35 Burst results for "MFA"

"mfa" Discussed on Identity at the Center

Identity at the Center

05:35 min | Last month

"mfa" Discussed on Identity at the Center

"Is that the most important thing in the world. sometimes forget forget the two years of mandatory mandatory military training. That's what i used to think that everybody needed. It's two years at least a food service. Oh yeah absolutely. Yeah i think the hobart is a good thing though the weeds start. Speak the lingo eighty. Six right you're outshining once you once you are in the business. It's difficult to go to a restaurant again and not understand how it works right. You're no longer kind of a passenger. You are on the inside and you you you start to spot things right okay. That's how many table section that person has you. What's that great movie with ryan reynolds. The in waiting terrific movie cannot believe in economic believe in didn't win an oscar. it's fantastic. I mean this is now a really getting the but if you are all interested in food service industry and light comedy and i still think it's one of the closest representations of what it's actually like to work in a restaurant go check out the movie waiting with ryan reynolds justin long just ferris like all kinds of famous. That comedian guy was in it like that. That started a lot of careers. Yeah it was You know some little indie flick. I think within the last twenty years or so. I'm not sure when it came out but it was immediately a cult classic. I think for people who were in the restaurant biz. Jim i love what how you did. You describe it. You remember how you describe that movie office space for the food service industry. Oh that's right. Yep yeah why go out. Check it out. It came out in two thousand and five. I looked it up so we can feel old together but Louise phone waiting. Definitely recommendation to check out I think so. You know we'll go ahead and leave it for this week but before we do. I want to give Roger in the team here also to a a chance to kind of any final thoughts around our conversations around multi factor indication. Roger will start with you. We'll go to jim islands. My reason for living is to help. Security defenders really focus on. What's the top ways of jury attacked which is usually social engineering on patch. Software sometimes passer guessing type south and realize that that is ninety percent of the battle in all these other. Things are just really distractions. From what the primary things are you in one day. Social engineering patch software in passwords will not be top three reasons why you're successfully attack. Just figure out what the top things are in focus on those things to. They're no longer the top things. That is the secret to being a better computer security defender right on about jim yourself. I think it's pretty similar to what rogers said which is look at the show that we put onto the a about hacking. Mfa is meant to discourage you from implementing mfa. Right the the idea as a information security professional is Continue to advance all forward. Continue to shrink the defenses. But let's stick our head in the sands and think that oh if i implemented mfa. I'm bulletproof right. The the ideas continue the research continue to educate ourselves and try to stay one. Step ahead of the adversary Mfa definitely puts you one step ahead of if you didn't have them. Fa at a very minimum next level is pastoralists. Next level is stronger fe because one of the things. We're my big takeaways. From rogers book is that you know there yet. Twelve ways to pack..

ryan reynolds hobart justin long jim islands Roger ferris oscar Louise Jim Mfa rogers jim
"mfa" Discussed on Identity at the Center

Identity at the Center

03:52 min | Last month

"mfa" Discussed on Identity at the Center

"Two large. Tv's and walmart or somewhere at the same time and they let my transaction go through in the denied hers like two minutes later saw. There is little sms message going. Is this really you trying to buy this. Not me well. That's kinda probably the. I think the ultimate future of authentication if they see you coming from your your same device in location that you're going to be allowed to do what you do. The watcher action. See what you do seem. It seems like normal there will be this constant monitoring of what you do and it as long as you're doing what you normally do and it's not something higher risk you're probably not going to be bothered but if you go to transfer ten thousand dollars than maybe you have to provide an mfa. Token provide the last four digits of your credit card or something like that. So i i do think if future is not linked password bliss but i think token was i think for the most part Twenty years from now. Our grandkids are gonna laugh about the archaic methods that we used to do authentication because it just gonna be a fabric of what they do. And for the most part they're not going to be bothered until it becomes like a higher risk event. It'll be like you don't when people here like a modem and now and the there's like these flashbacks back to hearing modems modem signals and people staying off the phone. It'll be the same type of concept where you used to do what to log into things like you had to log into things you kids. Don't know how hard it wasn't. I had to remember twenty different passwords different passwords with different patterns for different sites. Some they're going to. They're going to go what they're not gonna be able to comprehend. I think you're right. You know you're going to be old when someone says what's password remember. My daughter got Three daughters in the summer one of my my youngest daughter was telling her france. My dad remember what it was like when. Dvd's were used you know. Like indeed. i do..

walmart france
"mfa" Discussed on Identity at the Center

Identity at the Center

04:55 min | Last month

"mfa" Discussed on Identity at the Center

"I know but it depends on how you define fishing designs bomb. What i guess like one of the most common ones that are. That's the hardest. To prevent from. Fishing is me sending new to a fake website. So it looks just so you click on a link that goes to the wrong place and then i completely fake your experience. A lot of the the best resilient. Mfa tokens won't even activate if you go to the wrong website. But all i have to do as the attacker is fake. Like it worked and then go. Hey we're having an error when you're token we're going to have a text or call you talk about replacing your token and then you start asking much personal questions what you logging. Id fishing them. Or you think you log into a bank like oh we need to confirm your credit card or having a problem token we need to confirm your credit card from your debit card information at the bank. It is almost impossible for an mfa vendor to prevent a completely thick website from just faking the experience. And that's why it's tough to prevent phishing. They're thinking about fishing as still in a password or this or that but to prevent all fishing. I don't know the solution. A lot of it comes back to the quality of the attempt rate when we think. We're all familiar with the terrible. Irs calls that we get right. We're going to be thrown in jail right if we don't answer the call right there that second and talk to somebody but i think it's just a matter of time where one know one for one replica of a site makes it extremely convincing for people and we're talking about. You don't need you know this is. This is a numbers game right. They're trying to get anything and everything. They only have to succeed once to be successful. Whereas if you're on the other side and trying to do defense against this you have to be right every single time. I think it's a very difficult challenge for a lot of folks that are out there. Yeah yeah exactly in. Let's say so. I said i sold a lotta. Mfa solutions in my career. Almost everybody that ever hired me to put an mfa had been compromised one or more times badly. Compromised like nolan proactively. Prior to this year one proactively clouds. Hey i don't wanna get mfa. It's always because they've been compromised so like i need to get mfa. I would go in and spend in. Be these million dollar projects in multiple months of time and i would get accolades on time on budget which that the computer is just insane right on time and on budget but every single one of those customers eventually got hacked again not through them face solution but through unpack software social engineering in most cases or could be miss configuration overly permissive permissions on aws towards bucket or something. You know it's it's it..

Irs Mfa nolan
"mfa" Discussed on Identity at the Center

Identity at the Center

03:33 min | Last month

"mfa" Discussed on Identity at the Center

"There's some remote system than ask for your fingerprint. They can now start. Duplicating the fingerprint in using it in you always have the biometric vendors gone. There's no way they'll be able to fake our fingerprints or Retina scan or a facial in the next day there's like some eighteen year holden youtube showing how he faked the facial scan like a dollar eighty of materials. Like it's. it's just a joke. Mike is thirty years of by which vendors telling me. Oh we've figured out how to stop people from faking it. In thirty years of them absolutely failed. You know by some kid the next day. They all have their like. All you know. Hardware tokens and smart cards in a time based one time passwords verses event based one. Time passer tokens once you tell me that type of mfa that you have there is a as soon as you. Tell me what it is. There is at least five ten hacks that apply to your solution just because what it is and it isn't a bug. It's not like they're going to go out in patch. Something like the time based one time password. Once have ac- database of someone compromises the database. They can create a duplicate instance of your of your like your google or something. It's not above that. They're gonna fix all they could but it's literally something that's an inherent weakness in the type of mfa that it is and they all have their strengths and weaknesses in. I've heard a lot of discussion different types of fan one. That's come up as we've talked with vendors in the past this idea of fissionable versus nonfish abol. fa may think of your your fingerprint story. And i wonder. Is there really a difference between fishbowl. Non-official favors that just marketing speak. Well you so. There are certainly some that more resilient against common types of fishing Fido two tokens f. Idea that's an alliance is a standard an open standard. They are resilient against the man in the middle attack like i just described with evil jinx. Like jim and i were talking about because they required device registration to the actual website vice versa. So that if you were man in the middle attack your token is actually not going to activate because it is not registered for the mana middle site website that you're at and so it that makes it not official in that way but there are other types of phishing attacks that i guess the vendors not considering an limited. I get that a lot i get. You can't hack it this where you can. Yeah i can hack it like can i finish every single. Mfa token type. That is out there. There is no doubt in my mind that i can send a phishing attack and that's the thing once. Mfa protects you against about thirty percent of attacks. But once i know that you're using a particular type of dokan it actually probably makes you more likely to fall because the average person thinks. Mfa makes them uninhabitable and then they get hacked and very very common asked all these point. There's one thousand point pitch users using mfa that cost tens of millions of dollars. They thought they were told. If i'm using. Mfa on so much. I'm using high security so much likely not to be hack. And then but i got hacked because somebody sent me a phishing. Email like the. They're always like this rut row moment and they're like oh. No one told me that. I could just be senate phishing email. So you know isn't kim. Is there an anti. Is there an unofficial. Mfa not that..

youtube Mike Mfa google jim senate kim
"mfa" Discussed on Identity at the Center

Identity at the Center

04:53 min | Last month

"mfa" Discussed on Identity at the Center

"Are not coming up with the exploits themselves. They're downloading kits off the internet. And maybe doing some some script customization and they're looking for the easy targets and then they attacked the easy target so layering. Mfa is going to thwart some percentage. Why because there's plenty of organizations out there that still have them if they if you're using a very basic form of them. If if is not biometrics if it's not you know kind of you know a little bit more Then you're you're setting yourself up to have a false sense of security. I wonder what you think about that so exactly again. This tape a little bit in the past but a big article. This week is about a bunch of coin base users. People trading cryptocurrencies being compromised in coin. Face getting the money back right. Your currency against a lot of those people were using. Mfa right and the problem was is that they thought. Oh but you know everybody's like used. Mfa this is super high security. They don't tell you know. Mfa solution very few of them. Certainly not the people there like telling you. Hey this high security use mfa and this is high security so they kind of relax. I talk to people all the time. That thank if they're using. Mfa they can't be fish. Like no i can fix you. I can send you email. You click on the link in its game. They're shocked when they learn that now with that said light. What percentage of hacking will be fixed in remediated by. Mfa anybody taking that guest. Good luck but what i will say is if you look at one hundred percent of hacking. Just my best. Guess and i'm i'm around. Mfa a lot. I've been doing it for decades. I bet that. Mfa prevents thirty percent of tacky. And that's no small amount. That's a third of all hacking right but mfa at its best only prevents authentication attacked and doesn't prevent somebody from doing attacking unpacked software or eavesdropping. Or taking control of your in. You know you run. They tricked running a trojan on their desktop. It's game okay right so. Mfa only works prevents some types of authentication attacks. Now with that said it's a large percentage of authentication idex primary thing that mfa stops is simple fishing or sounds like hey give your log in and password and let me say those are a large majority of phishing attacks so using you know you cannot give away your password if you.

Mfa
"mfa" Discussed on Identity at the Center

Identity at the Center

04:13 min | Last month

"mfa" Discussed on Identity at the Center

"Everything aches that the victim quote victim did was sent to the real server and everything the real server Had all the pictures and things like that were sent back to the victim in and neither side is that there's this man in the middle in between they would. The victim would notice if they saw that the u. r. l. that they're connecting to is not the right. You're out so it you know it was amazing. And i i remember thinking i was like i know how to hack. Mfa a bunch of different ways. So i wrote an article for rural magazine. I wrote for them for fifteen years as a weekly columnist. I call it the hacking thing hacking him. I know ten ways to do it. And by the time i got we writing the ten ways articles i knew twelve ways in the so then i wrote twelve as jack. Mfa didn't he. Book ended up being my most popular webinar. Unless i've done hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of webinars it's by far still the most popular webinar presentation. I ever give. I gave it. Rsa in in black cat time. Sue standing room only crowds of thousands of people and people out in the hallways in the overflow rooms and stuff like that my editor for i was trying to talk my editor. Jim mental mandel the publishing a book on quantum cryptography quantum to how quantum computers gonna break a quantum a break. Today's traditional encryption. Which i wrote that book. But he's like roger looking at these crowds. I think you should be writing a hacking them. If able ever that know how to hack. Mfa over fifty. different ways. And i tell people i like. Mfa in everybody should use mfa with the biggest problem is is that most people most sys admins most ceases. Thank that when they have deployed. Mfa that they are significantly less likely to be hacked in. That is not true. I mean i've been some webinars just this week and last week. Some cyber insurance webinars.

Mfa rural magazine Jim mental mandel jack roger
"mfa" Discussed on Identity at the Center

Identity at the Center

05:20 min | Last month

"mfa" Discussed on Identity at the Center

"To that in our show notes. Welcome to the show. Roger glad to be your jeff gemma. Thanks and i just wanna go on record saying is i'm not gonna blame courtney love. There's like this unnatural thing that wants me. Blamed courtney love letting say it's not our fault. That's how i respond to that braid album break music though while roger she is named in the lawsuit so she is one of the big according to the article i read. She's one of the people named in the lawsuit is being sued for one hundred fifty thousand dollars or her role is sex sexual exploitation. It's an interesting story. yeah. I don't i don't know i don't get it but okay well whatever. Why don't we. Why don't we stick tight end. Because i think that's what we all. I think have more of a passion knowledge base on but before we get to that in a roger. Maybe can help us understand your background. And how you actually got into the identity and the info specks infosec base. Is that something that you can kind of take us through is a little of a journey. Here's her story. Yeah yeah. I think you know. Thirty four years of computer security experience is really why got in the ville early on was located like seventeen eighteen nineteen But i did like everybody else. Pc network technician all kinds of stuff on my journey But really will kinda got me in the identity. Space really was kinda my at least my door into it was. I was a big. Pk guy and so. I was doing a lot of pk. I love peaky i love. I love the crypt in typography in the beauty of it and that led to installing smart cards and that led to install a lot of different. Mfa solutions over the years. I probably installed two hundred. Mfa solutions in different places. Probably more than anybody else. i know. I've probably truly hacked paid the hack. A couple hundred others on probably twenty different projects from different companies. I worked for microsoft and other companies Found stone and stuff like that so kinda throat but it was all really through. Pk i that kinda. Got me into smart cards. Which was kind of the original one of the original multi factor authentication solutions and then and everything else and now you're a data driven defense evangelist. Which is a very cool title. And i'm not sure how how you swung that at no before. So what is what do you actually do. These days actually had the best easy job role. I get paid to write in talk actually. That title was funny as i was. I got hired an written a book called daydream computer data driven computer defense instill was an early big fan of it and really is it truly is like my magnum opus Which is literally says. Hey you should concentrate on the stuff of how you really act. And it's really about data like we're we're supposedly somewhat of a mature industry is what you would think. After thirty forty years of computers and computer security and network found out is that we're not really you know that mature in our thinking we're we're gonna like most cybersecurity is best guesses in gut feelings and when you look at the data a lot of times the data contradicts what. Conventional wisdom is like the nist digital identity guideline documents back in two thousand seventeen. That's nist special publication.

jeff gemma courtney Mfa Roger roger microsoft
"mfa" Discussed on Identity at the Center

Identity at the Center

03:02 min | Last month

"mfa" Discussed on Identity at the Center

"Geoff. That's jim hey jim. Hey jeff how are you. Oh not so bad yourself. I'm good but you know what Do levels of human stupidity are being reached with all going on the news. I'm going and this is not a news show but the story. I'm going to report on. Is that the baby from nirvana's nevermind album cover is suing the band at kirk cobain's estate for alleged sexual exploitation so so for people familiar with this cover our with his album. The probably doesn't need to be explained but for those who don't know. Iran is never mind album as recorded like thirty years ago. And it's a baby in the pool being lured in by dollar bill on a fishhook and the baby is naked. Sexual exploitation never crossed my mind with this with this cover but apparently this is left. The baby who's now a thirty year old roan person So distraught that he's suing the band members and people associated with the band for ten people for like a hundred and fifty thousand dollars apiece for like one point five million dollars Absolutely crazy what do you think. I don't know i think this sounds a little bit like a money. Grab almost like the picture itself. But that's just me. I don't guess. I don't have an opinion on it. All one way or the other just seems seems kind of kind of a weird time to do it but who knows. I know. it's definitely a money. Grab as being opportunistic. And this is. I mean as why everybody's free to do anything in this society is that you could be sued for absolutely nothing. I'm sorry there's no way anybody would be able to look at this picture and no it. Was this person this thirty year old man. Now if he wasn't out saying that was me and i was exploited. I'm sorry this is this is just craziness to me. I think the guy's been promoting it for a long time and now i'm not sure why now all of a sudden it's an issue but i'm not a judge and i guess not my pig farm alternate on there why i'm interested to hear what our guest is going to say about it. Yeah so why. Don't we get into it a little bit today. We have a pretty cool conversation. We're gonna talk about hacking multifactoral authentication. I think most people when they have conversation on. Mfa they sita's kinda the end all be all and you know. It's certainly better than a password but does not mean that it's perfect So introduce our guest. His name is roger grimes. He's a data driven defense evangelist at before he's also author of multiple books including one called hacking multi factor indication which you can find an amazon dot com. We'll have a link.

jim hey jim kirk cobain Geoff nirvana jeff Iran roger grimes Mfa amazon
Is Standardization Possible in Conversation Design? Conversations with Things Authors Diana Deibel and Rebecca Evanhoe - Voicebot Podcast Ep 220 - burst 05

The Voicebot Podcast

03:24 min | 2 months ago

Is Standardization Possible in Conversation Design? Conversations with Things Authors Diana Deibel and Rebecca Evanhoe - Voicebot Podcast Ep 220 - burst 05

"It strikes me as interesting that i have a former playwright. Someone who's trained and fiction writing and those are two disciplines that might have best practices. Sometimes processes assuredly certainly formulas the people of used over time but standards. I'm not sure. I don't think i've ever seen that before. Is this just inherently something about writing scripts language conversation that defies standardization. That's such an interesting question and one we've never been asked before i love this question. I would say yeah. I do think there is something really magical special. An unusual about language in that the tiniest variations can make huge differences in how it's understood. The same sentence can be completely differently. Understood by two different people Their the meaning is not fully made from words on a page or words that you hear it is made in your mind. Combining that information with other data. That's coming to you and your whole history so it is a really kind of wild thing to try and express meaning to another person. I do think that there is Something hard about language that it's always shifting. It's always changing In her diana has some some follow up here to rebecca. Tend to do this all the time where we can fight with each other or like specifically take opposing views just to see where we had a but since i i disagree with her kind of in that i think what you're asking brad or what the piece that i'm taking from it is. The standardization can apply both to like the content as well as the form and the form is absolutely standardize. Like when i think of a script for matt A play for matinee. There's there's forums that are standardizing that way an conversation will will leave and go in different places in. There's no sort of standard method of getting from point. Eight point b but when we look at conversations there is always kind of an arc to them which is how storytelling gets told in conversation. There's something that somebody needs or wants at the beginning. And then that is typically satisfied by the end of that conversation or it's unsatisfied and because of that dissatisfaction. The conversation has ended as that. I think also exists in the kinds of conversations that we talk about with bots. Yeah i think that's interesting because there are like Like in fiction either there is like the dramatic arc with rising action conflict falling resolution all those sorts of things. And so like in you know when you get an mfa or you study an art form you learn kind of the rules and you learn you study. Who's breaking them. And what effect. That has a where like art. Fullness comes in so there is there is attention. I guess between like there are rules but sometimes the best things happen when you break them.

Design Standards Conversation Conversation Designer VUX Writing Human Centered Diana Rebecca Brad Matt
A Desperate Writer Steals 'the Plot'

The Book Review

02:14 min | 5 months ago

A Desperate Writer Steals 'the Plot'

"Let's start with the premise of this book. And i i want to say upfront. There are a number of big twists plot to us in this book and we are not going to give away anything. So if you haven't read the book please don't fear. We will not ruin it for you. But give us the premise. The is about a a writer who i think we can. Safely say has failed is failing is well on his way to complete obscurity and he is seen in a pretty bottom of the barrel. Mfa program a low residency mfa program in into his classroom into his depression about his life walks. Just the worst of all possible students. He's arrogant he's dismissive. He has no time for anybody especially his teacher. Jake and he basically says i donate any of you people because i am writing this great novel that is going to be so successful that all of the good things that we book world are aware are going to happen to this novel. And jake ecorse dismisses this as the the arrogance of the young and the the early career writer the untried writer but then during a private conference he actually. Here's this plot and he unfortunately realizes that everything that this guy has said is going to come true. Some years later when he's even closer to the terminus of his own career he discovers that this young man has died and has died pretty soon after their encounter air. Go there is no book. There's not even a manuscript. There's only this story and as any writer would agree. This is a story that has to be told so. He writes his own novel with the story and all of the good things that his former student has predicted come true but he can't really enjoy it because he so terrified that somebody is going to step out of the shadows and accused him immense. Somebody does and the rest of the novelist really about his trying to steer clear of this person tried to avoid the disaster that this person represents for his professional life in his personal life and also ultimately to find out who this person is and where the story came. Pro-

Jake Ecorse MFA Jake Depression
"mfa" Discussed on Café com Tecnologia

Café com Tecnologia

03:30 min | 7 months ago

"mfa" Discussed on Café com Tecnologia

"Walk in sima divide people talking at bingo and being evan sodden them don't And if you us would keep fiat and mutual funds almost a budget. They've mayes look at toys. Factories was part of operas. Ain't blue abbasi cook kit. Who's saying it to put his ample applic- achieve all bench colluded their seattle wire grotto. Mayes wing don't mice speak assume is dim artem. Santa kalac caucusing babysit. Who's the marlins who look publicity. Happy days in los. Ask myself that singled us. All is the you my out the sequence commodities. I destroy nice. You should invite decision. Sat me tube. Gardo put up one point our podcast georgia somebody fiat. But if it will sit a brooklyn has hit. Soci- ice morisha qassim. You dasa on facebook. Twitter linke genes that gramp thought We'll can only do to make him because reciprocal allah can now. Because sit them. Being from youtube lapping vija technology. Thing live is live your inclusive. Was you interfere. Thing live with them being so returns for mom digital us. Most podcasts guests us keyhole villas molina's any search is seeking the fierce. He interferes these people. G gastropod agenda paddock to disaster towards the molina hope commotion from brooklyn. My star giovanni book. My stodgy minds. Viola farber keep civil cities when he was shot and put the interior. Will gas down to alamo canal due to be zuma live blog at them being dubbed. Won't morisha casimiro plant don't sit inc tops combat's perceive as possible. Secret files me. Emma bagman dies at damage to evoke all kind of felix demographic of Is a set literally. Got a on beinart. Bobbins abboud the he yup iki lost We the indian algae a salvage bombers viper case budget is. He was at the yet. They will produce more bizarre bizarre directly the milk broadcasts..

Emma bagman facebook Twitter youtube evan Viola farber morisha qassim allah morisha giovanni one point Santa kalac georgia Gardo alamo canal zuma live brooklyn
"mfa" Discussed on Café com Tecnologia

Café com Tecnologia

04:28 min | 7 months ago

"mfa" Discussed on Café com Tecnologia

"Along leaving to be vena o.'neil budget gas chicago technology a motive because it got over soccer. We'll see what somebody mef Danger castle video showed technology. Today's other sort of microsoft..

Optimizing your reputation online with Sean Smith

Elevate: The Official Podcast of Elite Agent Magazine

04:41 min | 7 months ago

Optimizing your reputation online with Sean Smith

"Welcome to another episode of the elevate. Podcast where we into some of the most interesting minds in business in real estate for the very best cheap since strategies it implemented. Elevate your business. I'm smith mclean. Editor relate agent and host of today's show on today's show joined by podium regional sales directors. Sean smith with a background in real estate that includes property management support and also some time we thrill state dot com delay. You sean carter. Focus involves helping agencies obtain and manage their online reviews which is very important. So welcome to the show sean. Thank you samantha. Grades of asia. That was a male phil. Welcome to the show on like this is a bit of alliteration going on there. So let's dive straight in an online reviews and you always hear about the importance of reviews. Why do they medicine much match. Agents online reputation depends when you're talking about online reviews of it is for an agency if they'd just using reviews as a way to get some nice testimonials that they wanna put on their website. That's great doesn't drive new business. So when i think of reviews and the reason i've come over into this space and i'm so passionate about reviews. Specifically in the real estate sector reviews me business. Landlords vandals looking at online reviews. They're only looking for one reason and that's to safer. The next agency is that they appoint to manage their property all sell the property much. That loss check isn't it. Because you do research and you jumping in jump out you do all sorts of other things as it can chamber and then finally before you make that selection you go and look at the reviews right absolutely absolutely any. It could be the difference between someone being photo to a great agent. That person still check those reviews and they might get turned off even if it's the best friends recommendation. Yeah it's an interesting topic but reviews on just about reputation. They're all about search engine optimization as well so can you talk us through how that works exactly questions. I'd encourage everyone listening to this when you get to a desktop buta or a about such real estate agency and then put in the suburb of your agency. If you're not just looking there at agencies that have a couple of reviews you'll get the most recommended agencies in that area and that's tied down to run about eight or nine out of ten. Seo factors with google a purely tied to those reviews whether they've recent reviews whether you consistently and frequently get those reviews and also you start writing in your total number as well but then the baffle the nettle. Yeah that's interesting. So google is actually ranking people based on race of reviews and based on the number of reviews and i also take it. The velocity of reviews like committee reviews of coming over sitting period of time. Absolutely in that in google's is that comes down to they want to make sure that this isn't just a flash in the pan for an office so if an office is ten reviews an and then they go. You know what this is really important. Add an extra hundred reviews next week. We're gonna ask all about science. That might look good in your number of reviews. No star writing but google's not going to look super favorably on that because it's not part of your process if you're looking at reviews as a new business strategy for instance make pot of every process make it part of the selling journey make it part of the. The tenant janis well finding appropriate after. They signed a lease in that secured the premise austin for review. It will just happen day down. Yeah that's interesting. And i want to get to asking for reviews because partying does that exceptionally well. We just talked a lot about google but there are a whole lot of review platforms agents right my agent real estate facebook etc in european. Where should agents focus. Think it depends a lot on what they're trying to which eighth with each of these different viewpoint foams. I'm very biased. Because google has actually backed podium. Not necessarily the best choice to get involved in which platform would always encourage people to find out where the custom is a finding them from. I know that some of those review sites. They're focused on buys intense. We know whether going though if they looking for property reviews probably on really influence. Mfa looking to buy property. Google is the first point. Of course someone doing the research on like i say land rivendell doing the research on the agency that they going to enlist. They'll be agent the agency and the brand. That's what google is absolutely the number one place because it's tied into your phone. It's tied into a web browser you see it straightaway and you can see her as the most recommended agency

Smith Mclean Sean Carter Google Sean Smith Samantha Sean Asia Janis Austin Facebook MFA
Cyber Security Headlines 15th January 2021

Cyber Security Headlines

03:09 min | 9 months ago

Cyber Security Headlines 15th January 2021

"Packers waltzed past mfa used by seesaw. On cloud. Accounts multi factor. Authentication is one of the strongest security protocols. We have but it's not infallible on wednesday. The us cyber security infrastructure security agency revealed that malicious actors bypassed mfa to get into its cloud service accounts cease said that the threat actors had tried multiple times to breaches systems by various tactics including fishing brute force logging attempts and possibly a pass the cookie attack which involves the theft of authentication cookies from browsers and related processes. That's how the attackers were able to hijack an authenticated session by using stolen session cookies to access ceases online services social media convulses after capital attack. A widespread shakeup is underway facebook's yanking posts of flyers promoting events leading up to biden's inauguration as terrorism and cyber experts helped the platform to ferret out images calling for harm the walkie talkie app zillow which hasn't proactively moderated content has deleted over two thousand militia related channels after finding it was used by insurrectionists and parlor the social media app favored by trump supporters. May never come back for having been scraped off the app. Stores kicked out by slack and cut by amazon. Ceo john matzec told reuters parlor filed charges on wednesday asking for amazon to be forced to restore its service. Google fixes bug that delayed kovic contact tracing apps. The api bug affected contact. Tracing apps worldwide delaying notifications sent to android users. The apps are built on top of the exposure notification system an api that google released jointly with apple to help health services develop contact tracing apps it looks like the problem only manifested on android devices. Not on ios the api. Let's developers create contact tracing tools that protect privacy by relying on bluetooth to exchange anonymous keys between smartphones an easy way to warn users if they've been in contact with someone who later tested positive apple yanks feature that lets apps bypass mac. Os firewalls and vpn's has removed the content filter exclusion list from mac. Os eleven point. Two beta to k known as big sur. The controversial feature had allowed fifty three of apple's own apps to bypass third party firewalls security tools and vpn apps that users themselves had installed for their own protection. The list included some of apple's biggest apps such as the app store maps and i cloud security researchers had discovered the problem this past october and had called it a security nightmare waiting to happen

Us Cyber Security Infrastructu Ceo John Matzec Packers Amazon Biden Apple Google Facebook Reuters App Store
"mfa" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

The Rookie Writer Show

04:49 min | 10 months ago

"mfa" Discussed on The Rookie Writer Show

"Hi welcome to unsettling read season. Three episode one. If you've been listening you know that at the end of season two. I was talking about reevaluating how this show worked. And when i got started the idea was to almost do my own little. Mfa and help people at the same time and it served to hold me accountable to getting through a lot of books said stacked up over the years on writing and courses that i want to take on writing and it really didn't get job getting me through those so as realizing that more and more i was just looking for books and courses to be able to do the show each week so then i kinda open it up so it was every other week and i thought that might be a better pace for me. since i had gone through so many already i needed shift other things and towards the end of the season last year. I got to thinking. What is it that i want to get out of the show now and i wanna give back through the show so through that i realized that in some ways the show is been so amazing but also has caused me a lot of writing time in part because there was a lot of research and and then printing up you know writing up the show notes and just getting everything all squared up with all the links and all this kind of stuff so i thought about just completely giving up on it altogether and then in all honesty i went and looked at my show stats and i realize that there's a fair number of you guys out there listening. This is these numbers beyond my friends and family. And so i thought well. How could it continue to be useful to people that have been tuning in other rookie writers as well as useful to me so that i get more reading done and then it occurred to me i could use it in a way that walked people through the process of.

Mfa
"mfa" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

04:32 min | 10 months ago

"mfa" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"That bill won't come before parliament until next year at the earliest would go into effect in twenty twenty two all right that one. I'm not sure about that. Well we need more details about it to be sure about it. It's it's in the earliest stages more details continue to come out related to the attack on solar winds orion network management platform and it's used to intrude on email networks at government and corporate networks. A lot about that yesterday if you need to catch up. Researchers at velocity said monday that they had encountered the same attackers penetrating a think tank organization three times in two thousand nine thousand nine in early twenty twenty and the attackers were able to bypass multi factor. Authentication provided by a company called duo by gaining administrator privileges on target network and then stealing the secret key. What do oh calls. It's a key from server running the outlook web app. They could use the key to generate a valid cookie that would be set when accessing account that they had already acquired the username and password for that would bypass multi factor authentication. It wouldn't happen so mfa wouldn't fail. Mfa would never be called because they could forge the cookie to look like it already had been called essentially fooling the authentication server into thinking. Multi factor was satisfied some more details on the malware that was actually implanted into orion also came out. It identified its network. Traffic as the orion improvement program. It was passing around at store data inside legitimate files to try to keep it from being detected. It would also search for security and antivirus tools in order to avoid them. And the operators never communicated from outside the network with the same computer or network more than once that way. There wouldn't be a build up of suspicious traffic from a particular source and they would only connect to the malware from outside the minimum amount of time they needed to to gain access to stolen credentials. Then we'd just use the stolen credentials and not access them. Our again reducing the ability to detect that something wrong was going on The malware also didn't use any code from previous malware which is often something malheur makers do which made it harder to detect. Can't wait for the movie. This is so convoluted and complex and I mean there's a movie to be made about a lot of this. I'm pretty sure sorry. this is my technical take. Yeah i mean it's it's it's fascinating stuff and we're going to keep getting more revelations about this obviously just the number of important organizations is going to keep building up We we talked about a few of them yesterday but but more. Us government organizations more corporations and it is going to be fascinating to find out how this operated This is a sophisticated actor. It's obviously nation state backed. This is not the kind of thing that your average attacker out there can pull off. It may sound easy to be like. Oh yeah you get admin privileges and you steal the secret key. But even admins don't necessarily know how to extract that key and create the forged cookies and if you're gonna come at duo and say well..

mfa Mfa Us government
"mfa" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

03:30 min | 10 months ago

"mfa" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"That bill won't come before parliament until next year at the earliest would go into effect in twenty twenty two all right that one. I'm not sure about that. Well we need more details about it to be sure about it. It's it's in the earliest stages more details continue to come out related to the attack on solar winds orion network management platform and it's used to intrude on email networks at government and corporate networks. A lot about that yesterday if you need to catch up. Researchers at velocity said monday that they had encountered the same attackers penetrating a think tank organization three times in two thousand nine thousand nine in early twenty twenty and the attackers were able to bypass multi factor. Authentication provided by a company called duo by gaining administrator privileges on target network and then stealing the secret key. What do oh calls. It's a key from server running the outlook web app. They could use the key to generate a valid cookie that would be set when accessing account that they had already acquired the username and password for that would bypass multi factor. Authentication didn't happen so mfa wouldn't fail. Mfa would never be called because they could forge the cookie to look like it already had been called essentially fooling the authentication server into thinking. Multi factor was satisfied some more details on the malware that was actually implanted into orion also came out. It identified its network. Traffic as the orion improvement program. It was passing around at store data inside legitimate files to try to keep it from being detected. It would also search for security and antivirus tools in order to avoid them. And the operators never communicated from outside the network with the same computer or network more than once that way. There wouldn't be a build up of suspicious traffic from a particular source and they would only connect to the malware from outside the minimum amount of time they needed to to gain access to stolen credentials. Then we'd just use the stolen credentials and not access them. Our again reducing the ability to detect that something wrong was going on The malware also didn't use any code from previous malware which is often something malheur makers do which made it harder to detect. Can't wait for the movie. This is so convoluted and complex and I mean there's a movie to be made about a lot of this. I'm pretty sure sorry. this is my technical take. Yeah i mean it's it's it's fascinating stuff and we're going to keep getting more revelations about this obviously just the number of important organizations is going to keep building up We we talked about a few of them yesterday but but more. Us government organizations more corporations and it is going to be fascinating to find out how this operated. This is a sophisticated actor. It's obviously nation state backed. This is not the kind of thing that your average attacker out there can pull off. It may sound easy to be like. Oh yeah you get admin privileges and you steal the secret key. But even admins don't necessarily know how to extract that key and create the forged cookies and if you're gonna come at duo and say well..

mfa Mfa Us government
The Women Who Revolutionized Fashion with Petra Slinkard

Dressed: The History of Fashion

04:28 min | 11 months ago

The Women Who Revolutionized Fashion with Petra Slinkard

"You are here to discuss the peabody essex. Museum latest exhibition the women who revolutionized fashion two hundred and fifty years of design as the title suggests. This is not by any means a small topic. Can you tell us about the exhibit and a little bit about the inspiration behind its creation. Sure absolutely So this exhibition actually is a partnership that we did our we're doing i should say With the consortium and then hand in the netherlands and it is an extension of a show. They put on called them. Vitol's strong women and fashion and their show then travelled to belgium and we are essentially kind of the third venue. But it's. It's an interesting collaboration because it's not an identical repaying of their show so they're installation on which was was beautiful and spanned multiple rooms in multiple galleries and our show is going to be designed a little bit differently And part of reason that we were very excited to partner with consortium is that they're so accommodating on really great partners they allowed us to borrow sixty objects from their election which was huge for us because of course the european collection Phenomenal works that represent into the big european designers for which doesn't have that much representation and but of course being in the united states. We really wanted to draw out of some additional stories that pertain to designers the twentieth century. But also american designers For whom there wasn't as much representation in their show the we've been able to augment With twenty five works from our own collection some of which are recent acquisitions and We borrowed a few pieces from the mfa in boston. We brought to pieces from the chicago history museum and then we're working with To private collectors. So there are a hundred eight mannequins in the show. It's a really big show and it does run the gamut. We say two hundred and fifty years. It's not of course the comprehensive look but it does span that timeframe and so why an exhibition dedicated to i mean. This probably goes without saying what inspired you to do. An exhibition dedicated just to women designers. Well that's a great question It actually takes me back to a time in chicago. Because i was working at the post. Your museum as the custom curators there and of course as a social history museum we were definitely thinking about a twenty twenty s. A hallmark year for the anniversary of the ratification of the nineteenth amendment. And so even then this back in two thousand seventeen By partner just kapoor. And i were already beginning to catacomb the collection and look to see what we might do in honor of women. Because of museum itself was looking to do a year of women based programming and exhibitions. My life changed. Because i. I moved tuesday when massachusetts became the vashon. Tech's curator the peabody essex museum. Is i kind of put that idea dressed. Rest until i was scrolling through instagram. One evening saw me ho. Hey who's curator at the museum post image of stack of books and i noticed all the names on the books. And they were all women designers. She said something pithy like coming soon. And you know a strong women fashion. And so i sent her a direct message and i said hey. Tell me more what is going on. What are you doing when he planning And she told me about the show. And i said oh. That's really interesting and said you'll have you ever worked with the us institution before she said. No we haven't What would you be interested. And she said yes so. I went and saw the expedition. And i came back and i spoke with our colleagues here in just so happened that we had a are scheduled for twenty twenty and We really been thinking at that point about doing anything dedicated to him in and so it all fell into place We were slated to open in may but of course because of covid that did not happen. but again because we have great partners they were very flexible. And now we're opening number twenty first.

Vitol Chicago History Museum The Netherlands Belgium MFA Boston Peabody Essex Museum Kapoor United States Chicago Massachusetts Tech
The Women Who Revolutionized Fashion with Petra Slinkard

Dressed: The History of Fashion

05:30 min | 11 months ago

The Women Who Revolutionized Fashion with Petra Slinkard

"Seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to trust the history of fashion. Podcasts are we explore the who what of why we wear. We are fashion historian and your host april kellyanne and cassidy zachary will hello dressed listeners. Today we are very excited to feature an exhibition. That does something that you know. We love to do on dressed. And that is celebrating the work of bad ass ladies from their history and today. And that's right because today we are welcoming the peabody essex museum fashion and textile curator pitcher sling card to the show to discuss. The exhibition. Made it the women who've revolutionized fashion and as the museum's website says through more than one hundred works made it celebrates the stories of women who revolutionized many aspects of the fashion industry and traces how these efforts parallel history of women's global struggle for equity and opportunity exhibition is actually collaboration between pem and the kunst museum didn't hog in the netherlands and it features clothing from both of these museums collections. As well as from private and public collections and so from every designer from elizabeth keck lead to lady. Lucille gordon to madeleine to bonnie cashin and low mary. Quant and then all the way to more contemporary designers like rei kawakubo Irishman herpin gina. Kuma you do not want to miss this exhibition. It actually just opened in its on view until march twenty twenty one yes and alas we will not be able to make it to salem massachussetts in person this year especially right now so what better way to celebrate this exhibition them by being joined by his co. curator patriot. Welcome to the show. He had show welcome to dress. It's such a pleasure to have you here today thank you. I'm excited to be with you. So you are here to discuss the peabody essex. Museum latest exhibition the women who revolutionized fashion two hundred and fifty years of design as the title suggests. This is not by any means a small topic. Can you tell us about the exhibit and a little bit about the inspiration behind its creation. Sure absolutely So this exhibition actually is a partnership that we did our we're doing i should say With the consortium and then hand in the netherlands and it is an extension of a show. They put on called them. Vitol's strong women and fashion and their show then travelled to belgium and we are essentially kind of the third venue. But it's. It's an interesting collaboration because it's not an identical repaying of their show so they're installation on which was was beautiful and spanned multiple rooms in multiple galleries and our show is going to be designed a little bit differently And part of reason that we were very excited to partner with consortium is that they're so accommodating on really great partners they allowed us to borrow sixty objects from their election which was huge for us because of course the european collection Phenomenal works that represent into the big european designers for which doesn't have that much representation and but of course being in the united states. We really wanted to draw out of some additional stories that pertain to designers the twentieth century. But also american designers For whom there wasn't as much representation in their show the we've been able to augment With twenty five works from our own collection some of which are recent acquisitions and We borrowed a few pieces from the mfa in boston. We brought to pieces from the chicago history museum and then we're working with To private collectors. So there are a hundred eight mannequins in the show. It's a really big show and it does run the gamut. We say two hundred and fifty years. It's not of course the comprehensive look but it does span that timeframe and so why an exhibition dedicated to i mean. This probably goes without saying what inspired you to do. An exhibition dedicated just to women designers. Well that's a great question It actually takes me back to a time in chicago. Because i was working at the post. Your museum as the custom curators there and of course as a social history museum we were definitely thinking about a twenty twenty s. A hallmark year for the anniversary of the ratification of the nineteenth amendment. And so even then this back in two thousand seventeen By partner just kapoor. And i were already beginning to catacomb the collection and look to see what we might do in honor of women. Because of museum itself was looking to do a year of women based programming and exhibitions. My life changed. Because i. I moved tuesday when massachusetts became the vashon. Tech's curator the peabody essex museum. Is i kind of put that idea dressed. Rest until i was scrolling through instagram. One evening saw me ho. Hey who's curator at the museum post image of stack of books and i noticed all the names on the books. And they were all women designers. She said something pithy like coming soon. And you know a strong women fashion.

April Kellyanne Cassidy Zachary Essex Museum Kunst Museum Elizabeth Keck Lucille Gordon Bonnie Cashin Low Mary The Netherlands Vitol Madeleine Gina Salem Chicago History Museum Belgium MFA United States Boston Kapoor
Art museum accused of racism names 1st director of inclusion

WBZ Afternoon News

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Art museum accused of racism names 1st director of inclusion

"Of Fine Arts has named its first director of belonging and inclusion. The facility, says Rosa Rodriguez Williams will play a critical role in helping to make the MFA a museum for all of Boston. Museum was accused of racism last year after black middle school students said they were mistreated on a class trip by other patrons, as well as a staff member

Rosa Rodriguez Williams Fine Arts Black Middle School Director Boston
Elizabeth Wetmore Interview

Bookworm

06:38 min | 1 year ago

Elizabeth Wetmore Interview

"Today. I'm rejoining Elizabeth what more Beth what more to talk about how? At Age fifty two, she published her first novel Valentine. A novel that not only is superb. It made its debut at number two on the New York Times bestseller list. The book is wonderful an impressive demonstration of the power of women's voices to carry a novel. Now, I'm very interested Elizabeth. How is it? That this. Is Your first novel at Age Fifty Two when did you start writing? Well I don't think I wrote my first short story until I was in my late twenties and I was a reader and I loved books and I read voraciously and impulsively as a little girl if somewhat in a somewhat unfocused manner and and really I don't come from a background where one becomes a writer at least not as a profession. So I think that this sort of combination of of a a kind of holding writers in such esteem I as a little girl in even as a young woman, I thought authors were. Other worldly they were sages and priests and rabbis and holy people live all sorts but I didn't think of writers as being particularly human or occupying the same world as the rest of us So I even write my first short story until I was in my late twenties but I read a lot and I love to read and I thought it must be a pretty holy profession to spend your time telling stories. I fell in love with reading and I had a hard time imagining who a writer might be. I, confused my teachers with riders. I thought that they and the books they taught me came from some specially magical and creative source and I felt song lucky. that. There were special classes when I was in elementary school, it had the ugly Title I. G C Intellectually Gifted Children. By the time I was in high school it was called AP advanced placement but whatever it was called we got to read the best books. One of my teachers took us not to the school library but to a public library where the head librarian was a friend of hers and we were able to take out adult books in this book, your new novel your first. Novel. Valentine one of the characters is reading the scarlet letter. There's a beautiful quote it's not identified, but I recognized it from Charlotte's Web. She here's the beauty of language, the children who are readers here that beauty and they find it on the local bookmobile. The comes to a nearby parking lot a parking lot that's near the strip. Strip joint. It's kind of amazing on the one hand you have. lost. Romantic children getting books and on the other hand you have the men watching the women taking their clothes off and that defied is the divide that defines this novel. But at a certain point Beth, you are at Iowa the Iowa Riders Program How did that happen? When I was waiting tables in Phoenix I started taking community fiction workshop It was being taught by to Grad students at Arizona State, and at that particular time, I don't know if they still do this. But at that time they the MFA students had to do some kind of community service project. So these two guys were teaching this community fiction writing workshop and. I sort of made my way into that and that was where I started and then at some point I was able to to sort of I wouldn't say sneak-in but I was able to get permission to sit on an MFA level workshop at Asu and just sort of as a guest It was really lucky and I'm not sure it would happen today. But but the long and the short of it is I was able to sit in on a class being taught by Ron Carlson who really encouraged me than to apply to Grad School, and I'm the first generation of my family to go to college I. Grew up in a really really working class background. So Honestly It wasn't until I was in my late twenties that I even really knew that there were such things as MFA programs when I signed up for that community fiction workshop was when I learned that there were MFA programs out there So So I was encouraged by a by a mentor to to apply and I did and You know initially he had said to me go do some research and come back in. So I, I went and did a little reading and came back with a sort of list of places to fly in University of Texas Syracuse Iowa was not even on my radar until he said, why is in Iowa on? What year is this one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine, I went to I. I was at Iowa from two, thousand, two two. Then I think it's easy to forget that there are whole swats of the you know the population for whom these kinds of things just are not on the radar at all. I mean for me the biggest one of the biggest things that happened in my life ever and and I would hold it in the top ten to this day was the day that book mobile parked on that lot because for me men I could check out books at at my pleasure ride I could just ride my bike up and get them. I didn't have to wait for someone to take downtown to the to the one library you know. So these things were not on my radar. That one could devote one's life to to telling stories into thinking about beauty.

Iowa Writer Beth Head Librarian Elizabeth New York Times Arizona State Ron Carlson Valentine Grad School Charlotte Syracuse University Of Texas
Elizabeth Wetmore: 'Valentine'

Bookworm

05:48 min | 1 year ago

Elizabeth Wetmore: 'Valentine'

"Today. I'm rejoining Elizabeth what more Beth what more to talk about how? At Age fifty two, she published her first novel Valentine. A novel that not only is superb. It made its debut at number two on the New York Times bestseller list. The book is wonderful an impressive demonstration of the power of women's voices to carry a novel. Now, I'm very interested Elizabeth. How is it? That this. Is Your first novel at Age Fifty Two when did you start writing? Well I don't think I wrote my first short story until I was in my late twenties and I was a reader and I loved books and I read voraciously and impulsively as a little girl if somewhat in a somewhat unfocused manner and and really I don't come from a background where one becomes a writer at least not as a profession. So I think that this sort of combination of of a a kind of holding writers in such esteem I as a little girl in even as a young woman, I thought authors were. Other worldly they were sages and priests and rabbis and holy people live all sorts but I didn't think of writers as being particularly human or occupying the same world as the rest of us So I even write my first short story until I was in my late twenties but I read a lot and I love to read and I thought it must be a pretty holy profession to spend your time telling stories. I fell in love with reading and I had a hard time imagining who a writer might be. I, confused my teachers with riders. I thought that they and the books they taught me came from some specially magical and creative source and I felt song lucky. that. There were special classes when I was in elementary school, it had the ugly Title I. G C Intellectually Gifted Children. By the time I was in high school it was called AP advanced placement but whatever it was called we got to read the best books. One of my teachers took us not to the school library but to a public library where the head librarian was a friend of hers and we were able to take out adult books in this book, your new novel your first. Novel. Valentine one of the characters is reading the scarlet letter. There's a beautiful quote it's not identified, but I recognized it from Charlotte's Web. She here's the beauty of language, the children who are readers here that beauty and they find it on the local bookmobile. The comes to a nearby parking lot a parking lot that's near the strip. Strip joint. It's kind of amazing on the one hand you have. lost. Romantic children getting books and on the other hand you have the men watching the women taking their clothes off and that defied is the divide that defines this novel. But at a certain point Beth, you are at Iowa the Iowa Riders Program How did that happen? When I was waiting tables in Phoenix I started taking community fiction workshop It was being taught by to Grad students at Arizona State, and at that particular time, I don't know if they still do this. But at that time they the MFA students had to do some kind of community service project. So these two guys were teaching this community fiction writing workshop and. I sort of made my way into that and that was where I started and then at some point I was able to to sort of I wouldn't say sneak-in but I was able to get permission to sit on an MFA level workshop at Asu and just sort of as a guest It was really lucky and I'm not sure it would happen today. But but the long and the short of it is I was able to sit in on a class being taught by Ron Carlson who really encouraged me than to apply to Grad School, and I'm the first generation of my family to go to college I. Grew up in a really really working class background. So Honestly It wasn't until I was in my late twenties that I even really knew that there were such things as MFA programs when I signed up for that community fiction workshop was when I learned that there were MFA programs out there So So I was encouraged by a by a mentor to to apply and I did and You know initially he had said to me go do some research and come back in. So I, I went and did a little reading and came back with a sort of list of places to fly in University of Texas Syracuse Iowa was not even on my radar until he said, why is in Iowa on?

Iowa Writer Beth Head Librarian Elizabeth New York Times Arizona State Ron Carlson Grad School Valentine Syracuse Charlotte University Of Texas
That's Just The Way The Ball Bounces

Asian Americana

04:43 min | 1 year ago

That's Just The Way The Ball Bounces

"The way we speak in the words we use are shaped by so many things, and that includes the family friends culture and language we grow up around for me growing up bilingual in. Thai. In English meant I was pretty used to code switching between the two for others. There may have been phrases in other languages that have stuck with you. Maybe A. To encourage someone or disapproving deny when you're being wasteful or even an exclamation of when you drop something or. To get someone's attention and these phrases include ones in English to sings like longtime. No see and no-can-do Asian American or rooted in the language of Nineteenth Century Chinese American immigrants. These words can serve lifeline to the boys of our cultural and linguistic heritage. But for some others, they're away to cope to find comfort and solace familiar mindset. They think when this pandemic began, I, was like really spinning out about it and I think my grandma really tapped into that and. She got from repeating this phrase to me thought she used to always say to me when I was a kid, but it wasn't just in this kind of like funny way that she's to always say this when we were growing up, felt a lot more like meaningful and intentional than that. That's Julianne. Parker minutes Chilean. Parker. I'm a documentary film producer in now in pursuing my MFA in creative nonfiction writing at the University of Pittsburgh. Fourth Generation, Japanese American woman. As she was saying her grandmother's particular turn of phrase had a change in tone, and it also felt really practiced like she was kind of returning to a mind state that she ben in before, and so I kind of wanted to understand that I started to draw parallels. My mind between be sparing says that my grandma has now lived through were she was out this like. Like real loss of control over her own life, and so I, kind of just wanted to understand her mentality a little bit better and see what I could learn from it. Today, we hear from contributor, Julianne Parker as she explores the depth and meaning of her grandmother signature saying in, that's just the way. The Ball Bounces I'm Quincy Sarah Smith and this is Asian Americana. Julianne. Bobby, how are you? Ever. Since I was a kid my grandma I've called each other a few times a week. Cross doing the crossword. So she used to call me every Thursday to remind me to serie chickens at Safeway. We're going on sale the next day. Or Two tell me when Walmart started selling Mentos for five cents cheaper than rose ours. I'm just as quick to call her with good news courtesy. She's always been my most enthusiastic cheerleader. She's eager to shower me with pride in praise for getting a good grade. You're finding a good discount on a pair of shoes. To call because I heard you made us tonight I, did make asparagus night 'cause. Really impressive. Lately, we don't have as much to talk about. It's the spring of two, thousand and twenty and in the midst of waiting out the coronavirus. Parents moved my grandma into their house. When the virus I broke out in nursing homes. In Seattle in hopes, it would lower her risk of exposure. And I'm finishing school remotely. So, our lives have gotten pretty quiet. These days when we call, we usually start by talking about the weather. Beautiful. Weather we've been. Lucky really. Man, and then again update on where she's out with their latest jigsaw puzzle. One. Smaller, and all the lights. Only entertaining thing I have to offer her now are updates about my quarantine inspired virtual dating experiences. So I, really leaning into it. Okay. What's going on with your own dates? We upgraded? We're not just doing folks. We're doing a facetime. For my top house bottom half is You've gotta be kidding. But inevitably, the conversation always turns back to the coronavirus. Everyone. You know everywhere, it just seems strange Oh. This world is. At a standstill, even a small portion isn't that crazy I mean everything's great. You know you know can go how long is because last I've never seen anything like this. I think we all through. And then without fail, the conversation ends with. Well. That's just the way. The boxers.

Julianne Parker Quincy Sarah Smith Seattle Producer Walmart Safeway Bobby University Of Pittsburgh
What Circular Fashion Really Means with Levi's

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

03:58 min | 1 year ago

What Circular Fashion Really Means with Levi's

"Okay, welcome to good together Paul. We're so excited to have you. I'm really excited to be talking to you all today. This is a great time. We've got some exciting exciting product and it's a really. I don't know it's an interesting time to think about changing the way we've been consuming changing the way we've been designing making, and so it seems like a nice inflection point for all. Just sort of. Pause. -olutely. Absolutely I think right now we all are faced with more time than ever before on our hands. It's giving us a great opportunity to be mindful like you just mentioned. BSO listeners were super excited to how Paul Dillinger the together podcast Paul is the vice president head of global product innovation in premium collection design, for Levi, Strauss and company, and I love that we're having the chance to talk with Paul for many reasons. But one reason is because when we think about heritage craft American brands that are known for products that last a long time I. Think everyone has Levi's pop into their head and I'm not just saying that I think has just been a brand that we've all trusted for years. So the fact that we've is is taking a step towards circular fashion were super excited at So Paul I wonder if you wanted to give us a really brief intro of yourself and sort of what you do at Levi's. Sure. Thank you for that introduction I. It's a fancy title and it's but it. It's easy to say I'm a fashion designer. That's that was my training to undergraduate and graduate school. In my MFA in fashion, design and I designed clothes but leave there's a recognition that beyond just the seasonal cycle you know spring clothes fall clothes in spring shows fall shows beyond that just a six month normal fashion cadence. There are some design challenges that take more time. There are some opportunities that you you can't. Really you can't. Tackle problem resolved delivery in in just two seasons sometimes the real. Big changes they need a little more time to be cultivated research developed. And thoughtfully executed and those sorts of projects fall to me. So rather than designing. For next fall or next spring I'm thinking about a systems based approach to changing the design method allergy entirely five years from now or new materials that might actually deliver value ten years from now it's more of a it's a the fashion skillset, but I'm a Senate set to longer view. And and which is interesting because we're the company that straddles this company that straddles. The fashion versus utility space. You Know Levi's were essentially a tool I for minors to make. You know up to. The Goldfields in and and our but. Our value was predicated on technical innovation, right it was the adding the copper rivet to a garment that was wearing out in certain spots and we added that rivet and it made it strong in those spots and we patented it, and then we became like the. Created. This whole this category world's biggest purveyor of Denim, which then slowly changed from being a tool being object of faction. So at once we're this company that has invented A. Thing and durable both in the form and also emotionally durable that people love their genes. Last may become good friends. We're also part of the fashion cycle and we do seasonal product and we try to stay relevant instead of trend and and and and and resonant with the with contemporary consumers, and so there's a dynamic tension in the Levi's in this sort of struggled under. It's sort of carefully weaving those together.

Levi Paul Dillinger Vice President Goldfields Senate Strauss
Tommy Orange Reads Louise Erdrich

The New Yorker: Fiction

04:58 min | 1 year ago

Tommy Orange Reads Louise Erdrich

"This month we're going to hear the years of my birth by Louisa Drake, which was published in the New Yorker in January of two thousand eleven growing up in the midst of a large family I had never registered visitations from my presence. At those rare moments when I was alone as something strange. The first time I was aware of it was when I was taken from Betty and putting the White Room. After that occasionally had the sensation that there was someone walking beside me or sitting behind you. Always, just beyond my peripheral vision. The story was chosen by Tommy Orange whose first novel there there was published in two thousand eighteen and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Hi Tony. Hey Deborah. So what made you choose a story by Louis urging for the podcast so you had published, I think last year. Short story of hers called The stone is a pretty short short story and is it was a strange story and it just struck me So when you asked me to choose a story I went looking for another one of hers. She's actually published a lot in the New Yorker because I haven't known her for Short Sir she only as one collection of short stories you don't with pretty massive career, most of her stories started stories and end up in her novels. Yes. That's what I've heard her say and this one just struck me I think it's such a perfect story. In what way is perfect for you. You know what I love that fiction can do is the way it can get inside a consciousness and the way it can push mystery. There's something. So mysterious in this story and I don't necessarily always like magical realism but what Lewis does so well, in a lot of her work is sort of pushing boundaries of reality where it still believable still realism you never are asked to believe too much sort of realism's magic. There's something so strange and mysterious about it and really powerful the sort of cultural touchdowns that she does. So subtly though a native culture plays into it in the way, white culture comes up. Yeah. It's interesting because there is a supernatural component, but it can also be read as almost completely realistic. You can kind of how much you WANNA. Think of this as a kind of allegorical story and how much you want to think of it as real. Yeah. This is exactly what what I love about this story and what Louise doesn't work like I said. And if you've been reading, Lewis worked for most of her writing career at least. I mean, she's definitely one of my favorite writers of all time but I came to her a little bit later in my reading path. It wasn't until I was going to the Institute of American Indian Arts Getting my MFA a lot of native literature I didn't come to until getting into the program I. Sort of came in through a back door reading. Wise. I read a lot of work in translation, but I read love medicine I and just completely fell in love with her work. And do you feel the connection for you is that you have shared native American heritage? Definitely when I first started reading actually was a little bit turned off to some native fiction because it was. So reservation based and I, I have this urban experience but that was just sort of at the beginning of me thinking about native representation what it would look like in my own work the way that she handles bringing in native culture I think is so perfect. There's a clumsy way to do it and she never does it that way. always comes across really organically. and. Do you think that this story the the years of my birthday this characteristic if that main character as we'll discover is actually not native. Yeah I. Think the way that that works for the reader to something. Really Cool. Sort of putting you into a native family as a white character does a lot of work for the story I think. We'll talk more after the story and now here's Tommy Orange reading the years of my birth by Louise urge. The years of my birth. The nurse had wrapped my brother and a blue flannel blanket and was just about to hand him to his mother when she whispered. Oh God there's another one and out I slid half dead. I then proceeded to diner ernest going from slightly pink to a dull grey blue at which point the nurse tried to scoop me into a bed warm by lights. She was stopped by the doctor who pointed out my head and legs. Stepping between and the mother, the doctor addressed her. Mrs Lascher I've something important to say your other child had a congenital deformity and may die. Shall we use extraordinary means to salvage it? She looked at the doctor with utter incomprehension at first then cried. No.

Louise Deborah Tommy Orange Lewis Louis Louisa Drake White Room Pulitzer Prize Institute Of American Indian A Betty Mrs Lascher Tony
MFA Trailer

MFA: The Parenting Edition

01:30 min | 1 year ago

MFA Trailer

"Welcome to MFA: The Parenting Edition, I'm Taisha Cameron. I'm a mom to feisty, fiery, fierce, flailing, finicky toddler and I'm a trained actor. These lessons from the theatre for raising ourselves and our kids came about when I realized my MFA in acting trained me for life as a mommy better than life as a full-time actor. Yes, my quest to slay at conscious parenting led me back to my grueling three year conservatory training at the New School for Drama. Here's what we have to look forward to on this journey. Each week we'll band together in the name of Artistic Parenthood to explore challenging life questions through stories, theatrical explorations and experiments to try at home. We'll end each episode with the Raise a Glass Series, a space for reflection and gratitude centered around the topic of the day, inspired by lyrics from Hamilton: An American Musical. So, let's unite to build a village designed to raise ourselves while guiding our children with humor, respect and compassion. No theatrical experience is necessary for this voyage. All you need is an open mind and a little imagination. From the Method to mommy meltdowns and all the moments in between, welcome to MFA.

Taisha Cameron Artistic Parenthood New School For Drama Hamilton
"Be Water" ESPN 30 for 30 Director: Bao Nguyen.

Monday Morning Critic Podcast

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"Be Water" ESPN 30 for 30 Director: Bao Nguyen.

"From. nyu You received your MFA from the School of Visual Arts also in New, York City how important are those degrees to supplement your ability as director? I mean I, think for. You know film, school and Education, the most important thing I take away from it is like building a community and finding like minded people who love films and you kind of carry on that love after you graduated in your work together on your on your feature, your future projects and and I mean obviously the education is important, but I think the relationships you take away from it or more important now. Is there I mean I know? For those who see the documentary, they know kind of what influence you partially to really loving a certain aspect of Bruce Lee, but is there any other driving forces that really kind of? Propelled you where you are today whether it's a filmmaker or an actor or a movie itself. I remember seeing a hoop dreams when I was pretty young. I was about ten or eleven, and it was just A. He's the first time I really saw documentary like a feature length documentary, and it's such an epic story right also an intimate at the same time, and I think it's informing me of like the type of story said I'm interested in the type of storytelling I'm interested in and also kind of the power of sports in the drama of Sports, and and how you can use sports as a way to talk about bigger issues in society, and so I think that film definitely played a role in how I. How I became a documentary filmmaker and I mean it's not a directly to to be water I. think he can maybe see. Some of the piano correlation. Oh absolutely, absolutely and you know. You've done some really creative and really great projects, but we documentary like be water that you're connected. Do personally that you? Again for anyone that has seen it. For the thirtieth. The world seated at this point. You know you really have a fondness in a your linked emotionally to the person you're you're you're making the documentary on become something else at that point? Right because it's still such a beautiful work of art, but because of your connection because of the way Bruce Lee moved you. Does. It become something else at that point bow. In your for me when I'm making it film. Tired of want to infuse my own voice in the not literally. You don't hear me speaking as a narrator anything like that, but I think that films at I'm kind of drawn to are the ones that feel personal and honest and authentic, and you can really feel the directors hand. Especially in a film, we were talking about such an icon that maybe anyone else could have done a certain style of Bruce. Lee Fill of documentary about Bruce. Lee But I wanted to make sure that this felt like my film, and by kind of going deep into my roots my parents Vietnamese refugees. They left Vietnam on a boat. We're living in Hong Kong refugee camp for for six months and then. Went over to America the very similar story to Bruce's in terms of coming to America. And not having connections, not really having any money, and that was sort of the Bruce Lee that I felt like I didn't know too much. About Bruce Lee as the immigrant American as Asian, American as the other American. So, I tried to infuse like what lessons I learned from my parents, and for my own upbringing as a child of immigrants and use that to make the films feel personal and have that touch point in a way. So yeah that was that was always the intention and I hope people. Felt that kind of personal filmmaking style. Even though we're talking about an icon like briefly. Yeah, I can't even imagine what it's like. Because you talk very very early in a documentary about you know, it's the very first time you recognize yourself. Somebody on screen. That isn't stereotypical or lacking the respect. They deserve I. Mean I can't believe I mean it. Had to be an. You've answered this such a passion project just because of the effect man had on you and millions of others as well. Yeah I mean I could say that. I was in like one of those huge Bruce Lee fans at went out and collected everything and. Watched every single movie ten times over, but as a symbol, and as an icon for representation for kind of hero, and fighting for the underdog, definitely left a mark on me and again it was just trying to unpack that that that iconography that mythology that I felt. Everyone knew, but they didn't know the person, and and that being said I agree responsibility, obviously telling the story of someone like Bruce Lee but I started to think of it more as a privilege that I'm privileged to have the opportunity to tell lead story into. You know mess it up in many ways and I once. I understood it more as a privilege recognized. It made it less of a daunting task I

Bruce Lee School Of Visual Arts Lee Fill School And Education Sports Director Hong Kong York City America Vietnam
Photographic Literacy

LensWork

09:03 min | 1 year ago

Photographic Literacy

"Here's the editor of Lens. Work Publishing Bruce Jensen. Let me confess right here at the beginning of this podcast that it's not always necessary to know where you've been in order to look ahead and know where you're going but it's awfully useful sometimes to know the history of what it is that you're about to attempt and to know how other people have tried to do what you're about to try to do and to learn from them as they say if. I've seen farther than others is because I've stood on the shoulders of giants. What would this in mind? You can imagine my reaction when the following story occurred. I was attending a photo review session. I was doing reviews there and I was looking through a body of work from a young woman and in the course of normal conversation talking about her work. I said well. This work reminds me a lot of the work of Edward Weston which I intended sort of a compliment but also to indicate to her that what she was doing wasn't necessarily as new and innovative and revolutionary as she thought it was and I was absolutely nonplussed. When her response was who's Edward Weston she had previously explained that she had an MFA in photography. So I wasn't quite sure how to respond to the fact that an MFA graduate in photography had never heard of Edward Weston and didn't know who he was explained a little bit about Edward Weston and the history of photography and she then explained that in the program that she was involved in she did not have to take the history of photography as that was an elective in her program. And I I suppose that's okay but as you can imagine. I was a little bit discouraged by that. But I've softened over the years and I realized that maybe maybe there's more to this than meets the eye because the problem is there's no limit to that train of thought. Okay so maybe you've heard of Edward Weston but you haven't heard of Mortenson okay maybe you've heard of Mortenson but you haven't heard of Ph Emerson. How far back do you go? How much knowledge do you have to have? How obscure a photographer is necessary. In order for you to have what might be considered a legitimate excuse for not ever having heard from of course. Edward Weston's very famous photographer but fame is also something that is curious in this regard. For example I just recently discovered of novelist from the nineteenth century named J S Fletcher. I'd never heard of J S Fletcher and turns out. He was during his lifetime practically the most popular crime novelist of his generation. Rivaling Sir Arthur CONAN doyle and Sherlock Holmes. And all of that J S Fletcher wrote two hundred thirty some odd books and I just discovered I'd never heard of him never heard him referred to in any conversations but yet in his day he was incredibly popular so the farther we look back in history the more some people are going to be obscured by nothing more substantial than time and collective memory that does not however mean that photographic literacy is unimportant in fact. I believe photographic literacy is very important. And here's a good demonstration of why I think so a few weeks ago as in my local library looking through some of the books. They had for sale as part of their fundraiser. And I found an interesting older volume called the reader's digest reader. It's an anthology selection done by Theodore Roosevelt. Not The president. But the president's son I think Published in nineteen forty. The president died in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine so I'm assuming it's Theodore Roosevelt junior who died nineteen forty four. According to Kapiti he anyway so Theodore Roosevelt Junior along with the editors of Reader's Digest. Put together this election published. This book and Roosevelt explains in the forward that he'd stumbled across a box of old copies of Reader's digest which tempted him and he says and I quote. I sat reading back copies for hours every time I finished an article which was off my main course in which I shouldn't have taken the time to read. I thought that I'd read only one other well. At least only one another and then another short run that followed it and another subject piqued my interest and lured me on. Eventually he continues. I dipped into an issue ten years back. But here the interest was even greater the forgotten world came into being not reminiscent Louis but with touches of unmistakable reality. I was astounded to find. How much of the past decade? I'd actually forgotten and how much more I remembered only vaguely. Yesterday's heroes and manners changing social complexions penetrating vignettes tell the story of Art Politics Science and business to find. These things is to have passed before ones is the cavalcade of American Life. And as you refresh your memory. Here's the key phrase by the way Roosevelt says and as you refresh your memory you improve your present perspective. The current scene gains new significance. Close quote what a marvelous way to look at work from the past and couldn't everything that he said about these articles he was finding in old copies of Reader's Digest. Couldn't they apply equally? Well to looking back. At the history of photography that is to say if it's true for the stories in Reader's Digest. Wouldn't it also be true for photography and it motivated me to go back and look through some of the jewels that I have in my photographic library book that I haven't pulled out for a while and I was amazed at what I found for example? Some of those books that I may be purchased thirty or forty years ago seem much more relevant today than they did back then because they were looking ahead in such a way that now in the benefit of hindsight we can see how right they were. And how brilliant? The photography was in. How far ahead of their time? Those photographers were other books. Do don't fare as well. There are others that I have in my library that I looked at from thirty and forty years ago that now I sorta scratch my head and say I wonder why I was so motivated to purchase those books in either case as Roosevelt said the current scene gains new significance. So there's a reason to look back at what other photographers have done. And what the trends in photography have been and we need to recognize that not only is there value but there's no end in that because new photographers from the pastor. Being discovered all the time their archives are being uncovered think. Vivian Maier and that kind of story. But also there's a lot of people a lot of historians who are doing research and discovering really terrific photographers who weren't popular in their time. Maybe they had no audience very small audience and now in the perspective of time we can look back at their work and see. How really terrific was so the idea of developing photographic literacy as a part of our creative life I think is incredibly valuable. And here's another example of why while I was doing all of this digging through my library and looking back I ran across a reference to Henry. Fox Talbot's the Pencil of nature which I had heard about thirty or forty years ago I've known the existence of this very very historically important publication but I never actually looked at it or read it and partly because I didn't know that it had ever been published although I have no doubt that it probably has been

Theodore Roosevelt Edward Weston J S Fletcher Editor Bruce Jensen President Trump Mortenson Vivian Maier Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Fox Talbot Kapiti Art Politics Science Louis American Life Henry Sherlock Holmes
Fashion college probes runway show criticized as racist

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Fashion college probes runway show criticized as racist

"The fashion institute of technology known as F. I. T. is apologizing for show by an alarm from China where models wore gigantic big bright red lips and oversize black years that many on social media like into black face and monkey years the school which is part of the state university of New York says it will examine what led up to the February seventh event the college's dean of the school of graduate studies and the chair of the MFA fashion design department were placed on administrative leave pending the investigation Julie Walker New York

China New York Fashion Institute Of Technolog State University Of New York Julie Walker
Soul Cycles

Unorthodox

02:26 min | 1 year ago

Soul Cycles

"It's Kinda bad for the Jews here in the United States. Many episodes odes of antisemitism every week we email updates for this sort of thing the most interesting one this week A woman in the Hudson River valley was charged with throwing a piece of pork at a synagogue. She's been charged with hate crime for throwing pork chops at a synagogue in Columbia County. What do we make of this? Can you say this. This is a heartache. But I was pretty impressed with her for her action. She could've gone with the very cheap kind of you know two dollar a pound pork. She went with a pork pork. Chop that is both expensive and in my mind a semi respectful thing. If you're going to go hate crime can I just read this to you. Rios on January nine in between the hours of five twenty three PM. Three Twenty eight am through a package of pork chops. A non kosher food onto the front steps of the congregation Andrzej MFA causing pork fluids to spilled onto its steps according to criminal complaint. That is just like so gory. Gross and like Kerry ask. I mean it's really fluids was the name of my high school band the back in the morning to photograph it. It's just really weirdly specific. My first thought when I read this was well. Well if it's a reformed temple they'll take the pork chops inside and cook them and have have a Nice Kesha. So last week was like reform movement kindness week take this is sponsored by the clan and honestly no judgment here. It's food and if you eat as many many the people as most American Jews do add more power to them than you take it inside you fry it up and you have a nice pork cutlet but it does seem that the show that she threw the pork chops at was a conservative synagogue. And this is what's really diabolical about it right because the conservative synagogue. Most of your members in fact do eat pork but they pretend not to eat pork and the rabbi pretends not to eat pork and the synagogue doesn't allow to be cooked on its premises. So what she's doing. She's throwing them this tasty cut of meat that they they all really would like to enjoy at their own homes that day after God. But she's throwing it at the synagogue on the slam of American Judaism. I mean she went like right into the hypocritical. Soul of American Judy. She's a one woman theological seminary. Oh Oh my it just feels like a waste of perfectly good pork.

Hudson River Valley Columbia County United States Andrzej Mfa Rios Kerry
Garth Greenwell: Cleanness

Bookworm

08:56 min | 1 year ago

Garth Greenwell: Cleanness

"I'm Michael Silver Blood and this poor for today. I'm excited to have as my guest Garth Greenwell you know. He's been on before with the previous book. Called what belongs to you and yet his new book called cleanness I think is still more extraordinary. Although the response to the first book was the response to the greeting of a brand undo writer of Great Dunk AC- beauty importance and Garth greenwell began his writing life as a poet. What turns you to pros? That's such a difficult question for me to answer because because it's so mysterious to me. I think it had to do with the seven years. I spent teaching high school which I think You know doing that. I discovered new a new capacity in myself to be interested in other people's lives and In the world around me and I think it had to do with moving to Sofia Bulgaria where I lived for four years and where I spoke a language other than English everyday some combination Shen of those things made me start hearing sentences. That aren't broken into lines. It's really interesting because was on the one hand there is in this new book cleanness which is a novel divided into stories stories kind of and sections stories form sections sections lead to the novel. And we're watching the the narrator develop his sense of sex and love their in Bulgaria and so when he falls in love. It's was someone who's done more frightened about public expression but the pros does. Your pros is not frightened of the six Russian. You're taking great care in sort of if James Ian Steps Comma by Comma to tell us what is thought and felt but vis mash up of James and pornography is absolutely you know. It's the first time time I think. Oh well thank you. That's a a wonderful response to the book. I mean the sentence is for me. The unit of composition. You know my great poetry. Teachers were three poets who are obsessed with the expansive capacity of English Syntax. The poets Frank Bidart Story Graham and Carl Phillips. Oh my I knew about Frank Bidart I am. I am friends with an I love jury. What a wonderful wonderfully strange person? She magnificent the real jealous But so is Ba- Dart and the third is Carl Phillips Owen. I know Karl to you or very often. I was extremely teachers. I mean this boy from you know Tobacco Farming Kentucky getting to study with these people. It's a real blessing and while you're a boy from a tobacco farm in Kentucky. It's only slightly exaggerated. I was first generation raised off the farm but every weekend every not every school break we were on the farm. Yeah and somehow or other though you had three brilliant poets who who were able to accept that you were going to become a novelist I got to have an extraordinary education. I did an MFA in poetry. With Carl Phillips Saint Louis and the night did half of Harvard which is where I worked with jewelry and then I dropped out of Harvard and I disappeared and didn't have any contact with them for seven in years while I was teaching high school for of those years in Bulgaria. But here's the thing I mean you know I wrote what belongs to you without ever studying fiction as a writer later or as a scholar without ever being a fiction workshop. And I really I think you know I wrote it using the tools that I had which were not the tools of a fiction writer the tools of a poet. Yes I think. In the case of this book it was very good for you to be in that circumstance because I think one of the program program could have done would be to expose you to people whose draws would draw with agitation about your subject brighter which in your short preceding novella mid go develops into your I novel. What belongs to you? And these are books about falling in love with a male prostitute Trieste and this is a subject matter. It's not that it hasn't been broached own. But it's not been broached easily and certainly it hasn't been broached without melodrama your book. These two who are unknown dramatic. They're calm passionate books about the fear. The comes along when you reveal yourself to another person and the other person in the first two books is that prostitute who is not used really to passion being directed at him by someone who wants to know what it's like to live a life with all the doors and windows open Right that's beautiful. That's a beautiful description of that relationship. Ya now frank. BIDART is not only one of your teachers to me. His one of the very very best and riskiest poets wits riding in America but his life is a very different kind of risk. Yes he keeps his sexual nature on a high level of the sacred and the spiritual and without that he'd rather not be involved so when he read how open you were going to be as a prose writer. What did he communicate Kate to you will so for me? I mean frank was my most important teacher and to me. He is the most important living American writer I agree and the great example of his work is a kind of utter fearlessness and determination nation. You know I think one thing that artists do that a certain kind of artists has to do and maybe to make the kind of art that I most value one has to go into an abyss and one has to follow one subject. All the way down you know. We've become very skeptical of a kind of romantic myth of the artist and I think that skepticism is a good thing but I also think that there is real risk and making that kind of art because when one goes into an abyss there is no guarantee one will come back out and writing parts of this book cleanness. I felt quite frightened frightened and I found myself in places I did not want to be. Frank was the great example. I called to mind about what what fearlessness in art looks like one of the things that most amazed me about the response to what belongs to was how much people talked about sex and just how surprised they were by the sex in the book. It didn't even occur to me to think that it was anything extraordinary because Frank Bidart was my great teacher. Frank Frank Bidart is the great potent. Nothing is forbidden in his in his work.

Frank Frank Bidart Writer Garth Greenwell Bulgaria Kentucky Sofia Bulgaria Michael Silver Harvard Carl Phillips Owen Carl Phillips Saint Louis James Ian Carl Phillips Ba- Dart Shen Karl America Kate Graham
"mfa" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"mfa" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"MFA museum of fine arts is a delightful place to visit any time and there is a new restaurant there that you might want to take it yeah we all we all have been there hopefully to feast our eyes on some of the most beautiful art in the world and now you can actually go up stairs and feast on some of the greatest food in the world that the the read recently redesigned restaurants faces calls for sixty five bar and restaurant for sixty five being the address on Huntington Avenue of the museum it's as you would expect artful beautiful comfortable they have a a bar they have a patio they have a little rentable space but the the real thing to come for is the food they have small plates large plates things to share the bar up front has a local favorites like Sam Adams and down the cider and a drink called the ginger trail which is really spicy dance moves they also have a lot some great mock tales which are nice if you stop by in the middle of the day and can't you know be able to tell your day guys from your because I was as it were but the the food is terrific they have a a su viewed watermelon steak with with fat and pickled jalapenos they have a grilled chicken Pyaar to fully dressed to Tunis was salad it's it's really a great place to that ago while at the museum or just to go for a great meal on its own thanks what a wonderful trip thank you so much Matt all part of conscious corner WBZ Boston's newsradio place in Illinois coming to the rescue of military veteran James Nicoletti who had fallen on hard times reporter Morris apparel of WBBM television with the story Nicoletti was having a crisis he called the Veterans Affairs hotline because he had just moved back to Illinois he wasn't getting his military checks yet that's when Burr when police got involved and when officer and told our responded he was shocked to find a veteran was sick and hadn't eaten in days and sleeping in his bed talk as a human being that the it didn't seem right to me officer told our got his colleagues to donate clothes and furnishings even helped Nicoletti get a job another NFL player making headlines for all the wrong reasons the New Orleans police department has rescinded its misdemeanor simple battery warrant for Cleveland Browns receiver Odell Beckham junior it started late Monday night at the Superdome where LSU one college football's national championship in the post game locker room victory celebration Beckham who played at LSU appear to swat a security officer on the backside video was posted to social media the police department now says the security officer involved has decided to drop the charge but Michigan CBS news thirty two degrees sunshine in Boston were headed for a high to the mid forties today power out in the area of Boston city hall WBZ's art cone will tell you why along with the rest of this morning's news coming up next at nine thirty anyone running.

MFA museum of fine arts
"mfa" Discussed on Microsoft Cloud IT Pro Podcast

Microsoft Cloud IT Pro Podcast

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"mfa" Discussed on Microsoft Cloud IT Pro Podcast

"Com slash cloud it. Another thing that we recommend besides it is the device right so a lot of customers stop in their journey in MFA. They're good but unfortunately they're missing out on their body of finding good advice enterprises that have on traditional domain which is ninety five per cent or more of the enterprises. Today they cannot security controls around. The machine is domain joint. And that's easy a to deploy I mean you have to prepare and everything like everything else the scale you can deployed on spare users from MFA prompts on on actually start looking more got device in the security posture so people can logging from the company only is sort of an inch deep manage phone on instead of MFA. And I think that's taking a step up on the security posture and fortunately we're not seeing a lot of customers. Well not seen a lot. But let's just say that we'd like to see deploy more than we are. Okay that's using the conditional access now and I think it's not only a benefit benefit for a from a strategic perspective but also for the end user. Because if you use the device borscht posture. So you know that a device manage than healthy and and based on that you can say. Oh maybe I don't need to do. MFA So as an end user experience. I don't need to do. MFA Like Five Times a day. I just signed into my machine and because you're on that that machine we have some more info about you can give you access to the data at this protected by issuing absolutely and then the other thing is that if you overdo this prompts despite the security team sometimes things get more good. It's actually not good because then you're conditioning. Your user. Just to blindly approve on. Say Yes is because they are used to it all the time the other day we're talking on. His presentation is that we did find a nap. In one of the biggest I mobile devices marketplace that out medically approves all the notifications coming from the device. Really no order. MFA product so it was like crazy. Ease the painfully so much that users somebody so market opportunity in an outdoor approve so people are spared from that pain so but that is pre Sunday's slippery slope right because that's a hacker. Does the same thing okay approved because you get its own annoyed. Get used to them if they're eight five working from the office they don't get any. MFA prompts that when they do it actually makes some stop getting the prompt this time. Because it's abnormal. You're touching another subject. which is their risk? Ask rescues For customers are using identity protection. They can't even out mate risk so you can say the identities at risk. I mean I showed he does a lot of of signals to qualify there of user or a signing session and then based on that you can force even reset advice or so. That's where you put put all the Swiss army knife together. Then you kind of come out with a very solid posture right so you can say either you cities risk because you know there was a bridge and then and somebody put the same username and password. which by the way happens to what a thing Seventy percent or so people reas buzzwords based on study more but but Then you have that scenario can automate a response saying I need to I want I'm going to For the user to recent gather back to productivity so there's Device posture undress tools in the toolbox to go on improve your posture. All Up. All right very cool. Is there anything else. We're running up on time here in the podcast center but anything else you guys want to throw their wrap up with before we call it a day. Yes so oh our team has so we were the largest customers all over the world on. We are learning along celery customers..

MFA
"mfa" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"mfa" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"And they all look like you're not supposed to be here. It's that kind of feeling. But everybody has that there because you're not worthy of seeing this greatness. That's the idea of most museums. Right. But I what I'm asking you again. Seventy one is do you believe that somebody that works for the FAA said, no food no drinks, no watermelon? That's I've been to the multiple times. I've never seen anything close to that type of thing. Yeah. I get the air. I just had this getting museum Jared, where I'm like, I'm not worthy of be ever, but there was nothing like that nobody. And I was taking pictures with the stuff to send to a buddy of mine going. Nobody said don't knock it off the crap out Bricusse blah, blah, blah six one seven two six sixty six let's go to the phones. Bob in Boston. Bob. You're next on our. Maybe. It wasn't racist day at the MFA it seems there's multiple situations where these children are being exposed to racism by different people. It just seems I and also it seems that the employees ease of this of this institution them are being a, you know, the Kilty until proven innocent. Why is this being released into the newspapers into the press? Why is this not being investigated? Fully in everybody given their their opportunity to, to speak about what took place. Well, saying, don't understand. So a couple things on that at its in the press because the school, put it in the press, I get that. Look, if this happened to your kids, I would get the word out. This is outrageous. This is unacceptable. We're not doing my daughter's going to feel drip coming up, too. Chinatown in a week. And if something like this happened there, I would be talking about it. I would be complaining about it. But what, what? But your first part is you're better part, which is that. There. There's multiple things that are happening like the entire time they were there different people were on them that seems pretty suspicious at the MFA. It'd be one thing for one person to make a ridiculous comment. That's fireable. It's another thing for multiple people to do it. Like it was like they had a group meeting. That said, okay, we got this tour coming in. Everybody be ready to say really offensive things to them that, that seems out of character for the MFA does it. Not six seven two six six sixty eight sixty eight. It's you're in the middle on AM six eighty wer..

MFA Bob FAA Jared Boston
"mfa" Discussed on Writers Who Don't Write

Writers Who Don't Write

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"mfa" Discussed on Writers Who Don't Write

"But in the event because princeton does not have a dedicated mfa uh the the the children onto mccolgan children and just so young children the the students the undergraduates that doing gonna they're doing something psyched made on your assigned saw england dr economics and they take writing poor since so so there is this not immune they're just trying attack tina for sides and and there is none of these jostling and competition envy and backstabbing that can become very at the prevalent tang's in in in instead of three to writing mfa ever everyone's trying to like get a publishing deal that have a collection of show through the novel and you know they're trying to get agents and so there was none of that so that's a very refreshing and i always i still maintain that you know you cannot teach people how to rai you know what i did was i had a very big section in my glasses i gave them signed text and we talked about you can teach people how to read and you know if you don't read you'd on right so at and you know go go the the best way you become to the the world is through is likely to read the you know you know you haven't served in the iraq war are you haven't you know a belived should through vietnam or whatever but i but put a book is something that will open up this world to you so much of the knowledge of the world we get is from books.

princeton tina vietnam mccolgan england iraq