37 Burst results for "MD"

Fresh update on "md" discussed on  The Kristen Hagopian Show

The Kristen Hagopian Show

00:36 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "md" discussed on The Kristen Hagopian Show

"You guys have emailed me. You've texted me. You've made me laugh. I love you guys in no particular order. Actually, this is something that does seem to grab a good number of us gang. You know, I'm huge into let's say, reversing the clock in ways that don't cost a lot of money or attempt to sucker me into bullcrap. Unproven strategies. I'm now in my fifties just hit the big 50 and I'm finding that I'm being targeted by a lot of companies with some magic, miraculous elixir or some plan. Unproven, untested stuffed with chemicals and expensive not in order of importance. So I'm kind of no, thank you. But I've been doing something lately. I was talking about this behind the scenes. You're going to think I'm nuts? Because I am honestly the most level headed read almost boring. Anti hocus pocus bull kind of gal you would ever want to meet. Shut up, Tony. But I've been doing this thing called grounding our eight grounding Google it. Look it up. If you don't believe me in a nutshell, All right, when you ground which means just putting your body's mainly my feet in contact with the earth. You're gonna think I'm nuts. Guys, I am so not hippy dippy like this. However, when we ground just putting your bare feet in the sand at the beach or on the ground at the lake or in your own backyard or in a park, just take off the shoes. For two minutes and plant them right there on the ground. All right, we absorb the earth's free electrons. I'm trying not to laugh, even reading this cause I got to tell you, my You know my reaction from this When you put your bare feet in contact with the earth again, we just got back from the shore. You might have. You know Michael towards the lake. You might just want to walk around back, you know, in your own backyard, whatever it is. Doesn't take a lot of work. You absorb the Earth's free electrons, which is one of the most anti inflammatory things you Khun Dio, apparently you neutralize When you do this, you neutralize all of the harmful free radicals in the body. We're always hearing about the free radicals. You're supposed to do this and you're supposed to do that. And you're supposed to slather on this cream or do this pill or whatever else new According Tio, whose is Stephen Sinatra, MD. Author of Earth Thing. I looked up this book when I had the reaction that I did all the time we spent indoors reduces that contact. All right, so the free radicals are going crazy and getting the upper hand but something that interested me with this We used to live in a day in ages were even when we were wearing shoes. They were made out of leather. They were made out of natural materials. And when you wore leather shoes and you touch the ground with him, you walked on grass. You walked on gravel. You walked on anything. You still had contact with the earth and you were still absorbing all of those electrons That really benefited the body. Okay? And then we changed, too. You know, the rubber soled shoes. All the shoes that I own are made of the most non natural materials in the world that you're probably the same way here is what I have gotten from the experience non hippy me indulging in just about 15 minutes of grounding a day. All right, just putting my bare feet when I'm sitting on the back steps. I'm talking to my folks. I'm doing business calls. I'm answering e mails on my kindle. I have changed nothing else in my life. No change in anything. Certainly not taking any pills. No change in foods. Well, you know, one small change in foods that I will detail later in this segment. Certainly no drugs. I don't do them prescription or otherwise. I have been grounding now, about 15 minutes a day. Okay. Been doing this for a few weeks now. I am now sleeping like a log. I'm sleeping in ways that I have not slept since the day before. Katie, my firstborn was born. I'm sleeping like a log, which for me, is downright miraculously. All right. Here's the next thing I'm noticing the aches and pains in my joints, namely my ankles, my knees gone also downright miraculous. Now they were never debilitating. But those aches and pains were there and now they're not. Alright. Give it a shot. I am talking about maybe 20 minutes a day sitting on your back step now. God forbid you relax, because none of you guys relax. I get all of your e mails on the same way. Let's sit out there. Get caught up on e mails with your kindle. Call your family. Get caught up. God forbid, we spend a little time on us, right? If you're hitting any shoreline this summer, this is especially cool lakefront ocean beaches, filling the kiddie pool for the kids and grandkids. Just putting your feet in the grass. Let a little water splash over your feet. My God, I mean, just enjoy it. Do it. I triple dogged area to give this a shot. You might just be amazed. Let me know how it works with your aches, your pains sleeping, maybe even whatever it is. You know, your body is better than I do. Certainly. And look for all okay, Tony, everybody else here in studio. Giving me the look. That's fine, Mike you up One day you guys could give me your full responses to this stuff. But honestly, give it a shot. Let me know what you find out. All right. I want to hear from you find me brilliant, frugal living dot com. There's one thing next up hot on the heels of that idea. This ties in Lowering your stress level by spending any kind of time around a body water, a lake a stream and ocean, the neighborhood Y M. C. A pool, a study in this journal called Health and Place I had to look it up. It's their found that people of any age kids seniors anybody in between who enjoyed what they call blue spaces like a pool and ocean a lake once a week. Doesn't have to be some full time. 24 7 thing once a week were 70% more likely to report high Well being, which is just another hippie dippy phrase for Ah, measure of good mood and physical health. Alright, even just looking at the bodies of water. If you're anything like me, you'll be multitasking on a phone, hopefully getting some time to read a book. But honestly, if I'm I'm with my kids near any body of water, even if my husband's with me As a parent, you parents and grand parents out there or, you know people out there with any kids in your life. You'll get what I'm talking about. If my kids are in the water My time at the water's edge is generally spends now unblinkingly dry eye scanning the water line for a dorsal fin just constantly. That's when my brains that while I smile and laugh in, my kid's like I'm relaxed, OK, Yeah, I constantly worry about this. You even even lakeside yet because you never know of some freakish Freshwater predator is going to come at my kids. So yes, Heck, when your kids are little, you're like scanning the bathtub for hazard. So enjoy the visual of me at the beach right now. Another one. I got to get this in. Before we hit the first break This one's big, another astonishingly effective sleep aid that I never would have thought of, or believed until I tried it for myself. Because honestly, I don't sleep much people. This is not gonna be a shock for those who spend any time around me because I got a written all over my face. I don't sleep a lot. I'm in bed during the nighttime hours, but I'm not sleeping. I'm obsessing over any number of things business things, household tasks, just stuff. You're probably the same way. Honestly, because I've studied this. I would maybe toss and turn for five or six hours a night. Just chalk it up to reality, You know, being one of the grown ups and just plug in the beloved coffee maker in the morning plugged through, just like everybody else now. What makes people sleep. Think about this for a second kids some of the finest sleepers on Earth. God bless them have a lot of what's called the relaxing hormone melatonin. You guys have heard this right coursing through their adorable little systems. As you get older, few more tasks to hand Maybe some taxes to pay. Maybe a job or two to go to melatonin in your system plummets and that regulates your sleep in weeks cycle. Okay, all of the pharmaceutical sleep AIDS out there, try to reverse that and some people do very well on them Good for them. For those who have tried any of that stuff, and they're not finding a good fit. Wait until you hear this. I couldn't believe it. I wanted to find a good way to increase melatonin. Naturally. So I read that cherry juice. Just regular. Nothing. Fancy cherry juice drinking eight ounces a day, Which isn't a lot isn't a little isn't a lot Saw their sleep time increased by 84 minutes a night. Like an hour and 1/2 I laugh out loud at this. I think it's hysterical..

Melatonin Tony Khun Dio MD Aids Michael Katie TIO Stephen Sinatra Mike
New Start-Up Helps Websites Store User Names, Postal Addresses of Anonymous Readers

Smashing Security

06:19 min | 4 d ago

New Start-Up Helps Websites Store User Names, Postal Addresses of Anonymous Readers

"Now Chum, Chum's imagine. For a moment that you're interested in checking book maybe maybe book by celebrated newly published author and you think all I'd love to find out more about that book visit an online bookshop But then you change your mind maybe you're distracted by something else right and then maybe half an hour an hour later. You receive an email saying, hey, we saw you visited our website. How would you feel what's? By giving them my email address. I haven't allowed in or anything like that. I'm just perusing the shop you haven't logged in you haven't given them your email address and yet they know you came to their website and they've contacted you var email we'll surely I mean. If Google facebook of God, a tracking code on the sides then they could tie that together with unless it's technically possible in fighting. So Nice. Say I'm Kinda surprised we haven't crossed that Rubicon yet it's happening. Well imagine they Semaj and you have a particularly niche porn interest may be a bit of a further on the side and you decide to go. Further, you said. You say you mean grab. With A. Reliably. Informed that fervor it's up people who? Like dressing up as very animals like a mascots at a football game. and. They get their kicks from these sort of things. Fit It looks like my husband because he's quite Harry. You must be a secret forever. I can't figure out what would be more disturbing called if he found out attractive or unattractive. So. Imagine you visit the site. You get your fill of wherever you want and they knew receive an email saying, hey, we'll see you're a bit of a fervored. Ejected throws it back in your face. WHOA says we've got even more that kind of stuff. Why don't you come back sometime if you had never give me your email address, you can be stabbed, right? Yes. Considerably, and also, of course, if someone's got your email address, any navigate some is the potential for doc seen or blackmail knows what you'd better tell me how they got our email address. Okay. There's a fascinating article on Jessica Bell. Jessa Bell has written about an outfit could get emails a startup. They claim to be the all new audience growth tool for publishers and they say they can fill up jeff way. They say they can convert anonymous website visitors into names email addresses and even their home addresses boom. And I know sales sorted. posted. Another Chapter Jeff any incredibly they claim they can do surrounded by a third of all US web traffic cheese. Okay. Well, their claims earn press Whoa Kay, let's look a little bit more into this. They say that their services already been used you know that Chap Tucker Carlson on Fox News. Well he is one of the founders of a website quite right wing website surprise you it cooed the daily caller. That is one of the sites which is using exactly this technology right now, this potentially some could find out if your partial particular political views as well. Don't understand Outta sorry you've lost me. Okay. So how is the daily caller this website run by Tucker Carlson, taking advantage of this technology so they are a customer of this firm could get emails. Okay. Get emails is run by a guy called Adam. Robinson right is a former Lehman brothers employee and his girlfriend Helen Sharp. And they've actually put together a video where they explain how that thing works. He can go and check that out on Youtube link but I can explain in very simple. Work. So, there are lots of scammy kind of websites on the Internet surprise surprise. No, there are no a shock. So there are websites which will claim Oh. We can get you better health insurance. So we can get better car insurance just enter your details here. And we will go away and find an answer for you right and what you don't do when you fill out those what most people don't do. They don't read all the terms and conditions and remained the new mock me about every week when. You're one of the unusual people who actually does that crew, but those sites will gather all that information and not really set up to. So you health insurance in countries, they do sometimes or read you. But what they're really doing these crates and a huge database of people's contact details. Okay and they are then selling those two people and that is all apparently legal because people chose to give their information and they agreed to the terms and conditions to be marketed up soon, the I've always thought those sites you know like insurance compare sites or mortgage compare sites I. think that's exactly what a lot of them are doing. I think some of them are legitimate getting A. Lot of the deals, but they say we are sharing this with interested parties on purpose to get you the numbers you want right really have to share that information with third parties. They don't have to give you a list here. Exact people were doing because it's changing all the time and some of them might be you know very bonafide companies. Some might be shade or one of the companies which is buying this kind of information is this company get emails and what they've done is they've generated md five hashes. So check some for all of those email addresses. They reckon they got about half a billion now and they're adding about one million more every day. And they say they've also partnered with mailing lists firms so that when folks click on a Lincoln newsletter and go to website a cookie can be set computer containing that MD five check some for their email address on their computer. And so what they're able to do is when you go to the daily caller cool website or never website, which is running, get email script, they can compare the hash in the Czech some to the hash in get emails database, which they've gathered from these sites around the world and they've got all information which you filled in on that full. Yeah, that's good instincts

Tucker Carlson Jessica Bell Google Rubicon MD Youtube Fox News Football Adam United States Lehman Brothers Jeff KAY Robinson Helen Sharp
Fresh update on "md" discussed on New England Weekend

New England Weekend

01:10 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "md" discussed on New England Weekend

"Shake them and terrify us. Earthquakes can destroy us. The snow falls and kids play in it, and avalanche falls and people are killed. The fire that warms us can turn on us and destroyed hundreds and thousands of acres. The son that we enjoy can parch the earth and burn our crops. If God really is in control of nature, these acts of God could lead us to believe that he doesn't always care for us like a tender father. Let's take a closer to home. Your mind is marvellous, but it could be so so upset by mental illness. Your body that thrived in your youth may be weakened by disease and certainly wears down with age. Your body and mind flourished once But now nature is working against you. Young Eric was quite insightful. God has the whole world in his hands. But nature sometimes suggests that God drops it. Eric God doesn't drop it. The truth is the way the Bible tells it, that God is the Lord of nature. God doesn't have the world of nature quite where he wants it. Once he did Genesis. Chapter one says this In the beginning, God created heaven and Earth. The Earth was formless. Sen, MD and darkness covered the deep water. Nature at that time was AH mixed up chaotic mess. Nothing was distinguishable like day and night Sun and Moon mountains and fields and all the specific things we see today in the world of nature. It was a mixed up watery mess that was enveloped in darkness. Over that dark, watery chaos hovered the spirit of God. The spirit of God was hovering over the water. Says Genesis Chapter one, verse two. You might say that God really was on top of the world of nature hovering over it as his spirit did. God decided to bring order out of that chaos. And you know how he did it. He spoke a word. Then God said, Let there be light, so there was light. God saw the light was good. Genesis Chapter one Verses three and four. And God didn't stop. There was still more good to do. If you remember your Bible history. You recall that God made all the things that fill the world around us today. Say a night sun and moon mountains and fields, plants and animals. And God does good work. The Bible tells us over and over again that God looked at the nature that he had made and saw that it was good. That was the time when nature was just the way God wanted it his perfect creation. But something happened as we have ample proof all about us. We're back now, to the idea that maybe God drops it from time to time. Something corrupted the world of nature so that it sometimes does the terrible things we talked about. Earthquakes and so on. What happened in the world of nature is very much like what has happened to human nature. God not only made A A and night sun and moon mountains and fields, plants and animals, But God also made a special creation man and woman. Like some folks say today, God doesn't make junk. He made the first people Adam and Eve could he made them the Bible tells us in his likeness. You can't get any better any more perfect than to be made in the likeness of God. Did Adam and Eve ever think that God dropped it? Not at all. They were living in a perfect place. No earthquakes, no floods, no lightning, starting fires and the like. Perfect people in a perfect place. The Garden of Eden. We call it But They sinned. They disobeyed God. They did what they selfishly wanted to do rather than what God wanted them to do. My will not mine be done. They dropped it, not God. So when Adam and Eve did that the perfect creation was corrupted. Their bodies became subject to death. It's in the Bible tells us has brought death into the world. And thinking now of earthquakes, and such the rest of the world of nature was no longer perfect because of their sin. Thorns and thistles started to grow, making it more difficult to raise crops. You gardeners and farmers know that Childbirth, which is still a marvel became a painful part of nature for a woman. People today talk about polluting the environment. The greatest environmental pollution of all time came when Adam and Eve sinned. After God in his goodness had hovered over the dark waters and brought order out of chaos. Mankind dropped it and turn back to that chaos. That's why you might think that God drops it every once in a while. He's not dropping it by our sins. We have become unruly and sin has made nature unruly, too. Oh, God. Give us a word of hope. That word comes for Eric for you for me. God spoke a decisive word. Let there be light. God is still hovering over all the darkness that sin has brought into this world and is saying a word that is guaranteed to show us how much he really does care for us. A word that God speaks over our chaotic world is nothing less than his son. Jesus Christ. Jesus is the eternal word of God. In the beginning was the word and the word was with God. And the word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things were made through him, and without him, nothing was made that was made. In him was life and the life was the light of men. And the light shines in the darkness and the darkness did not comprehend it. John Chapter one versus one through five. Jesus Christ his God's word of light into the chaos of our world. Jesus died so that our corrupted human nature could be restored Toe holiness and purity. That's why ST Paul says the God who commanded light to shine out of darkness has shown in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ. Second Corinthians Chapter four, verse six. When you believe that You start to trust the Bible when it tells you that there's a new day coming for you. Things aren't the way God wants them now. Don't read that wrong, God being.

Eric God Earthquakes Adam EVE Jesus Moon Mountains MD Garden Of Eden SEN St Paul John
Goldman Sachs $3.9B settlement with Malaysia over 1MDB

WSJ What's News

00:49 sec | 2 weeks ago

Goldman Sachs $3.9B settlement with Malaysia over 1MDB

"Sachs has reached nearly four billion dollar settlement with the government of Malaysia for its role in the alleged theft of billions of dollars from a government investment fund known as one MD. Our reporter lives. Hoffman has more on one of the worst scandals in the bank's history. The allegations against Goldman are basically that the bank turned a blind eye to red flags with one MVP. And that it failed oversee two of its senior bankers who have been accused and in. In one case pled guilty of being part of the scheme. It's important to note that the settlement today does not resolve an investigation into Goldman by the US Department of Justice, which still wants its pound of flesh. We reported late last year that the DOJ was seeking a guilty plea from the bank or or a subsidiary and wanted to install someone to overhaul its compliance

Goldman DOJ Sachs Reporter Theft Malaysia Hoffman MVP
Goldman Sachs $3.9B settlement with Malaysia over 1MDB

Wall Street Breakfast

00:29 sec | 2 weeks ago

Goldman Sachs $3.9B settlement with Malaysia over 1MDB

"Agreed to a three point nine billion dollar settlement with the Malaysian government over the multibillion dollar one MD. scandal backdrop Malaysian prosecutors filed charges in December two, thousand, eighteen against three Goldman units for misleading investors over bond sales, totaling six point five billion that the bank helped raise for the sovereign wealth fund. However Goldman has pleaded not guilty to the charges. Saying that certain members of government and one MD be lied to about how proceeds from the bond sales would be used.

Malaysian Government Goldman MD MD.
New unemployment claims rise in Washington DC and Va., fall sharply in Md.

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 3 weeks ago

New unemployment claims rise in Washington DC and Va., fall sharply in Md.

"The number of new unemployment claims nationwide fell for the 15th straight week last week, but New claims still totaled 1.3 million. The total number of Americans currently getting unemployment benefits, 13.3 million is the lowest since mid April. New unemployment claims in Maryland fell sharply last week. All the rose slightly in both D C and Virginia new claims in DC, Maryland and Virginia totaled 56,000 down from 68,000 the previous week.

Maryland Virginia DC
Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

Software Engineering Daily

54:31 min | 3 weeks ago

Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

"Blair and Chris Welcome to the show. Thank, you good to be here. We're talking about capital allocation today and I'd like you to start off by describing the problems that you see with modern capital allocation for technology companies. I'm happy happy to start there. So I think it might be helpful to give. The listeners, a little bit of our backgrounds so I was a venture capitalist at draper. Fisher Jurvetson for five years I worked very closely with Steve. Jurvetson and we were financing are very MD intensive. Technology projects that became businesses things like satellite companies companies that were making chips to challenge the GP you new applications of machine learning algorithm so on and so forth and I think the most important thing to recognize is that the vast majority of technology funding does not actually go to those kinds of companies. The venture space is a two hundred fifty billion dollars per year investment space. The vast majority of the capital goes to parts of businesses that are pretty predictable like raising money in in investing that in sales, marketing and inventory or building technologies that have a fairly low technical risk profile, so the vast majority of tech companies find themselves raising money. From a industry that was designed to finance crazy high technology risk projects at a time where that industry because technology so pervasive you know really do the great work of of many entrepreneurs over the past twenty to thirty years, technology is now mainstream, but the financing structure to finance businesses not has not really changed much in that period of time. Yeah, and then I guess I'll talk a little bit. My my background is I came from consumer education sort of background, so direct to consumer, thinking about how you use tools and make tools that ingrained into the lives of teachers, parents students I was down in the junior class dojo before starting capital with Blair. We were working on the Earth thesis He. He was telling me a lot about this. The the date out. There exists to make more data driven in data rich decisions. How do we go software to make that easy to access in self service and sort of servicing the signal from the noise, and we kicked around the idea and I thought that they were just a tremendous opportunity to bring. What Silicon Valley really pioneered which is I think making software that is easy to use in agreeing to your live into kind of old industry fund raising capital Haitian. The kinds of capital allocation that exist there's. And debt, financing and different flavors of these. Of these things say more about the different classes of fundraising in how they are typically appropriated two different kinds of businesses. So. You have the main the main groups you know. Absolutely correct, so there's. Equity means you sell part of your business forever to a group of people and as Business Rosen succeeds. They'll get a share in that. Success and ultimately income forever. Debt means you temporarily borrow money from somebody you pay them money, and then at some point in time that money's paid back and you all future income for your business, so equities permanent, not permanent. If you think about how companies are finance like. Let's take the P five hundred. About thirty percents of the capital that S&P five hundred companies use to run. Businesses comes from debt. In the venture world that's remarkably just two percent. And the thing that's crazy is this is two percent with early stage seed companies, also two percent with public venture, backed companies in places like the best cloud index, which is like a one trillion dollar index of publicly traded technology companies started their life, and in with injure backing many of them SAS companies, these companies, also just two percent finance with debt, but nonetheless within these these classes, the reason it's obviously economically much better for a business and pretty much every case to finance itself with debt because it's not. Not It's not permanent, and it can be paid back. It's much much cheaper to use debt. That's why you buy a house with a mortgage show. You know you don't sell twenty percent of your future income forever to your bank help you buy a house, but the reason that people use equity comes back to the risk profile so just like. If you lose your job and you can't pay off your mortgage. The bank owns your home. Same exact thing happens with debt in so restorick Louis, if there's very low. Certainty around the outcome in typically early stage investment you're you're doing a lot of brand new are indeed you have no idea if it's GonNa work you cope. You know over time that you'll be successful, but there's really quite a bit of uncertainty equities a great tool because you're. You'RE NOT GONNA lose a business, you know everybody can basically react to a failed. Are Indeed project. Decide what to do next had saints. Equity is kind of the continent tool for high technical risk, high uncertainty investments, and then debt is basically the tool for everything else, and it can be used as most companies do for. Ninety percent of The places that businesses are investing so if you're spending money on sales and marketing, and you know what you're doing and you've been running campaigns before. That were successful, very. Little reason you should use equity for that if you're buying inventory if you are a big business that's. Reach a level of success that on. Means you have a bunch of diversified cashless. Coming in businesses might take out dead on business kind of overall, so it's less important what specifically you're using the money for, but it's important to recognize that most companies are financed roughly fifty fifty equity versus dead, just just intra back companies that. That are kind of uniquely Equity Finance. Scaling a sequel cluster has historically been a difficult task cockroach. DB Makes Scaling your relational database much easier. COCKROACH! DVD's a distributed sequel database that makes it simple to build resilient scalable applications quickly. COCKROACH DB is post grass compatible giving the same familiar sequel interface that database developers have used for years. But unlike databases scaling with Cockroach DB's handled within the database itself, so you don't need to manage shards from your client application. And because the data is distributed, you won't lose data if a machine or data center goes down. cockroach D is resilient and adaptable to any environment. You can hosted on Prem. You can run in a hybrid cloud, and you can even deploy across multiple clouds. Some of the world's largest banks and massive online retailers and gaming platforms and developers from companies of all sizes, trust cockroach DB with their most critical data. Sign up for a free thirty day trial and get a free t shirt at cockroach labs dot com slash save daily thanks to coach labs for being a sponsor and nice work with cockroach DB. The capital that is being steered towards a recipient. It's often originating in a large source, a sovereign wealth fund or family office in it's being routed through something like capital allocators cater like a venture capital firm for example or a bank. How does this capital get allocated to these smaller sources? What is the supply chain of capital in the traditional sense? You know it's kind of funny to think about capital and things like the stock market in the form of a supply supply chain, but this is exactly how we think about it so at the end of the day. Capital originate. In somebody savings, basically society savings right you. You have a retirement account or your population like you know in in Singapore and Norway with a lot of capital, it sort of accumulated from. From the population and these sovereign wealth funds, or you're an endowment that's you know managing donations of accumulated over many many years, and ultimately you're trying to invest capital to earn a return and pay for something pay for your retirement pay for the university's operation so on so forth so that's Capitol starts, and it basically flows through the economy in theory. To all of the economic projects that are most profitable, inefficient for society, and so, if you step back, and you think about like how how is it that the American dream or the Chinese Miracle Happen? You know in in both of those cases different points of the last hundred years. Why is it that society basically stagnated? You know the world was a pretty scary. Scary place to live in up until about seventeen fifty, the industrial revolution started. Why is it that you know basically for all of human history? People fought each other for food and died at the age of thirty or forty, and over the last two hundred fifty years that it's totally changed. It's because we have an economic system that converts capital from its original owners. Diverts it to the most productive projects. which if they're successful, replace some old more expensive way of doing something with newer better way and so I think when when I described that like you know I, think most people can step back and say yeah, okay I. kind of see how capital flows through the system, it goes automatically to someone making an investment decision like a venture capital firm ultimately gets into the hands of the company company decides to invest in creating some great product that people love. Let's. Let's say like Amazon and then everybody switches from you know buying goods at some store that may or may not be out of you know may or may not being stock to the world's best selection of anything you'd never wanted. The most efficient price that's society gets wealthier basically through these these kind of steps in these transformations, but it's asking if you step back and think about it like nobody actually thinks it's processes as efficient as it could be like. We asked people all the time. People were interviewing journalists companies. We work with sewn. So how efficient do you think world's capital allocation is? I've never met a person that says it's pretty good. You know we're like ninety percent of the way there. In fact, most people think it's pretty inefficient. They think of companies like you know we work, and some of the more famous cases lately of of Silicon. Valley back businesses that that totally. underwhelmed disappointed. Their initial expectations and I think most people admit that the efficiency of capital allocation is either broken or nowhere close to achieving its potential, and so we basically we'll talk more about our technology and how we do we do. We basically think of this problem our problem to solve. There's an incredible amount of Apache inefficiency in how data that goes from a project or a company, ultimately funneling up to an investor flows, and so you know it's hard to place blame because there's so many people in the supply chain, but. But I think it super clear that if it's difficult to measure whether or not a project or a business is good at converting capital into value in wealth, and you know products that people want, it's nearly impossible for society to become really good and efficient at allocating its capital, so we're we're here basically to make the data gathering data transformation visualization communication of what's actually going on under the out of business as efficient as possible and you know from that, we thank some great things are going to happen to the economy. Goes a little bit deeper on the role that a bank typically plays in capital allocation. If you think about our bank works like let's take. Let's take a consumer bank that most people think about you gotTA checking account. Right, now you've got some money in that checking account. That account actually takes your money or dot and most people know this your dollars sitting in that account. You know just waiting around. You'd withdraw them. Your dollars are actually rolling up into the bank's treasury. There's somebody at the bank working with the regulators to say hey, how much of this money can we actually put into things like mortgages, commercial loans, all of the the uses of capital that society. Has In some some effort to. To, move the world forward and make the economy efficient, and so those deposits basically roll up into a big investment fund, and there's ratios that regulators set globally that say those dollars needed to be kept in reserve, versus how many are actually able to be invested, but with the portion that's able to be invested. It's there to fun. You know building a house to fund a business back -Tory to fund sales and marketing or inventory procurement for some other business, and so a bank was was basically the original investment fund, and a bank has unlike venture funds and other sources of. We typically think private capital. The bank has tricky. Problem were any moment all of the depositors holding the checking accounts could show up and say hey. I want my money back and so that's why banks have to deal with reserving capital predicting the amount of withdraw and classically everybody wants her money at once at the worst possible time, and so banks have to deal with quite a bit of volatility now if you take an investment fund on the other hand. Totally totally different structure, so your typical venture fund will have money available to it for a period of ten years from you know typically these larger pools of capital. We talked we talked about so very rarely. Individuals are investing retirement savings in venture funds, typically sovereign wealth funds down that's. Basically pools of that individuals capable. Win One of these funds makes a commitment to a venture fund. It'll say you've got the capital for ten years. You've gotta pay back. You know as investments exit, but other than that will check in ten years from now. We hope that we have more than we gave you the star with and there there's no liquidity problem because the fun has effectively carte blanche to keep the money invested until some set of businesses grow and succeed and go public and make distributions so one thing that's fascinating. The Tappan in the last twenty five years is private capital capital in the format of these kinds of funds. Have just grown tremendously and so today. There's a little over five trillion dollars. Of private capital being allocated in this way to think like buyout funds venture funds so on and so forth. Funds don't have the liquidity problems of banks. They can make much longer term for looking investments. This is created tremendous potential to make the economy more more efficient by taking out the time spectrum. You know this is why venture investors can do things like finance spacex or Tesla. Really. Build fundamental technologies in the way that a bank never could so this is an amazing thing it. However leads to a very long. You DAK cycle, so the incentive goes down when you take out the time line over which investment needs to pay back. To carefully monitor and understand what's going on in the business day today, so it's pretty interesting thing about the different pools of capital. There's not not to. Make it sound too confusing, but I think everybody will admit that the financial markets are incredibly diverse complicated we track basically about fifteen different kinds of capital, and they're sort of pros and cons with each one, but you know a bank is one. A private fund is wanted insurance companies balancing as another. You've got things like ETF and public vehicles that hold capital so there's quite a bit of complexity and the the structure of the financial markets. All right well. That's maybe the supply side of Capitol on. All kinds of middlemen and all kinds of different arrangements, but ultimately there is also the demand side of Capitol, at least from the point of view of companies getting started which is. Startups or computer in later stage with the maybe they're not exactly considered startup anymore, but they're mature. These companies have models for how they are predicting. They're going to grow, but oftentimes these companies are very. Lumpy in terms of how their their revenues come in how closely their predictions can track reality. So how do technology companies even model their finances? Is there a way to model their finances? That actually has some meaningful trajectory. Sure so first. Companies you know need need a base think of all the places that they're spending our money and. We're pretty. We Do I. Think a pretty good job of organizing this and making it simple so when we look at companies and we can, we can talk more about how the the cabinet machine operates, but when we look at companies, we basically think they're only a handful of places of money. Get spent you spend money on. Short term projects that you hope proficient things, sales and marketing. Houston money on paying for your sources of financing like paying interest on debt, making distributions to your investors, and then you spend money on everything else and everything else can be designing software building products on, and so forth, and so if you break the demand for capital down into just those three buckets. And look at them that way. Some pretty interesting things happen. The first is for the short term investments that you hope productive. You can track pretty granular nearly whether or not they are, and we'll come back to that. For paying back your investors, you sort of know exactly how much you're paying your investors so a pretty easy thing to track, and then for the operating costs you know most people will help us. Apax, that you're paying to keep the lights on things like Renton the your accountants, the CEO salaries on and so forth these are these are table stakes expenditures. You need to stay in business and so. Amongst each of those three things, there's different things that you wanna do to optimize and I'm happy to go into more detail sort of go through each one. If you think that'd be useful. Yeah Bliss a little bit more about about how these companies should be a modeling, their revenues are that is meaningful to model their revenue so that you can potentially think of them as targets for for capital allocation so. If we think about. Understanding what company might be a viable recipient of capital? How can you accurately predict the trajectory of that company, or or do they? Would they present a model? Would they develop a model good through a little more detail? How a company would serve justify? It's need for capital. So typically what what most companies do and this is not terribly useful or accurate, but I'll tell you what most people do I mean by the way like how central the entire economy predicts, predicts demand for capital works like this. Companies take. Their income statement on their. Balance Sheet historically. And they they basically have this excel file got a bunch of you know, rose and have different things like my revenue, my you revenue that sort of linked or my expenses that are linked revenue Mukasey could sold so on and so forth, and they grow each of those rose by some number that they hope to hit so if you want your revenue to double next year, you'll say my revenue one hundred dollars today I wanted to be two hundred. Hundred dollars twelve months from now I'm just GONNA draw a line between those two points and every month. There will be some number that's on that line, and that's why monthly revenue I want my expenses. You know everyone knows. Expenses are going to have to go up if my revenue goes up but I don't want them to go up as much as my revenue, so I'm going to draw a line. That's you know somewhere less than a doubling. and. You pull these lines together on one big excel file and there's your you know they're your corporate projections. In general, this is true for big companies small companies, but that's not actually how. Company revenue works because if you go back to the three categories, we talked about before, and you just focus on the one that talks about the short term investments. The. Way Company Revenue Actually Works is a company this month. Let's say they spend one hundred dollars on sales marketing. Well. They're hoping to get a return on that sales marketing, and so they're hoping that in the next you know six months. That's paid back. Twelve months that's paid back. You can actually track every time they spend money on sales and marketing. how quickly it gets paid back so it's that level of precision that can accurately predict revenue, and so what we do is we basically just get a list of every time? Money was spent on one of these short-term investments, so you sales and marketing for for an example, and then we get a list of all of the revenue that was ever earned. And we attribute between both of those lists causing effect. And we do that using a bunch of techniques that are pretty commonplace in your typical data, company or machine learning company. We use some math things like factor graphs. We use simple kind of correlations. We have You know a whole kind of financial framework to. Guess. What attribution should be because you learn a lot as you see different businesses and you see a bunch of different different patterns, which you can basically cluster on, but it is this linkage between spending on something like sales and marketing emceeing seeing revenue, go up or down, but makes or breaks a business, and you want to look at it and I is. Not a bundled. Entirety which is how financial projections are typically built? Okay, well! Let's talk a little bit more about what you actually do so if you're talking about early stage technology companies. Describe how you are modeling, those companies and how you are making decisions as to whether they should receive capital. When a company comes to capital they they come to our website. They sign up for this system that we built which which we've called the capital machine. And the first thing that they do is they connect their accounting system their payment processor typically, so think like a strike, and then sometimes they'll provide other things like a pitch deck or a data room, or whatever other information they have prepared. The system pulls down. All of the date in the accounting system and the the payment processor, and we look at other systems to these are the two key ones that all all dive into detail, and so, what ends up happening is from the accounting system. We get a list of all the times. Businesses spend money on these things like sales and marketing that we were talking about before. From the payment processor we get a list of all the revenue transactions in crucially we get it at. The level of each. Each customer payment, and so you know we scrub I all we really care about is having a customer ID, but once we have data at that level. We can start to do this linkage and say all right look. You know this business spent. A million dollars on sales and marketing and March of two thousand eighteen in April of twenty eighteen, and we saw revenue grow by twenty percent. That was a pretty substantial chain. You know what actually happened here. You can typically identify the subcategories of sales and marketing and start to do this link between these two, and this is really the you know the magic behind our our data science in our team pairing with our engineering team to figure out this problem and solve away that is, that's robust. Bud once we have these two data feeds, and the system goes through, and does all of these attribution. Populations were able to present that back to accompany a pretty clear picture of what's going on, and so we'll say things like hey. Your Business is pretty seasonal, and in the summer is when you're typically more more efficient at converting your sales and marketing dollars into growth so I, you want to finance growth in the summer. The second thing is only about eighty percent of your businesses financeable. There's twenty percent where you might not know it because you're not looking at this level of detail, you're busy building your business, which is exactly exactly what you should be doing, but Twenty percent of your businesses, not efficient. You're spending money on on your sales and marketing categories, product lines, and CETERA that just shouldn't exist and so if you get rid of those. If you double down on the part of Your Business, it is efficient. Then we predict your revenue will be act fifty percent higher, and we'll tell you exactly how much money you need to invest to raise money to to raise the revenue by fifty percent. We give you a bunch of charts that allow you to see how history and projections merged together and dig down. Inspect how we do that linkage to make sure you agree, but. This is what the capital machine does at its core. It Converts Company data into a fully audited completely transparent picture of. How business works where it sufficient where it's not efficient. And then that's where our technology stops, and where balanced she comes in, and so we then take this information, and we make balancing investments directly in companies, and so primarily at this point we lend money to technology companies that we see from their data are eligible for non dilutive funding. We make capital available to them directly. We basically allow them to access it through the capital machine. We use one system to communicate changes to the business. No keep both sides and form so on and so forth, but this is the kind of analytics layer that's essential to making these capital allocation decisions more efficient, and so I think you could imagine a day at least for us in the not too distant future when it's not just US using our balance sheet in this tool to make investments, but in fact, just like excel, every investor can benefit from a similar level of analytics and transparency, as can companies by getting more accurately priced faster access to capital less friction so on and so forth. Get Lab commit, is! Get labs inaugural community event. Get Lab is changing how people think about tools and engineering best practices and get lab commit in Brooklyn is a place for people to learn about the newest practices in devops, and how tools and processes come together to improve the software development life cycle. Get Lab commit is the official conference. Forget lab. It's coming to Brooklyn new. York September Seventeenth Twenty nineteen. If you can make it to Brooklyn, on September Seventeenth Mark Your calendar, forget lab, commit and go to software engineering daily dot, com slash commit. You can sign up with code commit s E. D.. That's COM MIT S. E. D.. And Save thirty percent on. Conference passes. If you're working in devops, and you can make it to New York. It's a great opportunity to take a day away from the office. Your company will probably pay for it, and you get thirty percent off if you sign up with code, commit S, e. There a great speakers from Delta. Airlines Goldman. Sachs northwestern, mutual, T, mobile and more. Check it out at software engineering daily Dot Com slash, commit and use code. Commit S. E. D.. Thank you to get lab for being sponsor. The inputs specifically if you think about a model for determining whether or not, a company should should be eligible to receive capital. I'd like to know how the the models are built. The the data science models that you're building are constructed from the point of view of the inputs. So how are you determining or how do you like company comes to you? How do you turn that company into some structured form of data that you could put into your models and determine whether it's worthy of capital. Yeah I mean it comes down to what what the data is your down so when we talk to a system like striper transaction records system, you know that that's the revenue of the company now where things get interesting when we connect to balance sheets in penalizing, it's of accompanying really onto understanding. Weighing. What exactly these numbers mean, and that sort of where we made our pipelines were built from the ground up to give us that granular. Of A company's cash family revolutions. Where's the money going where they allocating? And it's savable greenway or you once. What do you understand that data through that Lens? That let's build pretty sophisticated financial models Linda. And you know as soon as you have the picture of Company You can really do a lot of flexible analysis on the back leg distributed computation. Come stuff that you would never be able to excel and quite frankly a lot of these companies don't have the stacking internally or really the tools to understand for themselves, so you'd be surprised it you know when we surface this analysis back to the company by virtue of just being transparent on how we're making decision how it is perceived their business, the signals that were uncovering. These operators the CEO's the CFO's that are really focused on building company. Really surprising. They're really making these insights really transforming. How they think they should have capital. Should invest growing business. Are there any? Sources of Third Party data that you can gather to improve decision making. There are at a macro economic sense, and so it's actually quite useful to look at public company performance and say hey. SAS businesses in general. Most people notice, but facilities in general are seasonal in the fourth quarter. Budgets basically expire and people come in, and they buy a bunch of SAS. Software and so to take concepts like that basically shapes of curves, signals and apply them to private company. Financials is useful. Crucially though there is no private company. Data repository of any kind like it just doesn't exist, and you know notoriously even even with small businesses. It's actually quite quite difficult to get access to any sort of meaningful credit data, and so, what ends up happening is these aw. These businesses. Give you a picture of their business directly as an investor and you have to interpret it directly, and that's basically how this works totally unlike consumer credit, there's no credit bureau that people paying so most investors are analyzing the state and excel. Excel notoriously breaks when there's about a million cells worth of data, and so we've got this great visualization showing our data pipeline, and it's basically a bunch of boxes, and there's a little tiny. Tiny box in the bottom of corner that's excel, and there's a bunch of other boxes across the entire rest of the page that are nodes in our in our distributed computations, but accelerate very very limited, and so it makes it impossible to actually understand what's going on in business from the source data, and it's at the source that you see this variability in this linkage between profitable capital allocation decisions in unprofitable capital allocation decisions. Describing more detail, the workflow so a company comes to you and they're going to put their inputs into the. Would you call the capital machine? What does that workflow look like in a little bit more depth? Yes when they come to the website, they creighton count much like you would on. Twitter facebook account. When your details your email, you terrify your email, and then you on what's recalling like the capital portable on there? You have et CETERA. Tools to connect your sins record and these are typical offload. So you know people are very familiar with you. You know you say hey, let's connect by quickbooks you in your credentials and sort of be as secure way, and you click okay and the system checkmark by your quickbooks in the system start pulling that data out of regular cadence and. Depending on what system you're connecting you of the characteristics of that's not go systems of record, and how much data you have you know. The data's available anywhere from ten minutes to a couple of hours later and you know once we have Dr. System, we run that through our partake analysis pipeline in the users as a company. You get you get charged. In Tableau kind of call it, the insight Saban's these refused that we think would be helpful for you as an operator company understanding about Your Business in separately. We also get views of that data that are useful to our our internal investment team. Whoever is looking to capitalization systems? Are there certain business categories that are a better fit for modeling in better fit for the kind of. Predictable capital returns that you can, you can expect with the investments that you're making so like you ride sharing or Gig economy businesses or some businesses. What are the categories that are the best fit? Say Very few categories don't shit from the from the perspective of of linkages, but they're certainly models at their easier to think through and easier to understand, but our our system can underwrite today A. Lease on a commercial aircraft, a fleet of ships and Insurance Agency ask company the most important. Thing about our system is that the financial theory that underlies it is very general, just like p. e. rate is very general, and so that's kind of sounds crazy like. A lot of. A. Lot of people say what what businesses the best fit for your your system and you know it's kind of like asking what businesses the best for Warren Buffett like Warren. Buffett is a generalist. In any business, and he has a framework in his own head to figure out how to make ship comparable to American Express our assistant has a very similar framework. It just operates at the level of transactions instead of at the level of financial statements, but certainly within. That framework there's some examples that are just easier describes I think like you know thinking through the fishing of sales and marketing something. That's a lot more obvious than thinking through like the stability in refurbishment of commercial aircraft parts, which is a key question you know. Pricing pricing refurbished parts, which is a key question if your financing commercial aircraft and Our team, the ambassadors that use the capital machine internally which we primarily do internally do a little bit of partnering with without the groups to to use this as well. These people are all specialists in some particular area, but it's crucial to understand. They're looking at the exact same chance as all the other specialists and all the other areas, so it's like literally the the Fast Company and a commercial aircraft will have the same series of charts at investors. Are there two two draw their conclusion? Is the question for Chris. Can you describe the stack of technologies that you built in more detail? Yeah Yeah. Of course on the front, we are react type script, xjs, you know everything is on aws, and in the back, and we're. We're all python, and in really the reason for that is if you're doing any serious machine, learning or data science today can't really get away in python stack, so we're all python them back in. We have flasks. As a as our API late here and That's the that's a high level. And get a little bit more detail about how the data science layer works. Yeah, yeah, yeah, of course, so we put on the dea into basically a data lake the that goes down into Ardito pipeline in that's all air orchestrated on top of each called airflow, and we use a technology called desk for are distributed computation, and I think that this is a good choice. Choice for us at this moment you know I see us doing a lot of work on. You know using a spark in other distributed technologies in the future and his team and it turns out that when we pull this data down organizing the data was really important to us as we build a lot of attractions to make accessing that data, really easy for quantitative analysts. Important central to our whole technology is that we're able to do a lot of different financials experiment very quickly on top of this so the the implications of that really cascade down all the way into. You know what technologies where choosing how we structure our delayed. Even even how strokes are teams, so it really is brought up locations across all product. How is it when you're analyzing company that you have enough data that it warrants a spark cluster because I can imagine? The financial data around the company. How can there really be that much data to analyze how you do surprised in a lot of these transactions systems taking up the companies have been around a couple of years and their direct to consumer. These data sets can be can be pretty large. You know we're talking about in the millions and millions and millions of transactions that were pulling down and storing. Storing and that just on a per company basis. You know that's not even talking about if we wanted to. Benchmarks Cross companies, and also if we want to do scenario analysis, so you know one of the things we was part of a pipeline is take this data, and through like nine ninety nine hundred thousand simulations to understand the sensitivity of different variables on the performance of Your Business and If, you're starting out with starting that already large. Sort of a multiplying effect. On how much data the system is the old process? is you go through those different stages? And, can you tell me a little more detail? What would a typical spark job? Look like for a company that you're assessing. Yes, so first episode is ribbon. Our our financial didn't ingestion parts, so we download something on the order of you know forty fifty bytes of Tim's action data for for a company. We have to do all the work to interpret and understand what that means in reorganized that data in a way that are downstream analysis and primitives can. Make sense of and use for useful analysis so really the first step at this point job is is transformed the datum some it's useful, and then there's all the work on what are the clusters in order to machines and analysis in the computational. Resources needed to run simulations. You know not not just say local computer locally owned of fall over the only about thirty to sixty four gigabytes of Ram what league, so that's where workflow comes in creating easier faces into data, clusters and being. Should you know when you run a job? You know when it fails. You know it's done. You know when the team can't okay. This part of analysis done I had intermediate date asset to do more analysis on now get back to work is a lot of the time we spend developing internal tools to make. One other thing that'll mentioned that I think's important is. A lot of the underlying technology in our data pipeline it's no different than like what a tableau or you need. Traditional BI business would have access to, but what's fascinating when you have a vertically specific domain so financial data in our case you can make a lot of interpretations about the date of the let you do much more intelligent things, and so for example we. Don't have to make your own charts as a user of the capital machine. We make all the charts for you can of course. As a business we work with. Give us ideas for charts. You can mock up your own. We we basically have an interface for for business. The I team's to to write some code if they if they want to bought when you have clients who are thinking about financial risk, financial attribution across all of the companies that we see distilling that down into a series of indicators that are detailed, but generalize -able, and then publishing that back to all of the companies that use the capital machine to run their own capital, allocation, decisions and access, external fundraising and capital. Some pretty amazing things happen in so it's only with a vertical view. You actually having these we, we call our data scientists Kwan's, but but actually having these people who you know typically are graduate level economists, thinking for the first time about using transaction level data in their analysis, which is notoriously not not available to to normal economists that you get the kinds of insights and analysis the actionable for businesses, and then in terms of the data pipeline that then means we actually store a bunch of intermediate data that's opinionated in that way, and that makes it much faster to access much easier to benchmark much more useful across a network of companies, versus just that isolated excel model that. Explains only one business. One thing I'd like to ask you about. Capital intensity so there are kinds of businesses that are capital intensive for example where you have to pay upfront for a lot of ridesharing rides, and you know as Uber or lift. His has known in much detail. You allocate all this capital two things to subsidize rise because you try to win a market, there's all kinds of other capital intensive businesses. How does capital intensity change? What makes sense with regard to the equity financing the debt financing that you are shepherding for these companies? That is a great question and be because of where you focus in your audience. You totally get the most financiers don't so. The first point exactly like you said. Capital intensity means a business consumes a lot of capital. It doesn't mean a business has a physical factory or plant or railcars, so it is absolutely true exactly like you said that there are a lot of tech businesses that are incredibly capital intensive. If you are capital intensive business that means UNI especially if you're growing, you need to raise a lot of external capital, and so it is even more important that your capital or a big portion of your capital base is not dilutive. That's that's just essential. Table stakes because what you see with these businesses, the ride sharing companies are great. Example is by the time one of these things actually goes public the early owners in the business on a very very very miniscule. KEESA that business, still if you contrast that to company like Viva Systems which I think is one of the most capital capitol efficient businesses in venture history, I think that this race something like twelve or fifteen million dollars total before it went public in a at a multi billion dollar market cap. So capital intensity. Is a synonym for dilution your own way less. Than you think when you exit entities even more important that you figure out a way to raise capital non ludicrously upfront. Some broader questions zooming out in in getting your perspective. Do a thesis for what is going on in the economy right now where you look at. The fact that We have. Obvious pressures to. Reducing the size of the economy through the lack of tourism, the lack of social gatherings while the stock market climbs higher and higher, and it appears that the technology side of things is almost unaffected by Corona virus is there. Is there a thesis that you've arrived at or or their set of theses that through conversations with other people, you've found most compelling. Sure the most important thing to realize about the stock market is that it discounts all cash flows from all businesses in the stock market to infinity, and so the value, the stock market about eighty percent of the value. The stock market is. Pretty far into the future like more than three years from now, and so if you believe that the current economic crisis and this is why there's always a. At least in the Western, world, last two hundred fifty years after an economic crisis. If you believe the crisis will eventually revert, and there will be a recovery, then it only makes sense discount stock market assets by anywhere between ten and twenty five percent. If you believe businesses fundamentally going to go out of business because of this crisis, that's a different story, but that explains why something as terrible as Kobe nineteen and a pandemic. Only discount the stock market by by roughly thirty thirty five percent in a in March, but that's not what's actually going on today as you mentioned and so stock market prices now have completely recovered. That is something that we think is a little bit of out of sync with reality but I. I mention you know we're not. We don't spend too much time about the stock market beyond that we just look at you. Know Private Company fundamentals. We try to understand what's actually going on in individual businesses across all businesses that are network to see what you know what we can understand, and you know what kind of conclusions we can draw, and so if you take that Lens and you actually look at what's happening to businesses due to Cova nineteen, it's fascinating. Some businesses like think the food delivery space have gotten a lot more efficient, so those businesses lot like ridesharing businesses back twelve months ago, there was sort of a bloodbath between bunch of companies competing in local markets to acquire customers all all fighting Google and facebook console, and so forth you subsidies drivers, etc.. That's essentially stopped. These businesses incredibly profitable, the cost acquire customers has fallen by more than half a lot of cases. The channels were slot less competitive, and so if you're running one of those businesses. Now is a great time to be aggressively expanding. Weird things like commercial construction businesses. They're actually a handful businesses that we've seen do things like install windows and doors and commercial buildings whose businesses have accelerated because all of these buildings are closed down. Construction project timelines have gotten pulled up. All of these orders are coming. Do in they're you know sort of rapidly doing it solutions? There's obviously a bunch of other businesses have been that have been hurt by by the pandemic, but our general thesis are we've studied. Pretty detailed way the Spanish flu in nineteen eighteen, you know. These things eventually go away. There will be a vaccine. Economy will get back to normal, and as long as we can stay focused on working through this as as a society and of maintain our our fabric of of kind of economic progress then. DESAGUADERO values today will eventually make sense just sort of a question of of win for the stock market, and then if you're if you're actually running business in thinking about your own performance in isolation, really being clear about is now the time to invest and grow my business now the time to be very careful with my expenses interest, get through this for the next year or however long it takes for there to be a vaccine. So the way to think about your company, if I understand correctly if I was to to put in a nutshell, is that. I think of you as a data science middleman between large capital allocators, and and start ups deserving of capital, so the the sovereign wealth funds the banks the I guess. Funds of funds. These kinds of sources are essentially looking to you for guidance on where to direct the capital, and you're on the on the other side, absorbing data and creating opportunities from these startups to source the good directions of that capital. Just wrap up. Would you put any more color around that description or or refining anyway. Yeah I mean I. think that at the core of what capital is is where the. Core Technology Ambler of sort of. The private market if you think about public markets today, you've clearing-houses like the New York Stock Exchange, and you have companies that provide analysis on top of that like Bloomberg, you know we see a tremendous opportunity to shift the paradigm where you know the place where all the financial transactions happen. is also the place that collects the data improvise information for those making these decisions and yeah, so I think capitals really at the center of making a transparent technologically enabled financial marketplace. Guys. Thank you so much for coming on the show and discussing capital, and I guess one last question is. Do you have any predictions for how capital allocation for startups will look differently in five ten years? Sure so! The first prediction. And this is happening now. I mean the the infrastructure is. In place both within. And others. Most startups fairly early in their life. Think is equity only way to do this and. So. That's a cultural shift. That's that's already happened. People are starting to ask that question. The second prediction is. Seed and series a funding will be entirely unchanged. After series. There'll be a bifurcation between businesses that. Are Really. Capital intensive gigantic rnd projects think like SPACEX. The series, B. C. d. e. enough are really about building and launching a rocket. Those businesses will by and large not. Turn outside of equity to finance themselves, but there's very few of those businesses. Pretty much every other business businesses that you see raising a series B. Serie C. Will like any normal business in the entire rest of the economy raise maybe half of that capital nine allegedly either in the form of debt. Royalty financing factoring all of the other instruments that normal companies use to finance themselves in the void delusion that will happen roughly three years her. Now that'll that'll kind of we'll see obvious obvious signs of that from very early very early base, and then the final the final thing is. Steve Case talks a lot about this. With the rise of the rest, he's got this great venture fund that invests explicitly outside the coast, so kind of the rest of America and we've seen that there's there's a pretty dramatic distinction between being a coastal business non-coastal business from capital access perspective, but there's no distinction from an actual performance perspective, and so we'll start to see some of the regional. Differences in bias sees around where capital flows, go away. And so I would maybe put that on a five year timeline like raising capital is actually much more predictable, much less biased, and that's great back to the beginning of our conversation. That's great for the economy I mean every project or business that can convert capital, two products and services that people love should get finance. No questions asked doesn't mean it doesn't matter what the color of your skin is. What background you have whether you went to college didn't go to. College doesn't matter. You have a business with data that can prove whether people love it

Steve Case Business Rosen Fisher Jurvetson New York Chris Welcome Blair Silicon Valley CEO Restorick Louis Spacex Facebook Singapore
US Podcast Ad Revenues grew 48% in 2019

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03:05 min | 3 weeks ago

US Podcast Ad Revenues grew 48% in 2019

"The US podcast at markets grew forty eight percent in two, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, two, seven, hundred and eight million dollars, according to the AP's annual podcast revenue study that's nearly thirty million dollars higher than they predicted host read ads were responsible for two thirds of the revenue. Now will not hate a billion in two thousand, nine twenty, though, but we are still growing the IB predict slow growth of fourteen point seven percent this year to eight hundred and twelve million dollars. Thanks to the Pan Dome thanks pandemic. It's official scripts has agreed to sell stitcher to Sirius Xm. The agreed price is three hundred twenty five million dollars. Would expect the announcement of new CEO FOR POCKET CAST shortly. It's likely to be John W. Gibbons based in La. He's a strategic advisor to Pod chaser and worked at MD and Amazon for fourteen years. SPOTIFY's Gimblett media is being sued for failing to make its podcasts accessible to the deaf and hard of hearing. The New York lawsuit argues that GIMBLETT VIOLATES THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT for failing to provide closed captioning on various podcasts. Americans are starting their audio day a little later, according to new research from Edison Research. We hope you're enjoying your lion. Shift the kickoff event for the podcast movement. University happens later today it's free to take part and free to be a member. Australia Triton digital have published their podcast report for June total downloads virtually unchanged. The report only mentions participating publishers, not including the country's largest podcast publisher the AP. Even? Though they said that they were joining in the next few months back in October, we've got a pressing corean again. Hey, are insi- our podcast network. Australia, still number one according to Triton claims podcast listening in the news and entertainment categories are record highs. Pontiac has released the US top twenty podcast rank earthy Ben Shapiro show climbs to number five that also only measures participating publishers podcast podcasters unlimited is a new podcast network and consultantcy Paul chaser ratings, reviews and replies and are available on pod Kite Zeno. Is To district NPR podcast on their diaspora focused service and Brad Schwartz. ooh became the new podcasting boss of audible. Last month has left the company after employees discovered an old sexual harassment lawsuit in which Schwartz was named. And KOSS news once upon a time in the valley from enter cadence thirteen launched today, before the was Paris or Kim. There was Traci Lords, but this adult star wasn't Demi. Moore is starring and producing in a brand new podcast. Dirty Diana, the story of a dying marriage. How to partners find their way back to each other. And returning for a second series story bound is a radio this a program designed for the podcast age collaboration between the POD, glamorous and lit hub radio

United States Strategic Advisor AP Pan Dome Australia Triton Digital New York Australia Spotify Triton CEO Edison Research Traci Lords Amazon LA NPR Ben Shapiro Diana
Does Size Matter When It Comes To Health

Diet Starts Tomorrow

05:06 min | Last month

Does Size Matter When It Comes To Health

"Dr Stanford is an obesity medicine, physician, scientists, educator and policymaker at Massachusetts General. Hospital and Harvard Medical School. She also lectures at Brown and Teaches Med students at Harvard. Hello, and welcome well. Thanks for having me. It's an absolute delight to be here today with both of you. We're just we're the most accomplished person ever had this podcast like I cannot even begins. Batum were all you have. You guys are the best and this is. This is what I need to me through the rest of the day as I conquer the world. Yeah! We're honored that you made have the time the time to come talk to us just a little, so thank you so much. Did I get all of that right? You did I I. Guess What I can do is explain it to people because people are kind of like is all of that absolutely so? I'm obviously a mathematician, so the MD is the easiest part I think to understand on my completed my masters in public health nineteen years ago, so it shows you that I'm older than I appear. And that was in health policy management. My masters impose ministration was from the Harvard. Kennedy School, government and government. Currently working on my MBA executive MBA, so that hasn't quite made it to the end of my name, but I may lead US next year. Let me tell you guys. We'll have more to talk about. The the all the that you see after not team for fifteen, but it is nice that it goes with that, so those are all fellowships, so my fellow of the ANC, which is the American Academy pediatrics I'm a fellow of American College of Positions. American college positions represents all Physicians for adult so internal medicine, a fellow of the American Heart Association so basically. I'm looking at cardio metabolic health and being the fellow in the American Heart Association what represents that and then a fellow in the obesity society. Society which is the F. Toss? So you know these fellowships come you know after having accomplished in those different on areas domain, so I see children I see adults I work in this kind of Cardio Metabolic, health space obviously as obesity medicine physician I work in that space, so it really is a combination of kind of who I am, and just looking at Vegas, the letters that come after my name really talks to the work that I really care about and working with my patients patients across the wall. That's amazing. Wow -gratulations. What inspired you study obesity. One of the things that I was always very concerned about as a black one in a black woman who was born and raised in Atlanta Julie obviously in Boston is that's where mastermind Harvard are? I'm I was really. Perplexed I think is the word I WANNA. Use about the disproportionate impact obesity on communities of color particularly I'm the black community. That was what really brought me to this work, so if you go back twenty years ago, I think you've as you're in your twenties for twenty years ago. When I was doing my m H, you're not okay. Across. Our loved anyways Oh! That's Cute I. Love it still have you guys by? Decades! but one of the things I was really interested in seeing was like. I felt like there was a lot that we weren't doing to understand why. Obesity obesity disproportionately impacted certain groups and the groups that are more likely to kind of tackle these issues or the people that are representative, so those scripts so as a black woman and the group that is most disproportionately impacted by obesity I felt compelled to really approach and tackle this headline, so the projects that I was doing back at emory school of Public Health, back in ninety nine two thousand etc, We're looking at specifically obesity in the black community one project I was doing was. Was Looking at obesity in the Black Church community was looking at obesity among African, American, adolescent girls and one was looking at obesity within those that are law resources within the wick programs. It'll women's and children's for Ram, and how could we fix their Their plight in terms of recognizing that we can in some ways with the limited resources that they may have available to enhance their role house. So this was something that was kind of lingering. I didn't anticipate that I would choose obese medicine. 'cause that was not a field when I was twenty years ago. It really was not a field. There was no board certification in obesity medicine. The first Brit sort of patients directly. No Be Madison didn't start until two thousand well, which was well after I finished medical school, but I can tell you I was on. Call in the pediatric ICU when I was in residency and I as internal medicine pediatrics and I literally just googled obesity in medicine at about two thirty in the morning after I just intimated three kids in the ICU in a new. I was going to sleep at nights. I figured I'd just need to keep myself busy. And, the fellowship here at Mass General at Harvard popped up and I was like. What is this? You know I I really interested in obesity. I had no idea there was a fellowship, indeed the first ship and so I came and I spent three years. Doing a fellowship dedicated to understanding the disease of obesity.

Obesity Harvard Harvard Medical School American Heart Association Black Community Dr Stanford American College Of Positions Brown Massachusetts General Black Church Kennedy School United States Batum Emory School Of Public Health American Academy ANC MD
"md" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:17 min | Last month

"md" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"In 2020 So you don't have to take your rmd this year. That's important. So if you don't want your required minimum distribution, you don't have to take it. Don't forget that if you are of the right age, your rmd rate. I'm sorry. Age has been increased. If you have never taken in our MD Then it's now a 72. You can wait till 72. If you've already taken in our MD, then you have to keep taking them. And out to the old 17.5 rule, which is one of the dumbest rules I've ever seen in my life. I was probably a logic behind you somewhere, but I've never found it. All right. So let's see things you could do with your 401 K. Ah, Participants can withdraw up to $100,000 for Corona virus expenses income tax due on the account withdrawal can be paid over three years. That's not bad. Savers have three years to put the funds back into the retirement account. Okay? Not bad, either. I'm just giving you the highlights here. There's a lot more to it. Retirees can delay taking minimum distributions. We talked about that, for a one K loan limits increased to 100% of your vested account balance of $200,000. So If you want to borrow from your 401 k. You can borrow up to 100,000. 2019 R R I R A contribution deadline has been extended to July 15th. So not only do you get until the 15th to file your tax return, but you have until the 15th To make 2019 contributions to your IRA, Not a bad gig, either. So if you and this is actually a good idea if you wanted to open up the personal pension plan to 7.2% You could not only transfer Money from an IRA into the personal pension plan. But if it's within your means you can make that contribution was July 15,000 hit us yet. You can make that contribution for 2019 now. And at that to your personal pension plan, so not a not a bad idea. All right, so anyway, the 7.2%.

MD
Therapeutic Video Game on Trial

a16z

05:56 min | Last month

Therapeutic Video Game on Trial

"Today's episode covers the topic of Digital. Therapeutics given that earlier this month. The FDA approved its first ever prescription video game. And since this is journal, club, we go into one of the key clinical trials, underpinning this historic decision published recently in Lancet digital health by Scott Collins and colleagues, which evaluated this games ability to improve attention and kids with attention, deficit, hyperactivity, disorder, or adhd. Are Sister podcast. Sixteen minutes on the news also covered this topic debating the bigger picture. Questions of what is an isn't a digital therapeutic and where pricing and regulation comes in. You can find that episode at a Sixteen Zero Dot. com forward slash sixteen minutes. A sixteen. Biodiesel Team Partner Former MD entrepreneur. Justin Larkin joins me in this discussion where we cover the pros and cons of this video game compared to traditional pharmacological therapies. The game specifically targets the attention impairments in twelve year. Olds by having them help an Avatar navigate digital environment in the face of other distractions. We also discussed how the randomized controlled clinical trial or are. CT was designed the limitations of the study and the open questions to be addressed. Will you begin with what question this paper answers? Video game via digital therapeutic and I think this paper resoundingly answers that question of yes, a video game target, a specific mechanism of action can have advocacy to cross that threshold of being considered at their pubic, but then I think more importantly is. Can this specific video game have an impact on a child with Adhd? To the point where it could be considered a tool in the toolkit of physician, treating this patient and I would argue the resounding answer from this is certainly this is considered, both because it there's an obvious benefit, but also the risks associated with it proved to be pretty minimal. There's plenty more research to be done, but I think this does a great job at answering that in the subsequent FDA decision just went on to reinforce study further. My favorite part of the paper was getting to watch that supplemental file, showing the kids video game and see what the kid seems and being able to connect that to kind of the goals of the game. If you're to watch that video outside of. The context of knowing that this was coming from a digital therapeutic company or clinical trial. You probably wouldn't know that it was a digital therapeutic. You'd probably think it was any other game that our kids are playing these days, but I think the opportunity for digital therapeutics that creates an environment where a therapeutic can actually be enjoyable, can actually be entertaining, and the really cool thing about this program is that it learns it's able to know what the kids ability is, and then Taylor the game, and how hard it is based on how quickly they pick it up and it's always responding to that level of engagement as a kid learns to adopt those skills. If you think about nutritional therapeutic lake uphill. There's opportunity for real time iteration of the therapeutic. There's no ability to say hey. This person is responding great, so we're going to cut the sing off. This person isn't responding, so let's up titrate the dose. Where in the game there's this ability in real time to iterative on how the person's experiencing that there. Yeah. I've known kids with ADHD and some days. They have good days and some days. They have days where it's more difficult being able to have that happen. Real time seems really appropriate for this type of condition. I think it's a really great match. Between kind of underlying mechanism, underlying patient characteristics in the method of delivery of the therapeutic, so there's proof of concept evidence from previous studies. This therapeutic video game can help kids with Adhd, but this particular study really test that hypothesis with sophisticated and careful clinical trial design, so let's dig in now to some of the important details of the study, the built upon the pita studies by having truly randomized controlled trials. So this is where there's a control group women interventional group getting developed intervention, but then also importantly, all of the researchers involved were blinded to the intervention. Of Selves and the patients themselves are blinded to whether in the intervention group or not, so the control group also got a video game, and it was a word search game that it also learned was also rewarding, and also had a lot of the same kind of game design elements, but that video games doesn't target those same pathways that are issues. ADHD, an important is also used a method called the intention to treat meaning all of the people that were initially stratified into the two groups were included in a statistical analysis, regardless of whether they completed or not so really meeting at the top level criteria what it means to be a rigorous are ct for therapy. Yeah. This study is pre registered, and so the idea behind Predrag distraction. Is that you as a researcher? Lay Out exactly what you're going to do before you ever do the study how you're going to collect the data how you're going to analyze that data, and importantly you determined to be a significant outcome before you look at any of the data and that really help prevent that kind of post talk. We looked at the data. We see this as significant. Therefore, this is important. You're saying from the start. This is important and will only know if our study is successful if it meets this particular endpoint. To Study Island, importance of having got foresight in the design, but also another thing that was interesting in the study was the choice of outcome metrics traditionally adhd research. A lot of the outcomes have been focused on the number of different metrics and batteries of surveys, subjective measures to assess symptoms of adhd whereas this particular study use a measure called the Tova Api. That's Te'o via API, which is really focused on assessing objectively attention. They picked an outcome that really got out. Some of the core impairment comes along with Adhd and then a lot of circumstances is equated with some of the challenges. Kids have in the classroom and other settings.

Adhd FDA Sixteen Zero Dot. Study Island Researcher Scott Collins Mechanism Of Action Biodiesel Team Partner Former Justin Larkin Taylor
Inside the Start of an Online Membership Community with Kevin Fremon

Smart Passive Income

04:59 min | Last month

Inside the Start of an Online Membership Community with Kevin Fremon

"What's up everybody welcome to session four, hundred and twenty eight of the smart passive income podcast. Thank you so much for joining me today. My Name is Pat. Flynn here to help you make more money. Save more time and help more people to, and they were talking with Kevin Freeman who is starting a membership. In fact, he just recently launched it. We're going to talk about how he launched it and what it's been like in there, and how he is using this platform to communicate and have conversations and the types of conversations that he's happening to hopefully. Hopefully give you perspective on what is possible and you'll find out that it's not in fact, a giant community yet, and it's a slow start and I think there are reasons for that, and we'll talk about that as well, but I'm very proud of what has done. Kevin in fact is one of the members of our SPIC accelerator program, and this wasn't even a thing. When he came in to that program about seven months ago and to see this being created in the connections. He's creating with his community. Now it's just it's just unreal and I cannot. Tell you how mix how excited I am about how this is going to pan out in the future. We'll have to have him. Come back on the show to talk about what happens next, but you'll also find Kevin if you're interested on youtube. He's an amazing storyteller. A great friend so excited to introduce them to you here Kevin F. R. E. M. O. N. Fremont Helius. Kevin Welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks for being here man. I cannot tell you how excited I am to be here. Literally Pat for the past five years. I've been visualizing this very moments, and it is here, so thanks for having me I really appreciate it. Thank you and I remember you because Lincoln last year was when we really I met in person and gave his giant hug and I. I was like what happened like. What would that would i? What? Why do I deserve this and you've told me a lot more about your story. Even became a stew. Mike celebrated program. And now you're building these amazing communities, and just helping somebody more people yet these successful products online, and just so stoked to have become your friend recently and I just wanted to invite you on for A. A number of reasons number one I want to dig into your story a little bit because I think it's going to be very inspirational for people number two. You're working effort into building a new community. Literally from scratch lately has been really inspiring, because as many of you will hear next week. Matt and I have been building something related to this that works at its talk about, but we'll. We'll see that for later, but you've been just digging into the weeds of how to bring people together in your community in a very interesting way, and I want to unpack that as well, but let's start with with you head, and in your experience and entrepreneurship, and and of where this all start for you I know you have some incredible sort of ups and downs in this arena. Yeah. Absolutely, you know. It's funny that you mentioned kind of an. That's the topic of our conversation today because. Literally for the last twelve years I have been building communities both on the technical design side, and also on the human side, and there has absolutely been a tremendous amount of downs. It's actually what has helped me kind of come to this realization of what I would call the three CS of community and we'll get to that later in the show, but my story goes like this. When I was twenty three I basically said goodbye to the corporate world, and started off on a journey of my own as a creative as A. As someone who knew that I just wanted to step into entrepreneurship. And I remember the first big project. That's really kind of set the course for lot of my journey forward, and coincidentally that was actually community. This referral came in to myself and my cousin, who at the time had this design and branding business where we would build web products for other entrepreneurs and this client came in and said I want wikipedia meets facebook needs web MD and I wanted to be a community of people to expose all modalities of medicine and health. and. Of course, my cousin and I look at each other. Having just started this new business and look at our clients, potential client and say to them. We got this. We can do this. Let us your quotes and we'll get moving on this project. This turned into our first million dollar projects, and we worked on this community for a good three years, developing a really robust platform and learning a lot about community building, and so is that moments where I found this real love for helping entrepreneurs build products build community. That really helped the world. And so as we move through that journey, I had this wild idea of my own because I wanted my own concept. I wanted to build my own community. I didn't want to actually build another product for another entrepreneur and then have it. You know leave because it was something I was so passionate about.

Kevin Kevin Freeman Matt Flynn Kevin F. R. E. M. O. N. Fremon Kevin Welcome PAT Youtube Lincoln Mike Facebook
Spurring Social Change One Smile at a Time with Dr. Rania Habib, MD, DDS

The WoMed

06:17 min | Last month

Spurring Social Change One Smile at a Time with Dr. Rania Habib, MD, DDS

Are Vitamins Just Expensive Urine?

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

06:42 min | Last month

Are Vitamins Just Expensive Urine?

"Hello and welcome to this edition of the Green Wisdom Health. Show I'm Janet Lewis Sir. Lewis and we're here to give you a very informative show today, Hopefully we'll try to keep all this straits can is going to be a bunch of information and we hope all of you enjoy it, and we hope all of Y'all are doing well out in green wisdom land. this show is going to be called our vitamins, just expensive urine, and for those of you that are taking vitamins and know what they can do. There are many of you out there. That are new to listening to hell shows and are taking vitamins at. Maybe you're buying a big box store, and you don't really notice any difference and could say well. Maybe they're just expensive urine, so Dr Lewis is going to dispel some of those myths. He's GonNa tell you the differences. He's going to tell you. What a good vitamin and a different! Grade of category will do on lab work. What it what it can move for as far as lab value numbers, which is why we run lab and what a bad one can do as well but I I think we WANNA. Start this show off. We've got a bunch of questions but we have got a letter from one of our very loyal patients for many years at was kind enough to refer his friend to us. Who in turn had his wife do her lab with us? Michelle and so. Eric the one that actually did the referring to start with. Thank you very much Eric we love you. wrote a very nice letter to us over the weekend. And you guys as much as we try to inspire. You really helps when you inspire us as well and this did that for us, so I'd like to read that letter to you and then I'd like Dr Lewis to comment if that's okay this. He's ready to comment I know he is. So he wants to pass on, Eric wants to pass on some really good news Michelle did her lab with us and followed our instructions after a doctor visit that said her blood was out of whack, and she needed a bunch of prescription medications, and honestly that's when we get. A lot of people is when they don't want to take all these prescriptions. They Kinda. Wait until they've been hit with Oh my gosh, you're you're really sick, so let's lay all these drugs on you. So she got scared and her lab with us. Fast forward to this week when she went back to the doctor and told him well I. Did this Doctor Lewis Thing, and he looked at seven labs of panels and gave me some supplements to take. The doctor looked at the nurse. They chuckled and said you're peeing that down the drain, and they don't work, and you just need this ten dollar prescription and your cholesterol and triglycerides and blood pressure will be fine. So. He ran her blood work again call two days later and said he apologized I. Don't know who this guy is, but keep doing what you're doing and don't take these prescriptions. had better than fifty percent improvement in three months. How cool is that? Thanks for all you guys do. And you know the basics the. Of this I guess. The doctor actually wanted to know who Dr Lewis was so that was pretty cool. So Dr Lewis you want to tell us a little bit about What made you different? What made you do something different with her lab? Been What? Anybody, else would do I. Guess Well, because I'm a car proctor. I wouldn't prescribed drugs. Even if I could which I can't, but and I'm not against drugs, at all I love her medical profession, and but I've seen many many years ago where the medical doctors and osteopaths. they got were. They cannot really practice the the the and they have so called standard of care, which is not necessarily what's in the best interest of the patients, and they're frustrated, too. I've never seen an MD or do that wasn't just a wonderful person and had good intentions. But they're not trained that way. You know. I'm a contractor I. think everything's nerve supplier nutrition and he know sergeant everything's What can I do surgically to fix it, so we're all good people they're trying to help. Just you know one has opinion you like and so. Eric sent this email and he told me said. Don't let Janet Reba below the line. He had a little colorful remark about what he had to the doctor to see it at all. Eric, actually, she didn't until I pointed it out your Eric you're funny. I'm going to go down to port. Nitrous Texas wherever that is southeast. Texas Word Northeast Texas I'm. Go visit them sometimes. Some David I talked to Michelle. and. She's a sweetheart and she told me the story also and you know I'm not anti medical. They've saved my bacon more than once, but here's the problem. And unfortunately I'm pretty simple guy. Maybe unfortunately but. Since. When do we think that God is not involved in this process and why you know this thing, Oh, you just have expensive urine and I said on this one huge huge podcast I was a guest in. This guy has like quarter million listeners. Said something about expensive year and I said well. I just had a forty two dollar rib. I do. I have expensive excrement? You know it's foolish to think that your body doesn't take what it needs from that and use it for good. you have to take vitamins. You have to take good ones I've seen vitamins. Put out by famous doctors. You get famous by paying somebody ten or twenty grand route a book you know. Most of these books are not even written by the doctor. That's the only reason I could write a book. Have somebody do it better than me, but what happens is. Are The reason why you need vitamins and they have to be good ones. You know I've had a good wife and a bad one, so there's a difference in women. There's a difference in vitamins say. one of the things you have to realize that God's in control and he works in your body. Whatever you think God is, but North America is probably the most well fed, but undernourished people in history, the the souls been depleted of this nutritious at least for one hundred years. and now we're saturate and it with chemical fertilizers, pesticides, and it's Kinda. Killed The microorganisms that allow the nutrients to get up into. into the plant itself, and then we're feeding mannerly in inside and vitamin deficient. Food to our livestock, so they're not what they should be.

Dr Lewis Eric Janet Lewis Michelle North America Janet Reba Texas David Michelle.
Testing if an Approved Antiviral May Prevent COVID-19 Outbreaks

The Bio Report

03:57 min | 2 months ago

Testing if an Approved Antiviral May Prevent COVID-19 Outbreaks

"For pilly therapeutics to begin a face to study of an approved antiviral therapy as a potential preventative treatment against covid nineteen outbreaks, the study will enroll seven hundred sixty participants who are in long term care facilities in Ontario. The others are looking at the drug as a possible treatment for covid nineteen. This is the first study to consider its potential to prevent outbreaks. We spoke to Armand. Balboni see Ova pilly about the drug how it works and its potential to prevent outbreaks of covid nineteen in high risk populations. Armin thanks for joining us. Great to great lengths. We're going to talk about a guy. Its efforts to repurpose an approved antiviral as a prophylactic treatment against the covid nineteen virus in patients, long term care facilities in Canada for people, not familiar with the company. What does APU I do? Pillai Therapeutics was started. Twenty fifteen as an as a company in the anti infective space to address unmet needs. In. Fairly creative way we, we really are in global fighting instant action broadly, and what that means is, we are agnostic to a particular technology. We don't suffer from wasn't invented here, so we don't like it. We really look for the toughest problems in infectious disease, and then go and try and find solutions that could be an antibacterial, antiviral, anti, fungal, or accedes, which we actually have all of those so that that really is a little bit of different approach many. and. You're sponsoring the first clinical trial evaluating VIP Aveer for the prevention of covid nineteen. What is? there. So. The drug is a broad spectrum antiviral, and what that means is it has activity active against a wide range of viruses in this case there any viruses, so things like influenza. Ebola or I I had a chance to look at this in a couple of other agents. LHASA FEVER A Disease that endemic in. An Africa and of course songs cokie to. OR OF A. Ninety, and so it is a broad spectrum antiviral. Proof for influenza Japan and we noted that because of that activity. It is probably a great drug with a lot of safety data to to try against Cova Antena and that's binding. You actually had experience with the drug back when you were a staff officer at the US. Army Research Institute of Infectious Disease. What was your experience with the drug then? I was I. was at you Sam read actually. I was on I'm an officer been an officer? The US Army as both MD end of. Upper over seventeen years, and so what that means I've worked on a number of anti effective programs. The US. Department of Defense sent me to to the food and Drug Administration at two thousand fourteen for the outbreak, and it was during that whole. Albert but I had the opportunity to work as part of the review team reviewer in. In the FDA and looked at both from severe trump. It's now being used by Gilead and Santa Peer Review I'm so both drugs are broad spectrum. Antivirals and had had an opportunity to look at how they were against a some Arnie viruses legal.

Officer United States Army Research Institute Of Inf Us Army Pillai Therapeutics FDA Department Of Defense Cova Antena Armand Ontario SAM Lhasa Santa Peer Review Armin Vip Aveer Africa Japan Ebola Fever Albert
Participants in photo mocking the death of George Floyd may be Washington, DC U.Md. students

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

Participants in photo mocking the death of George Floyd may be Washington, DC U.Md. students

"The university of Maryland is investigating a social media post that shows two people mocking the death of George Floyd the photo showed one person pretending to kneel on the neck of of the the other other the the university's university's chief chief communications communications officer officer said said the the school school is is not not sure sure if if both both of of them them are are you you M. M. T. T. students students but but that that the the case case was was sent sent to to the the office office of student conduct in a statement the school condemned the images and stated that the error they were very outraged it was also possible that the images could be considered I hate bias

George Floyd Officer M. M. T. T. University Of Maryland
Paul Finebaum reacts to Michigan president's comments

The Paul Finebaum Show

06:55 min | 2 months ago

Paul Finebaum reacts to Michigan president's comments

"Was some very important news yesterday. Out of the University of Michigan where the President Dr Mark Schuessel? Who has an immunologist by training? Not The most common thing you see for a president a State University made a lot of news by tapping down some of the positivie about college football talking about how there would be no college football unless students were on campus. He referred to his training as a medical doctor. Phd In relation to doubting seriously that there could be college football fans in the stadiums and they also broke down the importance of college football but in the context of the University of Michigan overall. Dowse a little water on that as well saying that the university stand on its own. This comes in some contrast to what Jim told us last week on on get up when he said he would be okay with football. As long as he didn't he said he would. He would prefer fans but it would be okay without fans who better to talk to you than Giannis. Bacon was written callous books on the University of Michigan and certainly among the very leading experts in the world the on that subject John. Thank you Happy Memorial Day and first of all great to have you on with us and we hope you've been safe and well over these last couple of months Always a pleasure Paul and so far so good. The only we need is forty hours of daycare for weeks. My four and a half year old kid if you've got a babysitter send them up For All you've done for us I'll I'll give you some good recommendations Thank you. Let's talk about the this. I thought was a really fascinating comment first of all. Let's talk about President Schnitzel in terms of who is he what his credentials are then. They're incredible but have someone like that. Move into the presidency at school at the University of Michigan. Well his background is Brown University And California cal Berkeley so the pedigree and all that he's got a PhD in some former science probably immunology say as well as an MD. So you couldn't call them stupid He's probably also not the biggest football fan in the world. I think he probably loves the Brown model. Where you play. But it's not Nearly the importance as it is in the big ten or the SEC and so on But also knows where he is that Hundred Thousand People Disagree and they love it quite a bit so he is definitely on a high wire there But clearly his roles immunologist took over in his latest. Talk as you said if you days ago and I guess yesterday sorry And Yeah you say is very clear about this that if all the students aren't on campus. We're not going to have intercollegiate sports of any sort at least at Michigan which is not to say the big ten goes along with that or the rest of college athletics. But it's pretty hard back back down from that once you've said that and as you pointed out Paul that goes counter to what Jim Harbaugh said a few days earlier that he'll take football and almost any form Fans in the stands or not. Some graduated schedule some sort of Not Black or white but Modified approach would be fine with Jim. Which I'm sure is almost all major college football coach so I see a conflict there and I'm pretty sure I know who's going to win it. Yeah I mean there may be some school football coaches that have the clout to go head to head with the president. I doubt Jim Harbaugh wants to do that. Unless it's twenty minutes after beating. Ohio state I I I WANNA ask you. I WanNa ask you about about his comments about the budget. You know the school inside and now obviously I mean. I don't want to translate for him but he seemed to be saying that you know we we would this football but we're going on with or without it. Yeah and Miskin can right now Now the catch that is not all the big ten can goes out football Sunday. The MAC you can't. I mean look at Eastern Michigan Kent State places like that Miami of Ohio so the separation between haves and have-nots stronger not weaker. Now its biggest. Cost Ball is of course nationwide and gets all the attention at Michigan. The budget for the entire Athletic Department is around one hundred and eighty five million dollars which is almost doubled in ten years which says something right there and yet the budget for the whole university assist seven billion with a B. dollars so and half of that as a medical school on the health system so the football budget is big. It might beat us That's what they spend on rubber gloves at the hospital. So it's not that big a deal to the president. John you have a pretty good pulse on the The Michigan Fan base. I asked gently what has been the reaction about what the president said yesterday. Some folks feel yeah. Maybe there's mixed generous maybe it is It is going to be hard to argue though without students on campus having football. You're talking about exploiting the students who are in your student athletes who are not paid etc. I was become a hot button. Issue the last few years as it always should be I think That becomes greater when you're perhaps risking their health When you're not risking the other students health To play football. So that's one point of view. The flip side of course is that stadium is both the hold one hundred ten thousand people and if not for nothing of course so obviously people wanNA play football In any way she performed they possibly can Go Back Paul and nineteen eighteen when Michigan played the first game during the pandemic early October. And it flared up nationwide thereafter so they did not play again until November The team went five that your politics and on the big ten which counts as big ten champs and yes five Cowan as national champs. If only if only we're talking to John Bacon The New York Times bestselling author. He's written countless books on the University of Michigan. I WanNa take a break here because there are many issues beyond what the Michigan President feels. Although his comments probably going to be heard pretty loudly and other ivory towers around the country. I WanNa talk to John when we come back about what college football faces in trying to open up more comments from the esteemed author John U

Football University Of Michigan President Trump Michigan Jim Harbaugh Paul John Bacon Eastern Michigan Kent State Ohio Brown University John State University Dr Mark Schuessel Giannis SEC Cowan Miskin John U
Mail carriers injured in paintball attacks in Washington, D.C. and Md., postal service says

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

Mail carriers injured in paintball attacks in Washington, D.C. and Md., postal service says

"There's a fifty thousand dollar reward for help in figuring out who's responsible for a series of paintball attacks on mail carriers over the weekend it happened late Saturday afternoon five paintball attacks on mail carriers in southwest and southeast DC as well as Riverdale Maryland the carrier suffered minor injuries from the paintball pellets the US postal inspection service as in each case the two suspects drove a silver or gray four door sedan with temporary tags one suspects described as an African American man about five eleven slim with braids or dreadlocks and a white

Maryland DC United States
"md" Discussed on The WoMed

The WoMed

09:05 min | 2 months ago

"md" Discussed on The WoMed

"To I would say one. The one thing is the dispelling misconceptions like we talked about earlier on you know not all women enter various field of medicine Based on how they would be able to balance their lives but some do and Radiology can be a flexible career. Just like primary care You know where you you can find yourself in an outpatient practice if you'd like where you're part time or where you're you know No nights no weekends. Radiology does offer patient care. If you want it or none if you don't And you know so so I just think knowing the variety that's in radiology both in the subject matter but also the types of careers is important. you've got someone like Michelle? He has had on for Interventional Radiology. He's clearly living the full throttle or at least a course in training. She is that on a lifestyle and not something that she wants. But I know female interventional radiologists who did all that training and then went on to have a largely cosmetic practice they veins and talks Yeah and you know that would be the preferred lifestyle for me but just knowing. Those options are out there that that radiology does not mean sitting in a dark room. Reading justice raise it. It means. Yeah you know almost whatever you you want it to to a degree. That's so neat. You've I was. I was keeping on profile. Just learn more about you and you've just done such a I. I really enjoyed all of your posts. Your content is awesome. Your educational style on there is so relatable And I I'm just really glad that you are out there as a resource for more women in Radiology I think I think you are very valuable asset and that's coming from someone who's just a nurse in Nikki but I think oh no but you're those babies need to my. I mean I think that You know social media a lot of people look at it. As micro blogging and a lot of people use their their platforms in different ways And it is a great way. I think to be able to to spread messages. So Yeah No. I hope that I hope that my message is reaching one. Oh they definitely are. Hopefully they'll reach more after this podcast comes out so I like to segment out. Called everything is possible. And you're already doing so much but if you could like sky's the limit what would make you like a million times happier than you already are. What would you what more would you want? Or what more would you wish you could be doing? Yeah I mean I think impact is everything and I think that just being able to have an impact on me I am goal oriented up all right so right so you know I think How making that message into material outcome Where I'm actually seeing young women taking their health into their hands and he eh dentist buying their risk learning to reduce it and also another thing. That's really important to me that we haven't talked about because it's it's not my job and it's not medicine but I think plays a huge part in our health Certainly our own health and that of our planet is just being more environmentally conscious. Oh definitely So climate change has a huge impact on nearly everything and we don't realize the impact it has on on healthcare disparities and just our overall health in general. I mean your poor populations are subject to air pollution The chemicals that women are putting into their bodies that are affecting our reproductive hell are cancer risk and so I would love to have an impact in that arena and and this isn't for me or for my good it's just for the greater good in general. I wish You know would consider doing more. Things that are that are better for the environment. Whether that's being packaged. Free or composting or wasting less Because I think again I just I think the women's health and Being environmentally conscious go hand-in-hand one hundred percent. And I would love to have you back on to do another episode just on that. If you'd be interested absolutely I mean I can talk about Climate People. Get a little glassy eyed. When I start talking about all the things you know I personally but if you make them a lifestyle at they aren't they aren't burdens. No just a way of life that in there is A Test Earth study that I read This is years ago but some attested all of the different chemicals that were showing up in breast milk. Just from things that you addressed In the air and it was like gasoline. Reality that's you know transferring right to your baby. That is in no way. A breast milk is great. I love Brad smoke for. I'm just saying. We need to be more consciously aware of all of our surroundings than what we're ingesting where we're taking yourself so absolutely. We are at the end of our time. Dr mullet would you like to give any final last words for our listeners? Any other women in Radiology or radiology students. Yeah I mean you know I think just break down those barriers when it comes to thinking that radiologists are stuck in the dark on so to any woman who's interested in any field of medicine number one. You can find a way to be part of that field. You never have to compromise. Who ARE GONNA BE? You helped to shape it to your life and to what you want. So whether that's radiology whether that's medicine at all And and then just as always for all young women and men out there just just really be aware of your risks. Loan had a reduced had lived. You know a healthy lifestyle and to sixteen. I love that. I think that's a beautiful ending. Note thank you so much for having me on. Thank you for coming on A. Where can people find you so? I am on twitter and instagram. The handle is at Unbeliev Melik. Md So my first name last name MD On both and definitely instagram is where I am Vocal about women's health advocacy education and empowerment Twitter I use a little bit more for the radiology community. But certainly you can find Sometimes I'm bree tweeting or cheeky. Things Echo that awesome and a whoops the handle four bright pink at be bright. Pink is definitely the one for instagram. It might be the same for twitter verified but you can certainly look up right pink. They are very active on social media. Awesome will thank you so much Dr. Malek I'm really really appreciated. I've learned so much and it's been you can definitely hear how passionate you are when you speak about breast imaging in in Women In Radiology. It's it's been a joy talking to you today. Thank you so much major. Thank you to Dr. Malek for joining me today. To share her story she may not know it but hearing her speaking today about fear versus education and empowerment has really helped me. I have been trying to practice controlling the controllable during this time. And letting go breathing do that which I honestly can't please GO CHECK OUT DR. Malek on Instagram and twitter at unruly Melik. Md and her website unruly Malek MD DOT COM. Don't forget to send me your nursery energy moments to ask the Loma on instagram. I love reading them and I love sharing them with Roma community until next week woman..

Twitter instagram Interventional Radiology Women In Radiology Dr. Malek Michelle Malek MD Md Dr mullet Unbeliev Melik Nikki Melik Brad
Empowering Women Everywhere with Dr. Anjali Malik, MD

The WoMed

04:01 min | 2 months ago

Empowering Women Everywhere with Dr. Anjali Malik, MD

"Did you get started in medicine so my parents are both physicians? Which is also why. We ended up in our small town in Tennessee because foreign medical graduates were binding positions in the small rural areas. Being heavily recruited yes. My mom is family practice. She was your. I mean she was your old school physician who is essentially. You're twenty four seven Life to death physician I was cool. Yeah so when I was little she actually did obstetrics as well so she did. Deliveries as part of her family practice And then also of course did pediatrics Adolescent Medicine Adult medicine internal medicine and geriatrics. And I say that via the scope of general family practice is she was not sub specialized in in the and then thankfully at some point. She gave the the deliveries but through her. I mean I saw her. In outpatient care inpatient care nursing homes so she was really a huge exposure to medicine. And then my dad was sort of the exact opposite of that but kind of because he was. Okay yes yes of course Totally different patient interaction still doing a lot and easing to hear him when he did eventually help with chemistry and physics and not hear him talking about those kinds of things and NC him in action but But yeah so I had to spectrums of medicine growing and so there was always that sort of You know the the seed planted that I would wanna be a doctor and that were even expectation. Vam IN SOUTH ASIAN SOUTH ASIAN. And then the funny thing is. I went through that rebellious days where I was like. Oh I don't WanNa be a doctor. I'm not going to be a doctor. I'm GONNA at this that or the other public. Health was sensing that I was always interested in Outbreak was actually one of my favorite movies growing up where that was fantastic. Yeah my husband. I actually just re watched it recently of with all this going on. Kinda hits a little differently. If you're like wow look at their fully suited has met suits in kind of jealous of that but But Yeah so. I always have this idea that. Save the world public home person and so I was lucky that I went to Johns Hopkins. Which at the time was one of the only undergrad institutions that had public health as a major early. Yeah so I was able to do Public Health Bachelors And really get huge exposure there. I worked in health policy. I took variety classes. I really did the the full spectrum on. That's an interestingly through that I kind of came back to medicine because I realized that I was not A researcher or like a the kind of person who could work at something every day and not see the results. We need those people modestly. They are really the ones that move society forward. 'cause they're they're willing to put in work along call but turns out? Eichel oriented and I need to see that end result every day. And that's finally to yes. We need all types of people exactly that sort of pushed me back towards medicine and You Know Med is hard it it's certainly demoralizing at times But the thing was able to survive and made IT TO MED. School went to. Tulane where I actually almost considered an MD p. h. because they have an amazing school of public health and they're really well known for their tropical medicine and then Hurricane Katrina decided otherwise for me. I decided that I had had enough extra stuff piled onto my

Johns Hopkins Tennessee Tulane Outbreak Hurricane Katrina NC Researcher
Washington, DC - Md. COVID-19 hospitalizations at 3-week low as state begins emerging from lockdown

Rush Limbaugh

00:28 sec | 3 months ago

Washington, DC - Md. COVID-19 hospitalizations at 3-week low as state begins emerging from lockdown

"Covert nineteen hospitalizations of fallen to their lowest level in three weeks of the state of Maryland hospitalizations are at their lowest number since April twenty fifth Maryland governor Larry Hogan has always said that hospitalizations are key metric and looking at whether or not it's safe to reopen the state several parts of Maryland what into phase one of his reopening planned on Friday stay at home orders remain in place in counties closest to DC and Baltimore

Larry Hogan Maryland Baltimore
MD Gov. Hogan praises Farmers to Families Food Box program

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 3 months ago

MD Gov. Hogan praises Farmers to Families Food Box program

"Governor Hogan thank the trump administration for a new program that gets fresh produce to food banks it's called farmers to family food boxes helping our our farmers and our growers and our suppliers and it's helping put people to work right here and bring them back it's helping our food banks in our community organizations Hogan spoke at coastal Sunbelt produce in laurel which the government is using right now to help deliver up to three billion dollars worth of

Governor Hogan Sunbelt
"md" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

The Tony Kornheiser Show

11:55 min | 11 months ago

"md" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

"An archived episodes at the Tony Kornheiser show wherever you listen to podcasts including apple podcast spotify Google play and radio DOT COM if you show through I tunes. Please leave us a review. Let's get to the email shared from DC. It's a Haiku for for today Friday. The thirteenth a full moon. Don't be afraid be very afraid. You couldn't even see the moon today this morning because of the clouds in Washington. DC rain. It's thirteenth eighteenth is good as far as I'm concerned. This is the two month birthday of the hammered. Oh hammers two months old today so we're very happy about that from Michael Deamer I'm and local so I was hoping it'd be possible to drive by the Little House beeped twice in Carrollton. You chessy can run out my shirt. I'll have my twelve dollars folded neatly in an envelope eloped contact the exchange large. Please we I think this weekend maybe I'll do that. I'll go through some of the shirts and see if I can get a count on how many we have. We'll we'll take care of it. I shouldn't do it deep sleep. Leave him alone. I have a I have a phone. Call with rob coping. We'll handle little house. I I don't even think I need a key. Agnes kick in the door. Just ask the flying squirrels hundred turnout flying. Squirrel beefy is fist sized flat tale sounds like the flying squirrel to me. It wasn't flying Squirrel from Josh Cromwell in Moselle Mississippi as it turns out Nigel's fugitive monologue on Thursday was spot on just like Dr Richard Kimble Jimmy the Vol- who was falsely accused. I can only assume the flying squirrel was one on from Carl Florida. I don't care always suspected it but the volt false story confirmed that the woman Tony is related to by marriage is simply a saint wishing grandpa lots of locks from Joe root in Ellicott City Maryland after catching up in the conversation tation about scooters. I felt compelled to weigh in. It's very simple. They have to die all of them. They have no concern for people around them. On or off. The street says sometimes when they go by fantasize about throwing stick. Their wheels flipped over the bars directly into the path of an oncoming bus. I want them dead on their families said I want. Their houses burned to the ground. That's not wrong. Long is it. I didn't think so yes actually from Sean Roseanne's in Salinas California. Forget the vote or whatever vol- critter it is. What was the other thing Antonis bedroom last night in this year. I had to pause the podcast and go to my google machine to find out exactly what that looks like turns out. It's just a fancy one percent of word for book case her shelf off does not bode for Stephen Smith afternoon show on. WMA L. is leading is the Victorian home decor our with GRANDPA. I'm John Franson Takoma Park Maryland. Mr Tony raised the question of whether it was okay to drop bad dog poop into a neighbor's garbage can on the street. Here's a common sense poop etiquette guide if the trash has not been picked up. It's perfectly perfectly fine to drop in the POOP. Not No it isn't. It's not fine at the trash has been picked up who needs that hanging around for a week however if no one leaves their garbage van on on the street for a couple of days and days are long do what you want they deserve the back of there's a time honored exception to all of these rules is the designated cranky old guy in the neighborhood door. Gunners required to dog poop in paper bag set it on the porch of this house set it on fire ring the doorbell and run like hell from Atlanta and put it out to your boot last night. I was watching the show with the WOM- related to by marriage common commented on every new saying everyone knew college dorm had mono said. Oh boy you went went to college one hundred years ago. She's from Peru and she said Oh Bo Bo Hito. You went to college one hundred years ago. She's from Peru and he told means old man one hundred hundred please. He's only like fifty I went to college about fifty years ago and everyone had mono and that's just the way it worked which we call the kissing disease at that point from Champ Cox forty-six six in Kelly says dear aging Radio Celebrity Dallas to Houston to under thirty nine miles recently. My eleven year old son came home from school in announced data of a joke to tell you Houston we have a problem. I'm standing on Uranus. He then attempted to explain to me why the joke was funny but between fits of laughter I told him no explanation was necessary because he had just ordered the sacred code which initiated him into the Brotherhood jovial misfits and degenerates. It was true right of passage. I knew this was a watershed moment in his life and being with pride of an accomplished father knowing that my son's manhood is now upon him his mother was not impressed from Robert Keyhole dear Mr Tony. Could you let us know when you're opening the phone lines for questions blocks. There's no questions from dusty in Savannah Vanna Georgia. I would like to announce the birth of our second child. I mask and Child Cooper coming in ten pounds three ounces in one big. Should I go with the obvious nickname of coup or is there something something else you guys would recommend. Here's helping his first words are eat. It's Eliza Coupe is fine. Yeah Coop is is there's nothing wrong. Mike Giardi hi. My name is Mike. I'm a representative roaming roaming roosters in passing conversation. It has come to my attention that you would like to try one of our sandwiches. We would love to get in touch with you and bring you a sandwich place of work. Please do not hesitate to contact attacked me and he gave me his well. Let's do that. They're supposed to be funny. Sandwiches wonderful if only by everyone is always do where why this book is devastating the town yeah they cheeseburgers a little tiny still the news attorney attorney. Terry mm-hmm the the ladies girls while he's he's pay. Don't you yeah yeah aw way to spend your. I agree they they added on huge. Eh you began again. Uh Way Away Eh aw wait wait. Eh uh-huh..

Mr Tony Little House Peru Tony Kornheiser Mike Giardi Washington apple John Franson Takoma Park Maryl google attorney Bo Bo Hito Houston Carrollton Eliza Coupe Joe root Michael Deamer Agnes rob Sean Roseanne Carl Florida
"md" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

The Tony Kornheiser Show

14:15 min | 11 months ago

"md" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

"That's not news a woman at the front. Thank God everybody was quite remarkable. The guy that was like I mean we had a split second. It was like there was nothing and then there was a plane in front of us and these planes but it's big enough. You know that you don't want to run into it was first being reported which was late morning yesterday that a plane had landed on route fifty. I thought I just immediately went to someone was having having mechanical trouble or ran out of gas and they see a freeway which is what they're taught to do. It's like a runway and cars will get out of the way then you hear it took it crashed essentially right after takeoff golf from that airport and I thought ooh that's exactly I mean anyone has gone to the beach. That way sees that place. It's literally three hundred feet from the highway and I think I think it's not uncommon for this to happen. I think they've been other incidents before I mean it's time to move that runway. A little bit Kathryn Harvey Channeling Channeling Wilpon said she was not surprised at all. The trash crashed into the woods along the highway that three years ago. Maybe it's time for some landscaping or just closed close the highway anytime someone wants to take off or land. That's not prompt best. No No. We've got something very big. We need to talk about Mr Tony. The two thousand nineteen finalists for the Toil Toy Hall of I've been released now just to remind you the inductees for two thousand eighteen magic eight bowl pinball in so ohno is is a game card game. There was a pizzeria uno but that's not in the not toy. I guess we've had this discussion last sure but anyway well here on the finalists for two thousand nineteen up. I Care Bears K coloring book. That's it's not in the same. All these years book is not in Fisher price corn popper. This thing that's looks like Walker has are you coming. Book is more of an activity like a craft. Toy Jingle Jingle is that how are you wouldn't tower mystic block and try to the tower crane alliances trying to get my magic the gathering. I know you love this ages me. Hey Nah I used to try and get into magic by the starter pack then you had. No one knew what the rules were. Just throw down cards. There's like pogs. That was that's to me not a hall of fame. That's that's like a short of really good short really good career cut short like a daily enough right yeah not not really a whole maybe CBS and masters of the universe toys so like you know man and matchbox 'cause also. I'm surprised to be be my little pony. Sympathy votes from you. Guys know I don't care about my little poem Nerve Nerve Plaza which was the it was like the the NERF gun in gone that would shoot like dots in little balls. I'm making one a long shot. I think current political climate putting a gun toy. There's GonNa be a tough sell. I think that's age bias you have my generation grew up with those now. The problem is there is nothing like the anticipation for a NERF gun war. You'd queue up. You'd load up the entire chamber then five seconds. It's four little POPs it always landed ended shorter your friends and now you're getting yourself because the because Buzi and the hammer the NERF guns at GRANDPA's GonNa buy for them are like automatic weapons. I mean my kids had ones rapid fire oop. I mean they're little NERF darts. They couldn't flying squirrel troubles me about all of these his alleged toys. They're not generic anymore. They're all breaking masters of the universe. Is You know why can't it just be a stick or a ball or a and I got the game risk which feels like it should be an should be in there. That's an epic classics. You know just a spinning top. It might have been in there a long time. What is it and this one which leads me my head scratching the smartphone phone. That's not a toy platform for millions of games that people play on the phone so the smartphones first of all smartphone is just like how will the smartphone twelve years old like two thousand ten Don Yeah. Maybe the maybe they're trying to cozy up to apple to get funding for the museum who knows this interesting class but that's not but they have an announce the finalist. We'll get the final class in and if we ever do this show again. We'll get OUTTA here. We'll have old guy when when we return I'm Tony Kornheiser. You're listening to the Tony Kornheiser. Show Guy Radio for the day the next voice you hear will be to Elton John's. This is tiny dancer and the reason we are playing this is because the wonderful rock and roll movie almost famous where this is feature was released east on this date how many years ago nineteen in two thousand so really good movie. It's Cameron Crowe routed pretty much about himself. I think and I I would recommend that movie is the greatest rock and roll movie. I've seen is that thing you do but almost famous is great really is absolutely great. It's you know and this song is in it. I guess they're in the bus at this. They've had they've had a quarrel. Yeah guitarist character you know his fault with everybody and then when they get on it everybody's mad. The song comes on every plate starts singing. It and everyone feels good again. It's a really good Song Elton. John is really good with a variety of lyricist not just Bernie Taupin and and he's really good and he's he's stood tall over fifty standing yeah. He doesn't doesn't think he has I think he's done This was cindy. He's seventy one. This wasn't goading top song written young for his wife and I I'm GonNa mispronounced last name maxine fisherman. I don't know she was actually the same. Yes yes see was the seamstress for the band. Have you seen rocket man. I have not okay have you. I have good yeah I'm predisposed to like and I'm a huge Elton John and fan and also a big Taryn Edgerton fan so yeah it was good not great but good but tremendous Kim Jong UN negative little racket racket man. Let's talk about the democratic debate last night to some degree. I will just give a couple of comments. I cannot watch Bernie Sanders without thinking of Larry Bernie Sanders Bloom. He flaps his arms that he anger pointing. He's a relation at yeah. It's just it's I just start laughing after back soon enough so I don't know that that can be a good sign for someone trying to become the president I asto. He's a loon game show host this guy into Yang. He he gets up the air and he says for five lucky families. I want to give a thousand dollars a month for a whole year. Just go to my wet. What are you talking about `bout. He's like Chuck woolery not a serious candidate for president or your president. The president is a game show host okay but I mean. I don't know that you want another one. I think it seems to me that Kamla Mola Harris is running for vice. President and Elizabeth Warren is running for president. I'm that's my take away from them. Elizabeth Warren to me and I've said this before and she's really league good. She's really poised she really. I don't know that she's necessarily toned. Look you just can't tax rich people and pay for everything there aren't that many rich people and you can't take all even if you took all their money. It wouldn't pay for these things that she says. It's going to pay for for me. This is just for me. She's totally disqualified for what she did by by writing to try to improve her lot in life by saying she was an American Indian and that's that is for me disqualify right now you could say well look at the guy in sixteen hundred yeah yeah. I get it but for me. That's disqualifying but she's impressive. Joe Biden is is Joe. Biden is basically trying trying to stay on the road. That's all he's trying to do. Stay on the road to most of these people get off the road and then if I get if it's me in a couple of others that may be I've got a shot Julian Castro as we said earlier when after Biden's age I don't know that the obvious villains the obvious various villains in America right now or anyone who works for health insurance company I mean everybody is unloading on them. Everybody those who just Ma and I stopped after awhile and went back to sports 'cause I I don't I honestly I gotTa tell you I don't. There's about six or seven of them. I don't really care about him. I mean I. I don't think they can win if if they can win great they don't care about them down the road. Did you watch yeah. I I say anything wrong just now do you think amy clash ours running for vice president and because because of Joe Biden gets this nomination. It is a stone cold lock that he will pick a runway. Yes stone cold lock woman well. Sh- she's very she's very much in the same on the same road as Biden which might not work with Baden. He might want to get somebody pretty pretty. Solid blue state worn is something you need. I think you know for me both Br Bernie Sanders and Campbell Harris. There's just a little too too much guests during with the finger pointing. It's just a little too toxic from your own meal. Account Camera Harris is there to to personally look like someone that you would notice and you might like but she's not running for president. It doesn't appear. He actually remind you about trump. You know the wizard of Oz line a little too many packaged lines also she's more rehearsed I than some of the other. She reminds me a little when you're talking about running for VP 'cause I was thinking last night. She reminds me a little bit of of two thousand eight Joe Biden Leiden who was cast as sort of the bulldog was going to attack yeah the candidate on the other side so that Barack Obama didn't have to direct what what you want in the vice president right for that. That's a thought and I think I mean. She could take trump on. Mr Prosecutor ten is too many. Can we agree that too. Many was was this the one was Ricky Henderson and it wasn't in this one now ricky's in the next one of these people who had to qualify by having a certain amount of the following two percent or something. I like that nice to see the front runners on the state's together you come back you come back to the canned lines and even though we made a big point of this being a three hour debate it really is just to exist in perpetuity for their campaigns to put up on slogans for soundbites and it just feels disingenuous because it's not about the moment it's not reacting reacting to. WHO's to your left to your right and then with the actual say the way they shot it. I wanted to see more reactions because that's where you might the genuine response rather than the can line and it's so programmed as to Gary looks uncomfortable. I'm GONNA pull the camera off him and go just to the left. It's actually important. That's why you need to see the numbers going down. It's yeah it's at least they stop demonizing. Barack Obama. Last night was more complimentary him that previously I says the smart he sees there's no way he just he doesn't have the look right. Don't you need. There's a look doc recognizes that particular look. It's a look I know how this works from personal experience and Gino's this too when Ben Bradlee Rodley walked into a room you just wow you know yeah but doc just the current resident of the White House but previous resident not all also have had incredible charisma. I mean Reagan certainly had a I think Obama. Did you know I think George W Bush and his way did I I do but I you know we're. We've got a long way to go in this waiting a long way to go but the notion that everybody's going to get everything for free three and the people are going to pay for me. I don't have enough. I really don't have that I can't I can't I can't feed everybody. How's everybody in sending all the college. I don't have enough some corporation sitting on some money that can help but we are a demon sachs has a little bit more than their share and you know at some point and this is what I've always found interesting when when people when people hit organizations gins with sledgehammers when you go after the NCAA. That's so easy to go after a faceless organization these we are you going to go after the people the middle class people people who work for these companies these insurance companies. I mean you've got to close down could have put them on the street. What are you going to do. I would like somebody to stand end up in basically say you know what this is a hard one. This is tough because you got this and he says that anyone could have thought I'm not really.

president Joe Biden Elton John Barack Obama Bernie Sanders Don Yeah Kamla Mola Harris vice president Tony Kornheiser Kathryn Harvey Elizabeth Warren Toil Toy Hall Buzi CBS Bernie Taupin Nerve Nerve Plaza Cameron Crowe Mr Tony apple Joe Biden Leiden
"md" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

The Tony Kornheiser Show

02:57 min | 11 months ago

"md" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

"He's throwing a ball all over the place because he's been hit his whole career. He's just starting to see what happens when you don't protect your quarterback all the time. This is the end of it. This is the other end of that. His arm looked weak. I mean like that like you've never seen that from. Cam Newton like it just didn't appear. He could get the ball there. I mean part of it was footwork but I was wondering if part of it isn't just lingering effects from shoulder problems offseason surgery and they insist is not that I mean but it's hard to watch what you saw and not think that I think also though a big part of it is is if you when you watch him in the pocket like quarterbacks they stepped forward. They put their whole body into the throw they step into their front leg he can't. He wasn't doing that because I think he's Afraid GonNa get hit so he's he's gun shy and honestly I don't blame him. He's been really really hit a lot throughout his career and you're starting to see what happens when I when that when it goes down so would that explain how you make that call and you put Christian McCaffrey and a shotgun situation in your last chance to score and win the game and you don't have Newton handling the ball. That's a crazy call and why is Christian McCaffrey one of the best running vessel Assaliya spending so much time blocking and at the end and I think what happened is they they sort of lost faith in the offensive line that last play was indicative of that because it was like some weird trick play yeah and it's so close to the goal line and normally about yeah no only cam which is dropped back or jump over it so in or they ended the McCaffrey he just goes right up the middle but they have no faith in that line so they have to do all that crazy stuff and it didn't work and I'll give look I'll give James Winston some no credit to. I didn't think he will come out play well. He did that I think that saved their season and I don't think it's over stating that. It may have saved. They've his career. I mean at least temporarily because he was just he looked awful last week and looks like he was just going to go off the rails completely and he he came back and and he did well so you've got to give them credit but I'm worried about him so his future his immediate future. He just doesn't look like He. He doesn't look like the same guy by a long shot. Thank you Mike Talk to you soon. Thank you guys Mike Freeman boys and girls we will take a break. We will have news when we return. Perhaps James Car will join us. It's it's always sort of iffy but he was to an old last week. He had the army game like which I thought was nuts and he won that easily. I'm Tony Kornheiser. You're listening to the Tony Kornheiser show. This is the simply safe add on average. A burglary happens once every twenty three seconds in the United States approximately oximately two million Berkeley's or reported year in the United States census eighty. Three percent of burglars admitted that they specifically look to see if there's an alarm and twenty out of every thousand thousand households were burglarized in twenty seventeen and what's crazy is that only one in five.

James Winston Cam Newton Christian McCaffrey Tony Kornheiser James Car shoulder problems Mike Freeman United States Mike Talk burglary Berkeley twenty three seconds Three percent
"md" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"md" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"How do you set priorities? That really is a good question. And we are constantly evaluating and we all making sure that we are not putting ourselves too thin. And as you say this is a goody positive sum game for bitch. Have one on was after one at this point, and that's twenty fantastic to see, for example, we have really excellent relationships with the weapons MD people at Google who are for the most part focusing on different use cases from us end where we constantly can can take inspiration from each other, but also can move the consistent over all. All forward quicker by focusing on different use cases than we could if we were focusing on fiercely competing on exactly the same things and Jeb right? We, we do need to focus on specific use cases. And I think we have a fairly nice focused by now at Mazzola in the same way that, as far as I understand the folks at Google half a good focus that is somewhat different. And one thing that is just entirely clear in this is all of this, too big to go it alone. So we need good relationships. We need good partnerships with a lot of different players around all of these different concepts. And on these different pieces that need to be moved into place. How will web assembly change cloud providers significantly. So I'm deeply deeply quest by what fast doing who have bought weapons seventy.

Google Mazzola Jeb MD
"md" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"md" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"So I request code over the internet all the time. I am just browsing on the internet. And I clicked to a new page there's going to be code that loads onto my browser. If we compare the request path that code is usually taking in my browser today from coming over the network to running on my operating system. How does that compare to what we will have with a, a mature web, assembly world? I'm not sure if there is a single simple answer to this, because weapons MD will be used in a lot of different places, oftentimes, it'll not actually one on your machine, but it might one on your behalf on other machines. Could run on an edge server like it does in the fast Li CDN who recently started supporting winning weapons heavily on, on their servers, where it allows developers of internet services to provide which experiences for you by making these edge requests, more dynamic, or it might run in IOT device where it might also provide which are into actions with the device and a but it might also run on your machine. And be example a command line interface tool, or eventually full desktop application and all of these different paths and quite a few more that will eventually emerge already have different answers to your question. I think for the commandment interface, it's perhaps easier to, to immediately answer that. So we believe that one thing is important that we keep the security guarantees that weapons MD has alive wild winging it outside the browser. And that involves not giving these applications running in weapons MD just full access to your operating system. I'm sure you've heard about these issues with, for example, modules on N P M Notre s at the MJ dot com summary being modified in. Militias ways, end stealing people's bitcoin wanted, and these kinds of things are very hard to secure against if we advocation by falls Justice access to all of your files. So the as interface is.

MD
"md" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"md" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

"Relearn seldom used words and facts, but it appears to be a central for language comprehension and creativity as always don't forget, you can find complete show nuts, and episode transcripts at brain science, podcasts dot com. While you're there, you can sign up for our free newsletter so that you can get these show notes every month automatically, you can send me feedback at brain son as podcast at gmaiLcom Lee voice feedback at speak pipe dot com forward slash. Doc, Artem ass-. And you can also post your ideas and feedback on our Facebook fan page, finally, don't forget, send me screen shot of your items review so that I can send you an Amazon gift certificate next month. I hope to interview philosopher, Patricia church Lynn about her new book, conscience. But in the meantime, I hope you'll check out my other podcasts books on DEA and grain rainbows. Thanks again for listening. Brain science is copyright two thousand nineteen to for junior Campbell MD, you can copy this episode to share it with others, but for any other uses or derivatives. Please contact me at brain science podcast at g mail dot com. The new theme music for the brain sons podcast is mind, fire by Tony Cottrell Chea. You can find his work at syncopation now dot com..

Campbell MD Tony Cottrell Chea Artem ass Patricia church Lynn Facebook Lee DEA Amazon
"md" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"md" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Our M D R MD, according to the IRS stands for required minimum distribution. Now. According to me, it stands for reckless miserable and devastating. And why is that? Well, I'll tell you. I've been at this now for a little bit more than thirty years. I have many many clients that are in their mid seventies early eighties mid eighties. And every every year, they say the same thing, they say, oh for crying out loud. My taxes went up again because I have to take out my. Required. Distributions you know, for many of my clients that are in their late seventies or eighties. A Roth was never an option for them. Now, a Roth you don't have required distributions because the money comes out tax free. So really what I'm saying? Here is you need to develop a tax reduction strategy prior to getting into retirement now on the show today. We're talking about financial moves for every decade. We talked about the fifties. What you should do when you're in your fifties or sixties now we're talking about your seventies. And by chance if you just joined us, we're talking about required minimum distribution, and I refer to it as reckless miserable and devastating because systematically, your taxes will go up year after year after year after year, and unless you do something about it now unless you put together a tax reduction strategy, if you're the type of investor who never really understood the difference. Between a stock or a bond, or if you're the type of investor who just checks their investment statement. So maybe once or twice a month. Or maybe you're the exact other type, you know, you're hardcore you're a true investor. You check your investment portfolio every single morning with that first Cup of coffee. I'll tell you it to us. It doesn't matter. What type you are? I truly believe.

M D R MD IRS thirty years
"md" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"md" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

"Really you can help out by telling other people about the show subscribing and leaving a review in your favourite. Podcasting place apple podcast, Google podcasts, Stitcher Spotify wherever you happen to listen. Now, I'm going to take just a moment to tell you about my other podcast. I for years, I've had a show called books and ideas, but admittedly, it has not had any episodes in two thousand eighteen to fix that. I will be posting an episode next month with Dr Pamela, gay from astronomy cast, Pamela was recently inducted into the academy of podcasters hall of fame. And it's been about ten years since she was on the show. So I'm looking forward to talking with her again, my goal is to begin to post books and ideas on a regular basis again in two thousand nineteen traditionally books, and ideas has been the place. I put stuff that doesn't fit on this show. Oh, the big news that I wanna share with you today is that I am starting to brand new podcast. In fact, I have started a brand new podcast by the time. You hear this episode? They'll be at least two episodes of the new show out that new show is called grain rainbows coming out LGBT later in life. So he can find that despite searching for grain rainbows. I hope that you will share that show with anyone you think might be interested in it. We also have a Facebook page, and that's a weekly show that comes out on Mondays grain rainbows coming out LGBT plus later in life. Brain science with Dr ginger Campbell is copyright two thousand eighteen to for Jinya Campbell MD you can copy this show to share it with others, but for any other uses or derivatives, please contact me at brain science podcast at g mail dot com.

Dr Pamela Dr ginger Campbell Jinya Campbell MD Facebook apple Spotify Google ten years
"md" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"md" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"MD. It's Red Eye Radio. I'm Gary McNamara along with Eric Harley, I'm leaving little early today because need to catch a flight walks. Yeah. Need to catch a flight? Did I know about this issue? Did you know about it? Yeah. You got some you've got you got some special stuff coming up. I do we're gonna have a conversation with a friend of mine from wreaths across America. What a great organization. This is the tremendous effort by well grassroots effort by a couple of folks who started this years ago at family that started it we knew the story behind it. What it's all about. For those who served it's going to be very special December fifteenth as it always is. And we'll talk with the folks from wreaths across America after the top of the hour. Just want to say thank you to all of our great listeners because. All the great success. We have is a result of our loyal listenership, and so just want to thank you. And we just hope that by hope that everybody has just a great great thanksgiving. Hope you can spend it with family and friends. Enjoy a good time. You know, forget about everything that, you know, forget about everything we talked about today. Well, you should never bring the the troubles of the world that all this stuff can be worked out. It's it's not that. It's not important. But on that day. What's important? What's always more important is your family, right? Those people that you're with and or thinking about on that day except for many turkeys this year. They're doomed.

America Gary McNamara Eric Harley MD.
"md" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"md" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"MD has an incredible offer for radio listeners only. Stay tuned for our exclusive offer that includes a free charcoal pore, cleansing brush and free shipping. Proactive MD with prescriptions. Drink the dappling can heal and prevent future breakouts today for just nineteen ninety-five offering listeners the three piece proactive MD system with free shipping class a free gift new charcoal pore cleansing brush, this exclusive offer by calling now. One eight hundred five eight. Three eighty six sixty two or go to proactive dot com and enter promo code radio proactive MD, plus free shipping and a free gift. The new charcoal pore cleansing brush, you get all this for just nineteen ninety-five and their sixty day money back guarantee. You're guaranteed to get clear and stay clear or you get your money back. Call now, one eight hundred three eighty six sixty two that's one eight hundred five eight three eighty six sixty two proactive dot com and enter promo code radio again, proactive dot com and enter promo code radio. Individuals and businesses with tax problems, listen carefully. Do you feel like you're losing control over your finances? If you owe over ten thousand dollars in back taxes or have unfiled tax returns, we can help you take back control, the IRS is the largest and most aggressive collection agency in the world, and they can seize your Bank account, garnish your paycheck, close your business and file criminal charges. Take control of your tax problems now by calling the experts at tax mediation services and take advantage of the. Fresh start program and new laws that may allow us to negotiate a settlement for the lowest amount possible. Our team of tax attorneys and enrolled agents can stop collections and get you protected so you can take control of your financial future. Tax mediation services is accredited by the Better Business Bureau. Call now for a free case review and a price protection guaranteed quote. Call tax mediation services now at eight hundred three one eight one two five one that's eight hundred three one eight one two five one eight hundred three one eight one two five one. Get the news you need first. America's First News with Matt right? Tuesday Morning, America's First news. Thirteen th day of November. We are broadcasting live remote location this morning due to.

MD America Better Business Bureau IRS Matt ten thousand dollars sixty day
"md" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"md" Discussed on WJR 760

"To using renewable resources but having a full on sustainable perspective to our energy uses as well as you know all of our users i think is really important you said something in early on an early segment about different generations and i'm drawn to it because over the last week i've spoke if spoken to sustainable entrepreneurship group at msu and i'm speaking to another sustainable business student group tonight i think it's great the interest that we're seeing from the generations that are coming up to push back to james's point about we're doing this for future generations but you know those groups are interested in okay how are we how are we thinking about all of this so for example one of the questions i got last week was all right let's talk about rare earth minerals that we're using for batteries how are we thinking about secondary uses for batteries how are we thinking about recycling how are we making sure that it is a closed loop discussion in a cradle cradletograve discussion so but i think the water implications from an original perspective i think that that metric works out really well for for clean energy resources speaking of water and contamination and what have you we get into that a bit as well but there's a new initiative in michigan the pf as or i'm gonna try this perfluorooctane sulfonate acid right something so i might have holly floro alcohol this contaminant in all sorts of different products and a new governor snyder's md initiative on that a lot of people aren't aware these things right there you know they just issued a maximum contaminant level standard for that at seventy parts per trillion there are no other standards i mean there no clean water standards or anything like that existing now but they're working on that the governor has a task group or to research all this sort of star in it is used everywhere in and you find a lot of this contamination on if you scoured scotchgard wolverine writing out there also you see it a lot of air force bases us code i think is got a big problem related to that and that's in the fire retardant foams that they used and stuff like that so this is this is a this is a very interesting issue i think they're really focusing on this after what happened in.

msu james snyder michigan md
"md" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"md" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Pay those back or they become a early distribution again subject to that ten percent penalty so let's try to avoid early retirement plan withdrawal penalty going along with that and i would say the other end of the spectrum is the md penalty now what is the rnd it's a fancy way of saying required minimum distribution penalty and what this means is that when you turn seventy and a half and more specifically your first are md must be taken by april first of the year following the calendar year in which you turn seventy and a half so this is an example it means if you turn seventy in may of this year you'll need to take your first ram by april of next year and then all subsequent armed these are then do by the last day of the calendar year now what's the big deal here well the big deal is if you don't take your money out at seventy and a half and your broker or whoever is doing this investing for you will give you a chart of what the required minimum distributions are the penalty is fifty percent of whatever you neglected to remove so let's use that same ten thousand dollars example if you're our md is equal to ten thousand dollars and you fail to make that are md distribution you're gonna pay fifty percent penalty or five thousand dollars so it's very important if you've got any type of ira as or any type of investments that you make sure you're talking with your broker or the investment people and make sure you've got those are md setup because this is a huge cut you know big tax that you're gonna pay if you don't make those are md's and a lotta times i see this if people have multiple investment accounts you know you have to take them from each and every one of those accounts so it's something you want definitely talk to your broker or your bank.

md ten thousand dollars fifty percent five thousand dollars ten percent
"md" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"md" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

"Charity of listeners the beauty of podcasting is that you can listen whenever works best for you even if that means binge listening once every six months the reason i've decided to try facebook live is somewhat matter of timing have been struggling to find a way to create more premium content without depriving listeners with limited resources with facebook live you will be able to access the live event for free the recordings are intended to show my appreciation for those of you who support my work be a premium subscriptions or patriotic to learn more about these options just go to brain science podcasts dot com slash donations naturally it's my hope that this extra content will motivate more of you to support the show as always i appreciate your listening and hope you will share brain science with your friends i look forward to our first facebook law live session on april fifth two thousand eighteen at eight pm central time and the next full podcast of brain science will be released on the fourth friday in april thanks again for listening look forward to talking with you real soon brain science with dr ginger campbell is copyright two thousand eighteen to for jimmy campbell md you can copy this show to share it with others but for any other uses or derivatives please contact me at brain science podcast at g mail dot com.

facebook dr ginger campbell jimmy campbell six months
"md" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"md" Discussed on WDRC

"As md and and then and then these sampha two w two wins dan the genes miriam barnes hanson not what's the catch then there live there on the god has and the the again dan these.

md miriam barnes hanson two w
"md" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"md" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

"I highly recommend language at the speed of sight how we read why so many can and what can be done about it by mark seidenberg especially if you're interested in the science of reading or you're interested in how reading is taught i'm going to include additional references in the episode shonno's which you can find at brain science podcast dot com and as i mentioned earlier episode twenty four and twenty nine are also about the reading brain if you happen to use the free brain science mobile app you will find episode 24 included in the bonus content for this month's episode and of course you get both episodes twenty four and twenty nine and their transcripts if you were premium subscriber to learn more about the premium subscription and other ways you can support this podcast please go to brains hunts podcast dot com four donations i don't have any new announcements this month other than to remind you that our new schedule is to come out the last monday of each month even so i recommend that you sign up for the free newsletter so that you can get show notes automatically and don't miss new episodes well thank you again for listen at four to talking the he again next month rain science is copyright 2017 virginia campbell md you may copy this to share it with others that for any other uses or derivatives please contact me at brain science podcast gmailcom.

mark seidenberg virginia campbell md