nineteenth century a critic of his said he had a hand shake like a wilted petunia oh my you see the people remember your hand shakes the instrumental part of your first impression this is a very primal sort of a connection very emotional David givens is an anthropologist with Gonzaga university in Spokane Washington he says the handshake reaches back sixty million years to pansies and roses do much the same thing they they long for tactile contact they basically reach out with the forelimbs and especially with the poem so it's not an accident that we greet each other by shaking hands no because hands of all the neurological circuitry in emotional the parts that we need to make good contact with our fellow humans and throughout human history I haven't grasped that sealed the bargain the handshake it's been an expression of peace and forgiveness alas it is also as we've learned an excellent delivery vehicle for germs the casual handshake is pretty much of present a dead the formal handshake were closing a business deal this I think will remain but the the precautions beforehand you may even use a thin glove well to make the handshake Miriam radi the last Thursday of June is what national handshake day used to be anyway Miriam radi of Brody professional development in Jenkintown Pennsylvania he's such a fan of hand shaking she created national handshake day in two thousand four my personal pet peeve is the macho cowboy A. K. I don't want to hurt the little lady or or you know and you know I just want to kind of give you a little group here I demand respect and I would like a firm grip she knows that this June's celebration will have to be virtual I feel like if the handshake is gone that would be very sad for me personally but even if we can't touch David givens says we'll still use our hands what he calls our emotional smart parts to communicate good will and a good example is the plains Indian greeting where you raise your own home out in China the other person from a distance the eyes are going to be especially important now because that's how we're going to communicate warmth and trust perhaps we'll look to Asia for

Reacting to the Nintendo Direct Mini

Nintendo Voice Chat

08:59 min | 3 months ago

Reacting to the Nintendo Direct Mini

"We recorded yesterday's episode and then the direct just dropped out of nowhere on Thursday morning which is responsible very typical. Yeah it's not. It's not very typical though right because like usually Nintendo the day before will at least tweet out like. Hey there's a direct coming tomorrow or you know like hey there's a direct coming in two days but this is kind of unprecedented for them to just be like okay here. It is and it's it's odd because right you know. Usually they count on that to like bring in a bunch of people to watch that that premier live. I honestly thought it was really strange this morning to wake up and see like. Oh Nintendo just dropped thirty news games. Once as you. I see you could probably tell that. I'm a little annoyed because usually back as you can hear Zach Ryan joining us also chiming in right now. Is Brian Alto? But we're also joined because Casey is busy today by Seth Macy Long Distance. So while Brian what are you going to say I was GONNA say I meant typical in that. Nbc recorded yesterday and news broke after when you listen to the regular episode of NBC. This week you'll also hear a say hilarious things like I can't believe there's no borderlands on switch that's crazy why would there not be borderlands on switch and then literally less than twenty four hours later borderlands was switched? So you'll get that We are digging into this L. Let's just jump in. We're going to be going down our roundup article which you can find. You can actually go to this random article on. I dot Com to see all of the announcements as well as a poll. That's asking you. What your favorite reveal was from the tender direct so you can check that out but let's start at the top With the Smash Bros announcement which was kind of like a little bit of a half announcement right. They announced that the first fighter in the second fighter pass is going to be an arms character arriving in June and revealed in June. But we don't know which character yet and they need more time for which I bet it's a punch man a better man as the character that us. I was thinking fist girl. What else what about the other one might be showing perils? My was. They're leaving it open because it's going to be one of those things like like the Kupa lanes where every skin is a different character. Probably GONNA be the same arms fighters or something but I mean everybody was clamoring for more arms news so it makes sense that this would come be nice. People like people like the day like the like really like aren't arm team. This is a character like A. I'm not really like it's not a character. I'm disappointed to see Smash Bros and it's what I kind of thought that they were going to do in the first fighter pass anyway. It's it's certainly leads me to believe that. They're they're really still thinking about making arms a franchise. You know what I mean like. They said that like well development is still happening on arms to while they didn't say arm sue but they did hint that they're working on a sequel to arms legs. Chocking thank you so that was kind of shocking to me because I feel that game kind of came and went so fast it sold well and I think it like stuck around for a little bit but this this does. This news feels few years too late. I'm with you guys on that like I think if they had announced this character Few months after the launch it would have made a little bit more sense but I was going to be sorry. I was the protein shakes. I assumed that are there. Anonymous character was going to be the best game. I was surprised when the same kind of seems like a no brainer to put it like in the first round but it seems very weird to put it here in this third round of characters so the good thing is like they're they're coinciding with the allowing players to play the entire game for free for a little while. Which is I think. A smart move. It's basically a free switch game that you can download immediately and I think you know a Free First Party. Switch game Temporarily air quotes. But I think that's pretty awesome. Even if I didn't super get into that game us Mr Smash Redman Right now but like I'm not like overly crazier excited about the idea of like arms character but I am excited about the prospect of what an arms character as a smash. Bros fighter would be like. I think that character could be really fun to play. Yeah like I think that that it would be a a a nice medium distance character. You know like a lot of like good good. Reach a lot of great recovery probably. Yeah I interested as a fighting cared. I'm interested in it as a fighting game. I just think it's a weird move in terms of like their overall oeuvre at this point but because I I kind of assumed that nintendo would would do arms and see the reception and then just like okay. Well we tried that. Once we're bacteria we had small technical issues there but we're back to talk now about Zena bed Conoco's definitive addition We got a release date for this. May Twenty ninth. They also just like showed off a bunch of the game. This was sort of the headliner. aside from polk Amman. I think it's thing they spent the most time on this. Yup I've I've said my piece about Zena Blade chronicles on this show. I'M GONNA JUST YOU. Y'All go ahead and talk about this game. I'm good who is played it because I missed it back in the day. I also missed it back in the day. I played it. Okay your first one Brian. Yeah Yeah are you like did. Did you like what you saw here in terms of re master and definitive edition? Whatever they want. I mean this is like while I probably won't dive into this. This is obviously gigantic news. For people who love this game This is a highly beloved game that will take hundreds of hours finish and putting that on switches. Never bad news Personally it's not something. I'm really intrigued about but every time I've sort of been like oh who's even excited about this. Millions of people are like us and so I will just say I am happy for all of you who are happy for this game even though it's not for me personally Good luck and Godspeed. I hope you enjoy your fun time with the video game coming this year but I will say I'm really am excited that we just have another mainline. Switch Game. Release date this year. Like that's exciting to me But beyond that. I'm excited because when I was asking about if I should start seeing a blade chronicles two million years ago. The thing from people as you should really play the first one I but it's also not worth going. It's like it's more trouble than it's worth to go back to it because it's kind of an aged game so seeing this as like looking pretty much just as good as chronicles to now makes me want to be like. Oh Yeah I I can actually play this. Which is which is really exciting. Yeah I think the graphically like the overhaul looks gorgeous. The character models look really really good. The environments look really good. I think that the one thing that I really liked about chronicles to the ten hours that I spent with it was like it's just insane to see that expansive sort of open world those kinds of areas on the switch. No game does it anywhere near that good except for maybe breath of the wild so. Brian said I think it's really cool for fans of Zeno Blade. I'm stoked that they're get a chance to free. Play this one of the most exciting announcements for a lot of people at least gen our calm according to our poll was Two K Games announced their K. Announced that a bunch of there are coming so we're getting the bioshock collection which is a shock. One two and infinite. We're getting borderlands legendary collection and we're getting X. come to the X. Come to collection but that's really just like it in it's steel see Vats THREE SERIES. That are fantastic. All coming to switch and like on also on May Twenty Ninth. So this is like really. That's really cool thing. That's once that's like huge support from two K ma. My only concern here is that I hope that the bioshock collection that they're putting out for switch has been retooled since it was released for xbox and ps four there was awesome right really serious issues with that collection in even now like my friend just replayed through Bioshock two and she had like a bunch of glitches in issues and stuff in in the bioshock collection. So I'm hoping that that it's been ironed out before or will be ironed out before it comes to the

Brian Alto Nintendo Smash Bros Zach Ryan Mr Smash Redman NBC First Party Polk Amman Bros Casey Zeno Blade Seth Macy Vats
US indicts Venezuela's Maduro on narcoterror charges

Rush Limbaugh

03:44 min | 3 months ago

US indicts Venezuela's Maduro on narcoterror charges

"I don't know if you've heard this story that broke this morning the trump administration filed criminal charges against are you ready against the president Venezuela including senior officials and some of the charges are broken down here on getting this from several sources are all just like flying in at once C. N. B. C. New York times time magazine USA today this fox news everything's being pummeled Nicolas Maduro and members of his inner circle have been charged for converting Venezuela's state into a criminal enterprise at the service of drug traffickers and terrorist groups and cartels if you were thinking last night if you were driving around and you were thinking gosh it's been a crazy time in America I wonder what will top everything that's going on in America the the big give aid package which we're gonna break down for you because I know people have been waiting for this Nancy and and and team Schumer de railed on Monday people were very frustrated in fact we have a sound bite of Ted Cruz coming up and he was really frustrated about it but we're back on track with that we're gonna tell you what's happening there but would you have thought in a million years that you'd wake up this morning and you would hear that there are indictments from Miami and New York prosecutors which will encompass money laundering and drug trafficking charges it'll be announced at a news conference sometime today by U. S. Attorney General William Barr the U. S. is also expected to announce twenty five million dollars in rewards for information leading to the arrest or prosecution of Maduro holy moly this is this is big this is big but again all I can think of in my head when I see something like that promises kept Thomas is capped I remember president trump when he was campaigning someone ask him what if a government is involved in drugs remember that question of one of the debates what if it's a government because on more than one occasion president Donald Trump is mentioned you know we can't have drugs coming in from here we can't have people in this country or that country looking the other way and someone said well what you gonna do if it's another country he said we're going to go after anyone who is hurting the American people and and putting poison into our country well damn there it is now there is a cartel known as the cartel of sons and according to this indictment unsealed this morning under Maduro's leadership the president of Venezuela the cartel sought and I'm quoting from the indictment not only to enrich its members and enhance their power but also to flood the United States with cocaine and inflict the drug's harmful and addictive effects on users throughout America the indictment also states and other cartel members along with Maduro we're prioritizing using cocaine as a weapon against America and importing as much cocaine as possible the criminal charges said Maduro personally negotiated multi ton shipments of coke coordinated with Honduras and other countries so I'm gonna I'm gonna say that's a big headline I'm gonna put that in my big headlights

President Trump Venezuela
Coronavirus: Unmasking the Facts

Science Vs

07:28 min | 3 months ago

Coronavirus: Unmasking the Facts

"It's been a week of social distancing for me. I finished a puzzle I cooked for the first time in a million years. Well I put more than three ingredients into a ball for overnight arts. I was pretty proud of myself. And like a lot of S. I was glued to news about this corona virus and I kept coming across questions around to specific things. Ibuprofen and mosques. So that's what we're diving into today. Some reports are saying that ibuprofen. The stuffing advil is making people with corona virus sicker and they should steer clear of the drug. So what's going on there but vast we want to talk about mosques we're hearing a lot about shortages healthcare workers that didn't have enough mosques and other. Ghia to keep them safe in Italy more than thirty five hundred healthcare workers have already gotten the virus in the US. We heard from those who worried they would be next. He's one of few of them told us they've told us that they're only going to give one mask every five days. What they're having a stew is really wear the same dirty mask over and over and over again and if we need a new mask we have to go in. Show the old one to our supervisor to prove why it needs to be thrown away. We get handed in ninety five mess. And we're supposed to keep them in bags and put our names on them and reuse them through today this moment we are already rationing or as a few days ago. Got to a point where almost completely out and we had to start using some of our masks and gowns horrifying. We're all completely horrified. We feel like we are soldiers being sent to war without the protective equipment that we need. A lot of people are scared to go to work all. This is starting to sound awful. So how important are these mosques? Healthcare workers and is it that bad to reuse them for this. We called up. Professor Ryan McIntyre an infectious disease expert at the University of New South Wales Australia. Hello Hello so let me. Just Reina has led several clinical trials looking at how Moscow's protect healthcare workers from respiratory viruses. And she's found that the best kind the one that healthcare workers need the end ninety. Five's you might have heard of these reina. Kohl's them respirate a mosques. They're the ones that look like. They kind of molded over your nose and mouth and how they feet. It's actually potted them magic. The way you can tell is a respirator. Fits tightly around? The face doesn't allow the leakage of air and health. Care workers should wear resprayed and Rhino. She has the data to show. How good these puppies? All in one of her studies. She took more than three thousand healthcare workers in Beijing and found that after a month those given in ninety five mosques had roughly half the infection rate of workers using those classical surgical mosques like the ones. You might see the dentist now. Not all studies have found this. But Reina's Ah some of the largest and best in this space what healthcare work is really need in this pandemic. Those ninety five respirator style mosques but as we heard from healthcare workers in some places on enough to go around. There's been a lot of talk of a healthcare workers having to reuse mosques sometimes for multiple days in a row. How risky is that? It probably carries some risk because Musket Contaminated. They get moist. And that's not good for you because bacteria can grow in a moist environment. But it's got no choice. That's like a really difficult dilemma. One solution to the shortage is to not only reuse mosques but to disinfect them so to find out what might work producing. Rose Rim learn. I'm cold up an expert in this very fields. My name is Rachel. Jones and my specialty area is actually around the exposures of healthcare workers to viral respiratory infections. That's that's handy it is Rachel. Who'S AT THE UNIVERSITY OF UTAH. Told us that she'd been hearing of all kinds of things that doctors and nurses we using disinfect. Their respirators there was alcohol. Sprays bleach which we know can kill the virus. But you have to be careful so you don't breathe in a face full of bleach other places have been experimenting. With you irradiation. It can be used to disinfect respirators. And so you can. You can disinfect them. Yes that's great surprise their challenges and they haven't all been I think proven to work as robustly as we'd like them to work and it's not clear that you know all the healthcare facilities have the processes in place studies in the lab using special machinery have found that viruses can be killed with UvA radiation. But Rachel says a lot of hospitals in the US out set up for this kind of thing at the moment and so another idea has been popping up making mosques out of cloth like sometimes t shirt material yes. Crofting is joining the war movement. Some hospitals even calling on. Diy Croft as to so mosques to shore up the supply but can cloth. Stop a virus. Well Rachel says put down you needles and thread a lot of materials. Just aunt made to stop viruses space like think of teasha material. We liked t shirts because they airy and they don't make a sweat too much in viruses can roll right through them all those properties that we like in our T. shirt. Make them problematic to use as a mask. Because small particles have been demonstrated in experimental studies to move readily through cloth that is used asks like abandoned or a t-shirt the only clinical trial that we have on cloth mosques which had around a thousand doctors nurses found that they didn't work and in that study actually increased risk of viral infections. We don't know exactly why it's so interesting that the CDC has recommendations at say okay in dire straits it's like their last resort like if it's really dire straits it's a crisis there's nothing else you can wear cloth mask as a healthcare worker. Executive Vice. I don't think that's a good advice. I was really surprised that that came out as a recommendation as where some of my colleagues were saying to each other. Well mostly kind of snacking. Our foreheads going. Oh no mostly. We were just surprised because there really is no scientific evidence that That using a class mass offers any benefit to suggest. A cloth mask is is not based on science. And so it's important to separate out what is the science based type of controls. And what is the shortage based type of

Rachel Reina United States Ibuprofen Advil Ghia Utah Supervisor University Of New South Wales Kohl Moscow Beijing Rose Rim Executive Professor Ryan Mcintyre
Counting a star's birthday candels

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

01:39 min | 3 months ago

Counting a star's birthday candels

"There are many ways to count the candles on the star's birthday cake to star clusters that are in the western evening sky at this time of year provides two examples messy eight thirty four is in the constellation Perseus it's about halfway up the sky in the west northwest at nightfall well to the upper right of Venus the evening star and messy eight thirty six is higher in the sky in a raga it's to the left of the yellow orange star capella M. thirty six is the younger of the two clusters less than twenty five million years old one way astronomers came up with that number is by measuring lithium in a specially small cool stars stars begin life with just a smattering of lithium and it's quickly destroyed by the stars nuclear reactions more massive stars burn through their lithium faster than less massive stars so by measuring the amount of the element in stars of different weights they can come up with an estimate of a clusters H. in this case about twenty two million years astronomers you stars at the opposite end of the eight scale to measure the age of M. thirty four they used quite towards the small dead cores of once normal stars stars of different masses burn out at different times with heavier stars going first and they leave white dwarfs that have different mixtures of chemical elements for the white dwarfs in M. thirty four indicate an age of about two hundred twenty five million years a good match to the other techniques used to count the stars birthday candles we have much more

How do I work from home? Tips from the experienced

WSJ Tech News Briefing

12:04 min | 3 months ago

How do I work from home? Tips from the experienced

"Friday night. It's normally date night but not right now. Since the current virus outbreak social distancing has made dating nearly impossible keyword nearly our tech reporter. Georgia wells will join us to explain how people are using tack to try and find that special someone but first congratulations. You've made it to the end of another week of work from home to celebrate as per usual. We're inviting our senior personal tech columnist. Joanna Stern back to share another one of her work from home tech tips. Hey Joanna I'm here again. We're excited you don't ever sound excited. May I mentioned that? That's just I think that's my personality. Okay but I am genuinely deep down. I am excited to be here. Okay okay anyway. That's not the tip for the day. What is today's tip? Yeah so I saved this tip for the end of the week because it's a couple of tips in one and it requires a bit of work. But all of these tips have to do with your. I don't want to say crappy. Say a curse word but your home. Wifi INSERT ADJECTIVE THERE. About how you feel about your home. Wifi usually. It's not very good but there are some things you can do. And right now we are at a moment where our home networks have never been taxed so much and that is a lot from this streaming video and that is a lot from the video chatting but it's also all of the other activity of people in your house doing things on the network so I have a couple of tips about what you should do. The first one which is kind of a cop out. It's just don't use Wifi at all. So if you can plug in directly to your router get an Ethernet cord. Get a dangle that you can connect your laptop hard part here. Is there sold out everywhere? So best of luck to all of you. Survival of the fittest. You might have it in that box of cables that you have in your closet or in your basement or yes under your bed. Do you probably have the Ethernet Cord? Which is Great? Those have not changed in one million years. You probably don't have the dangle took it up into your laptop probably have a USB laptop. Maybe you had an older or laptop with the regular. Usb issue is that the laptops no longer have ethernet. Jacks so right. Good luck to you. I can't really help on that. But then comes the issue of most people don't want to be chained to their routers and they want to be around their house using. Wi Fi and best hip for people. And this is a good thing to do this weekend. Can you move your Wifi router to the center of the House to the area where you're using it the most for most people that's GonNa be the living room and a kitchen area? Chances are there's a reason your routers in the basement. It was installed there with a by your Internet service provider. And there's not much you can do but try this. It's always a decent solution. My biggest tip is figuring out if you need a new router and I have a couple of tips of this in my column but the biggest thing you can do is walk around your house running speed tests. Us speed test dot net. That's a website or you can download the APP and run the tests and see if there are pockets of the house where you're not getting as good signal and not not as good coverage. Chances are that is probably because your Wifi router is a little bit old and didn't have great range. I'm recommending that people if you have if you've had a Wifi router for around five years or more it's probably time for a new one. These get they. They don't get better every year but every three to five years they take some pretty big leaps and the gadgets. You have get better WIFI chips in them. And those WIFI chips need better routers to take advantage of the faster speeds all of that. You're probably wondering what route or do I recommend. I recommend the euro and you could buy the era by itself. Its Own box which is ninety nine dollars. And that's one router that you have in your house probably like the router you have right now or you can make the euro into a Mesh network system and this is something that has completely changed my life. This is one router and then you can buy these extra routers that you put around your house to create basically a blanket of Wifi for the entire house and it's pretty amazing you can get wi fi in places you thought were complete dead zones forever so yes. I'm suggesting you buy some things. But you don't have to buy them unless you follow the tips to see if you need them. Gotcha I mean and to be clear. We get zero kickbacks. We're not in any kind of business relationship with our. This is just based on your research and reporting your recommendation. Absolutely all right. That is a great tip. I know a lot of people are going to be Trying to work on their WIFI systems over the weekend. So thank you so much for that. We had also put a call out for our listeners to ask US questions or leave us their own work from home hassles challenges. What you've been listening to some of these. Tell me. Have you learned anything this week. I've learned so much this week and I want to encourage more people to call in because we are here for you. But you're kind of here for us too because they bring so much joy to us some of these comments and these these messages are not only funny. But they're insightful. So please call in. I'll give that number in a couple of seconds but I like this call. We got a lot from Jeremy. He's a student at the University of Minnesota where classes have been pushed completely online. Like everything else right now. I work from home. I have is not to do your work and your bed because you associate that place with sleeping and it makes you a lot more less productive and especially at University of Minnesota all online. It gets really difficult to God's side when it's cold and it's hard to find a space but even if it means getting your kitchen or your living room just take those online classes or do your work outside of your bedroom. That was a great tip from Jeremy. Doman are Joanna. If people want to reach out to you to share their own work from home tech tips or ask questions how should they reach out they should either email me at Joanna dot stern at wsj.com or they can leave us a message at our work from home? Tech hotline number is three one four six three five zero three eight eight excellent and we will be putting that number as we have all week in our show notes and the description. So you don't have to rewind and write it down you can just scroll into your APP and see it right there. Doing thank you so much. Have a great weekend all right after the break. Our TECH REPORTER. Georgia wells will be with us to tell us about some of the creative ways that people have used technology to keep dating in the age of social distancing. That's coming up next. We see breakthrough medicines getting to patients in record time at Emerson when issues become inspiration. Creating a better world isn't just a result. It's a responsibility. Emerson considerate solved. Sh- I've a little poem to share with you. All roses are red violets are blue. We're staying inside and social. Do that comes to you. Courtesy of our producer. Amanda llewellyn social. Distancing has changed almost every aspect of our lives these days going to the gym shopping at the grocery store and of course dating because now that those restaurants bars are closed which are the most popular date locations. People are having to find new ways to try to meet their special someone or just stay by themselves all the time. They don't WanNa do that. So they're using tack of course here to explain our tech reporter Georgia Wells. She is in San Francisco. Georgia thank you so much for joining us from very safe social distance of three thousand miles away. Thank you for having me are. A So Georgia dinner. Movie date not going to happen in the foreseeable future. What are people doing instead? Dating APP usage is through the roof. People are doing face timing. They're turning to dating APPS. The video function on dating APPs as also getting a lot of us and people are also trying to watch movies at the same time where they press play simultaneously and then do banter over text message as a way of kind of progressing their relationships while still maintaining the safe distance so I haven't been on dating APPS for awhile. Dating APPS now have video functionality. Some do and those that do are seeing a huge surge in usage prior to this pandemic the video futures weren't as popular a lot of people viewed them as almost as much work as meeting up in person and also. You didn't get to see the person but now there's this kind of obvious use case so there's an APP called say alot. They saw two hundred and fifty percent increase in video. Date sessions in the past two weeks swear they also saw spikes of usage and cities after there were corona virus local hotspots announced then the usage of the video date function would spike so people were basically canceling their real life dates. And saying okay. Let's just meet up on video. Exactly wow okay. So that's a huge jump. Are we seeing specific areas? Where this is happening more New York Montreal. Toronto Denver Los Angeles in particular. San Francisco wasn't on the list at the time. But I imagine it's probably now on the list so I can imagine that video chatting is at least better than just like texting right. At least you're seeing the person in real life or you're seeing them virtually whatever you're seeing them. What are people that you're talking to? How are they finding this? Is it harder to actually figure out if you like someone using video chat instead of meeting up? Yeah there's also a lot of etiquette associated with video chatting and so in the past people often with like give each other a heads up if they're going to video chat maybe someone would wanna put makeup or put on do their hair and put on the outfit and so chatting with the woman in San Francisco the other day. Who's this on the call with this guy who she hopes to meet up with? They couldn't meet out. They did a phone call and then out of the blue. He video chatted her and it was a really shocking moment. She said it was also maybe the new normal video chatting the also the singles. I've been chatting with say that there's a lot of pressure involved because they want to progress their relationships but they also don't want to like make expectations crazies for if they ever do get out of this shelter in state and if they ever can meet up that puts a lot of pressure on the person if they've already chatted with him for hours and hours and hours and also video chatted for hours and hours and hours and then what happens when they finally get to see each other but thanks to the pandemic all of these like norms are now at the window. People are lonely and so people wanna connect more than ever. What is this? What does that mean for the relationships? That are forming. And they're gonNA figure this out but people don't seem to have figured it out quite yet. Are you talking to anyone who is kind of making the quarantine a reason to get together? A lot of people are using it as a pickup line. I don't know if it's necessarily a reason to get together but like I've heard people saying things like didn't you know. Alcohol Kills Corona Virus. Come over to my place or you'd be worth sheltering in place together or funny lines like that. My sense is they're just using that as an excuse. There've been jokes like are they going to be quarantine babies and nine months i. Maybe I don't know but also people are looking for direction on this and it's hard so the dating apps have put up these kind of pop up. Psa's if you will but say like wash your hands off and maintain social distance but for people who aren't already in shelter in place it can be hard to know like what does that actually mean and so New York City's Mayor Bill de Blasio last week with telling people if you are feeling sick. Don't go on a date or if your data's feelings don't go on a date but now that a lot of places are in shelter in place that probably that advice is probably mood because people probably can't meet up at all aright tech reporter Georgia wells stay safe sheltering in place. Thank you you too. And that was your tech news briefing.

Tech Reporter Georgia San Francisco Joanna Georgia Wells Joanna Stern University Of Minnesota Jeremy Emerson Joanna Dot Corona WI Mayor Bill De Blasio New York City Amanda Llewellyn Wsj.Com
Were Turtles Once the Size of Cars?

BrainStuff

02:37 min | 3 months ago

Were Turtles Once the Size of Cars?

"Express. Look them to brainstorm a production of iheartmedia. Hey Rain Stuff. Lauren BOCOM here. Some of our favorite animals used to be bigger. The giant beaver of the Pleistocene was the size of a black bear. And the titanic. Boa was a snake longer than school bus and as big around as a tractor tire. There were hippo sized wombats humongous C- Scorpions and birds of prey. Size of small jets. We still have some giants today like the Blue Whale. The organism currently living on earth is a fungus that stretches some two point four miles. That's three point. Eight kilometers underground in Oregon but newby research published in February of Twenty Twenty in the Journal. Scientific advances beef up our picture. A stupendous geographic as a giant freshwater turtle the size of four door sedan which lived in the coastal wetlands of South America. Between five and ten million years ago before the Amazon River was formed. The study found that the turtle was one hundred times heavier and its closest modern relative and had the largest campus. Or Shell of any turtle ever known this whopping two thousand five hundred pound. Goliath. That's one thousand. One hundred and fifty kilos was also ready for battle. Some campuses were tricked out with front facing horns sitting on both sides of their head. Something scientists haven't seen before in prehistoric Turtles Marcello Sanchez director of the Paleontological Institute and Museum at the University of Zurich said in a press. Release the two Shell. Types indicate that two sexes of stupendous existed males with horns shells and females with hoernlund shells. Their shells were also covered in big scars and puncture marks suggesting a few things about dependence. These big brutes were fighters the males and females did look different and the males might have even fought each other for access to the females. The horns also have come in handy in fighting off another unspeakably hefty freshwater. Animal the purse. Soroush which was came in a group of reptiles related to alligators. That weighed nine. Point three tons and required ninety pounds or forty kilos of food a day just to get by all. Those dependence geographic was first described in the mid nineteen seventies. The current study has revised what we know about the size and abby distribution and ecology of this turtle beast because the vast wetlands of prehistoric Venezuela and Colombia could support such a heavy duty. Team of reptiles stupendous and her source. Probably duked it out until their ecosystem could no longer

Twenty Twenty Lauren Bocom BOA Amazon River South America Paleontological Institute And Blue Whale Oregon Marcello Sanchez University Of Zurich Newby Research Soroush Venezuela Director Colombia
'Wonderchicken' fossil reveals ancestor of today's birds

Mark Levin

00:25 sec | 3 months ago

'Wonderchicken' fossil reveals ancestor of today's birds

"A tiny fossil nicknamed wonder chicken has been discovered a new university of Cambridge study in the UK reports it's the oldest fossil of a modern bird dating from the age of dinosaurs the fossil includes a nearly complete skull hidden inside pieces of rock dating to more than sixty six million years ago this is less than one million years before the asteroid impact that killed off all of the large

UK University Of Cambridge
Flight Lines: The Heroic Story of Two Migratory Shorebirds

Published...Or Not

07:43 min | 3 months ago

Flight Lines: The Heroic Story of Two Migratory Shorebirds

"Have someone sitting opposite me just twitching to tell his story. The book is flat. Lines and the author is Andrew Dobson Andrew. Welcome to three C- I thank you. David I'm curious about the would twitching. I haven't really made a close study of twitching despite writing. This book. Twitching is a word that is used by dedicated. Some say obsessive Burgers and sometimes they detractors to Indicate their preoccupation with finding the next bird. An observing bird minded research. Because it's not actually mentioned in the book the twitching behavior of Howard Medhurst who was one of the leading birdwatchers in the nineteen fifties and sixties. But this book in other words is about birds or in particular one species of birds the grey plover a daoist wallflower of the shorter dance. It spreads thinly around the world's margins and is often overlooked. What's the fascination with the Gripe Lot? Well let's start by working our way towards the bird from what we are. Probably the closest bird that we know to this is the masked left wing. It's often colder plaza. But it's sexually left wing but that's what we know as a plot now go through that gate and think about the kinds of things that the left wing does transfer them to the tidal flats of the world the far-flung tidal flats of the world. And there's this small bird not much begun a blackbird gray when it's out of the breeding grounds highly colored up when it gets to the breeding grounds and it is commonly found with others in the group of Long Distance Flying Margaret lowrie shore. Birds the ultramarathons birds. Now when you say ultra-marathon sort of distance are we talking so the two birds that I particularly follow which were satellite tag in South Australia and flew north on the first flight. Each of them flew over the entirety of Australia of Indonesia the Philippines to land one of them in Taiwan and the other in southern China so each of them took a nonstop flight of more than seven thousand kilometers. Just to give us a sort of indication in layman's terms. When you're holding this bird. How much are you holding? Well you're holding about a cup of sugar not a big white. You're holding something that really can be quite placid in the hand. Despite its wildness. And you're holding. I guess the promise of many generations of optic life birdlife and they transcend boundaries in many ways in the journey. We've got apple tree boundaries as people on borders and they bicycling cross all of those hemispheres international borders and such like. It's it's quite a phenomenal feet. If you want to get carried beyond the trivialities of human life like borders then migratory long distance migratory birds are a really good way to start because there will pass through the margins of many countries but is not off one eye and they have total disregard for human borders. Now one of the things that the book sort of touches on as you look this journey other various forms of tagging that have occurred or the ability to follow from banding to rocket nets and now two satellites. The satellites would give you an inordinate amount of opportunity to try and be particular about what you say quite revelatory. They are Give you almost near real time information. About where on the planet this bird is and what it's doing even because if you have a lucrative say on a breeding ground you'll see it move from point to point to point as it fades and then goes back to the central point which is the nest So yes it can be unrivaled information and It really is hugely illuminating. As opposed to the banding which was more happenstance abandoning as the book suggests started in the lighting hundreds. But that would rely on. Someone actually catching the Buddha game. We'll exactly Either catching the again or killing it or finding a dead. The doyen of Australian Migratory Schubert's studies like Clive Minton when he lived in England. Has I band on? A migratory shortbread was on a lovely good coach spotted. Red Shank and he was really pleased to have it in hand really priest to put the band on it and some weeks later he got the band back because it had been shot by the mayor of putting your in France who returned the band with the address on to Clive. Now a couple of things fascinated me about. The birds are reading this book. I'm the song lines. There's a connection here with an indigenous song. Lawn is moving up. Moving from group to group and changing as guides and there's an equivocal mention of what the birds was well yes we'll I'm careful to not impose my description on indigenous cultures. But I hope that I have drawn out of the records of indigenous couches The great variety of names. This bird has as it travels not just from Australia. But through China up to Siberia and across to North America where? It's pretty circum Paula. It has a series of lovely nines. And the they are run there are really illuminating series. Too you know they describe often. I described the bird by its phonetic. Call sometimes they describe it by its coloring in Alaska where I went It was cold emphatic. And that means the scorched bird. But so there's a similarity through the sort of landscape in many ways. Yes depending on which part of the world now for such a fragile creature. They are quite a number of threats in this day and age the threats for the gripe the mind well. We've got a bird here. That has persisted down through evolutionary generations for about one hundred and thirty million years so it's not easily removed from the face of the earth. But while it's doing well other others. In the group of long distance migratory shore birds are not doing so well And as a whole the contracting in numbers. I'm this four that have been listed on Australia's critically endangered list in recent years. Because of the problems they face pardon the analogy but the canary in the coalmine. Well certainly you know I think migratory shore birds. We Stu people generally in Australia particularly and when we look at the coasts we should think about the health of Alco spy. The prison or absence of birds like

Australia Andrew Dobson China Long Distance Clive Minton South Australia David Margaret Lowrie Howard Medhurst Alco Burgers Alaska Paula Taiwan North America Red Shank France Philippines England
Desire and Addiction (Part 2 of 3): Voices of Longing Calling You Home

Tara Brach

09:45 min | 4 months ago

Desire and Addiction (Part 2 of 3): Voices of Longing Calling You Home

"We are discussing tonight. The second part of what's now a three part series on working wisely with desire addiction and I start with Buddhism because the Buddhist talk about the Middle Path as many of you know in approaching desire and it's to me desire with without any grasping but living at fully living fully what our hearts are experiencing with an open heart and wide open hand. I mean I love the cartoon of a dog and the caption is Zenda dreaming of a medium-sized bone. So this is our opening to exploring Some more work with desire and addiction and in the Buddhist cosmology one of the universal psychic domains is called the realm of the Hungry Ghost and the hungry ghosts are being who are drawn pictured with these narrow necks in these large bellies and it represents the fact that the riddled with desire but they're unable to satisfy themselves and really this refers to the universal way that we human suffer that we we all experienced to a degree that sense of something's missing. Now's not enough. I need something more. There's a kind of leaning forward so that the next moment contains with this moment does not and when it's intense it leads to craving and to addiction so whatever the degree of wanting mine that you may discover in yourself grasping when you investigate will take you from the one place where love and awareness and realizations actually possible. It takes us from French. Any amount of wanting and we're not really fully here to contact what we truly long for. I remember a long time ago. I heard a little story of a conversation between a man and God and the man said to God. How long's a million years to and God said a million years to me is one second and then the man said how much is a million dollars to God said well? A million dollars is one penny so the man screwed up his courage he said God. Can I have one of your pennies and we know it that when we're caught in wanting mind we lose sight of what truly matters to our hearts so the key inquiry and we'll explore this in in this class is what drives. Montaigne grasping an addiction and when we examine what we find. Is that under all of them? There's the stress of unmet needs in other words when our needs for belonging for love refueling seen when they aren't met more wired to grasp after some substitutes give us a sense of reward. And we get just enough reward from the substitutes to keep us hooked now some grasping an addiction substitutes are culturally accepted. My for instance. The unmet needs for feeling loved and respected and secured fixate on accumulating wealth or a. Hologram ARE ON POWERING OVER PEOPLE. Control and dominance are maybe in deceptions spinning things. It's assume will happen. Our maybe our substitute is exercise and we over exercise addicted to exercise. I can speak personally that over the years. Jonathan my husband and I've kind of tracked where we go for substitutes and the paired substitute we both end up going towards our combination of caffeine and then over work I mean there's some soothing and and pleasure reward from fuelling productive and we have shifted our caffeine and take over the years. We're both now during Macci which has in many ways as a as a very healthy green tea and it's still a addiction. It's not for us because if I stopped. Let's say tomorrow I'd have headache and I'm attached to it. I wouldn't be as productive so Jonathan because of different challenges of sleeping has decided. He's GonNa try to wean himself an experiment for a month without the Macho. Not so I thought I'd share with you. I just sent him something I encountered. It's a cartoon and it's got these two homeless guys that are sitting on a park bench. One sang to the other. I USED TO BE A. Ceo of a multinational had three homes private jet and then I switched to decaff. So here's the deal with substitutes and substitute gratifications. That are condone. We can still be hooked and we're hooked for good reason. We're afraid of being without them. They satisfy something. But some substitutes as we know are considered bad they're not societally condoned and they cause more obvious harm and this is where we're talking about the addiction to substances to gambling to sex violence to anger and when an addiction to a substitute is not condoned not only. Is there the suffering of the addiction? But then there's the added suffering of social condemnation and self condemnation and we're going to spend some time with this piece here because you might consider if the cause of addiction is UNMET NEEDS. How do you imagine condemnation impacts the addictive patterning? What we find is that it intensifies it it intensifies our needs for feeling worth and value and belonging and then it just drives the cycle of addiction the single most crucial part of healing addiction that I have found in my life and working with others is removing condemnation. I can speak for myself that probably the most challenging addiction for me In My late teens and early twenty s was overeating binge eating at times and really through the years. The single factor that most unhooked me was learning truly the process of self compassion. So that'll be. The focus of this talk is how do we bring compassion to ourselves when we're caught in addiction and it begins for some people are maybe let's say it's most helpful. When there's some understanding about how biologically and psychologically compelling addiction is beyond any sense of our own control. Read you a quote this is Robert Freedman and he's from Cornell Medical College as a psychiatrist I have yet to meet a patient who enjoys being. Addicted to drugs are compulsive overeating. Then it goes on to say we now have a body of research that makes the connection between stress an addiction definitive neuro. Scientists have found that food recreational drugs have a common target in the reward circuitry of the brain and that the brains of humans and other animals who are stressed undergo biological changes that makes them more susceptible to addiction now. Stress is a kind of a vague big word. So let's let's anchor this little bit. What happens when the brain is stressed by UNMET NEEDS? So let's say as a young child. You've been neglected or abused and what that does is it creates biological changes in the brain that the animal make you more susceptible to addiction and the way it happens. Is that that stress. As a young child creates fewer dopamine receptors. At means that you then become more driven to seek substitute rewards to compensate rewards like Saxon Food and money and drugs because they release dopamine and they have a sense of pleasure so craving fixate on behaviors that will light up the pleasure centers in the brain. And here's what happens. After that. In time the brain rewires and the use of the substitutes further decreased the number of receptor. So it takes more and more to get a reward and the craving gets stronger. In other words this less sensitivity to the rewards also and I didn't know this 'til recently with less dopamine receptors due to that stress. There's less activity in the prefrontal. Cortex which means that impairs critical thinking and the capacity for restraint

Dopamine Caffeine Zenda Saxon Food Montaigne Macci CEO Jonathan Robert Freedman Cornell Medical College
"million years" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

07:51 min | 5 months ago

"million years" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"Meat. I'm Mark Post Post. I am chief scientific officer of Motza meet startup that aims to commercialize cultures mute remembered the prediction that Winston Churchill may back in nineteen thirty one. One that could be grown in a lab. You might say that Mark Post is a man who's taken up that challenge. poche was a professor fester in the medical school at University in the Netherlands in two thousand and sex when he was asked to help out with a study that was being funded by the Dutch government lament the idea was to place muscle cells in a nutrient rich serum and encouraged US cells to grow into muscle so like fibers are many medical applications for this. What but the Dutch researchers looking beyond Madison? They he believed that. If you can turn animals stem cells into muscle fibers. You can actually grow synthetic meet in the lab. It could be the best has to both work real neat. That doesn't require a real animal now. I thought it was a great idea and I was also ready involved in tissue engineering for medical purposes and the more I learned about the problems with meat production in the next thirty five years. The more enthusiastic I became about this entire project not only scientifically but also for its suicidal impact. There were scientific hurdles that still had to be overcome but the main obstacle was money. They would need lots of it to scale up produced cell base meat for commercial mass consumption. It didn't help when in two thousand hasn't nine. The Dutch government withdrew funding for the project and basically the language that the government used. We don't see any commercial interest from companies companies in this kind of triggered me. I said well you know this is such a great idea. We need to be able to get this across the general population. So let's make make a sausage from a pig presented to the press while the pig is honking around on the stage and so that was kind of the image was for me was a very unusual kind I thought because I I just basically was a biomedical scientists but I was so frustrated. Is You know W- we'll show them. We needed quite a bit of money to do that. That wasn't really lying around so we had to wait until we got that money and then kind of out of the blue. That was a year and a half or two years later the office of Sergei Brin approached. Just me and said we want to talk to you about this project that you're doing and when we come over Sergei brand is one of the co founders of Google but while marked post had of course heard of people you've never heard of Sergei Graham so when Brennan's representative came came calling post had no idea who he was dealing with post told his visitor about his idea of creating a so based sausage and holding a press conference or the pig on the stage and the representative of Sergei Brennan said. Oh Yeah we will support that. How much money do you need and body set off a couple plus million would be fine Indian? We got the money that we needed to make. That event happened so suddenly Mark Post I had all the money he needed to make his cell meet prototype and the money came with only one string attached tugay brand. Dan wanted a hamburger on the stage. Not a sausage well that was basically a not a request but the demand from Sergei Britain. If you're going to do this it has to be a hamburger not sausage. It's an American thing and that was actually quite fortunate. I think because environmental impact impact of beef is actually a lot higher than that of pork and so on August fifth twenty thirteen. The first I sell Burger was ready to be unveiled at a press conference in London. The event was carried live around the world and included a taste test by food critic. Who of course very gratifying moment? That you because you you have been living up to this for two three years and to finally make that happen was was the big thing so I was pretty happy throughout. It was also a little bit nerve wracking because we had no idea how to tasters basically would respond onto it if they would spit out. Say Yuck this is nothing like we expected or if they would be at least somewhat positive about it we had no idea so that was nerve wracking thing but all in all the whole event went pretty well and I wasn't even noticeably nervous but somebody told me I was tapping my fingers continuously on a desk so Hawaii. Apparently I was the world's first. Cellular Burger got good reviews from the food critic but most of the press coverage focused on cost cost not taste the price tag on. That Burger was three hundred and thirty thousand dollars so mark mark post needed to find a way to drive down costs significantly or his cell Burger would remain an interesting science experiment with no commercial potential and more importantly no potential to solve the environmental challenges caused by animal based meat production. So one of the things that makes cell culture extremely expensive is factors Proteins that stimulate cells to grow and day cost like a million euro per gram. Unfortunately you need only very very small amounts but still if you start to grow at large scale. This is US prohibitive but I learned pretty quickly that end feed industry in a completely different industry not the biomedical part. But the feed industry people people are making similar proteins with similar technology for five. You're a programmer for Europe Aram. I thought well if we can do that. And I and the price of the cell culture drops tremendously and then we started to look at more components of this feat for cells. And we realized realized that if you source differently and you make it a little bit of a different composition you can actually make these very cheap type of Takashi in two thousand fifteen mark post started his own company called motion meet to continue his quest to develop affordable cellular alert meet at a commercial scale. Today he says the price of a Cell Burger is down to about fifteen eighteen dollars still too expensive song grocery three stores but he hopes to be able to increase meat production to the point. We can offer it in some higher end restaurants but then a couple of years post and Brown a two of the trailblazer. We're trying to address the enormous enormous environmental challenges. We are facing by leading what could be doric transformation in our eating at indeed indeed the biggest dietary revolution since humans for started eating me two point five million years ago. I'm Walter Walter Isaacson and you've been listening to trailblazers original podcast from Dell technologies for more on any of the guests on today's show. You can head to our website at Dell technologies dot com slash trailblazers. Thanks for listening..

Mark Post Sergei Brennan Sergei Brin Dell representative Sergei Britain Walter Walter Isaacson Winston Churchill Dutch government Burger chief scientific officer Sergei US Madison Netherlands Motza Sergei Graham professor Hawaii
"million years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"million years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Cooling for a couple of million years. This is another one. This is story from glacier, national park now. I'm not sure he ever been there. It's fairly beautiful place. It's on my bucket list of places to go. But glacier, national park in Montana. For several years, has had these signs up around their glaciers around there, little exhibits, you know, they have the, the signs up there to tell you about the certain area and all of this, all of the glaciers that they talk about the little information signs, underneath would say gone by twenty twenty. In saying that, you know, global warming caused this, the, this massive warming and all these glaciers are going to be gone by twenty twenty. Well. Turns out that glaciers, don't know how to read. And the glacier is in glacier, national park and many of the glaciers in Greenland or whatnot. Have actually started re growing. And instead of retreating they're coming back. So officials glacier, national park have begun quietly, removing and altering signs and government literature, which told visitors that the parks glaciers are all expected to disappear by twenty twenty or twenty thirty recent years, National Park Service, prominently, featured brochures signs films. Which boldly proclaimed that all glaciers in glacier, national park or melting away rapidly. But now fficials at the glacier, national park seems to be scrambling to hide to replace their previous hysterical claims. While avoiding any notice to the public that the claims were inaccurate teams from lice Anders. Spooner university visiting the park, a September have noted that glacier, national parks, most famous glaciers like the Grinnell glacier, and that Jackson glacier, appeared to have been growing not shrinking since twenty ten. Oh, jeez. Some of them may have grown at least twenty five percents. Now, see this is this is the left's problem. Is they use. Blanket narratives that all of the glaciers are going to retreat. And by the way, the same things happening in Greenland right now, so Greenland's glaciers are going to go away. It's.

twenty twenty But glacier Grinnell glacier Jackson glacier Greenland National Park Service Spooner university Montana million years
"million years" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

08:39 min | 1 year ago

"million years" Discussed on Post Reports

"For, I think eight charges altogether possession with intent to distribute cocaine possession of a firearm by non violent offender. Just a slew of charges projo, it was hard to think about anything but the prospect of being locked up, and it was a very depressing time to say the least, I remember I slept for at least the first day and a half, and eat anything. I was sick emotionally and physically sick and not from a drug withdrawal. But from realizing the jobs, you really did it this time. And this could potentially be the end for the Dane, twenty fifteen win Joe got out of prison wasn't any better. You know, the day that I got released was just as scary as the day that I got arrested, realizing that it's going to take. Probably the hardest work in your life. If not the absolute hardest work, and your life to make it out here into not go back eighty three percent of former inmates end up back in prison nine years after they're released Joe didn't want to be one of those people. So he did something new read an article about social media about videos, and I said, you know, maybe that could be something that I could do I could actually come home and his possibly focus on creating videos, to, again, showcase what it's like to come home and to really want to do better Josie. Youtube channel is called the after prison show his videos cover all kinds of topics from how to make a prison tattoo to how to readjust to life outside. Hey skipper,.

Joe drug withdrawal cocaine Youtube Josie eighty three percent nine years
"million years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"million years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Now. I mean, he Goodman, President Trump's former personal attorney and fixer Michael Cohen has accused his old boss of committing multiple criminal acts before and after he became president Colin made the charges during more than five hours of explosive public testimony on Capitol Hill Wednesday, he provided evidence that Trump had violated campaign. Finance laws by paying hush money to women he accused the Trump foundation of committing fraud by using the tax exempt organization for personal purposes. Cohen said Trump lied when he said he couldn't release his tax returns because they were being audited. He said Trump routinely deflated his assets to reduce his taxes. Well, inflating them in order to win Bank loans. Cohen claim Trump had advanced knowledge that WikiLeaks was preparing to publish a trove of emails to hurt Hillary Clinton's campaign Cohen also confirmed the president repeatedly checked in about the status of a proposed. Trump Tower Moscow project well into the two thousand sixteen campaign despite his public claims to the contrary, but Michael Cohen said he had seen no direct evidence that Trump had colluded with Russia during the two thousand six campaign Cohen also said he fears there would not be a peaceful transition of power Trump loses the twenty twenty election. Michael Collins testimony came two months before he's scheduled to begin a three year prison sentence for lying to congress a series of financial crimes and campaign violations. Cohen told congress us ashamed of his own failings. Never in a million years. Did I imagine when I accepted a job in two thousand and seven to work for Donald Trump. So he would one day run for the presidency. To launch a campaign on a platform of an intolerance. And actively win. I regret the day. I said yes to Mr. Trump. I regret all the help and support. I gave him a long way. I am ashamed of my own failings and publicly accepted responsibility for them by bleeding guilty in the southern district of New York. I am ashamed of my weakness and my misplaced loyalty. The things I did for Mr. Trump in an effort to protect and promote him. I am machine that I chose to take part in concealing, Mr. Trump's illicit axe rather than listening to my own conscience. I am ashamed. Because I know what. Mr. Trump.

President Trump Michael Cohen Trump Trump Tower Moscow president congress Michael Collins Hillary Clinton Goodman Colin fraud attorney Russia financial crimes New York WikiLeaks million years
"million years" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

15:09 min | 1 year ago

"million years" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Nine nine zero three. Welcome back to coast to coast AM, our guest tonight Isaac Arthur, and we are discussing Arthur's research that he has got in his video series over at science of future ISM, and the links for everything Isaac Arthur are over at coast to coast AM, and you need to go and check it out. It's nothing like taking notes and getting your learn on Isaac. We were discussing right before the break, the need to leave the planet mega structures and Dyson spheres all kind of interconnected certainly near world to and if we decided not to leave the planet for whatever reason population decrease our resources were brought under control, and and we just decided not to do that is also in that same position in that. That's where maybe the Fermi paradox could come into play where they just don't wanna be bothered Shaw. We often say. We don't know what the answer the phone. We paradoxes of course yet. And we have to have these filters that might be what causes them less common and one of the ones that get suggested that we have many filters behind us. But we still have some fun. And one of those might be that just turns out that interstellar space travel is just not something that is possible a practical until we actually have some walking colonies out. They all blown. I'm wanting to stall. We've really can't say Shaw. It might turn out that it's quite possible. But we just don't really want to do it too. Just because you can colonize Antarctica doesn't mean do. Although I think that we probably will at some point. So lots of exploration we've done we've never backed away from challenges. So I think that we would and I would tend to think any species that had developed while technology would too and then the breaking news last year, which I covered sort of you know, it's still in the news is tabby star. K I see a four six twenty eight fifty two. I've got it memorized. Right. That got to be pretty exciting. And I don't think the story has quite died yet. We haven't really solved it. But it certainly strongly suggested a mega structure, and that's what the news was reporting it as the possibility of an alien mega-structure. What did you think when the news first broke? I'm up, but I suppose taught it, and and I always tend to look at these things and say, especially from our standpoint discussing mega structuralist, if this was a a structural what sort of make a structural could it be and not the ones we normally discuss really fit the Markle out, which doesn't really mean. Too much you go back and ask NGO's in Rome. What a skyscraper whereas distance. They probably gonna guess. So we don't know what format they might be building towards. But in fitting, the ones we would normally say, and there have been quite a few suggestions for what it might be from Nashville standpoint. But it's just one of those examples of things that we really need to get about look at and the next show telescopes. Well, hopefully, I'll tell us a lot more about objects that we find these anomalies, but we all constantly finding these kind of anomalies, and we learn something new and different about each one. But tabby stall is is a natural source or something more artificial high tend to tilt toward the formal. It's gonna tell us a lot. More about the universe around us. Years ago, not not well, not terribly long ago. But fifteen years ago, we had an excellent planet count of one. Yeah. Right. Six thousand. Yeah. Right. Yeah. Today. It's a it's over four thousand officially logged and another nine thousand that are that are way that that are discovered but haven't been given catalogs yet. But that's that's where we're at today. And now in the last few years, certainly since you've started your presentations now, the general understanding of our Milky Way is that we don't have ten planets out there. We don't have twenty. But that we have one hundred billion a hundred billion planets in our Milky Way. Now, it's an exciting. It's an exciting time to be an astrophysicist. Absolutely. Well, it's been exciting time since being better telescope, but these all great ties could see so much more. We can take very big telescopes. A hundred billion plant is probably estimate that might be how many all around. Stalls at all reasonably like alone and close enough this Bill sign that they'd be warm not to have life. But there's you know, probably going to be planning on almost every stall. And I would not be spies. We've catalog trillions of of plants just the low zones. And then of course, you have all those dwarf fans to puppy, find another one hundred. So there wasn't alone solar system the small though, Neptune, Lloyd's, sure and the. Interview that I saw was a couple of weeks ago with an astronomer. He literally said if you want to go in find your own Exo planet, all you have to do is go to work for one night and you'll find one that's that's pretty nutty. It was this wasn't even a concept twenty years ago. Now now, it's it is just amazing how much easier what's gonna do though. Of course, they say that you do some decent Holloway had to do that. But you can we'll finding high. Lot fifteen thousand we included the candidates then PBS finding went almost every day. That's right. Yeah. It's it's it's extrordinary now to populate. Now. Let's let's go back to where we set this up with to populate the the Milky Way to go out and discover and to expand and to grow you have to you have to increase your population. You have to find those resources, but eventually it's going to happen. Whether it's by us or by different civilizations. That are out there. There could be millions of civilizations. We don't know or there could be one or two. But if it started how rapidly would our Milky Way get overtaken probably about a million years tops. I if you're limited to light speed and probably only factionalized point say ten percent of light speed. You can still call on is an entire galaxy in a million years. Sounds like a lot of time to us. And it certainly isn't a short time but compares the age the galaxy. It's it's about a second in the course of a day. It takes time to colonize a galaxy assuming you had the light technology expansion for it. And we would also have to be to see something like this is it would have to be at the right place at the right time in that. We have only been observing our Milky Way as it is right now. I guess ascent Edwin Hubble, I guess if we go back, you know, nineteen twenty three nine hundred twenty five so in a very very short window. We would have to be at the right place at the right time to see this occupation happen. Well, you have to be there. What's going on? But taking place it's sort of like, you know, seventy eighty thousand years ago. I can't remember the ashtray was they hypothesize, but they said it will only maybe a few hot humans latte. Don't quote me on that novel. And yet now the whole plan is for the if you look around now for people with very fine them. But in those days, they'll be very hard to find. So if you got a head start on us, you know, we would have any problems finding them that kind of context. So it does depending who showed up forced how fast they expanding. And how how many such civilizations exist? Is it just a few is that many poll? Galaxy is it only one post super quaestor? We just don't know yet in terms of the distribution with a SETI because we have to know what to look for. And he doing the right thing. I mean, what what do we need to see what is it that we need to look for when we're looking for this expansion of the universe into the Milky Way. I wouldn't say it's really a thing about what city aims do what it can. And you look for the lowest hanging food force, which is to look for those radio signals, but you know. The realist about this. We don't know that anybody would necessarily be using radio signals Omni directional radio singles online now they might be using something that was a point to point like a laser. But you know, they're looking for what the candidates the second half of that kind of resource which is just looking for, you know, things like Dyson spheres all very lowest make structural or k three civilizations, which is a galaxy spanning one. And it's not that we're necessarily are going to be a sign though is that we have a method to look for them that way. And that's of course. So you look for what you can have a decent chance of finding. It may not be the best way to look. But it's the one. Available. And if we are out looking at, you know with hobble and we're starting to see galaxies disappear. Because that's one of the things that we would see if Dyson spheres are being built around stars and blocking out the stars. And they take over a galaxy. Then that means the light from the galaxy would not be reaching us and technically the galaxy would start to disappear because it's being overtaken. Yes. And no I for a classic Dyson Swami or just transfer the visible light and infrared waste heat. So you would be able to see that. And we'd be scanning for that. Of course, assumes they they're using the same. We all which I think pretty solid a lot though Atlantic's, but we've only had two century. So somebody might find a walk around one day. In that case, you got to see the galaxy cash slowly disappear. And if those the kind of civilizations that come into system. So why is it? Just swam out around the stalls and build massive collectors habitats out each one. Then you actually be able to see these things disappear, and when you own galaxy you'd be wondering not who's living around those stalls. But what a stall was because you never seen one day or two you had radio telescopes telescopes because nights guy would be black right, right? And the the other part of this is our son is extremely stable. Okay. We we've had a pretty good run. We've met a pretty good ride with our son. And it's not the case. Even in our own Milky Way, where you've got a son that hasn't radically change in four or five ten billion years because that's what it takes to to develop to develop life. I now every stall changes with time every one of them starts to warm up over time. We always talk about how the sun will one day expand to being a vagina, but it actually gets a little bit warmer each she goes up in biting us by about one percent for one hundred million years. I've checked that just gets a little bit warmer with time and actually have a paradox for us as we are wondering why the oth- would be habitable for billion years ago because my little bit too cold based on sunlight, but we look at and it'd be see how old they all. And how much given based on their mass. And we'll say well, these ones are young these ones. Order to get more live all son is remarkably stable freakishly south, but really quite stable, and we have no way of knowing how common zone plants like alone. All at this time. We don't know how often you're gonna get off like planet and one of those zones. We don't know how many those stalls all stable enough, and what level stability we need. And we actually don't know that you really need off live out of various. Unlike son to to host life, it might turn out to be a much easier than we think it is what might turn out that we all be underestimating how how easy it is for life to to. Why is it that our universe? And when I say our universe. I firmly believe there are infinite universe's out there. We are just this is ours, but our universe with the big bang the way that it happened here. We have life. Things are created here. Right stars planets things elements gases photons electrons, everything it's it's just her fict- gravity was at the right spot at the right time the right numbers where we have life in this universe. But if it was just a fraction off if one of those numbers were off we could be a universe full of just lifeless dust, right? Oh, definitely. This is what we called off the fine tuning concept in general. And and to be fair. We don't really know exactly how that ranges that they might not be other islands of stability where you might get something to chemistry going on for different laws change, the speed of light a little bit changes the strength the gladdy little bit. And and things were not walk as they are right now, and especially can tell in most cases, they went to walk at all get chemistry. But that's how to say by now. And of course, we look at that. We will lose odd. It's staggering based on on what numbers people produce that for basic models. The odds are so huge that you have to look and say, well, we could just be example. Well, we won the lottery because there was a vast number so number of universes, and this just actually wanted to get life at all. Maybe this is the only universe, and we really lucked out possibly cyclic type of thing where you just keeps happy up expanding contracting or dying and getting a place until eventually you get one that walks with live. Oh, of course, the other options Allio potentially that was interesting which seventy has many variations like well simulation, hypothesis all various theological options. And we don't obviously have any way of no yet. We don't even have basic test hypothesis while we'd find out what one we run the numbers. Like the numbers of us having to take a break here in sixty seconds. When the when we run the numbers Isaac numbers are numbers. That's it. And the odds are the number. Say possibilities are endless anything is possible. And right now, there is another planet out. They're identical to this one where there's a graduate in physics host talking to a radio host without that never left elementary school talking about the universe and the possibility of life out there and their names are Isaac and Jimmy..

Galaxy Isaac Arthur Shaw Antarctica NGO Nashville Edwin Hubble Rome Markle Bill Holloway Allio Omni Atlantic Lloyd Jimmy one day million years
"million years" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

15:05 min | 1 year ago

"million years" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Seventy K L I F. Welcome back to coast to coast AM, our guest tonight Isaac Arthur, and we are discussing Arthur's research that he has got in his video series over at science and future ISM, and the links for everything is Arthur are over at coast to coast AM, and you need to go and check it out. It's nothing like taking notes and getting your learn on Isaac. We were discussing right before the break, the need to leave the planet mega structures and Dyson spheres all kind of interconnected, certainly in your world to and if we decided not to leave the planet for whatever reason population decrease our resources were brought under control, and and we just decided not to do that is ET also in that same position in that. That's where it may be the Fermi paradox could come into play where they just don't wanna be bothered. Shall we say, that's we don't know what the answer the phone paradox is of course, yet, and we ought to have these filters that might be what causes them less common. And one of the ones that get suggested is that we have many filters behind us, but we still have some funds and one of those might be that just tones out that interstellar space travel is just not something that is possible practical until we actually have fatal some walking colonies out. They all blown wanting to stall we really can't save Shaw. It might turn out that it's quite possible. But we just don't really wanna do it too. Just because you're gonna call an Isaiah Noda doesn't mean do. Although I think that we probably will at some point. So lots of exploration we've done and we've never backed away from challenges. So I think that we would and I would tend to think any species that had developed while technology would too and then the breaking news last year, which I covered. So did you know it's still in the news is tabby star. K? I see a four six twenty eight fifty two got it memorized. Right. That got to be pretty exciting. And I don't think the story has quite died yet. We haven't really solved it. But it certainly strongly suggested a mega structure, and that's what the news was reporting it as the possibility of an alien mega structure. What did you think? When the news first broke. Well, not. But I I taught it and always tend to look at these things to say, especially from our standpoint discussing mega mega-structure, if this wasn't make structural what sort of make a structural could it be and not the ones we normally would discuss really fit the Markle too. Well, which doesn't really mean too much you go back and ask NGOs in Rome. What a skyscraper as Modesto say. They probably all gonna guess. So we don't know what format they might be building towards, but in in fitting once we would normally say, and there have been quite a few suggestions for what it might be from an actual standpoint. But it's just one of those examples of things that you know, we really need to get about look at and the next show telescopes. Well, hopefully, I'll tell us a lot more about objects that we find these anomalies, but we all constantly finding these kind of anomalies and you'll be long something new and different about each one. But tabby stall is is, you know, whether it's a natural source or something more official in high tend to toll the formal. It's gonna tell us a lot. More about the universe around us. Years ago, not not well, not terribly long ago. But fifteen years ago, we had an exit planet count of one. Yeah. Right. Six thousand yet. Right. Yeah. Today. It's it's over four thousand officially logged him another nine thousand that are that are way that that are discovered but haven't been given catalogs yet. But that's that's where we're at today. And now in the last few years, certainly since you've started your presentations now, the general understanding of our Milky Way is that we don't have ten planets out there. We don't have twenty. But that we have a hundred billion a hundred billion planets in our Milky Way. Now, it's an exciting. It's an exciting time to be an astrophysicist. Absolutely. Well, it's been exciting time since we invented the telescope. But these all great ties could see so much more office. We get to pick really big telescopes. One hundred billion plant is probably an underestimate that might be how many over installs. Is that all reasonably enough like VO and close enough this and son that they'd be warm enough to have life. But this, you know, probably going to be planning on almost every stall. And I would not be spies. We've catalog trillions of of plants just the Austin Lotos zones. And then of course, you have all those dwarf fans to we'll probably find another one hundred. So that wasn't alone solar system of the small though, Neptune. Lloyd's annoyed. Sure. And the interview that I saw was a couple of weeks ago with an astronomer. He literally said if you want to go in find your own Exo planet, all you have to do is go to work for one night and you'll find one that's that's pretty nutty. It was this wasn't even a concept twenty years ago. No, no, I and it's it's just amazing. How much easier? What's gonna do though? Of course, they say that you do some decent hardware to do that. But you can you know, we'll finding. Hi, stopped. A lot fifteen thousand include the candidates, then went almost every day. So that's right. Yeah. It's it's it's extrordinary now to populate. Now. Let's let's go back to where we set this up with to populate the the Milky Way to go out and discover and to expand and to grow you have to you have to increase your population. You have to find those resources, but eventually it's going to happen. Whether it's by us or by different civilizations. That are either. There could be millions of civilizations. We don't know or there could be one or two. But if it started how rapidly would our Milky Way get overtaken probably about a million years tops. I if you're limited to light speed and probably only factionalized at point say ten percent of light speed. You can still colonize tile. Galaxy in a million years sounds like. A lot of time to us, and it certainly isn't a short time, but compared to the age the galaxy. It's it's about a second to the course of a day. So it takes a little time to colonize a galaxy assuming you have the technology and expansion for and we would also have to be to see something like this is a que- would have to be at the right place at the right time in that. We have only been observing our Milky Way as it is right now. I guess a sense Edwin Hubble, I guess if we go back, you know, nineteen Twenty-three nineteen twenty five so in a very very short window. We would have to be at the right place at the right time to see this occupation happen. Would you have to be there about what's going on? But it always taking place it's sort of like, you know, seventy eighty thousand years ago. I can't remember the asteroid that was they hypothesize, but they said it will only maybe a few hundred humans left, don't quote me on and yet. Now, the whole plan is for if you look around now for people with is fine. But in those days, they'll be defined. So if the got a head start on us, you know, we would have any problems finding them and that kind of context, so it does depending who showed up forced how fast the expanding and how many such civilizations exist. Is it just a few is that many poll? Galaxy is it only one super quaestor? We just don't know yet in terms of the distribution with a SETI because we have to know what to look for. And is said he doing the right thing. I mean, what what do we need to see what is it that we need to look for when we're looking for this expansion of the universe into the Milky Way. I wouldn't say it's really a thing. What city aims do is. What it can? And you look for the lowest hanging food force, which is to look for those radio signals. But you know, they they realist about this. We don't know that anybody would necessarily be using radio signals or Omni directional radio signals, Michael online. Now, they might be using something that was a point to point like a laser. But you're they're looking for what the candidates the second half of that kind of research, which is just looking for, you know, things like Dyson spheres, very lowest making structural or k three civilizations, which is a galaxy spanning one. And it's not that when necessary I'm going to be able to sign those. It's that we have a method to look for them that way. And that's of course. So you look for what you can have a decent chance of finding. It may not be the best way to look, but it's the wants to fail. And if we are out looking at, you know with hobble and we're starting to see galaxies disappear. Because that's one of the things that we would see if Dyson spheres are being built around stars and blocking out the stars. And they take over a galaxy. Then that means the light from the galaxy would not be reaching us and technically the galaxy would start to disappear because it's being overtaken. Yes. And no I for a classic Dyson Swamy, oh, just transfer the visible light and infrared waste heat. So you would be able to see that. And we'd be scanning for that. Of course, assumes they they're using the same Atlantic's, we all which I think a pretty solid a lot. We've only had two century. So somebody might find a walk around one day. In that case, you've got to see the galaxy costs slowly disappear. And if those the kind of civilizations that come into system, why is it just swim out around us dollars and build massive collectors habitats out each one, then you'd actually be able to see these things disappear. And if they when you own galaxy you'd be wondering not who's living around those stalls, but what a stall was because you never seen one day or two radio telescopes red telescopes 'cause nights guy would be black right, right? And the the other part of this is our son is extremely stable. Okay. We we've had a pretty good run met a pretty good run with our son. And it's not the case even in our own Milky Way, where you've got a son that hasn't radically changed in four five ten billion years because that's what it takes to to develop to develop life. I now every stall changes over time. Every one of them starts to warm up over time. We always talk about how the sun will one day expanded to being a vagina, but it actually gets a little bit warmer. She goes up inviting us by about one percent for hundred million years. I don't have to check that just gets a little bit warmer with time and actually have a payoff for us as we are wondering why the oth- would be habitable for billion years ago because my about a little bit you cold based on sunlight, but we look out dollars. And it'd be see how old they all. And how much to give an off based on their mass. And we'll say, well, these ones are young these ones auto to get off more live all son is remarkably stable, no freakishly south, but really quite stable, and we have no way of knowing how common habitable zone plants like oh at this time. We don't know how often you're gonna get off like planet in one of those owns. We don't know how those stall stable enough and stability we need. And we actually don't know that you really need a EBay off life out of various. Unlike son to to host live, it might turn out to be a much easier than we think it is what my turn out that. We all right. If we underestimating how how easy it is for life to evolve to why is it that our universe? And when I say our universe. I firmly believe there are infinite universe's out there. We are just this is ours, but our universe with the big bang the way that it happened here. We have life. Things are created here. Right stars planets things elements gases photons electrons, everything it's it's just her fict- gravity was at the right spot at the right time the right numbers where we have life in this universe. But if it was just a fraction off if one of those numbers were off we could be a universal of just lifeless dust, right? Oh, definitely. Oh, this is what we called off the fine tuning concept in general and to be fair. We don't really know exactly how that ranges or that. They might not be other islands of stability where you might get something of to chemistry going on for different laws change the speed of light a little bit changes the straight to grab a little bit. And and things would not walk as the right now, and especially can tell in most cases, they went walk at all. He just get chemistry. But that's how to say by now. And of course, we look at that. We were those odd at stake based on on what numbers people produce baffled basic models. The odds are so huge that you have to look at and say, well, we could just be the example. Well, we won the lottery because there was a vast number one so number of universes and this just after you got life at all. Maybe this is the only universe, and we really lucked out possibly to cyclic type of thing where you know, let's just keeps popping up expanding contracting all dying and getting a place until eventually you get one that walks with live, or of course, the other options, you know, potentially that was inch me which has many variations like well stimulation hypothesis vase theological options. And we don't obviously have any way of no yet. We don't even have basic testable hypothesis while we'd find out what one we run the numbers. And like the numbers of us having to take a break here in sixty seconds. A when we run the numbers Isaac numbers are numbers. That's it. And the odds are the number. Or say possibilities are endless anything is possible. And right now, there is another planet out. They're identical to this one where there's a graduate in physics host talking to a radio host without that never left elementary school talking about the universe and the possibility of life out there and their names are Isaac and Jimmy..

Galaxy Isaac Arthur Isaiah Noda Shaw Rome Edwin Hubble official Markle Modesto EBay Lloyd Omni Michael Jimmy one day million years seventy eighty thousand years four five ten billion years
"million years" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"million years" Discussed on Science Friday

"So there's a few hypothesis for it a big one is that there may have been a break-up in an asteroid family. So asteroids live in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter and sometimes two of these large asteroids or more collide into one another and they get broken down into smaller pieces, and as they absorb heat from the sun and re emit the heat back. They start to shift them their spot. They start to move around and eventually they exit the orbit and they start moving towards the inner solar system so towards the earth and the moon, you can think of it as a landslide slip starting at the top of the mountain and think of the earth and the moon as a house in the Val. Ali. So we see the footprints of those broken pieces of asteroids as craters on the earth and the moon. So something happened. Hundreds of million years ago. All of a sudden, you had more bombardment. Yes. So an asteroid family broke up in they started to move towards the inner solar system, and that that caused more of a bombardment you'd let some people use your data. I understand to create a piece of music that represents these impacts on the moon using sound gives an explanation of what you did. Yes. So system sounds kind enough to take our lunar data and turn it into a video and also into sound. So they've turned the last one billion years the history of the impact of the moon into sound where every note represents the size of an impact crater, and you can hear the frequency of the bombardment and they've been doing more turning into strana me and space data into music..

Ali Val one billion years million years
"million years" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"million years" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"And so the suggesting it is going to be the woman who says I find that really offend. I'm suggesting is about probably is never mind, but women are also more sensitive today. Give emotion. So there is some slightly higher probability that that might be the case. But then I think women are also associated at least in men's imaginations with nature, which is part of the chaotic domain say as opposed to culture because they're sexually selective. So you think what is nature we have that as a cognitive category. Right. We think of the natural world, we think of nature versus culture, it's a fundamental opposition. What is nature? Well, nature is trees and landscapes and animals and all of that. But that isn't what nature fundamentally is nature fundamentally is that which selects from a genetic perspective, that's nature. That's the fundamental definition of nature. And it is the case that human females are sexually selective, and it's a major component of human behavior. So the. The evolutionary theory. Roughly speaking is that the reason we diverged from chimpanzees eight million years ago seven million years ago is at least in part because of the differences between sexual selectivity between female, humans and female, chimpanzees female chimpanzees are more likely to have offspring from dominant males, but it's not because of their sexual selectivity. So a female chimpanzee has periods of fertility that are marked by physical by observable physiological changes not the case with human females human female automation is is concealed. So that's a very profound biological difference between human females and chimpanzees and the chimpanzee females will mate with any male, but the dominant males chased the subordinate males away but human females are sexually selective. And so, and it's not trivial fact so you have twice as many, female and. Sisters as male ancestors. You think well how can that be? Well, imagine that on average every single human female has had one child throughout the entire course of history, which is approximately correct, by the way, then imagine that half of the man had zero and the other half had to. Okay. And that's roughly the case so half of males. Historically, speaking have been reproductive disasters. And the reason for that is because of female sexual selectivity. So it is actually the case that female, humans are nature. It's not only that they're that. They're associated with nature symbolically as far as reproduction is concerned. They are the force of nature that does the selection and so their nature in the most fundamental way. And there is a chaotic element of that at least in relationship to men and also in relationship to women because a lot of the female on female competition is competition that's chaotic for the right to be sexually selective. Right. Not only with regards to man, which drives a lot of politicking. But also in relationship to each other because part of what human females do is jockey for position in the female dominance hierarchy for the top position. Which is the woman who gets to be most sexually selective. And so that drove. Female female competition, and it's different dynamic. There's there's similarities between female female competition and male male competition, but there are also differences and their pronounced so men, for example, while men are more likely to compute compete for socioeconomic status, and that's partly because that drives female may choice. So the correlation for men between socioeconomic status and sexual success is about point six and for women. It's zero. Zero. In fact, it's actually slightly negative you so and that's a huge difference between men and women. I know that you knew the anthropologists Sarah Hertie, HR D Y, an and she's like my favorite feminist theorist. Although is she would say, I'm a theorist who happens to be a feminist, but she studied primate behavior, and she watched she looked at the women very care.

Sarah Hertie eight million years seven million years
"million years" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

11:35 min | 1 year ago

"million years" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Was on CNN, which doesn't have much credibility. We'd all agree with that. NBC news doesn't have much credibility. We all can agree on that. And then there was a Harvard paper by two astronomers who gave it credibility. This sounds like almost my old friend art bell before he died. A mysterious cigar shaped object spotted tumbling through our solar system last year may have been an alien spacecraft sent to investigate earth to find any intelligent life, which I guess they didn't astronomers from Harvard have suggested the object named who he MU MU moa meeting a messenger that reaches out from the distant past in Hawaiian was first discovered in October two thousand seventeen since this discovery. Scientists have been an is to explain its unusual features in precise origins with researchers. I calling it a common then an asteroid before finally deeming it a new class of interstellar object this column goes on to say that researchers at the. The Harvard Smithsonian center for astrophysics raises the possibility that the along with dark red object, which is ten times as long as wide and traveling at one hundred ninety six thousand miles per hour. How fast is ninety six thousand miles per hour might have been an artificial origin. We MU moa may have been fully operational probe intentionally sent to earth by nearly and civilization. A man what perspective on this is dean Regas of the observatory dean Regas, welcome again to the Bill Cunningham show. Thanks for having me when this broke I guess in October two thousand seventeen here, we are in mid-november of of twenty eighteen did, you know about it over a year ago when exited the solar system do gimme your general feeling about. Ooh, moamoa. Yeah. So well, I it's hard to pronounce. That's for sure I've I've heard it's oh, boy, you gotta use all pronounce all the vowels and Hawaiian I guess that's what works for now. Yeah. Just long skinny object. A couple hundred feet across. Tumbling end over end as it goes through the solar system, and we found out about a year ago pretty much has already passed by. So it already, you know, we missed it on the way. And then we saw it on the way out, and it the shape is weird. The trajectory is weird. And the speed is weird. So that's how it started. Good go into the other leap for that. The phones did not too long ago that one boy went one step too, far my mind. So do you think this was an alien probe? Absolutely. Not that's like the least likely thing because first off if it wasn't alien probe. Boy, it was going pretty slow. It would've taken a million years just to get here for another space star system. Let's stay on that point. You say a million years, according to this Harvard paper this going to hundred ninety six thousand miles an hour. And you're is that fast or not fast? Oh, that's low slow for the for interstellar travel that is low. And so I would hope if aliens could make a spacecraft it'd be going faster than that. When it's coming through here. And it wouldn't be tumbling end over end. I mean, it's out of control, basically. So if it's a spacecraft with not a very good one. So what's fast, if you wanna travel to some other solar system if honor ninety six thousand miles an hour is not fast. What's fast? Well, if you want to try to approach the speed of light, which would be one hundred eighty six thousand miles per second. So one hundred eighty six thousand miles per hour. You're not even in the ballpark. You're you're in the that's what that's almost. We can't even do that. But we go we can't get anywhere close to the speed of light. And if you wanna go from star system, the star system, you gotta get that thing cooking a lot faster than that. So one hundred eighty six thousand miles a second would be going around the center of the earth about seven or eight times. One second one second, and that's moving right there. That's all the way around the year seven or eight times or go to the moon in one second one one point three seconds. You get to the moon instead of the way it took us. It took us three days to get to the moment with Neil, Armstrong and Aldrin, so we'd have to travel from here to the moon in one second. Yeah, we're going to speed of light that's about right? And so that's the thing is so this object is the cool part about it. So aliens aside because that's the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard. But the aliens aside, this is an interesting object because it seems to have come from somewhere else. So did not come with our solar system and everything we've ever studied. And even come close urethra anything we sent spacecraft. You have all been in the solar system. So this is this is from a light years away. And it's just wandered through our our vicinity now dean Regas where did it come from? Because of its wandering around. It's a long day to this one columns. Says comments are known as speed up due to a process known as outgassing, which is the sun heats up the surface of the icy comment releasing melda guests, but Moore didn't have a comma. So. Yeah, yeah, that's true. And that's that is the other mystery is so this thing went past the earth. And then it seemed to have sped up a little bit fraction that it shouldn't have just by just going around the sun and gravitational pull the neck. So why did why did it speed up role that it's still the open question? But the the the answer is don't go right to aliens. Please for the love of God, don't go right to aliens for the answer. It's most likely interactions with the sun. So we the material this object. We're not fully sure as we barely saw it when it passed by. So we don't know a lot. That's the problem. We we needed a little closer, look, we'd and maybe send up Bruce Willis to fly next door or something for a while. But no, we didn't get didn't get a very good luck. At it. Unfortunately, how long would it take us if we're going at the speed of light to go to the nearest solar system system that might have an earth like planet. Yeah. The the closest one to us is four point three four point two light years away. So at the speed of light or it's still take us four point two four point three years to get there. So we can generate a spaceship now travel hundred eighty six thousand miles a second we'd have to maintain that speed for four point two years. Yep. Isn't that impossible? It is impossible at least as far as we know to to to get that speed you'd have to use an unbelievable amount of energy just to get up to that. And then even then there's some beer at after since census and say, well, you once you get to the speed, then you can't go faster, and that you can't physically move your mask become so high. So the late Stephen hawking had this proposal that we get to build a spacecraft. They can go to like one fourth of. Speed of light or one tenth speed of light. And we can get to these star systems in forty years or twenty years forty years. And so it's still twenty twenty was on the the optimistic side, and the thing with the spacecraft's is they're not gonna be big our old style doing things and make big shuttles and big rockets, and that type of thing I think the future is going to be small spacecraft accelerates fast. And so there could be spacecraft that we make that are going to be the size of a credit card you fire into space near light speed. That's the better way to go. So this rock that's that flu virus solar system was several hundred feet across and a very dense like rocky metallic objects. Not a good thing for a spacecraft. Now. One of my favorite shows is Star Trek the next generation with captain John Luc Picard. Oh, yeah, they go at warp speed. And they seem to be okay inside the enterprises are travelling at or ten. Being great. Shame. They're traveling at that rate at a hundred times the speed of light, which is would be would be one million eight hundred sixty thousand miles a second. Which is moving. Definitely definitely is it possible that there's some mode of transportation speed outside of our solar system that exists and that they sent this probe here in order to make it look as if it was some natural object one inside was like their fancy, maybe the klingons had some sort of fancy telescope, and they wanted to check earth out to see if we are intelligent life. Well, that that is that's what these actual the scientists are proposing, but this could have been a cloak to where you know, the thing. But if I was an alien trying to avoid detection, I would've made my spacecraft smaller, and I would have changed the trajectory to make it seem like it came from our solar system national wanted to make it look like the way they made it look so people like you think it's a natural object. So maybe they're smarter than you think. Man. I don't know that. Yeah. But. Then they should have made it come from the solar system. Then we wouldn't have noticed. We wouldn't have been like. Oh, wait this things unique. It's from somewhere else, man. They tip their hand. They should have like had come from Mars or something like that. But what if they said, look, let's send it over there. We're going to see if there's any intelligent life. The modern listening to my show or maybe listening to maybe to the view, and they said there's no intelligent life on earth. They might think we're like cockroaches are termites. Well, if if they they have achieved interstellar travel than we are like to them they are way smarter than us because we are not anywhere close to being an interstellar species, we can barely spend things up into lower orbit. So we got a long way to go to catch up to something. Like that expert one say that if you take modern man in the twenty first century and compare him to aboriginal Australians, we are right next to them. And and if if you can travel interstellar space, you're you're a hundred thousand miles away from where we are. We're right next to the bridge and other words, the intelligence required to go interstellar hundred eighty six thousand miles a second for decades that that that technology is so superior to what we have. We think we're brightest smartest that we're very close to being a pair of Masoum compared to what they would be in the in the blip. The lifetime. Yeah. It's not much in the whole scheme of things with the the history of the earth industry of the universe. Boy. Our life is just a sweet little second out of all that. And yeah, we've got a long way to go to to achieve some things. We've come a long way, I will say that. I'm a I'm a big fan of human endeavors, and ingenuity, and but that kind of stuff is going to require some some really amazing thinking and some thinking out of the box. And so I will give the the authors of that paper credit. They're getting a stinking is faulty and is wrong as their evidence is at least we're talking about it. I liked that. But dean Regas have we take? Twenty four hour day. And if you take from the time of the big bang until this moment, the all the recorded human history history is not one AM or two AM or five AM or noon or four PM or nine.

dean Regas Harvard NBC CNN Harvard Smithsonian center Bill Cunningham Bruce Willis John Luc Picard Stephen hawking Masoum Moore Neil Aldrin Armstrong one second million years hundred feet forty years Twenty four hour
"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

The Tai Lopez Show

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

"I think that the dirt bacteria aren't that important. I think what's important or the bacteria you get from your mom, the bacteria that are on your skin. The ones that unions have had for million years that are disappearing. I think those are the important ones. Okay. Welcome to today's show. Special correspondent during the interview? One of my close friends, Dr her mon- Garcia Frisco who is a molecular neurobiologist and he's going to be introduced interviewing today's guests, Dr blazer, it's pretty fascinating. I listened to it afterwards, and I think that. I always say in life, there's three outcomes of everything you do. The verse one is goes as expected. The second is things Bill worse-than-expected and the ideal. The third is things go way better than expected and you'll find that in anything in job interview, you know, in in a date you have is somebody in a business partnership. And in this interview. We're expecting to be good, and everybody was like, wow, it was amazing. So fun listening. So we're really a partnership between microbes and us. So the human microbiome project is to try to understand that figure out what's going on. Is it an accurate statement to save without microbes? We wouldn't be able to be alive. Yes, it is an accurate statement. There are some exceptions where you can raise animals without microbes, but it's very artificial. Basically it's a partnership without microbes. We would not exist. Cool. So. What got you to write this book? I've been thinking about the ideas in this book for at least ten years, but I was always too busy and finally some editors contact me. They said, you know, we've read about your work. We think you have a book there. And Finally, I just decided I was going to do it. Did it a good? So have you want? I know you're a bestseller and it's been featured ever. You've got, you've been featuring the New York Times the nature. Obviously Washington Post the Wall Street Journal. He's been in talk shows good Morning America the today show national NPR. Is there any other awards that you achieved with his book? Well, actually here in LA the LA times have have book price in science. I was one of the finalists. I didn't win the prize, but it was a finalist. And then this year last year, the the national library of science gave missing microbes. It's it's a ward for the best book and science. Actually, there were three for the year, but there were three book. This was the only one in translation now the to Chinese. Wow, that's, that's impressive. I mean, like I told you, I read the book last year and I loved it, especially because I have, you know, and we're going to cover this in a little bit this whole conundrum of commercial probiotics and, and I really wanna know and I've been reading a lot and there's lots of books that talk about the benefits of taking probiotics, but I, I want to get your take, actually, let's cover now. What's your take on probiotics? Prebiotics is it? Is it mainly a scam? What you see out there? Is it true that we can increase from from reading your book? One of the things you mentioned is that because of time we've been changing our bodies so much that we've altered our microbiome to the point that it's, you know, it's not the same as it used to be fifty years ago. So my question I guess, is. Is, can we reverse that? Can we go back to what it was? If what it was is better and are these probiotics and prebiotics drinks and pills and food. Part of the solution or not. So you ask about ten questions? Yes. I'll start with one start with one. So as you said, the point is that we evolved in partnership with our microbes and over these last fifty years, there's evidence that microbes are disappearing. That's why I called missing microbes disappearing. And in the book I show some of the linkages to problems in health. Why asthma's rising why obesity is rising diabetes? Sealy axes, autism, all these disease arising and the hypothesis I raised is because we've lost these important microbes. And so now you ask, well, what can we do? What can we do to get them back or to to improve our health? And as you know, as everybody knows, if you go to a supermarket or health food store or drugstore, their shelves and shelves, filled with items called probiotics, and in part is because we live in a free country in the United States..

Dr blazer LA mon- Garcia Frisco New York Times United States asthma Washington Post Wall Street Journal NPR obesity America fifty years million years ten years
"million years" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Thousand thirteen through sixteen model years and two thousand, thirteen and fourteen escaped sport us apart can fall off. And even if you've shifted into, park you may not have really and the vehicle can just roll away. So far no word of crashes or injuries owners to be notified by the end of the month buddied could. Be September before the replacement. Part is available ford says until then use the parking brake richard cantu a._b._c. news a sweet story out of raymond new hampshire as a woman is reunited with their late father's truck w._b._z. t._v.'s ken macleod has more kaley second or pulled up in her new old pickup truck with a temporary tag and a lasting smile never thought in a million years i would ever see this truck again it's fire engine red because it belonged to her salem firefighter dad who taught her to drive in it when her dad committed suicide in two thousand sixteen the despair was overwhelming but the aging truck needed repair she couldn't afford fast forward to a couple of weeks ago when a firefighter she knows swore he'd spotted the truck at a used car place in little raymond new hampshire it was surreal i instantly got chills started crying duke drowns had rescued it from the scrap pile a few months ago and poured some money into it i pretty much gave it to her this felt good to do that you know so it's not it's not all about profits the old ford Still needs some more work. By Kelly says she's already feeling. Her dad's presents the DMV North. Carolina. Approves woman's request for our specialty license plate honoring her wife, after, initially being turned down the request for the plate which translates to lesbians and law was, initially denied with the, DMV saying they had the right. To turn down plates they deemed offensive by DMV Commissioner Tori Jessup has given his approval saying it was a mistake to reject it in the first place Jessup, reportedly left. A voice message. For the woman letting, her know the request was approved Europe slaps a huge fine on Google for breaching antitrust rules a fine five billion. For abusing the prominent position of its. Android.

DMV Commissioner Tori Jessup raymond new hampshire ford Kelly Europe richard cantu Carolina ken macleod Google salem duke million years
"million years" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on KCRW

"That that means that there's gotta be a technique that's right for every vegetable and i think that a lot of the vegetables that were used to grilling and that would be peppers and eggplants zucchini and potatoes and carrots some root vegetables actually grill better over low heat than over high heat so i think that you know it took me a long time to learn that actually learned it actually quite directly from gary danko who just said it's better to do it this way and he was right some of the things i'm happiest about giving recipes for our for example grilled romain lettuce and grilled ridichio and grilled radishes and grilled turnips and some of the some of the less common vegetables that people don't think of grilling that much that really can be quite fun again when you know when the right technique is used so i remember a million years ago in one of my katina bucks out that's like when the eighties the early nineties doing a recipe for you know grapes stretched in sugar and then put on the grill and people were astounded at this idea that you can grow fruit and now you know grilling for it has become something like a very common way i mean at least here in california to finish off finish off in outdoor grilling session but i must say i have never grilled watermelon and i think that's really smart i mean this is so such a silly thing to say but it starts with the watermelon so to get it right you have to have the right watermelon and you don't always know that when you buy a watermelon so at its worst it's pretty good at its best it's like eating a steak i mean the texture just gets drier and denser but it's kinda sweet and it's chewy and qc well thank you once again for giving us a light of quote food for thought always fun evan sees do now i've been talking to food journalist and cookbook author mark pitman he's the author of more than fifteen bucks including his insanely popular had a cook everything bucks the latest entry is how to grill everything find a link to his grub street article about eating healthy on the good food website coming up the business of beef we're talking all about it with third generation butcher katie flannery stay with us.

gary danko california evan mark pitman katie flannery million years
"million years" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"I go back when i was eighteen years old in a million years we were different that's a holy dip that's not fair what do you mean you wouldn't have done it dan wouldn't have done it i talked to ross about it he wouldn't have done it i don't know a man out there how about our guests in a million years you're eighteen which you have had your wouldn't want her taker i i wouldn't want him taking her out in the first place do they not know it's gonna snow like they've been saying for two days okay but he did so okay i think it's just like if kids having part because that's what you were bragging about i i want to ask you go ahead would you want him driving her home if he felt uncomfortable driving in winter weather like no i wouldn't want her take i wouldn't want him taking her out in the first place do they not know it's gonna snow like they've been saying for two days okay but he did so okay i think it's just like if kids had too much to drink and they called and said that's a completely at home you save let's stick to this then you bring it into infinite we're drinking if you let me finish i'll tell you what i mean it's the same thing when it comes to judge judgment he felt uncomfortable driving in the snow what i meant was it's the same thing for judgment when kids are drinking too much or if kids feel tired or if they're not feeling good and if he was having a seizure i'd want her to call to it's got nothing to do with the case at hand though it has to do with judgment i feel would you have ever done it well what difference does that make a no i okay maybe it goes down to okay who see dating an eighteen year old in eighteen year old that takes her out and can't get her home maybe that's the whole route of this that's an issue.

dan ross eighteen year million years two days eighteen years
"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

The Tai Lopez Show

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

"Are the easy to go along with the show up a common sense common sense common sense concert so if you're interested in bitcoin and cryptocurrencies and wanna learn how to make money with bitcoin opening up a brand new bitcoin crypto academy for you crypto is starting to fundamentally change everything from currencies to the very structure behind the internet if you don't understand it you will be left behind remember if you had put one hundred dollars in bitcoin in 2010 you would have over a hundred million dollars right now i don't want you miss out on the coming opportunities offered by bitcoin in the cryptocurrency space so i brought in the best experts in the game the people that are teaching me in training me and i'm gonna share that with you because it's not too late to understand bitcoin and cryptocurrencies and the block chain and to make money with it so to sign up for my new bitcoin crypto academy on learn how to invest how to make money in this new exciting safes i'm an open up room for a few of you early access to the new online mentor mastermind so go to tie lopez dot com slash bitcoin podcast to learn more so i'm testing the mastermind so i'm just going to let a few of you in at a low price and it's already filling up quickly so if you want to get in i'll let a few of you in so go to tie lopez dot com slash bitcoin podcast all one word bilo busy dot com slash bitcoin podcast if the course disclosed when you get to the page put in your name in the waiting list you missed out on the first round uh in if you see it welcome to the group glad you didn't procrastinate okay back to the show.

"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

The Tai Lopez Show

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

"So agassi there's a few times that i use it but mostly there's a few times of buddy shut them because they try to hold onto you especially in speed five you get up you do on here so the whole so when i now what exactly is all this is legal in business i'm telling you i mean people i higher be will be employed that think they need these complicated things but they really for everything they supposedly moved you four they distract you to steps one step forward to just back you basically need for your workstation one big monitor unless you're hedge fund trader or some complicated than one bad asked iphone eplus this is i don't like mac computers but on light 'cause i i don't care i'm up i'm simple all cure app that apple everything are you the do jimmy that's gotta wear are you are you will height beasts you gotta have brave shirt dan tan bates bay boxer the no you can you can vary and up to apple guy the guy gives shit about learn as corporation the world's apple a i things better than the ten because it's a bigger screen end up it's simpler you don't have the weird thing you know like it's a disease in europe look how big it is almost like a little ipad then you get one bad ask monitor deputies the i've got my seven teenage there one keyboard one mouse that go simple eu go back and forth main thing you don't internet go back and forth.

jimmy apple agassi iphone mac europe
"million years" Discussed on Double Toasted

Double Toasted

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on Double Toasted

"I get up on stage in front of evil goal i can think about his birthday laughed at me be you menu her fearless don't care are not going to happen for you not in a million years after that town which we could just make our own moving at great idea from but may have renewed the wheel of a renewed weekly yone help no no dedicated no amendments is me is going to last through this review radio i'm i'm going to tell you i kompyang sacrifice will you guys do it do it i with tool the and a promise you i did not reveal that movie i did not reveal them i did not i didn't i a high toast these review of eu now though we are talking about the movie the disaster artis under the disaster art is manned people in in la they were terrorized by this back rain for about two years the man who has got their vet party lumad over the channelling west rather than i just star wars you bet everybody wanted for two years what is this thing called room the billboard was up they're telling people go see there was even a number of inviting people to go see the movie and at the time there wasn't even a trailer for people see on the internet letting them know what they were getting into a lotta people just with to see it out of curiosity and when they got in their they said it was probably the biggest what the fuck but the big is happy is what the fuck moment a glorious accident if ever there was to be a perfect world.

eu la two years million years
"million years" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

The Tony Kornheiser Show

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"million years" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

"Did the knicks for a million years ninety six years old and broadcast in in seven full decadelow that's really good so so good bye to him and i think that people certainly in the washington area will know women in new york to because he did the next for so long we'll take a break as i said tim kirk shen will join us when we return i'm tony kornheiser this is that tony kornheiser show this is the audible read happy to do this now that summer season is here it means long car rides to the shore outdoor chores like mowing in gardening i just i went out to the beach him back that's two and a half to three time do it so polish your car while you shine up your life with audible audible is the leading provider of premium digital spoken audio information and entertainment on the internet which would include by the way this podcast it seems to me know does it not include podcasts maybe doesn't audible content well i should have read one more sentence audible content includes an unmatched selection of audio books and other audio products the other audio products give your life that glossy finish users can sign up is what i cast of the nra no good so sign on a rise this one will they should be well they should check on that uses can sign up as an audible listener which gives them book credits and access to short programs now playing and channels each month for low monthly fee customers download their choices they access them on their iphone android device they're kindle ipod or other mp three player come on even i have one of these devices i have i don't know how to use it i have two of these devices i think i used only listen to nonfiction audio where i could learn something but maybe now i need to queue up some business titles with my recent ventures which are.

knicks new york tim kirk shen tony kornheiser nra iphone ipod washington android kindle ninety six years million years