35 Burst results for "MHM"

Can you heal in the environment that hurt you?

Therapy for Black Girls

07:16 min | 8 months ago

Can you heal in the environment that hurt you?

"If you're unfamiliar help assist or out is an opportunity for members of our community to submit a question. They like others to weigh in on we posted host the questions on our social media channels and the community shares their input. If you have a question that you'd like to submit for a chance to be shared you can share it at therapy for black girls dot com slash H. A. S.. So this question in particular read. I know that you can't heal in the environment that hurt you. But what if the only people you have are the ones that hurt you very poignant question right and one one that many of you wanted feedback about so of course I had to make an episode about it and so join me in. This conversation for another visit with us is the incredible Melissa Apple who's a licensed clinical social worker in New York Melissa shares great information and I can't wait to get into it but first let's hear a quick word from our sponsor you love com- if so there's a perfect podcast for you. There's a new podcast called meet cute. Making short scripted. Round comes the take you for a meet cute to happily ever after in just fifteen minutes. Each meet cute story is made up of five. Three minute chapters. Their mission is to give you a much-needed burst of Happiness S. and hope these stories fit in your ear buds and anywhere. In Your Day you can find me cute on apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to see your audio me cute already has a library of stories waiting for you. Featuring diverse characters settings and storylines news stories drop every Monday Wednesday and Friday. So scribe to meet cute and then follow them on instagram. To stay up to date with the latest love stories stories as I mentioned Melissa is a licensed clinical social worker speaker wellness coach and therapist. Her Passion is working with women of color to assist them in managing their emotions. Through critical. Life transitions whether dealing with past hurt. A recent break up up moving to a new state navigating a new job or just deciding what you want from life. Melissa believes that your ability to understand what you you want and cope with the emotions that arise are critical pieces to assist you in being successful utilizing holistic wellness techniques. She's able to bridge the gap between traditional healing practices and clinical understanding to provide effective coping tools in education on how your mind body and spirit are impacted by painful experiences. She gets excited when she's able to encourage women to see themselves as whole people and thrive in spite of trauma. One of her favorite sayings. The Globe is in the show up demonstrates her belief that what you do determines the life you have and you really do get to choose and create the life you desire. Her goal is to help you. Take your life off autopilot and and put you back in the driver's seat toward your dreams. Melissa and I chatted about whether it's possible to heal an environment that hurt you what boundaries as might look like with someone who's hurt you the importance of having difficult conversations and what forgiveness really means when you've been hurt if you hear something well listening that resonates with you please share with us on social media using the Hashtag. TV G in session. Here's our conversation. Thank you so much for being back with us again. Melissa and always always grateful to be yes. So you know if y'all have been following the therapy for black girl social media pages you know that we have a feature call help assist assist out every now and then there will be a question that is lots of lots of engagement in people request. Oh we need to episode on this so a couple of weeks ago there was. There's a question about how do you heal in the environment that hurts you and a very poignant question you know sisters. I thought engaged beautifully with the question but I definitely wanted to bring into the pie has so that we can open enough or a further discussion and talk about like what this might look like in terms of help in Therapy Melissa. Of course you were the first person I thought some very grateful for you to be back with us. Thank you so much happening that you know. I have to be infiltrates now. I think ashes my phone and have dealt with personally and that I deal with you know with micronutrients on You know we're talking about generational stuff right intergenerational trauma as well plays a role in this and so it's important for us understand who then our life that impact that those people have one the roles that we choose to have those relationships are I think are and what I'm finding with my open the clients but our work with as you Chore War By. We assume that we need to have the same roles relationship. People don't have and you know that's not always the case you get to switch it up. MHM So this about like how you might even know how to switch it up right because I feel like so much of the conversation and of course there does does become appointed sometimes where the relationship does completely need to be dissolved today. But I hear you saying that there may be a way to kind of switch up the roles change things a little bit so that you can still engage in relationships without completely dissolving them for sure for sure I think the hardest thing important to think about it with me. The different types of abuse by we might be having an experience with someone who we love but because we define abuse or mistreatment and you know beverly specific harms. We don't think of the relationship as being hurtful or abuse or we can't quite figure around. Wow this person as parting us. Because they're not doing the things that we really was an island view and be is the goal sexual actual it can be emotional. It can be verbal it can be financial and it can also be spiritual and we need to understand that there are different contact Zac annual what defines something has traumatic for you or abuse of you is the impact that it has on you emotionally and or physically so oh you know hurt and harm as it needs to be defined by these very rare category with regard to the other person's behavior is you know we have to give ourselves permission to acknowledge how we feel they somehow somebody else. Hey being anti consul sit with that in mind we always want to give ourselves awesome opportunity to go inward and to own our own Hanukah dismissing

Melissa Apple Therapy Melissa New York Apple ZAC Beverly
Protocol president Tammy Wincup on applying the Politico playbook to tech coverage

Digiday Podcast

12:03 min | 8 months ago

Protocol president Tammy Wincup on applying the Politico playbook to tech coverage

"Welcome to the digital podcast Brian. Marcy and today I'm joined by Tammy link-up Tammy is the president of protocol which is a new tech publication which is from the publishers politico. Tammy welcome thank you. Thanks for coming in so explain a little bit. This is not the politico go for tech. It is not good We're super excited to have launched protocol yesterday and it is coming coming from the publisher of Politico Robert Alberton But it has a very very different focus. And so you know I I love to dive into what you know. What what are those one of those pieces you know? We are focused exclusively on technology on the people the power and the politics of Technology Eh. And this idea was generated by Robert over a year ago and really made a decision to actually make it they separate and bring a separate leadership team in a different ethos and focus but build on you know the the spectacular reputation and spectacular spectacular journey. That politico has had and that we are really lucky to kind of be able to build on that brand. But it's it's a separate view on the world suffered audience audience so explain why that even matters like that. It's not just the spin off from politico because there's look there's a lot of advantages to having a new publication that comes out of publication with a reputation Track record and a lot of other things going forward so why does it. I don't know what does it make sense to. It'd be like this is a different company. Well I I get the best of both worlds right. I have the ability to To look at the amazing track record and the amazing using could've story that politico has built And some of that DNA. I absolutely hope to replicate. You're not like recreating the technology stack and all the stuff right. I mean media's heart already why why why. Why would anyone duplicate this stuff? Well I think some of the pieces the best. Look I come from an industry that says you so you take the best of what others having you build upon it and some of that tech stack is just absolutely brilliant and others. You know it was You know it's a thirteen year old old company so we're looking at tools and opportunities and frankly services down the road that we're going to be able to build on. I think that that is actually you know as frankly. Frankly an entrepreneur in this That's actually really exciting to be able to be told that you can you know you can build using all of the muscle muscle memory of being building a really successful digital media company politico and then go and actually focus on a new audience that I now so just to to to stay on this for a little bit the structure so it's not like the editorial team is different but then all the other services are the exact same from politico like it's not like a shared sales force correct nothing short business and there's more advantages because there are a lot of I mean look media is you know particularly subscale media You know that eats into all the margins so explain why it's it's worth recreating a lot of stuff. I get thirteen years old. And maybe some of the Ad Tech Stacks not the best at this point because there's just a lot of style they've invested a lot in I. I believe that there's this top notch and look my sense is that we will. We will use a lot of what they have from a best practices perspective I think you actually have to start not with if You know not with the operation itself you actually have to start. I believe with what we're trying to accomplish. Which is the business in Tech Community that insider cider community is very very different than politics and policy insider community What they care about what they wanna read? Every day it's very business and industry industry focus piece And so you know my belief. Is that the vision of what she wanted. Accomplish has to start with that and then build both the editorial side and the business side for the audience and customer. You know I come from the tech world and come with viewpoint that you have to start with your customer career audience first and then build the editorial the content of the services that you want for that And so some of that is a playbook that politico GEICO has and has deployed wildly successfully and You know we will. We will take that and try and do the same but there are pieces of it. That technology the executive actually wants different. So you say technology executive do you mean an executive at a technology company or an executive at a non quote quote Unquote Technology Company that is dealing with the after effects of technology which is every executive absolutely that is precisely why we know the moment is right for new publications Pacific. lyod tack you. You just nailed it right there. Is that the intersection. It is no longer my adult lifetime. Having spent spent a good chunk of my career in technology it is changed to your point rent of being an industry. Vertical Call Technology L. Story to truly infiltrating and being a part in a Matrix Organization of other industries. Right so having come from Fintech or attack look at health check and so we actually really feel like. There's a gap of where we can go in terms of bridging this kind of tack and mainstream industries and and again from my viewpoint You know there are two book ends of what's out there right now. There is You know you're a business business either attack on enterprise and consumer tack or you're in a big vertical as leader trying to innovate with tack and you're trying to figure out on a daily basis. What's going going on? You either have things that are written for a mass audience for which on the topics that I care about on on. Ai and five G.. Gee and quantum and what's going to happen in Fintech in terms of payment services and things like that you don't get the depth necessarily that you need to actually make decisions for Your Business MHM on the flip side having come from venture backed businesses. It was very very difficult if you weren't a Unicorn or if you're not you know. Thank Company Day to actually find yourself being talked about in the media Unless you're raising money or unless you are announcing some widget okay and so it's not going to be product driven. Obviously there's a lot of quote unquote technology publications over the years where really venture capital Publication correct There's no shortage of people writing about the latest air pods or whatever So you're GonNa leave that aside And obviously technology is now now I. I think it's sort of moved into a few different. I mean it's obviously it's a horizontal story within the changing nature of all industries On the it doesn't side and then there's there's Society Angle And then obviously the government angle which I know you're still going to be covering has a great intersection You you know with with political on that piece. I think he'll you know you'll see us. So there's overlap there's absolutely I the article about California Privacy Law and people scrambling. Yeah try to get rewritten. I mean that could easily be employed right. I think it's interesting like that's a perfect story or even if you look at Linda stories yesterday around ethicists in salesforce. Right I think that's well first. Let's talk about the policy piece rate. That's a story that has policy implications. Has You know state implications. I think the story was very much could be seen on in either publication potentially uh-huh. I think what's fascinating about some of the stories that you saw yesterday on our launch day like Linda Story. Now this is You know those are thorny topics. Those are not bullet point topics. Those are bullet points to we occasionally since I like this You know that's a story that mark. Benny off retreated yesterday. And it. You know it was a story about salesforce but it wasn't necessarily you know it's a tricky issue and I think that that's that's the point on tech right now tech is no longer in in its infancy where we have the promise of kind of all it. Could you know could be. It is a full blown adult and it's it's messy and I think to talk about you know we have to actually go into some of these details around the people Around the politics because suddenly mature quote quote Unquote Power Center. That's having unintended consequences. That of course it is like that. That's that's where it is but we want to. Actually we WANNA hang in those issues and and and and cover them up and you saw the gaps. I guess because I think when you came out Obviously a lot of people say. Oh there's a lot of tech publications and understand Dan and honestly a lot of the stuff I just ignore. Because it's like it depends on how you execute like really like I mean there's always room for new media brand. I feel like I can't think of an area where there are is an room for one. You just have to do better right at the end of the day. We got to have a different Lens so the Lens. That protocol is bringing to this massive Asif issue like how would you sum it up. Yeah I think it's about audience focus and scope Were not writing for everyone right. Just like politico doesn't right or you know is really focused on the decision-makers now if I'm a decision maker in a C. Suite You know are. Are you trying to explain that a little bit. So you're are you. Are you writing to help them do their jobs better or are you helping them. Sort of unpacked these gigantic thorny societal governmental whole like Issues my belief is that if we do that second one right you are helping them do their job better particularly if you're if you're taking If you're taking topics and not just giving them cursory looks so for example. The today we launched a new product called braintrust The question of the week where we go out and actually ask experts parts around that topic That is actually really important because at the end of the day technologies nauseous about the product right. It's about the people making decisions visions in terms of that and the breath of that conversation. If you're sitting in a thin services company or a healthcare company and you're trying to deal with. How am I gonNA use a to better to better look at an issue in the house? You don't necessarily have that network and so how does protocol bring that network to you in a way. That's not a cursory kind of two lines trying to define a Is So our goal is to our newsletter in source code to be able to have that daily actionable invoke kind of start my day knowing at the big level at the high level. What's going on but then to be able to find those in depth You know those in depth conversations which I think you'll see a you'll see us have as well so you get income from politico. You didn't come from the media. said he came from the tech industry and then under this crazy I mean why would you go home to the media industry. This is crazy. Hazy decision explain this. What did you see? I mean because I think it's interesting people There's a lot of advantages that coming in with fresh eyes to an industry and I think a lot of people you know. They think they sort of they know media. Because media's like very tangible I think on one level but then up-close it's like wow a lot of this doesn't make sense right or was it not though. Well I'll tell you soon right Kanye Day then you officially say none of you know. Look I think there are lots of things both personally and

Politico Executive Linda Story Tammy Robert Alberton Tech Community Fintech Marcy Publisher Geico Unquote Technology Company President Trump California Kanye
Form a Power Habit Today with Tim Beverlin

The ONE Thing

09:41 min | 8 months ago

Form a Power Habit Today with Tim Beverlin

"Often wish that we had someone in our world who could hold US accountable. Who can have a vision of what's possible for us and would be willing to take a stand for the greatness when we may be fighting for our limitations? The person you're GonNa meet today found that person and he found it in the form of a five year old daughter. If you've read the book you know the FM Alexander quote that people do not decide their futures they decide their habits and their our habits decide their futures. What are the habits that you can form that? If you form them would make cheating extraordinary life easier easier or unnecessary. And who are the people in your world who can begin holding you accountable as you go on your first sixty six day challenge into making that a power habit. Today's episode is a journey of what it looks like to form that first habit what it looks like to seek accountability and how purpose can be woven in to all of this to take your results to an even higher level with that. Let's get into this conversation with Tim. Beverly so why are we sitting here today. Today happens to be day. Sixty six in my first sixty six day challenge of running every a day for sixty six days. What inspired you to go on? A six day challenge to form the habit of running so after listening to the podcast and rereading the one thing for the the sixth or seventh time and finding what is that thing that I struggle with right now and if I were to do that one thing would would lead to other habits being able to be stacked upon that Running is not something I necessarily enjoy and yet I knew if I could commit to running for sixty six days talk about it to others that are in my world in my businesses. An in my family that I would have level accountability as well as that a little check check mark but I want to get every day for six days so at six. Am this morning. started my run and at six thirty or so. When I was wrapping up it was sixty six days and I know that there will be sixty seventh day because it's now habit? How long did it take for it to become a habit for you? Great question by day Eh. About thirty or thirty five I had some traveling to do and my wife and I had a flight to catch from Philadelphia Tennessee at seven. Seven o'clock in the morning. We live about an hour from the airport. The only way to get my run in that day was to run at four o'clock in the morning. And that's not my normal wakeup time and I found myself waking up at three forty five without an alarm and on the treadmill at four. AM running to get my check mark for my thirty fifth day so that one was pretty confident. Confident it was. It was becoming a habit and yet not every day was easy. Talked about that a little bit because I think people it's very simple right. ooh Just just do one thing every day for six days power habit that sticks yes life is amazing. Go through through why it's not easy. It's not easy because life shows up and there are days in my business. That would go a little long and I would get home at seven or eight o'clock at night and I hadn't checked the box yet and sometimes I'd bring dinner home with me. Put It on the counter and go to the basement jumping my treadmill That was not easy and yet it became easier over time. MHM. Because I didn't WanNA break the streak in an at the time I implemented this sixty six day challenge. My daughter asked what the chart was on the fridge and I I have a five year old and five year olds are quite curious. What's that well it's A? It's a challenge. Daddy's zone is going to Run every day for sixty six days. Did she fully get that concept not at all. I want to talk to so I had a second chart. Laminated on the fridge. And everyday she had a good day as I. Four and five year olds. Don't always have good days. They have really great days and days and make you appreciate the really great days and she got a check mark for her really good days and there are times that she would ask my wife. Did Daddy run today. Did he get checkmark today. Where's the APP or travel and and come back? And did you get to put your check marks Markson did you miss any days and having that level of accountability from a five year old. It's really unbelievable. Go into that more. Because we've done a few episodes votes before with parents and their kids and how the kids started living the one thing as a result of watching the parent. What does it mean for your child to have a great day often? It's that my wife has a great day because our children had had now we're really talking the domino and it leads to me having a better day as well at least things got a tie together really really nicely. It's awareness really what it comes down to who is a as a five year old the you know some of their actions they control some of them are just pure emotion that comes out and watching her get really sad. What if she doesn't get a check mark that day that it's starting to become a check mark for her as well and and habits can be built for any age? Yeah so where did this go back to where this came from you. You put your sixty six day challenge calendar where I put it on the side of my refrigerator. Okay as I come in the door go around the corner from my garage. I see the side of the refrigerator and I can see the check marks. Okay and at. What point did your daughter start showing interest in this day one as soon as I put up the Fritsch daddy what's up? What is that and I had to copies? My original intention was to have a laminated copy on the fridge and one down on the treadmill and the two copies just are are side by side on the Fridge Wants Hers One's mine. And what point did it become hearse day one. So what would that conversation look. What because they were for a lot of the parents listen to this? They're like Oh this is really really cool so walk us through how you enlisted the involvement of your child so it was. What was that and when I explained that it was a challenge challenge of sorts? I really believe kids like to be challenged And she wanted to be involved in it and it became a thing that her and I could do together and came up with what would be something. We can measure how. `Bout we measure that every time you have a really good day weeds project MC and we roughly find with that means that Kinda depends on the day every time you don't eat. We're going to skip that day. You have a blank spot. And there's some days it she'll go to countersign. I didn't get my mark yesterday or the day before or the day before it just drives but three or four marks in a row and it's it's become thing we're really. I'm ahead of her. At the moment. I have all sixty six checks and yet she sees the value and what those check marks represent I should mention. I'm not a physician and I. I don't know that running every day for sixty six days. It's the right move quickly and yet the experience has been life changing. We'll hi how's it been life chain. It's come show me what's possible by doing something as simplistic as getting on a treadmill every day. And it's not about the distance I attract my time for the first mile L.. Attract me speed for the first mile and what we shared. Bur what I shared with you before was at my sprint has now become less than my pace and it was unintentional. It just found myself turning up to speed a little bit more in a little bit more in a little bit more in graduate gradually then suddenly I was running faster than I have ever tracked before and this is a habit that I never enjoyed loyd running a staring at a concrete wall running on a treadmill how exciting his at and by the way those eulogising if you would like to get a copy of the sixty six day challenge calendar just go to the one thing dot com. That's the number one in the oral. Click on the free stuff tab and you can download it and start your first power day before going through the sixty six. Stay Challenge. What used to be your sprint? The thing that you would have to work hard to get it's fast you could possibly go is now the bare minimum. That's the pace. That's the pace and the sprint now would have been something that would have knocked off the treadmill Go into more like this shows shows. What's possible what does that mean? What are the things that you now? What are the questions are now asking yourself that you've never asked before? What else have I? I've been cheating myself on by not doing this five years ago when I knew about the sixty six day challenge. And what's next. Say One to learn a a second language. Perhaps I pick one worded day that I learned in an another language for the next sixty six days. I've read somewhere that The average person says about two two hundred words about the use. Whether it's true or not I honestly don't know and yet if I could learn sixty six words in nearly any language who at least get me on the path to mastery of that language and that idea so simplistic one word today. Of course I can do that. How long would that really take to learn one word per day? Three three minutes five minutes and it's just committing to that activity every day and not ever ever ever skipping it. No matter what

United States Alexander Beverly TIM Philadelphia Markson Tennessee Loyd
Ross and Carrie Meet Isis: Age of Aquarius Edition

Oh No Ross and Carrie

09:39 min | 8 months ago

Ross and Carrie Meet Isis: Age of Aquarius Edition

"We got a hold of Isis aquarian via phone. She's in Hawaii. We had seen her at the source family reunion dinner but but we didn't talk to her there but she heard our show and she agreed to come on and talk to us and then she did it and it sounded like this high isis. How're you ewing doing Okay well thank you so much for doing this with us. Sure so isis want you tell us about how you got involved in the source family family to begin with I was living in. La Actually engaged to a famous rock and roll photographer. Rondo Shelly loved La. Look everything we were you were you originally from La. I grew up in the air force. My Dad was a military man so we lived in California before. But you know I basically basically lived Oregon California Hawaii okay. A real coastal girl. Oh actually we were living in Florida. My devastation it takes canaveral on. When was this that you are working with your photographer? Slash boyfriend in L. A. Mid Sixties. Okay actually hit meant what Jim Baker when he had three famous restaurants on sunset boulevard breath aware in the world and then the source and he was actually known as Food Goo. Jim Baker was an iconic Hollywood legend. Before he was even bother you owed. Oh Oh okay. That's news to me. In what way his restaurants were all very famous okay. Everybody went to his restaurants. They were shot as a curve. Her and he was you know he was La Player. He was very good looking and he was very inland with no one. BEADY and Steve Allen and it was the in crowd and and he was very well-known. Interesting Steve Allen of our ears so those those two people seem like unlikely. Unlikely friends because Steve Allen was sort of not very into the spiritual side of things. Do you know anything about that friendship while Jim Baker wasn't he didn't it really started his spiritual trip until he sold you old world kind of went on his journey and devise on each other before then. The way I described him Baker's he was the ultimate animal man. He's a man's man that he was lazy. And then now the women loved Kim Piazza Array of friends from Jack Lang to Paul Breaks. So well connected. When did you make the connection with him? Well when I hit lose UCLA. Before I met lawn I had gone to the old world. I was actually introduced to him and his wife. At the time I actually became very good friends with his wife. The store was kind of a whole put on us. Never really kindness connected we did we. Didn't you thought maybe a relationship or something might arise sooner than it did. It was a playboy and then I just Kinda moved onto another crowd and Net ron and then you know we were doing our studio. I haven't seen Jim in in a year or two. I heard that he opened. This restaurant called the source. It was the beginning beginning of this. That you chain restaurant that he opened up and we were looking for models for Jesus Christ superstar Mhm Booster we were doing and I love that I need some Jesus type looking people and I said well. I've heard that my old friend. Jim has him at this restaurant. There's a collection of Jesus wearing roads. I stepped onto the source doors patio. He came out looking like Moses. You know so close he wanted. Jesus and Moses. Yeah so you know is is women following him and beautiful young people at the stores and it was just like something happened I just I clicked. uh-huh never looked back. Did you have to go home and think about it and then return the next day just immediately a member it was immediately. I was Aw something happened. I would if it was if I knew this is what I was there for. I instantly blue that we had made agreements before incriminating and he confirmed that just like my destiny was that was it it was assets. What was the confirmation to just kind of agree with you or did he have some kind of evidence of that now? He looked at me and he said I. I've been waiting for you. It was like a cosmic snick download. And then he's voiced it. Okay yeah so I went back home and I told you on that. I was playing to join the first family way and I thought he would actually come with. Yeah I remember in the documentary. He was saying that that wasn't for him. Come with me. And he thought I was stark raving me now and he let me go thinking that you know in a couple of weeks I would be back but I didn't. That was that that next day you were having having Frist Bruce as a family and the sunflower and Solomon. Yeah that was the proof of Solomon and that to the studio and I got some cameras and I just started documenting. Because that's what I was used to doing. That started my path of being a family. Historian all starring in our guys keep her which is so cool and I think what really makes the source standout from so many other groups that you have so much documentation. How much of that is yours? And how did you kind of make sure that you yourself were included in the in the documentation. Well it was all mine. Basically I started it and then I was just with him all the time following him around and I became like one of the family administrators and Kinda hands the camera off to a Swiss. This brother only and by that time. He likes the whole thing being you know recording and he said this will end up saving the legacy and who has all that now. Does it take a good chunk of your house. How many photos yard? I you know she'll onto the art guys through forty some years of being here Hawaii. They started getting started deteriorating because the climate and just one day I well well you know I gotta figure this out. I gotTa do something and that was about fifteen years ago when I decided I was going to write the book. I never never intended to be the one that wrote the book but I couldn't get anybody else to do it. Some people were families didn't even know they were in the source family. They didn't Walker kids to know about the story. Okay so so how. Many of the former members G. think are still open about how they were in the source family versus what percentage would you say. Just kind of. Don't talk about it. It's buried deep in the past for them. Well since the documentaries a book and all the publicity the city and and we've had a couple of family reunions. I think everybody's pretty open to you. Know some people that that are negative negative to it and realization that we all came to and it was quite a shock to me when I think it was. We didn't all have the same. Mainly -ality is added censure thought through the Lens of our own being our own karmic experience that we had. y'All were on a different different paths with it so if we different people will get different stories everybody else. I'll have the same experience That's a really nuanced onced. Lovely view that you know we all have these different experiences and we might see them you know totally subjectively. I feel like that's A A little contrasting with some of the the ways that was presented in documentary where it felt more like father yoed is the embodiment of God and everyone in the source kind of saw him that way and he really was. What was the word? It was like your your earthly master. Something like that. So how do we do. Yes we you went through those phases through all phases from the beginning of the family we went to so many incarnations experience. The American Indian Chips the Hebrews. He took assuming everything he was on his path. Also listen incredible me but you know yes it got messy at times you know we were all all trying to figure it out including him he had to figure it out too. There was bends in the road. Yes you know. I think we all got a passing grade. We were a mystery school. We were just hippie. We were into the spiritual pursuit and it was new territory for him for all of us. Who is God? He was God to us. It's not uncommon to talk that way not uncommon to talk about being in our God goddess. Okay so what's he got in the same way that I'm God. Yeah Yeah so you know forty years ago that was just like new territory. We we saw each other gods. We saw each other spiritual beings

Jim Baker Steve Allen Hawaii LA California Rondo Shelly Ewing L. A. Mid Sixties Florida Ucla La Player Solomon Jesus Oregon Kim Piazza Frist Bruce RON Hollywood Moses
Grace Kosko: A Collector of Certifications

FitLabPGH

09:32 min | 8 months ago

Grace Kosko: A Collector of Certifications

"We are with grace. Costco Grace is a lifetime mover job. She's a physical therapy assistant. But if that's not enough. She's done a variety of other things so one of the questions. I often ask for my other podcasts. Moving to live is what your thirty second elevator Spiel of what you do so you see somebody somebody comes up to you. We're done interviewing. They said well. Who are you what do you do? What do you tell them? That is a difficult question. Let's see I am in the process of reinventing inventing myself. I am a former hairstylist. And became a yoga instructor. Loved learning about the human body. And I'm now in massage therapy school after completing physical therapist assistant school last year so I'm a collector of certifications and licenses and I may use that collector of certifications in the future thinking down the line. You suspect in the future. After doing the massage therapy there will be additional certifications coming along possibly strength and conditioning coach and I think one of the things grace was mentioning before we started recording is her boyfriend is also a collector of certifications. And he's got some of his own and his business and he us also also said he's branched out into the health and wellness field also very much. So he's a geek so nutrition so so pressure is on. If you get to know grace you have to keep up with the certifications vacations. My favorite question. I always went ask people from Philly. Pittsburgh is. Are you a Pittsburgh native if so why are you still here. If not what brought to Pittsburgh I am a Pittsburgh. Native grew up in a suburb about thirty minutes. Outside of the city in North Huntingdon. I don't know why I'm still in Pittsburgh. I would love to leave but I just don't know of anywhere to go that I love more than Pittsburgh and I know this is a podcast about movement. I always want to ask people. Obviously now is a yoga instructor working as a physical therapy assistant. You're going after. I believe you said at some point strong. I which is a kettle bell training certification which ages no joke. Were you active growing up or were you somebody who's like yeah. I don't like being active and kind of as a follow up to that where you active because mom and Dad said get the hell out of the house. Elsa don't come back until dinnertime or because mom and dad were active. If you had brothers and sisters they were active and you kind of got dragged along with them so my family is not an active family. My mom did tell me to get out of the House and not come home until dinner. I actually my fitness journey didn't start until I was about eighteen. I had ED Attended cosmetology school and gained weight. Because I ate from the vending machine on every ten minute break that we had and ballooned up to you two hundred pounds and I said Nope this has got to stop so stop. Drinking pop started eating better started attending a fitness class. Just that was local in our neighborhood neighborhood and eventually made my way to an official. Jim started taking yoga class. I loved the Yoga Teacher. She worked at a yoga. Studio became came a yoga instructor so it was just this little bits here and there that I collected and then Found that I really love weight training as well I'm unnaturally flexible person. But I noticed I was starting having some aches and pains and I thought maybe I need to do the other end of things and started weightlifting. Dabbled a little bit and cross bit But we have our own gym downstairs with pedal bells because you can do so much with one little weight. And that's why I'm pursuing that certification now now and I'm curious people that you knew when you were growing up or maybe when you first went to cosmetology school that you still keep in touch with. Do they think you're crazy. Do they love what you're doing. Do they look look at you and say what the heck you taking years off your life I would hope. They think that I'd love to be an inspiration to my friends and people that I know. I don't don't think they think I'm crazy. They just let me go. Do my own thing I try to impart that to them as well. I haven't really convinced many people although I do have two two friends that wanted to attend taste of fitness that was hosted at the ace hotel in East Liberty. So we got to do that together. And that was Super Fun thinking now in your fitness journeys said not super active growing up figured it out at eighteen because I know a lot of people. Don't they just continue eating away. They did growing up up thinking vending machine. Food is good looking back on it now a few years later. What do you think made the biggest difference or made you say I need to do something about this Honestly probably wasn't until I met my boyfriend that I really had my a come to Jesus moment with food and started figuring out why I was so emotionally emotionally connected to food. That was the big component for me. My mom always had baked goods in the house. Home Baked goods not little debbie snacks and it was a dessert after every meal will I was also part of the Clean Plate Club So as I started living on my own I started cooking from cooking white magazine so I was able to help myself out with that. But yeah until you go down the emotional path and the mental path of Y. You're eating the way you are and making the decisions that you are. I don't think there can really be changed and that was sweat. Did it for me and I think a lot of people don't hit on with that as it's different for everybody. There's not one magic thing I know we had earlier. podcast guest who transitioned transition from running to was in school and gained some weight and then started cycling because his dad and his brother who were both physical therapists said. Hey you need to do something and I asked the question and I said did they talk to you about your health. He said No. No my brother just guilted me into it so I think it's important for some people that is what it is like peer pressure and for other people it's figuring Out What's the emotional attachment. What works for you doesn't necessarily work for me or somebody else? I know for me. My journey with food was when I made the mistake of taking a nutrition class in college is like ooh. Some of this stuff isn't really good for me so I still like to eat the whole blueberry pie but it's probably after doing an eight or nine hour activity where it's like okay. I need calories. I'm curious also with the progression with fitness. One of the things that people often find. They're eighteen nineteen twenty. They get in school. They're out on their own. It's like okay I got school. I've got maybe work and I've got lots and lots of free time as you've probably figured out as you get older as you collect more certifications that I know from chatting with you you have at least one dog and at least one cat things start to pick up. How do you find the time? I'm to make sure that you stay active or their time. Just say I just can't do this because a lot of people say boy I'd love to work out or I'd love to watch what I eat but I just don't have time. It's easier to go out to eat so a lot of times times. Hearing what other people do is beneficial. Yeah that I don't understand why time gets less as you get older and it's Trying to optimize it as has best you can so I try not to burden myself with the need to exercise. I fit it in. Where can Dan so Mondays are completely obliterated? I don't even think about it Tuesdays are my day off so I fit it in where I can there Instead that of sitting on the couch I'll sit on the floor and I'll do either some stretches or some muscle activation stuff Taking my dog for a walk Crawling around on the floor is a great movements So if I don't really have a ton of time I just have made me fifteen minutes before work. I'll just head down into the basement and just do some mhm animal movement kind of stuff for cycle for ten minutes just to get the blood flowing Parking far away from the grocery store taking the stairs. You know the the normal things that you here as well and just kind of realizing that you don't have to block an hour out to go to the gym to fit movement into your life. We're talking with Grace Costco. I think from what she's just described over. The last few minutes she really is treating movement is a lifestyle from hearing. You mentioned crawling around on the floor doing animal animal movements. I have a suspicion at some point your future the move nat certification is going to become one of the things you do. I know for moving to live. We interviewed Jenny plus lost from New Mexico as a physical therapist who's actually moved using move nat in the clinic. She works with she was actually introduced to it by another physical therapist. And you hit on another thing that I don't think a lot of people take into account as far as making movement part of their lifestyle. You said we've got a gym in our basement and a couple of kettlebells or t-rex machine she into something like that then you don't blow the fifteen twenty thirty minutes going to the gym the ten minutes to park the five minutes of BS ING with the Front Desk Staff. Not In a bad headway. You've got twenty minutes if you've got twenty minutes or you've got ten minutes or five minutes you've always got it there and it's like I've got kettlebells upstairs I've got kettlebells downstairs pedal uh-huh kettlebells in my on my patio in the backyard. And it's it's really. I think you've hit on something enough. People don't do get some stuff for home because that's beneficial official. We have a basket in our living room. That's filled with kind of recovery stuff so balls. Resistance bands are everywhere. My boyfriend has a hand weights in his office. And we are Jim downstairs and in the summertime of course the deck is filled with staff when we have actually have a climbing rope from the bottom of the deck up to the top. I got stuck on it. Maybe next time you could build a climbing wall on the deck also. That's one of the things that I would like to do. That's definitely on our on our list. Climbing is One of our new hobbies that we started last year and definitely love

Pittsburgh Instructor Costco JIM Official North Huntingdon Yoga Teacher Grace Costco DAD Philly East Liberty Elsa Clean Plate Club Studio Front Desk Staff DAN Jenny New Mexico
The Story of William Tell

Classics for Kids

04:35 min | 8 months ago

The Story of William Tell

"To legend William Tell was a whiz with a bow and Arrow he lived in the mountains of Switzerland the opening of the William Am tell overture paints a beautiful picture of a mountain sunrise starting with a great solo for cello. In fact the whole first part of the overture is written just for the low string instruments cello bill bases MHM with a couple of ominous drum rolls to give you a hint that the weather forecast for today is not good. Sure enough when the rest of the orchestra joins in. It's a signal. The arrival of a Rossini specialty it starts with wind in the trees and some small blinky raindrops tell pretty soon. We're into a full-fledged downpour complete with lightning and thunder the sort of storm Benjamin Franklin would not have wanted to be caught flying in his kite in portraying. Thunderstorms in music was one of the things. Rossini did best. Rossini also used thunderstorm in this overture to show the political critical storm brewing. In William tells part of Switzerland which was controlled by foreigners from Austria headed by nasty guy named Yesler. Gessler thought that even when he wasn't around people should show how important he was by bowing down to his hat which he stuck on a pole in the middle of town. When William Tell came to town with his son he thought it was pretty dumbed? Bow Down to a hat on a pole. Gessler was not amused. But instead of killing William Tell Gessler usual punishment for failure to salute a hat in a public place Gessler. I said I hear Europe. Pretty hot. Shot Mister Towel. If you can prove it by shooting an apple off your son's head with a single Arrow I'll let you go. Uh both the story and the thunderstorm have happy endings when the rain ends outcome the birds. And because we're in Switzerland home of Swiss cheese and milk chocolate there are cows to be called the orchestra instrument that does a lot of cow calling duty. Is the the English horn. It's sitting in for an Alpenhorn a Swiss folk instrument that's used to call from mountain to mountain back back to the story of William Tell who did shoot the apple off his son's head with a single ero but Gessler. The bad guy noticed that before tell took his one one shot. He took two arrows out of his quiver so he asked why Williams tells answer was if I had missed that second era would have been for you eventually. William Tell did kill Gessler which started a Swiss uprising and got rid of the Austrian invaders. If you're going to have an uprising rising what do you need trumpet to rally the troops and of course horses. And that's the part of the William Intel overture. You probably recognize your parents or grandparents know it as the theme to the Lone Ranger Radio and television shows

William Tell Gessler William Tell Switzerland Gessler Rossini William Am William Intel William MHM Apple Benjamin Franklin Mister Towel Europe Austria Williams Alpenhorn
Fighting cancer with CRISPR

Science Magazine Podcast

10:23 min | 8 months ago

Fighting cancer with CRISPR

"Now we have staff writer Jennifer cousin Frankel. She wrote a story this week on Crisper and cancer immunotherapy to big ideas says mushed together for the first time in human patients. Hi Jennifer Hi. Thanks for having me sure. I said something scary. It's not every day that we get to say a something is a first. There's always a lot of pushback whenever we put it into a story or if it comes up in a research paper but this is some type of I. This is the first time that that researchers have reported on taking immune cells in this case the T. cells which we kind of think of as the soldiers of the immune in system that fight off infection using crisper to modify them together and then putting them back inside a human body and seeing what happens. It's that hasn't been done before. It hasn't been described before their trials that are going on. That are testing this and this is why we never put I in a headline exactly far to do was dive into the techniques. We're GonNa talk about cancer immunotherapy and then we're also going to talk about crisper. We need to kind of understand both of those things to understand what happened in this paper. This is a specific kind of cancer. Immunotherapy right yes. That's right so cancer. Immunotherapy is essentially trying being to harness the immune system to fight cancer. And it's something that's been really hot in the cancer field for the last several years in fact won the Nobel prize is just the other year. What this study is making use of is one technique in cancer? Immunotherapy that uses the T. cells and it tries to to sort of help. The t cells recognize tumor cells and then destroy them some of the problems that have come up as people have experimented with that. Were things like it. It doesn't really get into solid tumors and some other things. This is still a really new field and people are still working very hard to improve. Its success it's been pretty successful in blood cancers leukemia in lymphomas and there are two Cardi cell therapy's that companies have developed in that have been approved there are some additional additional hurdles in solid tumors. And it has been more difficult to consistently get the therapy to work in solid tumors solid tumors or things. Like brain tumor pancreatic host humor. Like I think yeah any tumor. That's kind of a solid mass as opposed to in the blood. That's the cancer immunotherapy side of things. Let's talk about the crisper side of things. Can you just tell us what crisper is. And then maybe we can talk about how. It's been used their politically or not so far. So crisper is another really hot area in biology Jay. It's a technology that essentially cuts DNA and then the DNA can kind of recombine in different ways it can be used in different settings to add genes or DNA to remove them. It depends but it can give a lot of flexibility around modifying DNA A and it's used in all different settings not just in medicine but strongly medicine is one area where there's been a lot of interest in using crisper because it's a way of modifying lying. The genome in this case crisper is used to modify immune cell so they took immune cells out of a patient and then use this gene editing technique to make changes to them. They had these three patients and what they did was they took out blood cells and then they modified those cells in the lab. They had to add in a gene gene. That was going to target a protein that was on the surface of their cancer cells. The other thing that they did was they used crisper to edit the genome such that they were knocking out three other genes and the genes that they chose they chose because they I hope they would make the T. cells even more powerful. They hope they would help them. Hang around longer in the body more effective against the tumors than they reintroduce introduce those cells. They gave them back in. That whole process takes several weeks. It takes four to six weeks to from the time you take the blood out to the time you put the cells back in. They had to go through a number of layers to make sure that they were really doing everything safely and carefully. So what were they worried about when they reintroduced these cells into the body. One one question was just you know with these cells even survive right. He just kind of disappear which has been a problem. In general with some genetically modified t cells it can be hard good for them to kind of thrive in the body and these these were cells that had been modified in several different ways. Then of course another question is are they going to cause harm MHM if they do survive and one particular concern with crisper. Is that when you go in to do this. Editing you can have these off off target effects. Were you accidentally cause modifications to other DNA. That you weren't aiming for there was concern that that could happen then of course that's changing other. DNA in the T.. Cells who knows what effects that might have on the patients so those are the big two questions and then also you know they probably wanted to know if the people would get better. Everyone of course hoped that that it would help. These patients get better at the same time. The trial was not really designed for efficacy it was too small and it was also also so new and so they made certain choices in the very specific details of the treatment. They offered that improved safety. There were certain things they did did to try and make it less likely that the immune system of the patients would react in a sort of dangerous way to the cells but in doing so that could potentially elite reduced. How effective the treatment is you know the target that they picked on the cancer cells? They pick that specific target because there had been a number of trials targeting doing that with traditional therapy so they knew was probably a pretty safe target. But it may be isn't the best target unfortunately and as you might expect from. I'm talking about it. The patients did not recover from their cancer. Because of this therapy. What were some of the other results of the experiment that we can talk about now so I would say the results were that for the time for which they've been followed? The treatment appeared safe so far. Nothing scary happened nothing. There were no showstoppers. They saw some off target effects. But those off target effects didn't seem to cause any obvious harm to the musicians in the cells that had the off target effects. The percentage of cells with those effects seemed to kind of fade out over time about the target effects like the changes made to the T.. Cells of these patients. Were those persistent in the body. One thing that I think was quite heartening. Is that these. He sells really stuck around in a way. That other t cells going after this particular target haven't in other published studies and so they've they've lasted so far up to nine months and they're continuing to follow these patients and also when they took out the cells over months which they did did they would take blood from the patients and then look at the sells again it could get them back and study them in the lab and those sales were targeting cancer in the lab now like you say in the patients. The benefits were definitely limited. There were three people treated one of those people has since died and in the other to their disease has progressed and they are getting other treatments. MHM so the effects were limited. You know it can be hard to kind of know how to understand that on the one hand this is just three patients and so we were very very sick. And so if we're thinking about what's going to be an effective treatment you need to treat more people to really know and then again you're thinking about this. First Time in people have focused on safety safety from your story from boats. It really seemed like that people in this field were saying this is a step. This is getting us over a really big hurdle. Yes I think it's a step and I think it's kind of layering on the use of crisper onto this other area of cell therapy that have gotten so much interest interest in generated so much excitement cancer but also still have a lot of room to improve and it's a way of saying can we make better use is other technology. What's expected to happen next more of the same thing? Are they going to try to infer different targets. One of the exciting things about this field right now. Is there so much happening. And people have so many he different ideas for what they could try and there are a lot of different theories and we don't really know what's going to pan out and what's not and so there are a lot of different. The group's thinking about different targets different cancers other diseases of course to apply crisper to their companies. That are involved. They're just a lot of different ways. You could go with this but right now. There are other trials that are recruiting patients for crisper modified t cells else and some people. I talked to said you know. There are surely going to be many more trials opening in parts result of this study. What kind of of regulatory oversight was there for this is there a body that governs crisper studies? There's not a body that's specific to crisper but there is as a group called the recombinant DNA Advisory Committee which is a a panel that has traditionally vetted the safety and ethics of different gene therapy trials funded by the US government or other other funders and so this went through the review of that committee. which is colloquially known as the rack of the and also so went through you know a lot of review of the National Institutes of health a lot of review from the US Food and Drug Administration? You know as you can imagine anything new. Where you're you're genetically commodifying cells to a degree? You have four earn away. You haven't before writing them into people you have to be careful and of course you know. Everyone has hopes for this therapy in the years ahead. And because of that you have to be so careful when you're starting out. The hopes of a lot of people were pinned on gene therapies. His and yeah you know some early problems. Really put a damper on the field for a long time. Yes if something really terrible happens not only is that obviously terrible for that individual it has these ripple effects across the field and so I think the people running this trial. We're thinking of both of those things as they designed and pursued the study. Thank you so much Jennifer. Thank

Crisper Cancer Solid Tumors Jennifer Hi Cardi Cell Therapy Nobel Prize Jennifer Cousin Frankel Staff Writer Us Food And Drug Administratio Jennifer Dna Advisory Committee Us Government National Institutes Of Health
Terminology and Science Museums

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

10:10 min | 8 months ago

Terminology and Science Museums

"So we can have a dialogue again. This is exciting. I love talking about museums with my museum friends and I hope you guys like it too but first first of all I wanted to. I neglected to mention something in my last episode with regards to conservators and this is very important for trivia purposes. One of the best solvents for gently cleaning the surface of paintings is human saliva and that sounds gross in weird but in fact any conservative that you talk it was like Oh yeah absolutely spit on that well not spit on it. I actually I got a chance to do that at work. The other you've got to spit on I got to spend on some painting raining so We were cleaning some Oil on board me and my coworker Carol. Hi Carol she doesn't listen to this podcast and She gave me a bunch of thin sticks and a bunch of loose cotton and she taught me to grab a piece of cotton and roll it up and stick it in my cheek and let it sit there and then pull it out. Roll it around the stick and then gently like buff. The surface of the vichy was hazing. You she he did the same thing. We're both both like cotton or cheeks like like the Godfather and cleaning the surface of paintings and it is this is an excellent solvent because it has a gentle and like I'm enzyme that breaks down the surface of dirt but doesn't harm The the image the image or the varnish. That's the word I'm looking for and this is why people don't want you to get up close and personal with the paintings museums because it's covered and spit. They're covered in human spirit. You guys just thinking they don't want you to spend on at least don't spit on them because it will break it down eventually eventually. Also zoos museums yes. One hundred percent hundred percent user museums. They have a collection process. They collect animals and they have a loan process. They loan animals to other museums for certain amount of time. There's paperwork involved. They have the accession process. It's more gruesome than a normal museum process shirts. They D- Accession. There's paperwork involved when an animal shuffles off this mortal coil. So I wanted to give a shout out to you my cousin the zoo not my my work cousin the chiefs that your cousin is zoo. Steve's yes yeah Steve's brothers the Internet my cousin Xue facts okay we we. We have a friend in listener yes Jane Liz Zookeeper Oh keeper. Yes Hello James. Hello James and we decided we're just going to go to the zoo with a microphone and having talked to us. I think it's a good idea and I think I think he would be down for it. He's been like really. I mean I feel terrible because we have been in touch with him and we just have not gotten a chance to like hook up and actually do an episode. But he's a great guy he he has very interesting work. He's funny interesting and we're definitely going to do an episode soon. And that's I think we definitely should go to the zoo do like real. NPR Shit Man Mandalay Bay. She goes to the zoo. I love that okay. That's it misinformation goes to the zoo. Get Ready James. We're coming for you all right museum terminology. Time time okay. All of these terms are for my award. Winning powerpoint presentation entitled Life Is Short and then you die physical deterioration and how to prevent it. It is not award-winning. It's just one of my powerpoint from class but okay I term inherent vice. which was my team? Name for Trivia and Grad School and. Yes we want a lot Inherent Vice is the tendency and physical objects to deteriorate because of the fundamental instability of the components of which they are made as opposed to deterioration caused us by external forces. What does that mean it? Basically means that the makeup of the object is slowly destroying it from the inside. And there's nothing you can do about it. A good example of this as newspapers the process by which the paper is made is very acidic which causes the paper to yellow and crumble eventually which is not reversible by any conservation mean all objects have some kind of inherent vice as a result of the baseline law of entropy of course but we're not going to get really philosophical about this because that's just looking into an abyss is that we just don't have time for today. My students in my injured archives course get a whole week of me just telling them how terrible everything the thing is. Light is bad. Water is bad. Air As bad heat is bad touching things as bad like just. Don't yeah just don't that's the that's basically. Yeah this is your stuff is going to die. Yup Life is short and then you die. That's why I called that. My students laugh but it's true. The next term is foxing. Your must be familiar. smiliar with this. It is an age related process of deterioration that causes spots and Browning on old paper documents. The name may derive from the Fox like Reddish Brown color of the stains or the arrest. Chemical Ferric Oxide which may be involved paper so affected is said to be Fox. I see this a lot with like bookbinding Oh yeah absolutely foxing also occurs biological study skins or specimens as an effective chemical reactions or mold on Melanin. The causes of foxing aren't super stood. It might be mold or the oxidation of metals. Like iron or copper in the pulp or rag from which the paper is made but no one is entirely sure it is reversible but it is kind even intensive process so a lot of times if the paper is already unstable foxing. Isn't that big of a deal and so a lot of conservatives we'll just leave it mhm unless it's like super bad and you can't actually read the paper yeah The next word is crippling Crippling the distinctive network of fine cracks in glass which is visible to the naked eye It's one of the symptoms of Glass Disease Aka sick class or glass s. l. nece nicer bones. Yup Bird bones. Glass disease is caused by an inherent instability the chemical composition of the original glass formula It is irreversible double but able to be slowed down by tight climate control which we will talk about in a moment and and Lauren did a really great episode heart glass. Yes I did an episode episode twenty one year. So we're back there in the catalog early enough first year and also if you like glass may I plug the series blown away on Netflix. which there's like competition show about glassblowing very fascinating so yeah glasses? Amazing like if you're a local New York state. I highly recommend the Corning Museum of glass which talks about the science the history the art and like another thing of glass. It's just all about glass and it's a big beautiful museum that got a great a gift shop off their gift shops fantastic and they do hot glass shows where they actually like make glass in front of you and talking about the process and it's really cool So highly recommend and go to the Corning Museum of Glass. The next term is called cobbling cobbling is a plea distortion of paper parchment or textile. It appears as has wrinkles puckers or ripples often in parallel ridges without creases liked buckling but appears in waves. So cobbling just kind of looks looks like like a rumpled sheet basically like on your bed also just as an FYI words like weeping oozing desiccation or drying out offc gassing the evaporation potentially dangerous chemicals into the air or fry -able which is easily broken apart or flaking tends to be words used in other fields as well but all have to do with pound object is damaged or breaking down the just going back The like this cock owing paper happens because Paper if it absorbs water and then when the water out so this is why you don't want your humidity and your temperature. Allocate Awhile Talk Yeah. That's that's a big thing that'll happen that you can like clearly visible that Yudo. Something's wrong paper starts doing yeah. It's a very obvious symptom Kim of that also a couple of words that are not necessarily damage But definitely our weaknesses in the object. So so this term correct floor. Crack Laura's a fine pattern of dense cracking formed on the surface of materials usually oil paintings. It can be a result of drying aging aging intentional patterning or a combination of all three and the term is most often used to refer to temper Oil paintings but it can also develop old ivory carvings painted miniatures on ivory backing. Recently analysis. Chrysler has been proposed as a way to authenticate art basically. It's just the way that paint is layered in the process of actually painting getting the piece of artwork sometimes certain layers Dry faster than others or there is an off gassing process during the drying process and it damages the surface level and so it actually shrinks or expands spending and causes these fine cracks Which is interesting Crack floor in Pottery is called crazing in that at similar in that it's fine. Cracks appear on the surface of the material most often the glaze layer of pottery ceramics and beautiful it is beautiful and especially like both cracker crazing. One could argue is desirable desirable in certain cases. Like when you see Chrysler and a painting you know it's old it's an antique Lens Air of like authenticity to it. crazing and pottery is seen as like a textural benefits and it does make the peace weaker to a certain extent. You're not supposed to like DOC put. You're not supposed to wash or soak pieces of pottery. That have crazing on them. Because that means that there's a weakness in the water can get into the poorest part of the pottery but it is very beautiful in some potters and artists. Like make sure that it is purposeful like they purposely fire. Fire it so that there is some crazy

Corning Museum Of Glass James Carol Chrysler Steve Chiefs Jane Liz Zookeeper Yudo Mandalay Bay Grad School NPR FOX Browning XUE Lauren New York Netflix. KIM Laura
Sepsis Is A Global Killer. Can Vitamin C Be The Cure?

Short Wave

04:57 min | 8 months ago

Sepsis Is A Global Killer. Can Vitamin C Be The Cure?

"Mattie Safai in the House with Richard Harris yet another one of my favorite science correspondence must be all your favorite special. That's what my mother always said. You're all my favorite Richard. You have some serious business to discuss today. Indeed indeed I do yes. I'm GonNa Talk to you about sepsis right so for anybody who might not know. Sepsis is actually caused by the body's reaction to an infection basically the immune system overreacts causing this huge inflammatory response. Blood vessels get a leaky which messes up. How blood flows throughout the body body? In severe cases. Septic shock can set in. And that's when your blood pressure drops to dangerously low levels sometimes leading to multiple organ failure and in death doctors treat that initial infection and they can try to manage the dangerous symptoms of Sepsis. But there's no cure for it that's right and as a result assault is the single most expensive condition in. US hospitals best estimate is that it strikes one point seven million people a year in the United States and kills more than a quarter million. Wow so it's a huge toll right and one of the reasons. It's so common is because a lot of different types of infections can result in sepsis many roads into sepsis but even though it's a huge deal we don't really talk about it that much in. That's kind of weird isn't it is such a common condition but it isn't even bigger problem. Globally thirty thousand people die of it every single day. That's why it's a huge number. It's truly under appreciated disease. And why I'm telling you the story today is because the results have been published important new study on the treatment of Sepsis with the transfusion of simple mixture really vitamin C.. And Fireman thion which is vitamin B. One that's right and also some corticosteroids. These are all cheap and readily available drugs so today in the show the journey to find a cure for sepsis. Yes we hear the latest on this wild claim about a potential cure of vitamin C drug cocktail. Okay Okay Richard. When you were first telling me about this you said you actually got to talk to somebody a few years ago? Who received this newfangled treatment right? I was interested in really following how this evolved volve this this audacious idea and seeing where it would go and actually a number of doctors immediately started picking up and started using it at least on their most desperately ill patients and talked to one of them. This guy with an incredible story in Christopher Kelly who had this horrid logging accident this is out in Seattle I was cutting for a logging outfit up on these rock cliffs and fell about one hundred and fifty foot for tree into these maple trees. They add a bunch of dead tops we call them widow makers mhm tree came down the butt of it bounce toward him crushing him. I heard the bones crunch when it got me. It was pretty precarity Yell for a minute. And then I'd pass out and I guess my ribs were ripping. My lungs is the reason I I was only you know in and out of consciousness. And Amazingly he was there for a couple of hours before a couple of other men working in the area found him and got him on a Medevac helicopter to harborview medical center in Seattle in the Wendy says he wound up with a shattered pelvis all of his ribs. Broken twenty two bones and Dane. The day I met him. He developed a very high fever along with shock. That's one of Kelly's doctors at David car-bomb who realized that Sepsis was beginning to set in so sepsis is one of the big risks and injuries like this because infections sometimes time start on the wounds on the skin or from inside the lungs or internal injuries or whatever and the infection of course can turn into septic shock which is the nastiest form of this condition. When Oregon's start to fail that often leads to death and as we mentioned earlier? There's no known cure for SEPSIS. That's right car-bomb could treat the underlying infection with antibiotics Roddick's but he was also one of a set of doctors who had actually started experimenting with his new treatment of vitamin C and firemen and steroids and discuss it with his son and his son and was very amenable. We talked about The fact that it's a new therapy that there really wasn't very strong evidence but I felt that it was not a ton of risk and that this could be beneficial. How did it work Richard? Well hold on how quickly to respond. Usually patients very sick for a few days before responding antibiotics and him it took about a day his fever head cleared and he was off the medicines to support his blood pressure and looked remarkably better. But this is not actually a totally new new idea at all. I mean vitamin CS. Curative Properties have been batted around for decades and decades. A lot of. It's kind of Kooky so that actually works against this argument people initially and understandably skeptical about it but that said it is true that people who have sepsis have surprisingly low levels of vitamin C in their blood. So there's some biological logical plausibility to doing this right.

Sepsis Richard Harris Seattle Fever United States Christopher Kelly Mattie Safai Harborview Medical Center Multiple Organ Failure Dane Curative Properties Assault Oregon Roddick Wendy
Luke Combs Interview

Bobbycast

07:09 min | 8 months ago

Luke Combs Interview

"All right. Welcome to episode to twenty-six lacomb likewise been home in a while so I'm not. I got a text from me like an hour to get here. Yeah Yeah it's a it's a decent way out you finish working out and I was like Oh looks looks to be here like saws throwing on clothes. You're like he's going to be hearing launderers. Wet Towel off all the way and then I didn't realize you live so far away. Yeah Yeah when did that happen for you. We actually able to buy some landing. It was probably just about a year ago. So I've been in my house just over a year now so is it feels like home it does. It does now for sure I definitely. Didn't we move there. You know because it was you know so far from town and our friends ends you know still live in town and it's just a it took a little bit of getting used to man but I wouldn't wanna be anywhere else now. Isn't it furniture the worst. Yes because you just don't expect expect it to be that expensive. Not only that but you think that like okay. Well if I'M GONNA spend X. amount on this couch which I think is an insane amount. There should just be one. That's there like you have one in the store and it's GonNa take you six months to get one to my house like I just don't understand a specially for a nice one right. You'd think they could move to the next right. You would think they would just be like. Oh let's just make this tomorrow. The things that I buy that are are frustrating to me our furniture and again I live in a pretty nice house now and but to fill it up with crap. I'm leaving in most of my rooms. It's Solano nope not at all. I don't WanNA leave empty because I'm ocd about that stuff and then they're like this is how much a bad costs you can. Refrigerators frigerator suck. frigerator are mine just broke recently which was great car tires. It's something else that you go. You gotTa have good ones. You get what you pay for. I've got a vehicle that's getting. I'm not there now. Giving me a new vehicle. It's broken like four times since I've had it Geeta lemon like women law. That's the thing right where they just like. Okay well we're just GONNA take the loss and just give you a new one so the car that you bought rubber broken four times. Yeah I mean it works but it's just kind of user error. No it's not user air. No it's it's great and it's just every time time it always happens right when I get right when I get home from like a long period of not being here and I haven't been able to drive live and then I get in it like at the airport and then it it breaks on the way home like you just trying to get home right by. TV does that enough. Like I'm ready to get home. I've been out the only time I need to use it. It didn't work and watch the office and just chilling then. It doesn't connect so I don't want them to fix it anymore just just either. Semi new owner argue Mary Fund or something. So Oh you did the last couple of New York doing doing sem love what was that like for you. Get in the call and I'm not sure how that call work. Do you go. I'd I'd like to be on. SNL think about us or not really you know it was like it was super last minute and it always is. I think it's like because they booked the hosts I mean I'm not certain but I feel like they book the hosts three weeks out and then the musical act. I mean it was like a week and a half so oh you didn't know for three or four months that you were going to be. SNL Yeah no no. It was like I got called in it was like. Hey we're doing this. Alison Week half and I was like okay so we had torsos scheduled like we rented out the space and all the crews. They're setting everything up. The ban guys had already rehearsed a couple of days and then they had to open. Go to New York like super last minute. That's pretty cool. Though right it was awesome and it was really awesome. It was it was definitely the coolest coolest list like filming thing experience that I've had what's it like walking into that space for the first time because you rehearse pre The day before or a couple of days so we went in. I mean two or three days. We were in New York for four days. And I can't imagine how. Jj was there heaps probably there for at least a week. Maybe maybe even the writing meetings he was in all the right meetings and changing the skits and everything like that so it was really cool because I grew up watching US L. With my dad and and so it was really neat. It was very surreal to be there in like C set so a conic you know and is awesome in You know definitely do it again. Do you do the first. Because the first show they we do as full and then they'll end up moving and cutting sketches a bit and then they just go again and do it again live. Yes when you do the first one to do the same two songs running just as you were going to run and how did you feel after basically the super dress rehearsal talk really good about it. I mean you know Lauren came in and was like. Hey you're holding the Mike too high I on the first song cameras. Yeah and you can't because normally I'm holding up here and he's like why can't see your face if you're holding up here so you got to just calm. But that was the only we note that he had but other than that it was great. Who did you ask to take pictures with? I didn't really ask. I'm not a big like I'm not a big like take the picture backstage guy you know unless it happens naturally Obviously me and JJ got a picture. But I mean obviously I wanted to picture with Lorne because I've been a fan of his for a long time and But that was it you know I. I've never been into like unless it's a natural thing that happens. You know. I'm not a big like pop in the dressing room and be like what's You know I mean I don't mind that at all. I actually love when people do that but sometimes I just feel uncomfortable about it. You know because you don't really know I didn't know. Jj Who's going to be like Super Nice Awesome Guy. You Know I. I mean I've never met him so he might have been like. Who's this Guy Michaels? Like he was awesome. He was Super Nice. He's definitely a boss. You can definitely tell. He runs the show But he was he was very nice. Man Very no one will Just had some great stories you know and then. Jj Eh you know. Obviously he's mass of my experience the NFL players as they look big on TV. But then when you meet them you're like Oh my God. They're so big. It was like that to me yes. They're so much bigger they look big on TV but everyone on TV's big on the Games you know so you don't really like if there's the guy that looks bigger than the rest of the guys that guy's really big and so sent him to Jj it was. It was definitely weird. I'm not small guy but he was just massive Tali six foot so when you did the promos watching some of those promos. Because that's those are the iconic thing where they have one of the cast members the host and the musical art MHM like as far as what I was able to see. That was one of the coolest things I got to see you do because I've just seen so many people do that every year. Yeah it was neat and they put eighty Brian on a like an apple box so she she was just she was like she looked like a child. You know beside us. So they had her up on apple doc just so she was like in the frame. I mean it was. It was pretty

JJ New York Apple United States SNL NFL Solano Alison Week Mary Fund Brian Lauren Lorne Mike Michaels
Will treating poverty reshape a childs brain?

The Big Story

13:41 min | 8 months ago

Will treating poverty reshape a childs brain?

"What does it mean to grow up for that sounded like a philosophical question? I didn't mean it that way. It's a real. How does a child's life change when they spend their formative years never having enough money living below the poverty line in some cases their family barely making it paycheck to paycheck? What don't those kids do because of that? What hurdles as a place in their path? How does it affect them? Down the road does the impact of poverty literally alter their brains. And if that's the case how can we change that a simple yep. Profound experiment aims to answer that question and perhaps even offer a controversial but effective cure for the damage. That poverty does to a child. What is that cure? While what do you think the cure for poverty is MHM Jordan Heath. Rawlings this is the big story. Shannon proud foot is a writer at Maclean's one of our favorite guests. Hope Shanna I don't either. Why don't you start by kind of level setting for us and in terms of research that has been done? What do we know about children who grow up in poverty? Okay okay so what has been known for years in all kinds of dimensions. Is that kids who grew up in poverty struggle across sort of staunching array of things. You know they tend to be physically smaller smaller. They tend to get sick more often. But for the purposes of this study the ones were most interested in are there's all kinds of of cognitive academic disadvantages. They have so that we know. Oh in very broad global ways. That kids who grew up in poverty tend to do worse in school than kids. Who Grow up more well off They have lower graduation rates. Their grades aren't as good. They have have less likelihood of going on to post secondary. But what was not known until sort of astonishingly recently is why I kinda Kinda came to think of the analogy as as you. You know we knew that that kids who grew up poor would kind of emerge from the woods when they finished childhood different point than richer kids but nobody had thought to look at the path of how they got there. Because there's different ways to have poor academic outcomes right which of their skills were lagging. What was what was going on there? And so one of the principal investigators on this new new study that I've written about Kimberly Noble who works at Columbia University. Her huge splash. She made early in her career. She's a neuroscientist was looking added. Exactly why it is. That kids who grow up poor tend to do more poorly in school and and and cognitively I'm so sh- she sort of unpacked the specific skills the specific regions of the brain the the wise in house of how poverty affects how kids process information and achieve academically later in their lives. And what does she learn so the big takeaway is that Kids who grew up poor tend to lag in language skills like reading and vocabulary and also in sort of what we might think of self restraint skill so the ability to ignore distractions to concentrate working memory that kind of stuff and then subsequently Noble Co authored authored. A big paper in two thousand fifteen. That made a huge splash again. In this area of academic research where they scan the brains of just over a thousand kids and teens and the average sort of the size of their brains they were looking at primarily. What's called the corneal surface area? So this is the the outer wrinkly part of the brain. It does a lot of the heavy lifting cognitively early and when they sort of correlated different different aspects of these kids profiles the one thing they found that was consistently associated with the size as of the coral surface area on the brain was family income so that raises all kinds of interesting questions about what's going on there and not immediately makes the leap to me. It's so compelling because it makes the leap from okay. There are different skills or different strengths. That kids were better off. You know have that kids who are poor. Don't but it's physically. We possibly reshaping their brains or at least associated with a different shape and size to their brains which is quite profound. It's something that you would just never expect to see proven. You might see the results of it but to prove that correlation is quite startling right and so using the word correlation Asian here is important because what Nobles Research and other people who've been working in this area consistently over the last couple of decades has shown is that we know that poverty is associated with all all these negative outcomes. That's correlation what nobody has been able to show is causation. Has What you could do is pull that apart and say okay but is it really. The fact that these kids are poorer that their brains are smaller. They have a harder time with these skills or is it that poor families are more likely to be in a single parent situation or have substance abuse or live in neighborhoods. That are kind of scary very like you just can't and scientifically say that it's the poverty that's causing this. You can only say that the poverty sort of shows us that this is occurring. So that's where this is new unbelievably ambitious but also incredibly simple and elegant study comes in that started about a year ago it will be ongoing for the next several years before we talk about that. Study because we're GONNA spend a lot of time on that. You mentioned that we tend to think and think of and treat the various disadvantageous effects of poverty offers. You know the the school skills that these kids can struggle within. What have we traditionally done to help them? When when those difficulties manifest yes there's sort of different steps along on the way where you could intervene if you start to notice that a child in grade one is struggling in school? And you know. They come from a disadvantaged family background where there's all kinds of ways you can kick in tutoring. You can have them go to special classes for extra support. You can make sure that there's an individual learning plan in place but those things tend to be a really ambitious that costs a lot of money either very time intensive and they happen quite late in the process because research shows that kids you know from from the age of two or even earlier you can already see the effects of poverty so if you're not able to identify the kind of downstream effects the symptoms if you will until they're in school and then try to sort of intervene and turn back the clock. Obviously that's a much much more difficult proposition. If you think about kids growing up in poverty have certain life experiences that appear to affect their brains in certain ways that then affects their learning potential potential. Well depending on where you intervene in that sort of stream of cascading effects it might be a bit easier. What if you could inoculate the kids against that whole all domino effect starting in the first place? It's almost like rather than intervening after someone has fallen ill with the disease in his experiencing symptoms. Would if you gave them a vaccine that prevented I'm from ever getting the disease in the first place. Now I'm certainly. This is just a creative analogy. I'm using calling poverty or its effects a disease but it sort of suggests that if the study study is born out there may be a more elegant more efficient possibly even simpler more effective way to kind of intervene earlier in the process before or the negative effects of already kicked in. And then you're trying to undo them so explain the study now and what it does. What is I guess it's called babies first years. Yeah babies first year so it's hugely ambitious. Seventeen million dollars in public and private funding very heavy hitting academic experts from across the US primarily so they're six principal investigators instigators who are sort of the top in their field at different institutions in different areas of expertise you have neuroscience economics sociology education. Things like that at what they did is they went to Maternity wards in four cities so they picked out New Orleans. Minneapolis Saint Paul New York City and Omaha and they deliberately picked cities cities where they would get kind of a nice cross range of rural versus urban different demographic make-up's and they recruited one thousand mothers within days of having their babies so they recruited created the right from the hospital to enroll in this study and there is effectively again because they're trying to establish causation. There's effectively a placebo group or control group and a treatment group and so all of the MOMS who are enrolled in the study will receive a debit card and every month money will be loaded onto that debit card. So sixty percent of the MOMS will receive. What's called a nominal amount of money? Twenty bucks so enough to be worth their while to stay in the study but not enough to really make a huge difference and that's essentially the placebo where you're giving them money. You're giving giving them a debit card. You're keeping them in the study and keep tabs on them and their kids but the amount of money is not really a difference making amount and forty percent of the MOMS in the study those in the quote unquote treatment in group are going to receive three hundred thirty three dollars a month. So that adds up to four thousand dollars a year which depending on your income bracket may or may not seem like a lot of money but all of the MOMS in this study are at or below the poverty line and so the idea is that because the families the MOMS and kids in this study are randomized into one group or the other? They're it just kinda drawn by a computer. If at the end of the study there are differences between the group that got more money in the group that got less then you can scientifically solidly say that. It's because of the money honey. That is the difference between the two and that would finally allow them to establish causation as opposed to just correlation in terms of poverty and all these negative in outcomes for kids. Well how will the study proceed. And how will they attempt to kind of measure this along the way. They've already started with what they call through to the year. One so what. The idea is that they will check in with the the kids and MOMS around the kids first birthday second birthday. Third Birthday the study is funded up to that point so far but they're now applying for continuous funding and there is is a pretty good precedent of really ambitious. Recall Longitudinal Studies that follow people over time being extended so you can easily imagine that maybe the study won't end when these kids are three. It might follow them until they're five until ten until they're twenty. There's fascinating possibilities there. But they will bring them into the lab and obviously the kids would be turning one to three on a rolling basis because the mom's been recruited all year. They'll do some brain scans of the kids. They'll talk to the moms about sort of how things are for them. On a day to day basis it will take a hair sample of the MOMS which allows them to measure stress through cortisol levels built a video of the moms playing with their kids so that allows them to kind of code for look at the quality of interaction between the parents and the kids and sort of how they're how they're mood is with each other and eventually down the road as the kids get a little older closer to three they will do more. Ambitious brain scans functional. MRI To show them better sort of specifically how the different areas of the brain are working size of the different areas and to really unpack sort of the differences that may emerge because they they don't know the end the research researchers very open about that. We can talk about what they think might happen. But they really don't know and either way the study should come out with a pretty fascinating fascinating robust answer about would if the real problem with an he's problem in quotes but if the real problem with poor families or four families is chess money and what if you just give the money like what if you don't worry about stuff like do. They have enough books in their house. Other kids enrolled in good preschool programs. You know do. The parents have a harmonious oneal relationship. Would have you just give them a chunk of money. Does that change everything a little bit. It's it's kind of has amazing possible implications or the answer might aby. No you know what it doesn't change that much. There is too much stress in the lives of these families. There are too many factors going on that money. Just can't cancel out so either wait you sort of end up with a really interesting answer will not put too fine a point on it but I can imagine that if this study did prove causation. Shen and did prove that look. It's not any of these other things it's just money that would really blow up some of the stigmas that are attached to kids in poverty. Yeah I mean there. There are obvious quite deep political implications here existential implications. You Know People's ideas about why some people have more. Some people have lost their ideas about how we as a society should help people or how much people should bootstrap themselves up. Those are pretty deeply held things right. Those are sort of the maybe the most hot metrics of by which we sort of see political divisiveness right now. So yeah I mean you're not going to convert vert everyone but it's always an interesting thing to have a solid scientific answer. You can point to know. The researchers are very careful to say they're not suggesting this panacea. They're not saying we should get rid of of all these ambitious. You know preschool improvement programs or parenting classes or anything like that and just give us families envelopes of cash. It's more that this is an interesting idea. That's worth testing. That hasn't been tested because there have been decades of testing that have gone on around. You know preschool programs parenting all that other stuff so we should road test this one too and no. It is a useful tool to have in the toolbox but absolutely if the answer comes back that guess what if you give poor families four thousand bucks a year. It improves a bunch which of things by enough to matter. Then that might suggest that maybe the only problem with those Pam families was that they were poor and if you give them a little leg up on the poverty already they can sort of solve all the other stuff themselves. There's also all kinds of other expectations baked into this about how poor people spend money and musicians about finances. And I when I asked I asked Kimberly Noble. Do you get us by people. Like what if the mom spend the money on crappy stuff like what if they make poor decisions in there you know buying liquor Acre cigarettes or whatever and she laughed and said we get that question all the time. It's one of the first things they get us because there's no strings attached to this money but the answer is that that just it doesn't really happen. They did a small pilot. Study to sort of test the feasibility of the debit card thing and out of I think it was eleven hundred transactions. Exactly three occurred at stores that could be considered liquor stores.

Kimberly Noble Principal Shannon Jordan Heath Rawlings Shanna United States Noble Co Maclean New Orleans Writer Nobles Research Cortisol Longitudinal Studies Columbia University PAM Minneapolis Shen Omaha
We Are Celebrating Kobe Bryants #GirlDad Legacy

Yes, Girl!

09:55 min | 8 months ago

We Are Celebrating Kobe Bryants #GirlDad Legacy

"I I'll be honest. It's been a rough week. I've lost a bit of my spirit right now. We understand We're all learning learning about the news of Kobe. Bryant and his daughter who's donating he The seven other passengers and that Sunday was a horrible as a whole is really bad and we know everybody is hurting everyone I think honestly I think the the world is shocked especially Los Angeles. You know Peres Kobe's family his ways all of their families really everyone family. There's a lot of loss but there seems to be some love and gratitude. That's been bubbling. Blaine that you I noticed. Yes so we were looking and you know all the journalists. During their due diligence we know what journalists do. They were finding older clips of Kobe. Talking about being a father you know being a man loving his family and one of them that emerged. He's someone's did you ever WanNa boy because you know. He was the proud father of four girls and he was like you know. I'M A girl dead. All the way and the girl that movement has happened bothers all over the Internet. Ah from every race. Every corner of the world are proudly proclaiming girl. DADS fathers of girls just for clarity bothers. Girls groner young are posting the images. And how they are to be grow father and I quit. I have to say we needed this moment. Because as I was thinking about this you know definitely And I say this on the episode that we have in the weeds of covering it like you said You know the notes and the nuts and bolts but also legacy of Kobe But what has been really beautiful and I think it was your post on the one. You did on dedicated just to his relationship with G. G. and I started thinking about how we're going to broach conversation station this week and you know realize that we have a girl debt right here amongst us right in the office right in the office so while we were daughters four daughters. This someone we've been trying to talk to like you said we just wanted his business. His business masterclass. We decided to talk to our essence ventures founder and chair Richard Dennis tennis about being a Gerlad. Yep Proud data four girls and he's married four daughters ages twenty five to nine so he he knows a few you think And you know as a dis girl you guys know you often hear me talk about my relationship my father but you know I just can't stop looking at these images of Koby and Jonah and the thing that it's hard to find anything to feel good about but I was telling corey the part that I keep thinking his. He died doing what he loved. The most which is being an easing. Yep and if you gotta go let it be doing something you love with the people that you love and the fact that he was with his daughter being a coach and a father other supporting her supporting her friends. Yeah exactly and I have to say To all the amazing black fathers out there any amazing father's period. Yeah you know we see you. Thank you and this conversation. Today is my father's yet but it was time to have this conversation. Just talk about what it means to be the father of a daughter order so up next our conversation with richly Dennis and please after you listen guys Hashtag escrow. podcast tells about your girl that if you are girl dad just what you felt listening to the conversation and just what you feel about raising daughters. Let's talk about it so Charlie Pin Corey. We are coming together under different circumstances this week. It's been a rough week very sad Um as you know and as our listeners know we're all dealing with the sudden passing of the Great Kobe Bryant and and his daughter plus seven other passengers that died in a helicopter crash on Sunday But as you and I we've been deep the weeds covering it And the thing that I thought was most beautiful and this is not about social following social traffic. You did a story just on on the fact that when it was confirmed that his daughter was in the playing with him and they're behind and their bonds. And everyone's you know start talking about that and we sorry thinking like we've got to talk to a dad how they feel dad of daughters and how they feel about that and last night we would like Ritu Dennis the essence ventures founder and chair. And Not because you were easy to get to but it makes it made sense because you have four daughters ages twenty five nine Mr Richard Loud Girl Dad. We spent every day. I had the pleasure of getting to know some of your daughters here. They have their own podcast. Girls United shout out there with a walk into the shower at. We'll thank you thanks for. Thanks for thinking man inviting me me. You know it's Having having daughters In the world that we live in and the challenges that we go through the community but more specifically the challenges at Women go through in this society and raising women to not be afraid of what they face to not to not feel overwhelmed by what they faced. Raced to to actually be empowered by what they face and to and to be able to Look beyond the challenge in C- Eh See how you conquer that challenge has been has been an incredible motivating factor for me in my life in the things that I do. And so The Girl Dad thing Israel Israel that how did you feel. Oh when you heard this news. We're you you know what happened when I heard this news I was actually on a plane. ooh Move I was on a plane back from From Davos and and all. I wanted to do to hug my daughters. All I wanted to do was to hug them. And as soon as I got off the plane I made a beeline aligned to them. And that's that's what I did and And in that moment All the emotions emotions go through you right and all the emotions around what they mean to you what you mean to them but then also so what you must fight together and how and how much stronger you are because you have daughters and how much stronger they are. Because they they have a father that is focused on them overcoming and becoming in conquering and celebrating with them. I'm and living with them. And and seeing them go from infants to now young women and how they flourish in how they grow and the things that they're doing all all of that comes through you and there's there's nothing there's no greater satisfaction in life I can tell you like Kobe You know what's been surfacing now as the clip with the ESPN reporter L.. Dunkin where she asked him wants to. Do you ever want boys so so. Did you ever want boys. You know that I haven't seen that clip but I can tell you I've never wanted for a boy MHM Right I've never I've never wanted for a boy. I think that when you're when you're when you're a I have a sister right. And so you know I thought I would have a a son and a daughter right And then had my first daughter and then I had my second daughter and then had my third daughter and then I had my fourth daughter and I can tell you that there was never a time where where I thought. I hope. This time is a boy or I wish it was a boy or or any of those things right. And there's just something thing when you and I I mean I've never had a son so I don't know but there was something really magical each time. I held one of those babies in my hand. Right right when those young young girls in my hand one of those baby girls in my hand and all the responsibility that I felt right and all the all the commitment commitment that I felt in all the drive that I felt another motivation that I felt because I knew that I'd have partners throughout life in them and that they would have a partner in me throughout life and and that has just driven relationship which is just an amazing? I mean I I I think I have the greatest daughters on the planet as does every other but their minds claiming I think I have the greatest daughters on the planet.

Peres Kobe Kobe Bryant Charlie Pin Corey Founder Ritu Dennis Los Angeles Partner Richard Dennis Israel Dads Blaine Davos Mr Richard G. G. Gerlad Koby Espn Dunkin Jonah Reporter
Dog and goat compete for honorary mayor of Vermont town

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:38 sec | 8 months ago

Dog and goat compete for honorary mayor of Vermont town

"Jerusalem is not for sale and in fair haven Vermont you can vote for a coach or a dog for mayor this year's honorary electoral battle pits link in the goat again Sammy the dog voting on animals is an idea how much by the town manager it's designed to raise the money to fix up an area playground and get kids into civics was just trying to decide the benefits of both with the gold as mayor you you get like a built in maintenance crew yeah they really right stuff eat the grass yeah things like that yeah the dog you probably get a consensus builder at times whiting is tail wants to be friends with everybody MHM do as a sub decision there they can go on to the mayor and vice mayor or something thanks to him twenty three minutes after the hour on this morning America's first news coming up next beyond baseball cards and comic books the new

Jerusalem Vermont America Sammy Baseball
Nikki Haley: "No One Is Going to Fight For You But You"

Journeys of Faith with Paula Faris

09:58 min | 8 months ago

Nikki Haley: "No One Is Going to Fight For You But You"

"Hey there it's Paula Farris and welcome to journeys of faith. Our next guest is widely expected to run for president in twenty twenty four. We're talking to Nikki. Haley former governor of South Carolina and United States Ambassador to the UN on this episode. Haley whose parents are from India talks about being raised in in a Sikh family in rural South Carolina. She reveals what she loves about the Sikh faith but also why she converted to Christianity Haley also dives lives into the confederate flag. Debate those rumors about her replacing Mike Pence on the ticket and she opens up like never before about a possible run for president. Here's Nikki Haley. Nikki Haley welcome into the studio for the journeys of Faith podcast. Last time I saw you on the sidelines of the National Championship Chip College Football Championship game. When Clemson was beating Alabama? Such a good time had an amazing program. I'm really three National Championships. UNSHIPPED four years. We're proud Davo. Were proud of that team or product. Schoon yeah you are and you went to Clemson just for all of those listening out there. You graduated from Clemson and I'm not GonNa date you and say when which are very young well I graduated from Clemson met my husband my first weekend at Clemson got engaged at Clemson and our daughter daughter is now at Clemson's who were a bit clemson obsessed what I really love about your history. Your faith history. You're raised in a seekonk so tell me uh-huh maybe some of the tenants the main tenants of the Sikh faith. Well you know it's interesting because we were the only Indian family in a small southern town probably less the one percent of the population in South Carolina's Indian. And then you go when you look at the Sikhs in the area I mean it was just small. Every third Sunday Sunday seek families would get together at someone's home in the state to have to have prayers and so it was probably no more than one hundred people people that we would get together with but the faith itself is a very kind peaceful faith. It's one that's all accepting mm-hmm they believe in one God and what was so interesting was even though I would go every third Sunday with my family somewhere My parents made us go to different churches. Methodist Baptist Catholic Yummy. You name it. They go so my mom would say I want you to respect everyone and how they do their prayers but you understand. There's one guide but everyone has has their own pathway. And as long as you have your relationship with God the new will be okay and so they just wanted us one to respect other religions but to to understand and see the relationship people have with God and so it was really important because I talk about how and why I converted converted when I would go to a good war or temple for prayers. I would feel it. I would feel God in the room but I couldn't understand understand it because I didn't I didn't know the religion I didn't know the language and so when I started dating my husband and we started going more and more to his church and he was methodist. I immediately could relate I immediately. You found a connection of a sudden there was not just the feeling but it was the words that I could relate to. That really meant something to me. And that was really when I knew if I wanted to grow deeper in my faith if I wanted to have a stronger relationship tip I needed to have something that spoke to me and so that was that was how it happened so your husband was methodist when you met him. Yeah you're seek and you had a multi-denominational wedding you celebrated the methodist traditions and the Sikh traditions girl my family obviously wanted to see me have an Indian ceremony so I did. So that was for all of their friends and family and then we had a Christian ceremony for Michael's friends and family so in the end we got married twice. Were doubly. Okay yes you're deli okay. I know you just touched on it. But what made you convert to Christianity from the Sikh faith a faith that your parents still adhere adhere to it really was when you grow your faith you have to be able to talk to God and you have to be able to go to a service service and feel it and if you don't understand the language you're not hearing it and it's harder and harder to feel it and so the the language that they're speaking is just to clarify Punjabi. Yes was what they were speaking at the time. But you know you have to have that connection and when you're sitting thing in service and you feel it that's one it's so important you know I always say My faith has grown over time. Because you know I you have a faith because your appearance teach you to have a strong faith then you start to grow when you get married because you have faith together with your husband and then when you have children it takes you to a whole new level because Michael always said that our children if we could teach them a faith and a conscience everything else would be okay and so all of a sudden it gets deeper and then as I went through challenges in my life it just went to another level I mean obviously when we dealt with the Charleston shooting. I think that was a huge turning point for me because it was so painful and it was so hard that there was no one or nothing that was going to get me through that but God and I I mean that's when I started to believe in and just recite Joshua one nine be strong and be courageous. Do not be afraid you know or the Lord. Your God is with you wherever God with you wherever you go and I think that was you know when you when you feel that and you and it speaks to you you look more for how else it can speak to you and how you can grow your faith. Hey I want to touch on the Charleston shooting in just a moment which you write about in yearbook. That's out with all due respect it was released in two thousand nineteen but just going back to the Sikh faith. I know you have converted to Christianity. Your parents are still seek. Are there parts of the faith. The tradition practices that you still implement into to your daily life that you still hold dear. I think you know more than that. It's just respect for parents. Respect for family Love of all people MHM Respect for all people and you know in the Sikh faith it acknowledges other religions so it doesn't say you have to be secret nothing else. It acknowledges analogize other religions it acknowledges Jesus it acknowledges you know that Jesus was the son of God you and so there's different things that they had more than that what I take from it is the is the respect and the peaceful side of the Sikh faith which is respect everyone and in everything you do in your life should lead to peace and the best way to appreciate your blessings is to give back. Those were the things that I took away from what my parents parents taught us. And when the Sikh faith taught us and so then when I converted to Christianity those are all things that you can still go and build on and carry it forward right but I I you know. I can't give enough credit to my parents for how they raised us. And how much emphasis put on the respect of other religions and I think that's that's what made for me and easier transition and they have never had a problem with the fact that I've converted and I want to talk about your book. Yes called with all due respect out. Now congratulations thank you a lot of fun to write very therapeutic. I can imagine but in one of the sections. I know you talk about your faith in the book but in one of the sections you talk about the Charleston shooting which you just mentioned in how much you relied on your faith to get you through that you also made the decision to take down the confederate flag can at the State House grounds. And you said at the time that it because of the connection in the connotation to hatred and racism At I know recently you WanNa Glenn Back and you said that you caused a little controversy in that interview. You said that some saw the confederate flag is service and sacrifice and heritage. And that Dylann unroofed. The gunmen hijacked it. Some people felt that this was a reversal. Because in two thousand fifteen you say that it's deeply offensive symbol of brutally oppressive past. I was at a reversal. So telling of how toxic politics has gotten literally the same words I said in Glen on the Glenn Beck Show are the same words. I said in twenty-fifty if you go back and read my speech where I'm asking for the flag to come down. I talk about how some some people in the state saw the flag and related to service and heritage and talk about the other people in the state that saw all the flag and felt pain. And what I said was. We don't want anyone in our state to feel pain when they see that flag and I went on onto say not to judge either side as a governor. That's not your job. You Represent All people what it was was. I need all of you to come together. You can have respect for the confederate flag. But we're going to move it to a museum because it is a living breathing symbol. That does not represent. Is that all of the people in the state and went on to talk about. How if it causes any child pain when they passed that Nate House? There's something wrong and and we needed to pull it down. Had I gone and said that half the state was racist. That flag would never have come

Nikki Haley Clemson South Carolina Charleston Michael Mike Pence President Trump Paula Farris India UN Methodist Baptist Catholic Yum Pain United States Ambassador Alabama Seekonk Nate House Dylann Unroofed Joshua State House
Atheist Experience with Matt Dillahunty & Don Baker

The Atheist Experience

09:05 min | 8 months ago

Atheist Experience with Matt Dillahunty & Don Baker

"Today's January twenty six two thousand nineteen. I'm your host Matt Dillon. Are you on some edzard. What's the deal joining me? This is John Baker. We are here in the sense to go. Then I know how you doing out there in the world. Yeah Yeah Yeah we are. We're live and You know stuff happens zip so after having by the way I'm GonNa talk some. ACA Business for funsies so after having solved our Toilet problem and then authorizing the board authorized the expense of nineteen thousand dollars words to replace the concrete sewer line that drains. It's been there for fifty six years or whatever and there's tree roots growing through it so it has to be done and that's just what it's going to be it comes out here. Runs runs out to the street. We're GONNA replace that. Everything's working after clearing it out Today it's not so it's a good thing that the port bodies still here however The repairs are we're gonNA be done Soon and then hopefully be working But that's a good point to remind people that you can become a patron and supporter of the Atheist Community of Authentic Pedro Dot com slash the atheist atheist experience. And that's the. That's the way we use your money. We should sell naming rights to that toilet we should. It's it's which ever apologised donates the most modern there you go it will become their throne and put their name on it. No it's it's all good but yeah I just got her this morning so yesterday we we were doing a series of adventures outings. The errands our a new board member and Events Coordinator and so we had done The Texas Renaissance Fair but yesterday we went to the Houston Museum of Natural Science And the planetarium originally it was just. We're going to the planetarium for the pink. Floyd show okay and I have some comments about that first of all these still do that. Yeah that was the thing back when I was a kid. Yeah it's actually the same thing is it. Oh my goodness so Thanks Aaron for organizing. This is and I'm glad we went and I enjoyed the show. But if I driven two and a half hours to Houston and two and a half hours back to see the forty you know listen to dark side of the moon and watch graphics that were originally done in like the ninety S. I might have been disappointed however as it turns out. Since there's nothing else there at the planetarium property theater you know and I want to go back and see like some space stuff but we did get to walk around That museum in Houston great stuff. There had a great time That would incredibly good dinosaur collection mhm they multiple t rexes and Other we we joked that we're going to spend all day looking at rocks because the fossils are essentially rocks walks. The rocks that the fossils are in Iraq's the gemstone collection is rocks pretty rocks the pottery and stuff that that's done by the Americans. No no no no. The taxidermy. Stuff was not rocks. But I decided that for fun we would say we went look rocks and stuffed animals malls because that's basically There was some good stuff. There is A Nice Egyptian exhibit. some cool stuff on you know evolution Asian in good dating and probably not as informative and educational as much as it is observational. But I out a really good time there Lots of stuff to see and I was exhausted by the time I got home. Lives her Sherwin so for the first time in eight is the dominant Demille Museum. We drove passive the Fine Arts Museum which caught my attention because Their advertisement is girl with a Pearl earring. The VERMEILLE vermeer not for me But also at the at that. Here's the museum they had Faberge display including a faberge egg a bunch of items that were created. It was a good day and so so While we just drove my truck and didn't use the van because there weren't that many people who showed up here and some people just met US there Yeah if for the people who who are in the Austin area or going to be in the area buildings open seven days a week roughly from eleven to nine or so. There's a number of events going on including various gaming gatherings and philosophical off discussions and then the hosts were recording countless shows now in addition to the experience and talk to them which was on earlier Friday nights is truth. Wanted but there was a problem with the Internet and so that that truth wanted is going to air immediately after this I believe on the same channel. Same as we've done for other things so if you missed ocoee or if you missed wanted on Friday you'll be able to watch it. The the official premiere of the recorded version of a live show immediately following. If you can't get enough atheism today and you should do right. Because there wasn't very I was here when they were recording. There wasn't all that much atheism on there. There was Interesting pay perhaps conspiracy theorist type stuff off and on and some good discussions. Yeah and Topaz imaginary friends. Okay yeah that you know Dan Had Eric Murphy theonest guest. And so that'd be airing right after this. In addition to the atheist experience. Talk here then truth. Wanted we also produce godless bitches. Parenting beyond belief Secular sexuality which Airs Live Live on Thursdays and Just way too much stuff for me to name but not too much stuff for you to watch because we're finally producing enough content so that it's is not just ooh call in and argue with the douchebag you know me being the Douchebag News twenty four hours a day every day I I would do this show every single day for three hours. My goodness Yeah so life man is his life. This is this is like a okay so anyway You have been doing this show longer than I have a calendar time by a couple of years. But you've gone far more episodes awesome. I have yeah but I haven't done as many episodes on failures and where where I come in with the topic all the time I I do try to do that. And today you have in other topic another topic is kind of a light topic today Last time I talked about God's anointed leaders And how the Bible sort of says you know every every leader is anointed by God and chosen by God and you better damn will obey them Today I have an editorial from the magazine Christianity Andy Today that came out December nineteenth and It's about the about the impeachment trial and such and I'm going to read read a couple of quotes from it and then read a couple of his responses and that'll be my topic today And as a reminder yeah The Atheist Community Boston is is nonpartisan nonpartisan and we're not endorsing any candidate or anything else but we can in fact talk about issues and we can talk about people's positions on issues and stuff like that. It's right so we're not telling you who to vote for absolutely absolutely not. Well we would like you to vote. Though I can not voting as a good thing I can take opposition to other people to participate in the system. especially if you're going to be one of the people who complains about the right. which would you everybody complains about? I I loved hearing from people complaining. They're like I don't voting's a waste of time and all I'm tired of voting for the lesser of two evils. Well if you even if you view it that way where there's two evils voting for the less of lesser of those two evils is by your own admission the better choice and and if by not voting the worst of the two evils gets elected or gets passed as legislation you basically implicitly supported and endorsed the greater of the two who evils by not on sending a message. Okay yes you are are sending a message and don't get me wrong apathetic. I used to be on it. I I was largely apolitical. I didn't care. I didn't think my vote Matt. Oh I live in you. Know in this place and it's going to go read or it's GonNa go blue depending on what my vote doesn't matter. There's lots of other reasons listens to vote and it's not. I think I think when people do that. Oh I'm vote. Why would I vote for the lesser of two evils I think that's a a gross oversample simplification perhaps misrepresentation but it. Lets me know that they're at least okay. And and actually I've seen people post that I'm not gonNa vote for the last two evils. Let the let the worst or the of the two evils have it and let this whole thing burned down and crumble. So that we can start over again attend because Yeah the the sausage making making isn't very pretty there. Yeah it's also an issue of like the perfect is the enemy of the good and if you expect the there's not a single candidate or probably not even a piece of legislation that I would remotely consider perfect If anything politics is the art of compromise and if nobody's particularly happy happy the argument is that you probably done pretty good but if if you're waiting for perfection if you have some kind of Utopian ideal yeah then you're GonNa find yourself constantly disappointed and sometimes you go with this just better or this is good enough and this gets the foot in the door to allow you know. Allow us to continue continue improving.

Matt Dillon Houston Atheist Community Of Authentic John Baker Houston Museum Of Natural Scie Fine Arts Museum Douchebag News United States Demille Museum Floyd Events Coordinator Aaron Iraq Sherwin Official Austin DAN Eric Murphy
Sleepwalkers at CES

Sleepwalkers

09:17 min | 8 months ago

Sleepwalkers at CES

"Secure I'd never been to Las Vegas before which is the difference between us. I've Been Vegas gets too many times. I could tell and didn't feel good to be in good hands with an old vegas handler. You one of the new things. Though for me was slots which I don't normally play play. I think subconsciously I was thinking about what Tristan Harris talked about in the first season of sleep walker former Google lower. Who told us that? Instagram is actually supposed to feel a lot like slot machine or the Tristan studied at the Stanford persuasion lab and told us about how casino architecture has influenced the development of highly addictive tape products like instagram. Interesting for me to actually see Vegas and the bright lights and the impossibility of escape firsthand not to mention the replicas of if the empire state building the canals of Venice Coliseum of Rome you know I was lucky enough to see the Seattle space needle for the first time. I didn't know that it was in Las Vegas. But doesn't we were there. We were there for C.. Es The consumer electronics show in this episode. Were actually going to talk about some of the coolest things we saw there. But we're going to focus focused more on the innovations that are at the intersection of technology and humanity rather than talk about you know infamous toilet. Paper dispensers run of the big reasons we went is because we you were invited by wave maker which is an agency part of WPP to do an interview on stage alive. PODCAST so to speak with Matt Monahan. The HATTON who is head of product at publishing and publishing is part of the Washington Post Orcas also an interesting case of a and action because they're forward thinking in terms of increasing the visibility of content through personalization. An optimizing everything from headlines to photo selection all using machine learning and those are things that really matter for journalists and readers. Yeah and this use of. Ai stands out to me because it provides a solution to real problem. How do you get eyeballs on the right content when there's just so much that said the issue of personalization does raise questions about what happens when machine thought to know US better than we know ourselves not to mention and what are the appropriate limits of how companies use AI and data about us? Yeah I can definitely streamline processes by detecting patterns that you know human beings cannot see or it can allow you to scale like tag hundreds of thousands of articles that again human beings just cannot do so greater efficiency is on one side of the spectrum and extremely attractive to people but on the other side. You have issues of taking humans out of the loop like the blackbox problem and authenticity in a world of deep fake so a question for businesses and users of technology is sort of when does Ai. Add to our experience experience and when does it maybe hold us back or take advantage of us for example from seeing news stories that we should see but maybe the algorithm doesn't think we want want to see it or that we won't click on it right in the old days. When everyone received a print newspaper on their doorstep? Everyone had the same front page in the same headlines Nowadays holidays when you log onto a news website or on social media everybody has a different version of the world and that is obviously positive for driving engagement but may not be so positive in terms of having conversations with the same facts about the same stories equally. We have to ask. Do we want articles where the headlines been written by Algorithm. ooh Do we prefer headlines written person. And that's something we talked about with Matt because all actually tested headline writing technology. Let's talk to Matt. Lucas says let's cut to the chase are really came out of a collaboration trying to better understand what actual journalists needed it. Can you talk a little bit more at the very beginning. You know we were just trying to solve problems for ourselves. Seven or eight years ago. We knew he had to make some pretty fundamental transformation to the post and to really prepare for the digital future. We didn't have the right tools to do it. And we couldn't really find the right tools on the market either. What we did was spent a lot of the journalist and the editor is trying to figure out what it was that make their lives easier? It's trying to figure out. How do you make journalists work better publish faster? What are the little things you can do? Inside of IT products make it easier easier for them to write stories or publish from there about four years ago when we started evolving into a commercial offering. Today we're running hundreds of websites around the world breath about twenty different countries. We're running companies like BP their internal communications as well as some of the marketing. We're running large broadcasters and all their live video and beauty and of course I was still running a lot of newspapers and news publishers. Like the post and many others around the world looking in publishing you know that. Ai Artificial intelligence in headlines MHM and there was a story in the Financial Times last year. We said forty percent of startups us. No whatsoever uh-huh so I bet it's probably higher so when we talk about using a Ohio when you talk about what we actually mean so it can span the range of technologies analogies from something like machine learning which is basically a way to use algorithms to take large sets of data in either uncover patterns in it or try to model away to predict a certain outcome. The two technologies like computer vision which you can use to look at images or video and extract information about them by recognizing patterns and trying to identify objects inside of them and so a lot of those technologies than when you put them together conform. Some really interesting workflows that you know in the past. You might have had us humans to do that. You can actually do much more simple automatically. was there a the titular business challenge or challenge the Washington Post that. You couldn't have sold if you hadn't been using AI. Any story that we right on Washington Post. We're mapping to a set of I two or three hundred topics maybe an example of one of those might be like congressional policy or narcotics crime. What you're trying to do is say if I look at all this content? I'm not just pulling specific words. I'm actually trying to figure out. What is this content about? What is the fundamental concept of this so you pick a set of articles? Let's say one hundred two thousand news articles in the case this example for the post and I see us. Humans of Micro Labor to do this training set and the goal is you're building an algorithm Based on a set of real data and so the humans are going there and saying this article. Yeah this is about congressional policy. Why because I know it is I read it? That's what it's about. This one's about narcotics crime time and this one's about soccer and so you train all these articles against that algorithm until finally the algorithm is basically sufficiently advanced to predict a new article that you put into it and determine it outcome with the same high probability of success that you're able to with human training now every time. A journalist Saves Saves publishes the story we're able to Parse over all the contents inside that story then we can predict the strength at which it's likely to belong to that topic. How do you create a better user experience in your case news experience for an individual consumer with the medicine? You can do a lot of interesting things we can figure out that. Hey this is something that they're interested in reading. Perhaps they'd like to read more in. It actually serves the signal into a recommendation Algorithms from your perspective where can businesses sort of harness the power of machine learning to really hone in on who their customer is and what that customer wants. We want to deliver more content to our readers leaders. Who Want to help them? Find more content that we've created. We have about nine hundred journalists at the Washington Post we write something like three or four hundred original stories today. So there's is a Lotta content there to get readers to all different content and to have them continue moving through your constant. You spent a lot of money to produce is really challenging. And so that's a great use case for personalization Shen but where you can make it really come alive is by having more sophisticated. Meditated more sophisticated information about that content. That's more likely to bring readers to it. And so that's where these machine learning remodels really come in handy. I think part of what's fun about this conversation is there's a lot of cases out there where average users you know. They imagine they see something like that. You see the boots on instagram. And you think Oh my God he's companies. Must you know indiscernible for magic right. There must be some crazy model out there doing this. And perhaps is there is but in a lot of ways you know. Your users aren't necessarily as aware of the advertising ecosystem data ecosystem and how these things tied together between platforms incites and I think as like industry professionals. We always kind of underestimate that fact and so the net effect is that users are completely surprised by this. I think you must be doing something completely on her to achieve it. When in fact you know it could be really simple data sharing and so the reason? I think that's important than when you do. Bill Technologies that actually utilize some these more sophisticated methods to build data sets. You have to be aware that your users you know first of all your users aren't going to necessarily anticipate the outcomes you can create and if you don't do a good job on the product side of making sure that you really think through the use case and how you're leveraging technology solve it you can generate unexpected outcomes. You know there was the example of the retailer who produced advertising flyers that were able to predict folks who are pregnant right. Even if some of those folks didn't necessarily know that themselves or hadn't shared it with with their family or their spouses.

Las Vegas Washington Post Instagram AI Matt Monahan Tristan Harris United States Venice Coliseum Of Rome Google Seattle Ohio Washington Soccer WPP Stanford Head Of Product Bill Technologies MHM
Pawpaw Fruit Facts

Urban Forestry Radio

07:19 min | 8 months ago

Pawpaw Fruit Facts

"Let's dig into today's topic. Paul can we start with you You heard my story about how I discovered. Papa's thanks to you How did you discover? Papa's well I stood. Discovered Papa's in the native of trees of Canada. I discovered them on a page. Not In reality. Unfortunately I grew up in a family that was in the produce business My both my grandfathers this were farmers Where we're in the Agra in the native you know in the native Place for Papa's grew or still grow but I had never tasted them mhm nor heard of them and it piqued my interest so much because we had always Prided ourselves on being the first to taste everything that came into the market and new member. One Re Pini Dini came in and went Avocados came into the market and when kiwifruit and star fruit and all. Those things first appeared here And this it was the kind of our native exotic that I had never experienced. So it was part of a schoolyard naturalization pro project and really part of more broadly of using native plants to restore habitat. And so there is there is that broader Value of these trees while of course because they are native They're co evolved with all the insects and diseases that That are here. so they're not susceptible to them and and they host Many important species as well so tell me something so you read about it in a book there. Was this naturalization project in your neighborhood or something. What did you guys do? You never heard about the train you go and you buy it and you plant. or how did that happen well. This was the early nineties so for me. The early days of the of the Internet and I did track someone down through through the interweb of that day. You know very very BA barebones in those days And found some of the Niagara and into we had just you know we were. We're lucky we had just moved into a new home. We had a front yard. That was kind of a had been lawn and of course we didn't want to have lawn anymore. We don't have any lawn and it's such a such a poor use of the small space that we had in in urban setting So we wanted to plant it with native trees stories and We also wanted to scare the view to our neighbor across the street and When I came home we came home? Not with two trees but with two sticks As my partner so kindly So kindly described them and so it took about ten years. Oh my gosh. So th the next ingredient is patients it is. It's really a slow food. Okay it's very slow so it took Tennessee. You plant these trees. Your partner is okay with it. Look like two little sticks What did they look like as they were growing up? As you're nurturing these two little sticks what are they looking. I think the first thing that I notice about them was just so how distinctive the leaves czar. They look like no other tree and I have had a number of people Just walked down the sidewalk and look at them and then the bravest among them go like what tree is that. I think I know all the trees but I've never seen something with such a long feather shaped leaf And you know my my friend. Who spent a lot of time in America around Cacao Trees Religious Jew really notes. How similar they are to cow as well in their structure so they are a very unique looking tree And the and then a when the blossoms came out the blossoms are also fascinating as well. They're very dark Maroon Maroon color I believe they're mimicking meet because they are pollinated by midges That are attracted blow flies. which are attracted to dead meat? So what do they smell like. Do they smell like dead meat. So if you don't smell like dead meat they are the the. They are a little acrid smelling rolling. They're they're certainly not fragrant like an apple blossom right okay so you plant this tree and you're hanging in there and you're waiting mm-hmm and you're waiting you're waiting did you at some point. Did you almost lose your enthusiasm for this. Great idea of planting palm tree. No I think we're there. There are many other things going on and I was very hopeful and I and it was just as I was reading more and more of the work that Lorraine Johnson was doing and other other great Authors were doing around native plants and I would start accumulating references to pop. Aw and when and the more I read about dumb and the and the more I read descriptions of of their flavor the more we just couldn't lose interest because I was just kind of salivating every year and then there is frustration because for a couple of years we got some blossoms but no fruit set and so actually getting pollination especially on isolated trees in in an area where there's really no native no no other surrounding trees that could cross pollinate with them. It took a long time so finally the day comes that you start to see fruit for me. Tell me about what year was that and what was going on for you. That was two thousand and four. I I was involved in agriculture. At that point I was working in the wine industry Saw Back and forth in Agra Lot and really felt that I was kind of telling the the the agricultural story in our urban setting and this was another part of that story And so as they foreign we got very excited. I why did you know the the small. The small mammals do like to climb up and down the trees and sometimes knocked them off before they're fully ripe so that was a little bit of a frustration. Especially when you're you know and we would count the fruits right at the end of his own fifteen this year you know. And then and then there's attrition through the whole season right and but when those first fruits did ripen and you could smell their ripe and you could feel they were right They became very highly price in our in our in jealously guarded. Oh Yeah Y.. Y within our household as well yes okay so in your household old guy. Your first ripe fruit. Is this actually the first time you taste papa. Your own fruit yes. I had never had that point. There were no I. I hadn't yet to see them at farmers markets Forbes wild foods does have some now and now there are some other farmers who are growing them in in a more more commercial quantities. But at that point not at all so what did you think I was just blown away. The the flavor is so mystifyingly defying Li exotic so tropical in its character The texture is so silky and smooth and as they get ripe they get this. Really really beautiful. Creme Brulee characters a bit of a roasted character to them that is just really satisfying and really enhance and attractive. And and then of course you want to multiply your pleasures by sharing them. So that's really what I started to do. Work through slow food and other organizations to you want to really share share the beauty of the of that

Papa Agra Partner Canada Pini Dini Paul Tennessee Creme Brulee America LI Lorraine Johnson
American Airlines Delays Boeing 737 MAX Once Again

The Journal.

10:54 min | 9 months ago

American Airlines Delays Boeing 737 MAX Once Again

"March. A seven thirty seven Max crashed in Ethiopia killing one hundred fifty seven people and shocking the world Regulators started grounding the plane and within days. The Max was completely out of the air. Boeing began working with authorities to figure out what happened and airlines also had to reckon with the fallout American airline CEO. Doug Parker said the company was ready to work closely with Boeing to get the planes back in the air. Your is your tragic events And what we care about is safety and we will work together as this industry always does to ensure that safety. He's number one focus. But at the same time American Airlines and other carriers needed to figure out how to cope with grounding of the Max while still operating their businesses Mrs it was really something of a scramble for them to figure out what to do. Reporter Alley cider covers the aviation industry industry. They looked at what would be the least disruptive way to cut flights the Max mostly flew between the New York area and Miami. You you know that's where most of the Max's were being used. Obviously Kansas stop flying between the Florida so they had to kind of spread it out and look at their network and look okay. We're flights that we we have multiple frequencies a day where we could cut one. So we're not just ending travel between two cities trimming a couple of frequencies looked at long haul flights where you can cancel one long haul flight instead of a bunch of short flights where you've suddenly inconvenienced a lot of people. At the time of the grounding. You had people who were already scheduled to travel in. Their plans. Had to be sort of offended at the last minute you know. We talked to passengers who were sort of already on vacation. And then they get a call from their airline airline that says actually your flight home has been cancelled. Then we've re booked you and maybe on a flight that's not on the day. He wanted to travel or has a stopover when he wanted to direct act. Can you tell me what all of this flight rescheduling looked like so most of the stuff they do software. A lot of it is automated. And they're still using using that software you know they're not just like using crayons and colored pencils on a big map of the US or the world but there is a lot of thoughts and analysis and expertise expertise that has to go into figuring out. What's the best way or the least inconvenient way to basically redraw so I spoke to Vasu Raja? He works the network planning at American Airlines. And from what you told me there is a lot of late nights like imagining correctly. Like people at the office office really laid and lots of empty pizza boxes and he said yeah pretty much and all. This scrambling wasn't just causing headaches and late nights for the planning team. Once they make a decision about their network is sort of ripples throughout the company there's people on Revenue Management hoped to decide what the availability should be in making sure to keep some mhm seats open so anyone. Who's Max flight got canceled? You know has the place to go. You know they tell everyone. Don't worry you'll get an email if your schedule has been changed but if you're worried about your vacation you're definitely going to call so they have to staff up on customer service and make sure there are people there to answer those calls and explain the situation so it really is this huge logistical challenge talents. That kind of ripples throughout the airline at the time I think there was a sense that could be pretty temporary but that delay would not be temporary as the Federal Aviation Administration investigated. Boeing's Max Fleet. They uncovered more and more safety concerns. I think what initially seem to some some people like it would be a pretty straightforward fixed. That could be done. Relatively quickly started to just take longer and longer as new issues were discovered and just amid a heightened scrutiny by the FAA but also regulators all over the world. You know bullying was saying it was going to provide all this information to regulators to take a look at and that kind of kept getting pushed back again and again and you know the process just kind of kept getting delayed over and over again regulators flagged problems with pilot training emergency safety st procedures and some of the planes software and as the safety inquiry stretched. On for months Boeing's estimate on the Max would return to service kept moving back I Boeing pushed it into the summer of twenty nineteen and then bowing pushed back again until the end of the year. With each month that the Max's return was delayed. American Airlines had to go into scramble mode all over again canceling more flights. They're kind of just on the receiving and here you know all they can do is wait for Boeing and the FAA to work out the process. And there's really not a lot they can do to speed things along and airlines have to make decisions decisions about the Max you know way before they really having clarity about what's going on with the Max. They have to decide over two months like seventy days before her their schedule. That's when they really have to finalize things so they can get their flight attendants in their pilots scheduled beyond that point just gets harder and harder to make changes. So you know. They've had to kind of looking to the future and think. How likely is it that the Max is going to be back? And allie says the ongoing wing uncertainty put Americans growth plans on hold. It wasn't flying the twenty four Max planes. It had and it wouldn't be getting the sixteen more it had ordered for the rest of the year. American patients with Boeing was wearing thin. The airlines have gotten pretty frustrated with the number of delays that they've seen You know I don't want to suggest that they want to rush the process along but I think you know they're just unhappy with the way. Expectations have been managed. And just how long this has gone on. Those mismanaged edged expectations were costing American and it wanted bowing to pay. That's after the break in this episode of the Journal is brought to you by Lincoln jobs. If your New Year's resolutions include growing your business linked in can help Lincoln's symptons Greens candidates for both hard and soft skills. Things like collaboration creativity. Adaptability Lincoln looks beyond the work skills to connect you with the people you want to to hire people with the qualifications. Who can help your business grow? Visit Lincoln Dot Com slash the Journal for fifty dollars off your first job post. That's linked dot com slash the journal terms and conditions apply. Welcome back by the fall. Delays in the safety assessment of the seven thirty seven MACs were piling up and American Airlines was juggling the fallout its pilots were upset because they we're losing money and peak. Holiday travel was on the horizon in an October investor. Call American CEO. Doug Parker expressed his aggravation with Boeing. They believe the F. B. certified in or quarter. It's probably best. It's that information is best case given what we've all seen. Ah over the over the course of this process so we're prostrate bullying American have been in touch throughout the year. You know American American and other airlines have made it clear that they don't believe they should be on the hook financially for this That they're expecting bowing to make them whole James extended grounding her customers or members enter. Cheryl's we're working to ensure that Boeing shareholders bear the cost of Boeing's failures not American Airlines American Airlines basically said they believed the grounding would result in a five hundred and forty million dollar reduction their full year or twenty nineteen and profits. So that's pretty significant and it's like a big step up from what they thought originally like in the first effort their first quarter earnings. They were predicting a three hundred. Fifty million dollar impact so it's been much more expensive than they were anticipating on. That call Parker said that American was in talks with Boeing about compensating. The airline for about five hundred forty million dollar hit and last week. American said it reached a settlement with Boeing for an undisclosed amount but that deal just applies applies to two thousand nineteen and the Max grounding is still ongoing meaning American Airlines is facing more costs twenty twenty. Where does this leave? American Airlines going into twenty twenty so going into two thousand twenty American Airlines has said that getting the Max flying again. It's sort of one of the biggest I think it needs to do to get on track. American is currently planning for the Max to return by June more than a year after the initial grounding but even even if the Max is clear to fly all the headaches and additional costs for American will be far from over for one thing. It'll take weeks of maintenance to get the planes ready to fly I again after they sat on the ground for more than a year. And then there's the issue of flight simulator training. I think the biggest thing in terms of time and money is that recently. It's starting to become more and more likely it sounds stats pilots. Who need to go through some kind of training before? They're allowed to fly the Mexican. Why would it pose such a high cost for American Airlines pilots would need to go through this training so first of all it was unexpected? It's not really budgeted time time for a simulator. It's just in one place so all the pilots have to come from wherever they're based all around the country and spend time in it. Can you describe bribe. What a flight simulator is like? What does it look like? They kind of look like Like in Star Wars those like like robots on skinny long legs that kind of what are they called At yeah that's sort of what they look like. Yeah Yeah I just googled it to me. That's what they look like. I'M GONNA get a lot of trouble with like a lot of people who are really knowledgeable trouble about aviation. Who aren't going to be like? No that's not what they look like so like a full motion flight simulator. They're sophisticated piece of equipment and they're very expensive and the process of getting everyone to wear the simulator is and scheduling them all for time in the simulator. You know it's just a big another logistical challenge. You know after a year. That's been full of challenges. Do you have a sense. That American Airlines is okay with some of this this delay because it's so much needs the restoration of customer confidence. I do think that safety is the highest priority for the airlines. Sort sort of making sure that everyone is confident in the plane is their top priority so they are planning to do a lot you know. There will likely be a period between when regulators liters allowed the plane to fly again and when it enters commercial service. And they're planning to sort of do as much as they can to put

American Airlines Boeing MAX American Airlines American Air Doug Parker Federal Aviation Administratio Max Fleet CEO Ethiopia Kansas Reporter Vasu Raja United States Alley Cider New York Florida Lincoln Dot Com
"mhm" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"mhm" Discussed on WDRC

"Never seen the like do you love was that just came in MHM Lana nobody can man I didn't see nobody at seven the mistake in this case now they're still beautiful diamonds hi I'm satisfied what do you mean you're satisfied because yes that is fine what about the money for them the doctor I bring back with me this afternoon I'm almost tempted man you expect I would come with all of this money the gentleman of your reputation without first seen arms that you what happened to the plan file actually get lost Jerry Hey boys what goes on here nothing against French is says he'll be back this afternoon with a dull that's okay with me see and now you will please excuse me Bob gentleman a dog you've got the case on a doesn't feel right going anywhere right what the don random back yeah I want to fight crime chamber I highly it didn't work get up those diamonds before we ship your back to France and plaster of Paris but I have no time Monday all of a sudden voice that accent sounds funny to me and that mustache and goatee looks only till Chatham of a about when I see a burial Hey they came up in my hand and look friend she really is it's Boston Blackie that's right I'm black and has my calling card Bob and with that yeah got a bomb random let's get him in the back of the shop okay get hold of so the romper sure okay it was some kind of god according to plan delay coming to all right it didn't let go of them not to stand on its own two feet catch a bloody rather than chase let me with mom and lucky he does Tom I don't get lucky with his gun Blackie such advice when you're searching for I don't know how well a brand diamonds all right reaching his pockets Bob you can't find a diamond by just Patton is close okay okay and then I can't balance door he doesn't doesn't have money aside he got on any of these pockets either a one this is his queen bossy a got those diamonds no one now and he swallowed them gently some of them as a bit out of the we're gonna drag him up the doctor Jones and have and use a florist open this bomb I'm sorry joking about the fluoroscope shows nothing that's a good thing they tossed you out of med school or you couldn't get a case of mumps without a search warrant doc there's nothing wrong with me Dalton it's your theory Blackie didn't swallow those done I guess your fellow then want me anymore yeah lacking stock he's got perhaps one of them they are not and we went over everything is wearing his all of them all right sorry Dalton but the fluoroscope shows that he did not swallow them believe me you didn't and what happened last time is where I think I don't know that's what I'm trying to figure out I know it he took a right did were wrong look you don't want me anymore they're not gonna get out of the we don't want you we want those time you can't let him go Mike and I he hasn't got the stones and then we went on a police parking up on us they don't like it okay but where rod the raxle does happen in a chair a I wonder what happened to the plan.

MHM Lana two feet
"mhm" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"mhm" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"The movie is the MOMS say no. We're GONNA go like we saw your character and that clip and she was like no. I'm I'm coming to see you. I'm not leaving until he says he loves me needs me. Do you see yourself doing that. You've got two kids now. Thirteen right I have done it. You know because well my daughter. She gives me kisses everyday. She's very easy free with that like I love you. Mom Mhm on the phone right is always three kiss before you get off my son. He's just too cool for school and I've had to sit him down and say I love you and I walk. I sacrifice being we're here to you know to make things nice for you and it would be nice if you would say I love you mom or can we spend some time. I mean just real at that age. He was at that stage kids. Go through slight hug. You Hudli no no. He's like he's like I'm a man now. I'm out yeah. Kinda Kinda Gene Your old man at sea but he's he's he's come back around. He's pretty loving loving through here but I know it's a passing phase. I know it like every other phase and it's coming on when we might be a passing. You seem like a very down to earth and simple person considering the world that you live in. Is that like the stage or is that just you. That's excuse me yeah yeah. How do you think you've remained grounded in all of these years? Because if I was a legend I would not be grounded. I don't think so you like one of the most down to Earth just like genuine beautiful people ever met but you also legend. If I was a legend I would tell people I'm I'm alleged begin ever since as a legend alleged what do you what do you think has has kept you being youth all of these years you know I think the wonderful family that that race meet the simplicity in which that was raised you know single mom you know just working hard trying to you know make a dollar out of fifteen cents. Say My Auntie who I who I love so much he said don't don't waste your college education. Don't waste your education on theater because is I guess it's not GonNa work out work out for you it so tenuous and you know and unimaginable but it did work out work out but it didn't have to but until cart work and it took Opportunity Unity Opportunity Meeting your preparation and and and you're a legend as you hold the second Angela Bassett everybody the legend the daily show criminal years addition wants to show weeknights at eleven ten central on comedy central and the comedy..

Mom Mhm Angela Bassett
"mhm" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

Rob Has a Podcast

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"mhm" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

"We spent a lot of time on that very very sad that Sam family no shade. I just was like I was sort of quizzical as why they included in the episode because they haven't talked about it a ton the house it's not a big top point so it was a big Downer episode but you know I feel bad for Sam. So what can you do <hes> yeah okay all right so let's go go ahead and you know we have a lot to talk about as it pertains to the vote for tomorrow night has been a lot of a lot of discussion about that during the day today today a lot of stuff in the last couple of days on the live feeds and we are going to take questions later on in the show as it pertains to that so okay if you're gonNA leave us now we back on Thursday night with Caitlin Herman. Airman here in the studio to talk about the eviction episode at Ten Fifteen PM Eastern time on Thursday so be on the lookout for that and in the meantime. Let's talk spoilers the office MHM Civil Defense has issued the following message spoiler three screenings buzzer. I'M GONNA get under my wine in glass of wine glass. At least you can like grab the wind in your all down Michelle. Yes I did feel the earthquake Friday night that one yeah I did not. I didn't the one on Thursday but Friday night. I was like Oh quick finish washing dishes. Yeah surprising included that comment about who was the person who said it was like California and just just GonNa Break Off one day. Yeah don't say somebody under the table start time. Okay all right so we have our fiction coming up tomorrow and I've been paying very close attention with these live feeds. I got to join Taryn Armstrong on the live feed update this morning following a Brent Waltham on who is on the line beat up on Tuesday where we're spoiling you guys <hes> this week with us on the live feed updates but all right we are twenty four hours away from the big eviction and things were looking brighter for Chemie at points today yes they were. I can't say that that anything's changed though does still look to me like Kenney is going the main problem is that in any vote right now that has chemi stain you're going to need Tommy and or Christie and they move as the pair and they do not wish to make a move because they think that even though they would love for Kimmy to to stay and take a shot against Jack. At least they wouldn't have to do it. Kristie specifically said that <hes> the one problem is though that in voting for her to stay it would be seen as an attack on Jack much like in Big Brother Eighteen Win Vanessa sister stayed in Nepali viewed it as an attack on him the people it's one thing to to vote one way but when the person on the block is expressly trying to go after somebody who is the current head of household and you've got one vote for them to stay. It's seen as an attack and oftentimes you're more culpable in the eyes of other people than the person who eventually stayed because you're the one who did the train Christie Army. Do Not WanNa rock the boat of this. I think it's Nick and Bella and SAM would like to say it's so amazing to be watching this because then just give me like thirty seconds Robert Sam remember he had the power of veto he could have saved the better never really considered using it and then fast forward two days later. He's literally going around the house trying to round up votes to save Kenny..

Robert Sam Brent Waltham Jack MHM Civil Defense Caitlin Herman Kristie Michelle Nick Christie Army Taryn Armstrong California Chemie Vanessa Kenny Kimmy Christie Bella Tommy Kenney
"mhm" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"mhm" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

"Current and former yale you that you hear exact ethic back after exit you're standing on the thirty one year old if you have time after time and time again i don't i don't know how long you stay on this hour before let me come rescue but that's fine i'll turn around treat you like gilligan's island i'll leave you right there and then i come back in a year if you change of mind i'm only island up okay whatever i am this is what we know scale doug mark cooper mhm in that are dependent on zeke zeke russia's four left in seventy five yards in a game that prescott is all in feather in forty eight guys did you know in seventeen that he seventeenth make sure we are last year and the thirty two teams quarterback protein you maybe have a couple of guys got injured so you probably got thirty five quarterback that would qualify for the qb all that and that seventeen which means what you need middle of the romaine lettuce lesser charges she had only been speaking speaking for like thirty seconds thirty seven thirty seventeen of his forty eight game four minutes four and a half minutes dak prescott in seventeen forty against him he's been the two hundred fewer yards passing that's the same number blake auto fair transformational about bet number what what is it that by blake bortles i get it quarterback of the most important position but not middle of the road quarterback which you're guy though by hand that on tape now it'll of the road quarterback that that would have numbers had it all of famer shannon i don't know what hey you don't lose your credentials all of fame going in the mind you might go up there couple of years near boston is gonna be setting out on the street still olive would have gotten you you you love that you love i got a bunch you know you don't vote for me i mean it's a no brainer i don't know why you won't that went through says you guy oh is it my turn is your child thank you very much i cannot tell you how wrong this is from whoever these three exacts are in a very low around me you know a whole lot of people are gonna eat a whole lot of crow thinks this young man because because i will give you is zeke you'll elliott is an extraordinary talent he is hall of fame bound he will join you someday hall of fame but he is not the most valuable dallas cowboy if you actually watching study the cowboys the way i do these leader of that team and it's not even close is the quarterback the clutch playmaker on this team is the quarterback which is why over the last three years dak prescott has led the national football league in game winning dry dak prescott did not have a number one receiver he had any real for width until mid season last year he was stuck with dez bryant in you continually criticized the point of condemning dimming dez bryant for the way he comported himself the ralph's the he failed to run for dak prescott in the first two years and we're does now god bless them were gonna make it out he's making a killing but but again he became a shell of self and dak prescott had no connection with them in indian no use for it and then the heavens opened up in jerry jones should have been any executive of the year for the move that he made to go acquire amari cooper in what happened dak prescott prescott after he got a true number one receiver who he immediately clicked in vibe to it on and off the field what happened dak prescott went seven and one over the last eight games is that good seven and one beaten billy twice he was third and the nfl in completions he was fourth in passing yards over the last eight games that's pretty good this is top five stuff he would stop for thing completion percentage he was fifth in air distance over the last eight games and that means.

yale seventy five yards thirty one year thirty seconds four minutes three years two years
"mhm" Discussed on The Hoop Collective

The Hoop Collective

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"mhm" Discussed on The Hoop Collective

"She said, you're welcome Portland. So good for her. Feel like like I know that Dame plays the disrespect card, and he is an awesome player and the shots that he hit and game one. I mean, I was sitting in the airport getting ready to fly out here. Watching the game on watch ESPN on my phone with my headphones and just sitting in the airport half the airport is delayed because whether yesterday in Chicago, which messed everything up and he takes that shot. And I just my head staff back that I just like exclaimed, which I never do. I was so impressed with that shot. It was like a Ralph Lawler exclamation only. Am I it was just like? Q? No, like, they might have send people over to make sure I was okay. Because I was so impressed with that shot like Dame is awesome. But like he's on my MVP ballot. Brian interesting that you said that, but he's not on yours. He was on my second T-ball MBA. He so generally my first team all MBA less. There's some unusual circumstances is my ballot. Joel Embiid was on my ballot. Mhm Steph curry was on my ballot. He's fifth on my ballot. As he was on my first team, all MBA. And I don't think that saying that Damian Lillard is the third best guard in the NBA is an insult. I think that's an appropriate place to put them not at all. I do. I mean, the absolutely not. And he's that's where he is on my MBA team is well, I do think though that MVP Allenby or two different things. I think that we don't have. I mean, I'm not gonna I'm not gonna do my entire speech for you. But the effect that we don't have all where. Yes. But no. But we don't have any way of saying. This is the best player in the NBA. We still haven't fixed that and even all MBA isn't really a way to say. Here's the best fifteen players in the NBA because they're still make us do it by positions, which is something that needs to be reformed as well. So all MBA is at least closer to. Okay. Who are the best players in the league? Whereas MVP is supposed to be a little bit more about value. And as much as I love, you know, we talked about our ballots and Steph curry this year is not I'm he's on your MVP valid on. He is not on mine. I think Steph curry is like Newquay. Question one of the top players in the league. And he is on my first team Mamba, Damian Lillard is not but his value is diminished on a team with other players who were so exceptional. If he misses games. They don't play quite the same with Steph. We've looked at all those comps they still win games. Right. If Damian Lillard off that team, they don't win, and especially when York went down and CJ was in playing for that long stretch that it is a very compelling point. And especially since when I had to make the my mind up on the third team all NBA guards, which was a super duper duper important vote. I went with Bradley Beal, and Russell Westbrook because the ask of them on a nightly basis is so big versus like because I really wanted to put clay on there. But comparing what clay does every night to compare what Russia's says every night, not comparable. So that's that can save your point is well taken and but again, putting Kevin Dame six in my mind versus v. It's not. It's not meant to be an insult. But at the end of the day. This is a great opportunity for Portland. They're playing a team. That is weakened Paul George is weakened. We'll say he looked weakened in game one. Okay. I am curious to see what happens..

Damian Lillard Steph curry Kevin Dame MVP NBA Portland Ralph Lawler ESPN Paul George Chicago Joel Embiid Bradley Beal Brian Russia Allenby Russell Westbrook Mamba York
"mhm" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"mhm" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Mhm is people who know that things can get better. Even if they're really bad season was rebuilt over several years while classes had to be held in tents and trailers the Northridge earthquake killed dozens of people in did more than twenty billion dollars worth of damage. Talks are scheduled to start in about an hour in the LA teacher strike mayor Garcetti is acting as a mediator between the teachers union and the school district this high school teacher spoke at a rally this morning at our Lita high school. He says where he works as one of the few schools with a full time nurse, but he still has to help out some of the students after five out of my own pocket. Kleenex boxes or tissue paper. I have to buy things like bandaids for my students. They of the school district says the issue isn't about money math, not values. He says the district has offered. All it Ken given its financial constraints. The state has approved a rule allowing pot deliveries anywhere in California. The regulation includes delivering to homes within the mini cities in California that still banned commercial marijuana. The cannabis bureau says it's just clarifying a rule that was already part of what voters widely approved in two thousand sixteen industry. Experts say it allows access to those who live in pot desert's far away from cities approving recreational sales. Critics say it will create an unruly market of hidden we transactions while taking control from cities and counties that have already decided they don't want pot in their area new legislation or the courts may have the final say corporate. Carson KFI news today marks the beginning of a new era in our missile defense program. The president has called for an expanded program to better protect the United States strategy is grounded in one overriding objective. To detect and destroy every type of missile attack against any American target whether before or after launch Trump says that America's adversaries are increasing their lethal strike capabilities. And that his first duty is defensive our country, the top Republican in the house speaker Nancy Pelosi's request to postpone the state of the union is unbecoming of the office. Pelosi has raised security concerns for the address because homeland security workers are now going without pay. But department says it's fully capable of securing the state of the union if this shutdown persists, President Trump is postponing speaker Pelosi's upcoming trip to Egypt Afghanistan at Brussels, some are speculating that his payback for Pelosi asking Trump to reschedule the state of the union Trump calls Pelosi's trip a public relations event and says if she wants to take the trip she should fly commercial traffic from the helpful socal Honda traffic center. There's a crash and Elision.

President Trump Nancy Pelosi Mhm California pot desert Lita high school teachers union mayor Garcetti school teacher Carson KFI Northridge cannabis bureau LA Elision Ken president marijuana Brussels United States Honda
"mhm" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"mhm" Discussed on KOMO

"Mhm says a partial government shutdown at midnight is likely the president met with Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell for more than an hour at the White House. Mr. Trump is standing firm on his demand for funding for his border wall. Last week, the president said he would own government shutdown over border security today. Now, it's up to the Democrats as to whether or not we have shut down tonight. I hope we don't, but we're totally prepared for very long shutdown. Karen Travers, ABC news. The White House. Supreme court Justice Ruth, Bader Ginsburg had surgery this morning to treat lung cancer. The malignancy was found during tests the eighty-five year old hat after falling and breaking ribs last month the cancerous growth removed from Justice Ginsberg's left lung were discovered during tests she had after she fractured ribs in a fall last month. Doctors at Memorial Sloan Kettering cancer center here in New York said there was no evidence of disease anywhere else in her body. This Ginsberg's third bout with cancer since she took her place on the supreme court bench in nineteen Ninety-three. She's due to remain in the hospital for a few days. ABC's eric. Trzcinski arrests today in Colorado and the thanksgiving disappearance of a pilot and mother police have not found Kelsey Berra's body but woodland park Colorado. Police chief miles to young says Abeille Berith was murdered by her fiance. Patrick freezing. Today, we arrested Patrick crazy on charges of first degree murder of Kelsey birth. And he is currently being held in the teller county jail says evidence indicates a crime may have occurred at barris home. She was last seen on Thanksgiving Day. Her phone mysteriously pinged in Idaho. Alex stone ABC news holiday travel, headaches are possible with the large east coast storm this man's flying. From New York to Chicago fingers are crossed there's.

Justice Ginsberg lung cancer president ABC Abeille Berith Kelsey Berra White House Mr. Trump Memorial Sloan Kettering cance Patrick crazy New York Mitch McConnell Mhm Senate Karen Travers Justice Ruth
"mhm" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"mhm" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"By one to nineteen. Wins. News time twelve thirty four well Christmas trees could be carrying a little something special this year. That's according to Senator Chuck Schumer who spoke at a news conference earlier. He says an invasive bug called a lantern fly. Maybe hitching a ride on some trees. It is not an infestation New York yet. But they've been spotted in Suffolk County in Albany and in gates county, which is in the finger lakes small numbers of them. But they will come here. And one of the ways they come through our Christmas trees. Out of state. And of course, are imported in state the spotted lantern flies in invasive species native to China and southeastern Asia and feeds on seventy different kinds of trees plants and crops wins news time, twelve thirty five. The government could be heading for a partial shutdown at the end of this week if the White House and congressional leaders failed to reach an agreement so far there's no signal of a deal. Correspondent Jordan Phelps has more. The White House is digging in on the president's declaration that he'd be proud to shut down parts of the federal government in order to secure funding for a southern border wall. White House adviser Stephen Miller on CBS face the nation. We're going to do whatever is necessary to build the border wall to stop this ongoing crisis illegal immigration, President Trump is requesting five billion dollars for the project, but Democrats are only willing to give one point six billion for border security broadly, and in Europe, hundreds of Italians in migrants have taken to the streets to protest a tough new migration law. Megan Williams has more from. Mhm Rome holding stand up for your rights signs, the talian in African migrants. Protested a tough new law that has eliminated humanitarian.

Senator Chuck Schumer White House Jordan Phelps Mhm Rome President Trump New York gates county Megan Williams Suffolk County Albany Stephen Miller president CBS Asia China Europe five billion dollars
"mhm" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"mhm" Discussed on WLAC

"Know it's springtime it's and it was, freezing and it was not even really optimal weather to be working, outside but when everyone's doing, it Yes I mean springs. The, time get. Out, there. And do it make your house, Brady depression wash this weekend oh man chose this week in the pressure wash yes I did oh man it's between between all the the the rain and. The weather and everything else Look, I've dealt with? A. Lot of mud this weekend I'm just glad. To be here not have mud in my. Hair man it's. Been, raining. And raining and it's like rain one. Week, one day. It's, like. Sunny and then like three or, four days it rains MAC the rain again Mhm has been crazy, I'm over. It Bring out the sun yes get your house ready for for the. Leinen listed you being a real tour what do you think some of the top things somebody should do to get their house list is because we had this little article here about we're gonna post that on, the website for getting your house listed are the twenty top tips for listen to your. House for sale for the spring rush but what do? You, think the the top top, items well I'm looking, at your list agree with your list but if I, had to say the two main things I would say to anybody getting their house ready to list would be the two. Main things are declutter and clean degrom you need to clean your house? Like you don't even live there right and you need to declutter like you don't live. There either and you don't own anything nobody. Wants, to. See all your little person dick right and and the other thing is when you go in people's, house because let's be real. People are you know people are interesting so learn a lot about some of. The. House and you. Kinda just forget I ain't even looking more Very neat very. Shocking or whatever it happens your house can stand. Up. For the wrong reasons exactly so in a lot, of, times we disturbed, by, wow look, at that or. You know I just sold I disclosed a house and they, literally when when, we closed they were like I really wish. I could meet these people I'm just curious because they. Were really kind of dull And it wasn't that it, didn't have personal, effects it was just like even their furniture. And the colors and everything was just very very vanilla I'm just really and they were like I think this is probably the two, most boring I was like I don't know maybe they're like librarians or something dislike I. Dunno it was really then. You then you want, to meet him to see? All about so it goes both ways some. People. Are overly can you know conservative on there's nothing and it's very to two basic yeah and, then some people have way. Too much stuff, on it all come, on man for real putting all that in there The, there's a lot of cool things in this list and me just pick. It all out, use it to. Your own discretion but at the, same. Time we, can't go through them all but man.

Mhm Brady Leinen four days one day
"mhm" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"mhm" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"In Wisconsin hi secretary. Okay you are just How are you doing so awesome in greetings. From Hayward oh Hayward that's a, cool part of. The state what's. Hayward known for Hayward is known for so many things but it. It is called the Hayward lakes area it's famous? For the? Big. Chip. The. Chippewa lake it, is gorgeous and, of. Course Muskie they claim the, largest Muskie ever. Caught seventy are you at a different place in the. State every. Day. Much yeah okay Pretty much usually Mondays I'm in Madison at. The, office, and then off you go all right. You are busy lady let's talk about this I love the, topic you've come up with his lodging with rooftop. Views this is so fun let's, start in Milwaukee. Okay you know. When when you are going on vacation whether it's you know with. Your family or a business trip it's so wonderful? To have a. Great. Hotel Mhm hotel, has a rooftop view or it's got. A bar or restaurant on the top it just makes it special so. Let's kick it off Emma walkie the historic third ward there is the. Award winning. Kempton journeyman hotel it's. One of the city's. Noah's places it is. So cool and they do all these small touches. Just to really class. It up so it's. A. Dog friendly hotel but if you don't have a, dog I, love this, because I'm dog crazy there's a ceramic, dog in every room waiting to greet you That's a lot of their decorum is real vintage Milwaukee things so like ventured summer fest posters you'll find? In. The rooms I'll paying homage to you know one of the great events in the. World but they're rooftop deal. You're gonna find at a place called the outsider it's on the ninth floor of the journeyman hotel it's. An indoor outdoor restaurant and bar that. Is so cool I have been there and I was wild it got written up there was. A story done about the best. Patio restaurants and bars in the world, for us and in the top fifteen. In the world was it Kempton journeymen hotel in the world I mean I read this, article and I'm like are you kidding me Miami in, New York, City, and there was, Milwaukee in so check out the outsider. You know it's it's been cool but it's Milwaukee come. As you are you don't have to be in a suit and tie you know it, was casual and you can play shuffleboard and cornhole. And giant. Jenga well sipping on craft beer looking. At this. Amazing deal all. Right let's go to Oakland. Near the lists more hotel tell us more. The Lismore hotel is cool it used to, be an older property downtown it was, really kind of losing its luster and it just got come poli renovated and. It's a hotel and convention center is in, the heart of downtown. Clare so, it's a short walk to Phoenix Park which is so cool you know you're walking along the. River and it's neat because they even have what's called the planet walk so you heard about the different planets as you're walking and. To state trails are, there and the, farmers market, and the concert series so location is, great but the hotel L. is, really millennial friendly it's big with the. Social spaces modern art scene they have what's called the. Dive bar at the hotel's rooftop so this dive bar you would think right dumpy, it's, a dive bar Ono it used to be the. Location of. The hotel tummy call and it was. Located where. The current bar. Is and so they call. It the dive bar because of the great. Diving board they had fun so they have, a great drink menu and they do, rotating cocktails depending on the season or the holiday this year they invade six. Different pactel's that were inspired by by all, of the artists that. Perform in, Justin Vernon's oh Clair's music festival and the arts festival so just a really hip place and. Again if you're millennial I'm telling you this is the place for you do even if you're our age to I would like to. Go with Yousaf that, would be great And, we'll, invite bony. Avair and Justin Vernon who will you guys are nothing but trouble I tell. You what you got sixty seconds, to tell us. About another cool property the shower mountain across crosses newest the. Sharma hotel is the only independent boutique hotel in lacrosse you've got a view..

Hotel Mhm hotel Milwaukee Hayward Sharma hotel Hayward lakes Justin Vernon Wisconsin secretary Emma walkie Chippewa lake Lismore Madison Noah cornhole lacrosse New York Oakland Avair Clare Miami
"mhm" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"mhm" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Explicitly with your life and vice versa and and upon whom you depend without. That we know. That people will be more prone to physical and mental illness shorten lifespan can be unhappy so we know now we know that we need that and worry about people who don't have that at all. Because those are the people who are going to again like I said manifest illness Mhm couples know if they have secure functioning and their relationship secure functioning means that were in the foxhole together. Were like cop car partners we may disagree about a lot of things, we have different interests but we we are interdependent, on some fundamental levels such as survival we need each. Other to survive we have each other's backs were were you know radically loyal to each other. Because we can be and because we exist in a world that is not going to be with us so it's this is an adult agreement. Between people who could do otherwise but they elect. To be experts on each other protect each, other from each other in from everybody else and we have examples of this all over the world. And and in different socio economic backgrounds people are able to do this because they realize that there is nothing else but to protect each other into to look out, for each other, so that's What secure functioning it is if you're in a relationship that fails to unfair, to unjust to insensitive to. Much. Of the time if it's not collaborative or cooperative then you are not in a secure functioning relationship it's a very interesting concept I. Know another one of your concepts you've talked. About in your bucks, is the, couple of all he explained that audience fits with the. Idea secure functioning that you and. I you and I decide to, to, protect the, resources that we create this you know we have a bubble around us that's like our eco system and we're good stewards of that. Eco-system it's the water retrieves the air we breathe and we were mutual, stakeholders in keeping that clean that's our safety and, security system we don't mess around with that we're always. Quick to shore it up is one or the other person feels unsafe or insecure about anything. This is what we do we put all our money on each other were the best thing since lice Turkey or sliced beef depending on what. You like You know and we're each other's heroes in that sense and we, do this because why not It could be arranged to not have that but we do it. Because we realize, that that life is easier this way we can do much more this way and so we we basically, everybody we are governors were the. Top of the food chain where the leaders of the pack and we take responsibility. For that we are basically alight to other people and we manage. Everything everywhere we go on. That makes us formidable as a as a team as a couple. And that's the couple bubble a couple of bubble is. We don't reach other under the bus. We don't embarrass each other in public or private on we, keep our, secrets, to each, other we don't leak outside of the relationship. And poison the well you know we We, are good representations of of what we're building that sort of thing called a relationship that we protect with our lives because our lives depend on it so it it, is that's the the bubble basically we determine who gets in who doesn't get in and who can take the resources. From us and, that includes children. In laws x.'s but also drugs and alcohol and other activities that could compete stand you, talk a lot about thirds and. Your writing and when you're teaching other clinicians right like you've just mentioned them can. You describe the concept of thirds and how couples might conceptualize them. Anything other than the couple. And so they exist right in the in the atmosphere in the. Environment and they must exist so the question is do. We understand the concept of primacy that..

Mhm
"mhm" Discussed on House of Carbs

House of Carbs

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"mhm" Discussed on House of Carbs

"Mhm hotels to help them sell their unsold rooms which means you get amazing deals all the takes ten seconds just three taps and a swipe to book no long endless lists of zillion hotel choices hotel tonight only shows you the best deals at the best tells perfect whether you are a planner or like me you like to leave things to the very last minute hotel tonight and has a great perks program the h t perks program the more you book the better the deals get so start scoring amazing deals at incredible hotels and download the hotel tonight at now taste both before we jump into today's show a couple plug for what's going on at the ringer get yourself to the rigor dot com justin charity has this very cool story what makes star wars superior tomorrow that's take justin charity is on it also on the rare podcast network the press box with two hungry home he's david shoemaker and brian curtis they are covering all kinds of territory they are revisiting the muller investigation they're discussing how america consumed the royal wedding and there's a look at alex rodriguez media makeover the ri the ringer podcast network check out the press box analysis get it on with house of cards my taste buds my culinary comrades by famished friends we've done it we are back another episode of how oh oh cau part of the ringer podcast network hungry home you know this is the podcast for the hungry people by the hungry people i am you're hungry host joe house what a great show today we are honored and humbled with this guest pat the freida from pat the freighters meat purveyors on to help us with summer grilling recommendations and techniques and of course food news with juliet littman with a surprise appearance by nephew kyle who was at this week's la version of the con with our pows from infatuation but let's get in that belly with pat la freida.

david shoemaker brian curtis joe house juliet littman kyle Mhm justin muller america alex rodriguez pat la freida ten seconds
"mhm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"mhm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The united states of america versus william foster transcript of his trial more slavery violating the prohibition against international slave trading but this is these are here this is the natural nation this is the naturalization one here africa africa mhm tony thomas archie thomas there charles louis africa job read this is it's awesome kitty joe this africa each twenty one october twenty thirty sixty eight okay fairly convinced are you convinced now that he did exist natty came from africa i'm this is our descendant dismissed sylvianne a diaz dreams of africa in alabama a meticulous account of africa town's founding as a fraud her documents several of which we saw in the mobile museum also frauds he called zora neale hurston plagiarised and well in fact she has been charged with that and he called kodjo lewis suggestive child grown old newspaper reports eyewitness accounts official records fosters criminal trial all frauds the clotilde he said would never have been able to enter the port of mobile he seems wrong about all of that and yet his larger point the one to which he returns again and again is this right is fresh air and sunshine sparkling on the water and that is this is not the real story mike i'm saying you you come to a call rick you want to take care of the people that was hurt but y'all come report you report on the car just just over the top being something you lead a people laying the street dan you're to say it's not about a slave ship or the last living slave as a reporter i see those as narrative hooks reminders pats to empathy the descendant called them white people stories distractions the real story being slavery's lasting impact it's evolution from jim crow to mass incarceration it's about injustice reparations not cujo not tilda they try to find a day ahead of group you making tons of money what did i tell you about the car wreck industry people come in here in davos and everything and they didn't find anything because what nothing that fire.

america rick mike i official zora neale africa charles louis africa tony thomas archie thomas william foster united states davos jim crow reporter fraud alabama diaz sylvianne
"mhm" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"mhm" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"A freaking flame thrower you know you only got two arms or is not so much you can do at a time with all these and the church in with possessing a machine gun because he had the bump stock wow so now his mission then he's waiting for we'll be in prison waiting for the judge to the call him over to court and hoping to meet somebody nice while he's there in prison 'cause that's where you can eat all kinds of really nice people you've been to prison or jail i've been to jail yeah okay it's a whole nother story made you a hardened criminal that you are mhm jeffey actually meant and you are able to help him get on a work release program ended up here and so and the rest is history that's beautiful story so this caravan supposedly is released a group of demands and apparently they're not breaking up they're not getting smaller they haven't disbanded in fact a caravan headed for the united states illegally in now includes fifteen hundred people and they've reached their about four hundred miles closer and the closer the get the more help they get from the mexican people pueblo sin front terrace political outreach group that organized the caravan released a press statement for the united states mexico and central american governments here's there we demand demands of the mexico and the united states so wait a minute these pass throughs are making demands of the country that they're crossing as the country that are approaching and the destination country.

united states mexico
"mhm" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"mhm" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Mhm rhinelander wisconsin georgia welcome to on point i kim this thinking you know how things happen with the with president trump is i think he gets the ones in the in and sees what they're like and see how far he can trust them and then if he they're not doing like with for we the people i think then it's time he terminates him you know but i think he is it enough of a shot to see where they're going with it and that's what it is i think it's just like you know how us the saying you have your friends close but your enemies closer okay and that sort of turnaround has been the subject of of not only news headlines but also headlines in the onion the latest says from the onion rick perry apologizes for trying to outdo fellow cabinet members by using seventy two million dollars of taxpayer funds on a lamp shade you know that that's funny but it gets to something that we have seen a lot of juliet lately which are these sort of financial controversies of people living high on the taxpayer dollar a talk a little bit about that sure i've been spending a lot of my time in recent months covering with my colleagues you know some of the spending the unusual spending that we've we've seen by this cabinet and so you know you can their their range of agencies and cabinet members that fall under this category for example scott pruitt the head of the environmental protection agency has made the decision along with the security.

rick perry juliet Mhm rhinelander wisconsin georgia president trump scott pruitt seventy two million dollars
"mhm" Discussed on wellRED podcast

wellRED podcast

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"mhm" Discussed on wellRED podcast

"You didn't see me yeah you should let them come with a with a nabet on a tray yes the south mhm weird liquor laws day to you can't you can have a drink in your room but they have to walk it up they have they have to deliver it to the room whether you call in and get some drinks rhino call it nick bring it up okay cool because i'm about to do that because now you're hitting and and thank you can't do doubles so he gave he technically gave me a half a shot and a one and a half ounce pour in the drink because utah's something else weird three point two percent draft beer at every bar and restaurant as a law in the bottles are just regular right you can they don't have any problem with serving it they just can't make it what because some of them bottles was made here so it's just the draft right what the fuck i mean all blue oh you mean like even all they can bottle beers that are brewed in utah and they can be more than that or the polygamy porter came from a different day and out there yeah there was there was like a polygamy porter and there's also i seen a polygamy sandwich yesterday while they're really on the goddamn knows with this whole thing i've been talking to the crowd's a lot about that and how the south get shit on because we fuck are cousins and the job has been hidden for people is but at least we do at one and a god damn time does it i mean i feel like it's easier for them to joke about it because it's so not real anymore like inspite of the reality television show and whatever we hear about some bum fucked place in utah that's as far removed from them as like bloodletting is from you know you're maybe not literally in terms of time but in terms of culture but.

utah two percent
"mhm" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"mhm" Discussed on WRVA

"Both both days and all of that is free you come on in pay for any food you want to eat to tell me about the entertainment but can people expect where we have a couple of really really good climber band's playing and we have got the new this year is a country blues guitarist playing hello offense firing should be good now there are things for the kids to do either arts and crafts and different things and learning a bill or things they can learn the history that type thing there's some of that going around okay and tell me about to food who i'll prepare the food where does it come from and what are some of the dishes everything we do is run by volunteers so it's our volunteers that cook all the food in fact my wife is a one of the cooks and she has cooked literally tons and tons of food one of the some of the dishes people love our stuffed cabbage mhm they may we have israeli food as well as traditional over the jewish american foods these rayleigh food includes sh warmer and some philosophy we have another dish popular in israel called shock sugar which is eggs with a spicy tomato sauce is really delicious we introduced last year new and everybody really enjoyed it now are you able to come in and carry out the food yet you can order ahead on line and pick up your food when you're there and we have a delivery service just like we did last year just check our our website which is richmond jewish food festivalcom and will post the information about ordering through the website and the delivered to your house for your office.

israel richmond