26 Burst results for "MD Anderson"

Houston's first COVID-19 vaccine arrives at MD Anderson

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:35 sec | 4 months ago

Houston's first COVID-19 vaccine arrives at MD Anderson

"First first Corona Corona virus virus vaccine vaccine arrived arrived in in Houston Houston and and MD MD Anderson Anderson Monday Monday meantime, meantime, Houston Houston Methodist Methodist CEO CEO Dr Dr Mark Mark Boom Boom says says they're they're expecting expecting it it Later. Later. Today Today we've we've been been informed informed across across our our hospital hospital system, 13,650 doses will be our first week allotment. So when you start thinking about how do we vaccinate the very front lines that 13,060 Actually, we'll do a very good job for us getting into a pretty good proportion of our staff. Memorial. Harmon will also receive the vaccine later today. Texas Department of State Health Services says nearly 95,000 doses of the vaccine and all are headed for hospitals statewide this week.

Anderson Anderson Houston Houston Methodist Meth Dr Dr Mark Mark Boom Boom Houston MD Harmon Texas Department Of State Heal
COVID-19 vaccine: Pfizer shots arriving at Houston hospitals Monday and Tuesday

Sean Hannity

00:35 sec | 4 months ago

COVID-19 vaccine: Pfizer shots arriving at Houston hospitals Monday and Tuesday

"Corner corner virus virus vaccine vaccine arrives arrives in in Houston Houston and and MD MD Anderson Anderson today. today. Meantime, Meantime, Houston Houston Methodist Methodist CEO CEO Dr Dr Mark Mark Boone Boone says says they're they're expecting expecting it. it. Tomorrow Tomorrow we've we've been been informed informed across across our our hospital hospital system. 13,650 doses will be our first week allotment. So when you start thinking about how do we vaccinate the very Front lines that 6 13,050 actually will do a very good job for us getting into a pretty good proportion of our staff Memorial. Hermann will also receive the vaccine tomorrow. The Texas Department of State Health Services says nearly 95,000 doses of the vaccine and all are heading for hospitals statewide this week.

Anderson Anderson Houston Houston Methodist Meth Dr Dr Mark Mark Boone Boone Houston MD Hermann Texas Department Of State Heal
interview With Emily Reiser

Outcomes Rocket

04:54 min | 4 months ago

interview With Emily Reiser

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez's here. And today i have the privilege of hosting emily riser. She is the senior manager of innovation community engagement with the texas medical center. She supports clinicians and administrators at the tmc member institutions as well as hundreds of startups and other corporate partners engaged with tmc innovation. You guys have probably heard some of the healthcare entrepreneurs we've had out of the center. They're doing such incredible things in her previous role at emc she was a strategist for two tmc x. Cohorts she contributed to the redesign of the tmc axe program for twenty twenty and started the tmc alpha program for local innovators prior to joining tmc innovation. She led and venture a nonprofit organization supporting entrepreneurship training and company formation in the life sciences. She has directly contributed to business development projects with dozens of local life startups and supported the formation of four new companies. So her heart is totally in healthcare. Emily earned her bachelor's in biology from emory university and her phd in bio engineering from university focused on drug delivery for cancer immunotherapy. So you can imagine that. It's going to be a really cool conversation and emily Really really grateful that you Carved out some time to be with us today. Thanks for thanks for being outcast. Thank you so much saw so excited to be with today. Yeah and so you have such a cool experience right you've been in the healthcare startups and you know you've kind of gone pretty far in your formal education with bio engineering. And now you're in this area with this like incubating these cool really forward thinking companies that are changing the game. so what is it that Inspires your work in healthcare. I think a lot of us in healthcare are looking to have an impact on how patients are being cared for and that certainly inspires my work as well. And i always knew that i wanted to be in the healthcare space but didn't know how to do that while also making the most impact that i could so when exploring -nology that took me into research which you know if you can develop something that s- impacts you know thousands of people then really feels like you've done something meaningful to impact patient care but of course you have to pick something good you can spend your whole life Working on something. That doesn't end up doing that. And so i've moved more close to the patient closer to the bedside throughout my journey and now i have the privilege to work with folks that are directly saving lives. Impacting how how systems are ryan and making things easier for clinicians hospital administrators and then of course the patients to access the care that they need. So that's what. I love about my job right now. Is being able to work with somebody different kinds of people within the community you know. The house systems themselves clinicians entrepreneurs so every day is different but every single person is working toward making patient. Care better love that you're so mission oriented in that love their by two as you as you think about the work you guys are doing. Tmc is texas medical centers innovationlab. And so i think it's a good opportunity for folks that don't know about it to educate them about it but then after you tell us about it let us know a little bit more about how you're adding value to the healthcare ecosystem absolutely so the texas medical center is that's really interesting. Nonprofit organization that was started seventy five years ago through a gift from the md anderson foundation and we don't provide health care so we're not a health stem but we provide infrastructure that sits under md anderson texas children's houston methodist small herman and twenty one other different clinical institutions as. Well as you know. Other research institutions universities rice university of houston etc and so our role is to be the connective tissue and dr collaboration between and among all of the different institutions. So right now that looks like data that we publish every day around You can go to our website. I you and see how were clobbering across all these institutions to share updates on hospitalizations and other things that are relevant within our hospitals or doing a lot of work behind the scenes to try and make sure that everyone is cloud reading and and sharing best practices. And there's been a lot of really cool work coming out of that but five years ago we also started this great innovation initiative which combines space talent physical resources that all come together to provide different actors to entrepreneurs that can work with our health systems. And so it's an incubator. We have a partnership with johnson and johnson j. labs and body and other corporate partners to create density around making startups possible and always relevant tied back to the clinical application clinical outcomes. And

TMC Emily Riser Texas Medical Center Marquez Emory University EMC Emily Md Anderson Foundation Cancer Rice University Of Houston Ryan Houston Texas Johnson J Johnson
Texas among states chosen to test COVID-19 vaccine distribution

Our American Stories

01:06 min | 4 months ago

Texas among states chosen to test COVID-19 vaccine distribution

"For the corona virus is imminent. Boxes. Charles Watson reports, the country is approaching an average of 200,000 new infections a day as the U. S. Adds 1.2 million Mork cases in the last week alone, what help could be on the way soon as Fizer awaits emergency approval from the FDA, Ford's Cove in 19 vaccine officials are preparing for an almost immediate roll out. The White House task Force said the U. S will ship millions of doses of the vaccine within 24 hours if the FDA grants emergency use Authorization. Healthcare workers. Nursing homes in those with serious medical conditions are expected to be among the first to receive the vaccine. The biotech company Moderna is another front runner to produce an effective vaccine and said it is also expected to apply soon for FDA emergency authorization for Houston area hospitals are working to prepare for shipments of the first one likely in mid December, the hospitals or Texas Children's Houston Methodist Memorial, Hermann and MD. Anderson Cancer Center. Advising the vaccines be given to frontline hospital workers First

Charles Watson U. S. Fizer FDA Task Force U. Ford White House Moderna Houston Methodist Memorial Anderson Cancer Center Hermann Texas MD
"md anderson" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

11:47 min | 2 years ago

"md anderson" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Tampa and traveled to MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston for fellowship training in micro, vascular surgery, despite time in my former city of Houston, Texas. She remains unfamiliar with bubbas buffalo burgers, but she certainly will know how to get there after this program, Dr Dorn, whereas we was recruited to the department of plastic surgery at MC W two years ago in two thousand and sixteen Dr Chris fight. I completed undergraduate school and medical school. At Howard University in Washington DC, his anesthesiology training was completed at rush university. Followed by a fellowship in pain, management, and regional anesthesia at the university of Wisconsin. He joined the CW faculty last year in the department of anesthesiology well in this segment of the program, we will going to focus on ventral hernias. We tried to cover inguinal groin, groin hernias in the last segment. Matt, can you start with a brief description of what a ventral hernia is? So eventual hernia is is essentially a hernia on the abdominal wall. That is in the front portion of the abdominal wall. So the dorsal half of a body is in the back in the front so just about anything in the front most of these occur either as a belly button. Hernia or as a previous incision that caused a hernia okay? And when the when, when you have to fix the ventral hernia the incision is usually larger or the procedure is usually of greater magnitude than. An England oak Reinhard here. Is that correct? Typically unless we're talking about just a belly button or an umbilical hernia. Those are usually small little outpatient procedures oftentimes done at the same time as a inguinal hernia. But yeah. When once we get to the incision hernias, those are typically a little bit more involved. And for those of us who do in my in my in my practice, I do a lot of pancreatic cancer care. And so typically, many of those operations are large operations done through an open incision. So a straight line typically that's from a little bit below the breast bone to a little bit below the belly button. What causes eventual hernia? Why in some patients? When the surgeon sews up the abdominal wall, it, stays shut and everything is perfect. And why and other patients do they develop a hernia. So, basically once, you know, once you cut through the muscle to get into the abdomen. You have to repair that. Muscle and muscle. Intendant. Really? And so if you think about any other repair, if you repaired, your somebody's knee, or their achilles tendon or something like that, you would put that patient in some sort of immobilization for a while as things healed. But unfortunately, for the abdomen you start using your dominant wall muscles, the moment you start to wake up from anesthesia. So essentially, you can do a perfect job sewing things together. But it's just the fact of waking up coughing breathing standing that sort of causes things to pull apart. Now, there, there are risk factors that make some patients more susceptible to getting a hernia such things as obesity, diabetes smoking, and just sort of the genetics of how that person heels. But, but basically any big incision puts you at risk anywhere from twenty to forty percent for getting a hernia. And how long should we patients often ask? How long can I not lift anything and how many pounds can I lift until? Until the abdomen has healed from a big incision. So you'd get a different answer for just about, as many doctors as there are out there, but based on some, some older data, what we think is, is a reasonable amount of time is about somewhere between four and six weeks. We try to limit patients to lifting more than either ten or twenty pounds and that just has to do with how much straining you put on your domino wall when you lift those things we know that you probably put some more strain on your domino wall, when you cough and you sneeze and you laugh and you go to the bathroom, but we can't really control those things, but we do ask patients, not to, to lift heavy things if, if they can control it. Well, Chris, maybe, maybe we'll talk a little bit about both post operative pain control. And what kind of anesthesia many patients often get we can maybe do this in reverse order, we'll start with post operative pain control. So Dr Goldblatt does, fixes, a huge ventral hernia on a patient. How should that? Should the pain be controlled in that patient? So basically the modalities the we have a pink control for venture on years includes the, the plane blocks, and essentially the variety of plane blogs. We have the trans-pacific dumb, no plane blocks to rectus, she'd plane, blocks and equipped Ratto slumbering plane blocks. And what those are is basically injecting local anesthetics in between. The mostly is way the nurse. Terminate supply sensation and on cessation of pain across until abdominal wall all the way to the posterior abdominal wall the goal again is to use an ultrasound to check this local anesthetics into the muscle as wet is knows terminates to provide pain control post operative. So typically, you do that before the operation, or at the end of the operation. When when do you do that? Ideally, it's best to do it before the operation. You can also do it afterwards. Again, it's much, much challenge in because at the post operative changes that occur after surgery again. Ideally specified before. And how do you know you're in the right right place? Do you use ultrasound to what do you use? Ultrasound guidance is extremely beneficial and show you underwrite place. And you do that with the patient awake or or asleep. We offer light sedation before proceeding with the block, and we do a local anesthetic injections at the site of the injection with ultrasound guidance. So you typically do it before they before they go into the operating room in the in the like holding area prior to the operating room. Is that what you do this? We usually do it into regional as t- Zhou and acute pain section of the hospital before they go into does the does the patient have to ask for this. I mean, how do patients know that this kind of service is available also easy to coordinate with the globe? Goldblatt end the soldiers. And if they if it's requested, then we call the. Patient the night before in communicating exactly what we will be doing the day of surgery and on arrival rival on the DO surgery. They usually are Trieste from the area to the wraps area. Get your block in transit transition to the operating room, and most of these large ventral hernias, had done under general anesthesia. Is that correct? That is correct. So that means that the patient has a breathing to put in there on the breathing machine during this correct? Yeah. And the, the benefit of doing a block with a gentleman is t- joys was day they wake up and they start using abdominal muscles, that Dr go black nation. The, the block is still in place in so days at good pain control during the surgery prior, and also was awake in the in the pacu and beyond. Great. So Erin is as a plastic surgeon, you're oftentimes kind of the last person in the chain of doctors. So the patient say had a cancer operation done my me, and unfortunately, developed a hernia you may be involved either before or after Dr Goldblatt because they just don't like, maybe for example, they didn't like how their abdomen looked before the hernia repair. They may not like how their abdomen looked after the hernia repair. What can you do about it? That's a good question. We often see a lot of patients in that situation at somewhat similar to women after pregnancy that may end up with extra skin tissue on the abdomen after multiple surgeries or potentially hernia repairs. You can end up with extra skin and fat that money patients are unhappy with so one of the most common procedures we perform, which can be done at the same time as a hernia repair, or it can be done. After is called Pinnock elected me. It's similar in some ways to abdominal plastic or tummy, tuck, and that we remove extra skin. And sometimes extra fat from the abdomen to make a improved contour and this can be done in two ways, most commonly, it's done with a large transverse incision. So an incision that goes from hip bone to hip them or can also be done with a vertical incision. That goes along the line of your belly button. And why would why does some patients just not worry about it? In other patients want to have the contour of the abdomen fixed. I mean, maybe it sounds like a simple question, but I mean how patients come to you are? There are they're potentially impediments to coming to you. I mean obviously, there are probably a group of patients that frequently go to plastic surgeons for cosmetic issues, and then there are probably a large number of patients who are a little bit embarrassed or inhibited, about going to correct. That's correct. And we often. A lot of patients where the amount of excess of Domino's skin and soft tissue that they have is intrusive to their life. Maybe they're not able to exercise or fit into close easily some patients actually getting infections, and rashes, and the full of extra tissue. So it goes beyond a cosmetic procedure, and often is covered by insurance because of the amount of excess tissue. Other patients have smaller amounts of extra tissue and are less bothered by it because it doesn't affect their daily activities. And so they may not come forward for intervention. Sure. Matt, you had a comment here too. Well, I was going to say that these combined procedures that will do sometimes really sometimes the most gratifying because the patients really come in with a really a body image problem. And the hernia is, is the underlying physical defect. But what they're seeing on the surface is the skin. And so when you, you know, we can go in there and we can fix the hernia and then have plastic surgery come in and do a beautiful. Job closing up and taking off excess skin and the just to see the patients. You know, the there is when they first get a look at how things look after surgeries really gratifying thing to to all of us medicine. So certainly for some of these patients with larger abdomens who have had multiple operations in the past for whatever reason. You, you and Erin would would work together in one anesthetic, the patient would be put to sleep once, and then the hernia would be fixed, and the abdominal wall would be Ricans. Reconstructed reconfigured, if you will to look much better, right. I mean it just seems to make a lot of sense to, to only have an anesthetic once to only have one stay in the hospital and, and so, yeah, if we can get it to work that way in coordinate, it, it certainly seems to be the one of the best ways ago perfect. Well Aaron maybe in our last thirty or forty seconds. You can talk about pain. Do you do you see some patients who just have pain from their from their abdominal wall surgeries? I would say, that's less common. Occasionally patients do have pain from their abdominal wall operations and certainly having excess skin and tissue or. Can affect the the pain as well. But are there any other any options for injecting those patients who have chronic pain options of injecting local anesthetics around the area of the pain, again?.

umbilical hernia ventral hernia inguinal hernia Dr Goldblatt Dr Chris acute pain Matt university of Wisconsin Erin Houston Dr Dorn Tampa MD Anderson Cancer Center Texas Washington Howard University achilles tendon MC W Trieste
"md anderson" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"md anderson" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Hired and MD Anderson pay the accountants twenty three million dollars for services with this project. And then and again, I never heard that this project stopped that I read a lot of in the cancer world, this is although I do every day in the Wall Street Journal says IBM stop supporting the technology and September and IBM declined to comment on the status of the project. So there you are what was spent tens probably hundreds of millions of dollars can trying to get computers into medical care. Cancer treatment is. Kaput the hospital seemingly lost tens of millions of dollars seemed like IBM has lost that are more the president of the hospitals resigned. And where are we were back to what we talk about every day on the radio, and that is communication between the doctor and the patient. Sure, you can put a lot of information in a computer, but it's hard for the computer to understand each patient to understand the history of the patient emotions of the patient. The family of the patients the past of the patient to examine the patient. A computer can has the patient. The computer can't feel a lymph node or look at a swollen town. So or cancer in the breast cancer in the prostate. It takes a human being a doctor with a vast understanding to an allies each patient and to offer the best treatment and all the options. And that's what we do every day at radio surge in New York, and we stressed the human connection, we stress the communication. We. Stressed the interaction we trust the availability as my boss by chief at Harvard Medical School. CC Wong used to say tech the four as to be affable available and able to be trained to take care of a patient. So not only can you be Haibo and affable available. You have to have the technology to compile all the information for each patient. And that's what we do here at radio surgery, New York. And if you're going up against a.

IBM Cancer New York Wall Street Journal MD Anderson CC Wong Harvard Medical School president twenty three million dollars
American Cancer Society, Anderson Cancer Center And Obesity discussed on Phil Valentine

Phil Valentine

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

American Cancer Society, Anderson Cancer Center And Obesity discussed on Phil Valentine

"Here in the United States. The overall cancer rate is decreasing in men and stabilizing and women. That's according to researchers at the American Cancer Society, but young adults ages twenty four to twenty nine are seeing a rise in related cancers. Colon and Dmitry gallbladder kidney pancreatic to name a few. This new studies lead author says his findings are warning increase burden of obesity related cancer in the future saying that obesity is now potentially halting or reversing the progress. Achieved with cancer over the past several decades. One in college. As we spoke with from MD Anderson Cancer Center

American Cancer Society Anderson Cancer Center Obesity United States
"md anderson" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

Directionally Challenged

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"md anderson" Discussed on Directionally Challenged

"So I turned to my fiance, and I said who just flown in from New York to his wedding and Puerto Rico and said, my parents aren't coming. I think there's something I think my dad's dying of cancer, and he was like, you're crazy. You're crazy. There's no way and it kept texting my sister. I was like let me know something series is going on because I know something's going on will no one would tell me what was going on while I was at the wedding because they didn't want me to freak out and still enjoy my best friend's wedding. And I flew home that Sunday, and I looked at my best friend who I was sitting with on the flight. And I said I my sister's about bidding up from the airport, and she's about to tell me my dad's about to die of cancer. And sure enough I got in the car, and it legitimizes Ranko data's cancer doesn't she's like stage for politics, like how did you know? I don't know what it is. I don't know if God prepared me for it. I don't know if the universe prepared before. But something prepared me because then as soon as we got to the hospital, my sister, and my mom during the process of like my dad, actually like, you know, like in the ICU passing. They couldn't hand. Well, it and they're like the strongest ones in my family. So it was weird. I'm the Pisces. I'm the emotional one. And in that moment, I stepped into I was making the phone calls. I was getting on a plane to Texas, you know, to get him to into MD Anderson like all of those things. So I don't know if God prepared me. So that in that moment when I hit the ground, and we had to, you know, figure out what to do I was able to step into that role. Because then my sister, and my mom, I lost it. What's interesting? You say that that's kind of the role that you've taken on census passing as well. Right. As muscle this backbone of the family, right? And that already like the week of like, you kind of felt that it kind of called to you. And it kind of overtook you, and you were ready from the very beginning to be that for your family. Yeah. I just think sometimes God prepares you for things in a weird way. I don't know if that's just because he knew I could handle it. And like when my dad actually pass I was the only one who awake. So it was just it was. Worst seven days in my life. But it was weird when we're at MD Anderson when they moved my dad from ICU to politics care out is that mentality of cares. Basically like, it's a Costas. They're lied. You know, what you're going to you're on your way out. My dad was like walking and talking that was the weird thing. So the nurses were coming up to us saying like most of the people in ICU were on feeding tubes. And completely incapacitated. My dad was like cracking jokes. So the nurse came up to me. And she's like, I she was like losing her mind. And she said I can't believe that your dad is still like talking like how is he about to die? And it was like girl beats me, you're the medical professional. But you're like on that episode of Grey's anatomy. No. But it was actually one really funny thing that happened in the hospital, and honestly, so many like in the dark dark times there were so many things worse laugh out loud. Funny. Like, that's why I I'm so open about talking about grief is because truly the dark is things bring the lightest and most joyful things. Just you couldn't make this stuff up. So one of the anesthesiologist who had to come up to us. They were going to try and perform a a quick surgery on my dad to see if they could actually save him. But they couldn't get his blood pressure to settle down. So you can't operate on somebody. I mean automatically kill him. So this indices Yala just comes around the corner. And when I say like Joe manganiello like hottest most delicious man you've ever seen like his scrub..

cancer MD Anderson Puerto Rico New York Joe manganiello Texas Grey seven days
"md anderson" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"md anderson" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Oh, I orange Baptist church. And then we'd go to different places, and we would go Christmas. Caroline. In a small town. People are happy that you showed up to knock on the door old people come to the door. And you know, you got your low Caroline group out there and you go to town. That's a nice thing. I've missed that. So I'm going to try to recreate that December nineteenth s Michael's birthday, by the way. But we're having his party on a different day. So we're going to do some Christmas. Caroline that night. It's going to be fun, and I need acquired tell me about your choir. Who they are what their ages and assured me that chalk can do all the classics. Because that's the important part MD Anderson's. Jim Allison, boy, this is a big honour will receive his Nobel prize today in science from the king of Sweden. He plans to give the prize money to charity. Allison was awarded the prize for his breakthrough discovery in immunotherapy that has revolutionized cancer treatment. The awards ceremony in Stockholm begins at nine thirty central this morning. Last week Allison visited the Nobel museum where he signed the bottom of a chair at bistro. Nobel a tradition among Nobel recipients. Do you know the story behind the Nobel prize? I've ever told you this Alfred Nobel was childless living in France. And he was a dynamite. He was an arm sky, but dynamite was at the time nuclear weaponry. And he was together and moving it. He was the guy you bought you bought it from and he was so hated by the pacifist of the era. That they wrote an obituary it was believed that he had died. I think it was his brother that had died. Instead. And the obituary was about what an awful human being. He was just absolutely terrible. Alfred Nobel has died and we're glad he's terrible and that cost him to begin to repair his image. So he started donating money to found this Nobel prize and our own Houston's own MD Anderson's. Jim Allison will receive this more. You know, he's married to an Indian woman. Pod mini Sharma? She's also an MD Anderson. Professor, she is his longtime research collaborator. And of course, his wife. There's quite a tradition behind winning this Nobel prize and science the different things. The different thing you hand over some things for their museum some artifacts. And I'll tell you just a moment what he hindered. The Michael berry show. Please clap. My name is Scott. My name is John whoever you are. My name is Blakely..

Nobel prize Alfred Nobel Jim Allison Caroline Nobel Nobel museum MD Anderson Michael berry orange Baptist church Stockholm Blakely Sweden Anderson John Scott research collaborator France Professor Houston
"md anderson" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

05:47 min | 2 years ago

"md anderson" Discussed on KTRH

"You know, a grand mal seizure. Ellis. Within the school and went home sick. And. Oh, I guess nausea, symptoms and everything and Caesar. And so how did you come out of the seizure to somebody fired? You. Well, yeah, it's. But my brother was off from work. Also that day. Hit me. Sorry, my right leg. And then I just I knew something was wrong. Second. That's having a stroke or something. In. Started coming up and down, you know. Last thing. I remember he was trying to say a prayer with me and everything and then he called nine one one and. Next thing. I knew about four or five minutes later. The paramedics were there and everything they brought me to Saint Elizabeth Beaumont. Does that sound out? They did a CAT scan him. Has report my brain. And it was confirmed. It was you know, is cancerous and everything through MD Anderson. Alma is what they said at the time. And then they'll make sure there's probably an Astros. So what they call almost there. So love you. You know, it's great to but uh. Anyway. So there's no genetic testing this remarkable. I'm a political trial drugs. It. H one inhibitor. So they found out just to that. They've done a lot of research figured out that there's certain genetic markers on timbers I can determine targeted therapy for. So that's what I'm going to start therapy. So in those eighteen years, how many surgeries have you had to had to and I've had a full round. Awaken. Cranial? I'll be at the MD Everson. Dr Frankel dementia did that he's an Italian Canadian Braxton down here in Texas, but he's still at Indiana. But I don't know anything credit was about six hour surgery. And then I had one in December December twenty eighth of seventeen or just recently. Maryland oncologist, the Anderson sale national health, and he recommended a guy there, but an immature and two thousand twelve I had European MO. And then I started chemo in August seventeen. And. Chemo until November twenty nine th and it really wouldn't. Anniston was caller stable but still slightly growing. And so I I consulted with doctor Martin Gilbert up there emphasis in Maryland, and he recommended surgery and so. I had another surgery and had to go through a lot of rehab there. Cheer hospital and. You're in Houston. And then great. And I'm just now doing outpatient physical therapy is kind of left me with some some deficits. I'm looking foot, but that's one of those. Foot drop the ASO orthotics. Hi, I'm glad to be alive. So still work. So it made. So it lifted your leg up where your your legs aren't the same link. Now. Well, no. It affected. My my mother part of my got, right weakness. Now, do the second surgery. We knew that going in that was a choice. I had to make this is somewhat recoverability. It'll leave you with some supplementary motor area syndrome. And so. Wherein in af owed, basically Jeep ankle shrinked ankle and foot and not not material. And all that. But yeah. So we just right now. Right now because because of the protocol I had to go to NBN she wants to teach. So that's been tough lately. Trying to. John arose assist press one keep a job. And then also Jimmy Anderson can say in the clinical trial. Where is your what school are you at? I'm over Marshall middle school, which is well. Well, when I see you wear is where is it located itself down road Dallin how how close to Tim Dowling and Gladys. Oh, yeah. I had a benefactor named Pete coconuts lived on Gladys. I know exactly. I know. I know the coconut Sam I know I've known some of them. Yeah. The other good people get Greek family. Yeah. Big Greek family. So. Does it leave you? I mean, your speech sounds very good. Did you have to have that? That hasn't affected anything there. I mean, we're we're good with speech. Areas of thing is. The right leg. Having to deal with that matter of fact, there's a coca knows it subs over there and the like. Maybe Pete Pete passed away. But could be his probably his grandchild now because Pete would be. That was nineteen eighty nine which is nine thirty years ago. And he was probably in his sixties in yet. It would probably be his his grandchild. Hold on just a second, Shannon. Wow. You'd think you're having a bad day. Ramon at fellow. He didn't he didn't even bother isn't an.

Pete Pete Astros Chemo Jimmy Anderson MD Anderson Maryland Foot drop Ellis Marshall middle school Saint Elizabeth Beaumont Martin Gilbert Anderson Pete coconuts Anniston Houston supplementary motor area Gladys Alma
Anderson Cancer Center, Dr Pedro Ramirez And Mike Rosty discussed on 24 Hour News

24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Anderson Cancer Center, Dr Pedro Ramirez And Mike Rosty discussed on 24 Hour News

"Minute. There's some surprising results for patients, undergoing cervical cancer surgery. AP's Mike Rosty reports were deaths have been found when using a less invasive procedure. Studies of surgery for cervical cancer have produced. Unexpected results finding the less invasive version to have a higher death rate for patients Dr Pedro Ramirez of the university of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, led the more rigorous of the studies it found women who had the less invasive surgery were four times more likely to see their cancer return compared to women who underwent traditional radical

Anderson Cancer Center Dr Pedro Ramirez Mike Rosty Houston University Of Texas
"md anderson" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"md anderson" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"In your randomized trial. You did six hundred thirty one and then you stopped. Why's that? What were you seeing in those numbers? When we had already accrued a total of six hundred thirty women onto the trial. We'd received a message from the of eighteen monitoring committee, and basically this is a committee. That advises us is to the safety of the of the intervention of the safety of what we're doing and they were concerned that in one of the arms. There was an issue that they wanted to evaluate further. So this happened back in June of last year. They asked us for further. Follow up information from all the sites at that time. We had thirty three sites around the world participating in this study they propose that after we obtain that additional follow up data within three to four month period that reevaluation would be performed. And then we we did that at reevaluation and that did show that these safety signal was essentially did. And in fact, they told us that we needed. To stop the study because of a high risk of recurrence, and they in a high risk of death in the patients who had minimally invasive surgery how much high risk. So we found that women who had a minimally invasive radical hysterectomy had a four fold increase of recurrence win compared to the open radical hysterectomy. So this is quite striking. And just I guess a numbers of people because it's more graphic when you look at that of getting the straits a follow up found that twenty seven women in the minimally invasive group had cancer recurrence. Only seven with the open surgery nineteen deaths in the minimally invasive group and only three in the open in the open surgery group. So that's really dramatic, isn't it? Yes, this is actually quite alarming. And as you mentioned these were recurrences of cervical cancer, these were death. So obviously we had to make an immediate change in our. Actes when we learn these results here at MD Anderson, we stopped offering the.

cancer MD Anderson four month
"md anderson" Discussed on Politico's Off Message

Politico's Off Message

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"md anderson" Discussed on Politico's Off Message

"It may or may have been my fault in some ways. I joke it might have been because when I was working for him on his presidential campaign, you'll know that I'm a cancer survivor and I was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma the week before he kicked off his campaign. In fact, I was supposed to be in Charleston, South Carolina for the kickoff which was at the red state gathering you might remember. And instead I was an MD Anderson in Houston, starting my treatment, but he would call me frequently from the road after debates around that time offering scripture offering prayer and so joked with him. One time after one of the debate performances. I said, I, I guess it was my fault that you that you forgot the agency. You're thinking about me, weren't you. So there may be some. Truth to that. You know, what's interesting. I remember how the book was meant to convey the message that Rick Perry had at the time that look, Washington is a disaster. The federal government has become overbearing and intrusive, and even had a quote at some point to the effective you. You couldn't pay me to go to Washington, right? Like get me as far away from that place as possible. But later he said by way of explaining why he was running for president that in order to sort of get a handle on Washington, you need to send people to Washington who hate Washington, right? And you. I get the sense in running for congress are taking something of a similar approach that you believe that in order to sort of get a collar on Washington and to bring it under control that you need an influx of lawmakers who fundamentally distrust and dislike Washington. I think that's a fair statement. I think maybe overstate a little bit by saying, quote, hate Washington, although it probably feels like that at times for those of us who have a strong concern about the swamp as the current president refers to it. But prior. To President Trump's run in two thousand sixteen where he obviously branded that term. There were a number of us who had been expressing our concern about the power and the growth in Washington and how fundamentally at odds that is with our nation's founding, and frankly, the greatness of our of our country over its history. The first chapter in the book fed up with governor Perry is titled if I remember correctly, America's great, Washington is broken, and that was capturing what governor Perry and I had and our meeting of the minds about his great love for all that he saw currying in Texas. Like I mentioned a second ago and how out odds that is with what we were seeing in Washington. So much growth in so much interference and we, you know, one of the things I talk about on the campaign trail lot is how divided a lot of people believe the country currently is. I think the right there is a lot of division, but how much of that is stemming from a top down approach, a one-size-fits-all solution on every issue under. The sun that's causing so many Americans to be at each other's throats. I don't wanna wake up on Sunday morning, you know, zeroing in on meet the press, trying to figure out what's going to be the next fight of the day. I wanna wake up on Sunday morning and go to church family. Go has some, you know, fun in the afternoon on Sunday, and you know, stay focused on our communities, stay focused on our cities or state to helping the veteran down the street, whatever you might be doing and your neighborhoods and really Washington..

Washington governor Perry Hodgkin president President Trump cancer South Carolina federal government Charleston MD Anderson congress Houston America Texas
Two Scientists Earn Nobel for Discovering a New Pillar in Cancer Therapy

Michael Berry

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

Two Scientists Earn Nobel for Discovering a New Pillar in Cancer Therapy

"For the first time a Nobel prize in medicine has been awarded for cancer therapy. One of the researchers sharing the prize did his groundbreaking work at UC Berkeley. Here's science editor. Daniel Benton, James Allison says he didn't start out intending to cure cancer. He wanted to know how t cells work T cells are a key part of our immune system. They attacked cancers and other diseases, but they also have a kind of breaking system that slows them down Alison discovered the molecule that serves as the brakes and had an idea here. He is speaking at a press conference this morning. Russia just disable the brakes and see if that will allow them your sister to attack cancer and. Did the therapy has extended the lives of thousands of cancer patients. Alison director the UC Berkeley cancer research laboratory for twenty years he currently works at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in

Cancer Md Anderson Cancer Center Nobel Prize Uc Berkeley James Allison Alison Daniel Benton Russia Editor Director Twenty Years
Houston scientist Jim Allison awarded Nobel Prize for Medicine

Investor's Edge

02:49 min | 2 years ago

Houston scientist Jim Allison awarded Nobel Prize for Medicine

"American ensuring the Nobel prize for medicine USA radio networks, Chris Barnes has more on the story to scientists run from the US and one from Japan are the winners of the Nobel prize for medicine, the Nobel Institute in Stockholm announcing the Jim Allison and to sue Honjo were honoured for their discoveries leading to new approaches and using the immune system to battle cancer. Allison is a professor at the university of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in

Nobel Prize Jim Allison Nobel Institute Anderson Cancer Center Sue Honjo Chris Barnes United States Stockholm Professor University Of Texas Japan
"md anderson" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"md anderson" Discussed on KTRH

"Hour traffic center, pretty heavy rains down towards Galveston again today, they're drifting north and some of that action coming into the southern burbs here. This afternoon. Eighty-four degrees. Sixty percent chance of some downpours. Rich high pressure east of Florida continuing to provide a favorable flow off the Gulf and scattered thunderstorms. Just about every day this week for us. I'm Scott Lawrimore Weather, Channel, rain and seventy six on the island eighty one. Now at the top tax defenders twenty four hour weather center three oh, one our top story. A researcher at MD Anderson has won the Nobel prize. Dr James Allison sharing the award with a doctor from Kyoto University in Japan for their advancements in immunotherapy drugs. Dr Alison says he was shocked. I'm still have sort of a state of shock and awe sinking in. So he's really wonderful this boring to wake up, and my my son called me at five thirty and was the first to let me know that I won this prize. Nobel committee said the pairs research, which harnesses the body's immune system to attack cancer cells amounted to a landmark in our fight against cancer. A New Jersey man is dead after contracting a brain eating amoeba from a wave pool at a resort in Waco. According to the Waco, tribune-herald twenty nine old Fabrizio stable, nor died at the rare illness, the Atlantic City medical center officials say he came home from his vacation and was feeling sick had a severe headache that he couldn't shake and when he woke up one day was incoherent after days are being treated at the hospital. He tested positive for the amoeba known as naegleria fowleri the day before he died the SR cable parks surf resort has been shut down as a precaution. As officials test. The water swimmers can contract the infection via contaminated water that gets into. Their mouths or noses. The amoeba causes encephalitis guthman reporting, the boards of memorial Hermann health system, and Baylor Scott and white health of signed a letter of intent to merge into a massive combined system. The health systems would serve more than thirty Texas counties employing more than seventy three thousand across the state that merger expected to be completed next year. US marshals shot and killed a suspect while serving a warrant in the heights this morning. It happened near east twelfth street and studio one as you open the back door.

Nobel prize Waco Dr Alison memorial Hermann health system Galveston Dr James Allison Nobel committee US Baylor Scott Florida Kyoto University MD Anderson researcher Atlantic City medical center New Jersey Japan Texas
Cancer Immunotherapy Conference features latest research on response, resistance, treatment | Science Codex

Here & Now

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

Cancer Immunotherapy Conference features latest research on response, resistance, treatment | Science Codex

"We've seen spectacular results, including patients who are surviving for decades as a result of these novel treatments. When we look more specifically at the population said, have been treated by the drug that Jim. Team has developed. We can see the twenty percent of those live for at least three years with many patients living ten years and beyond. These are really unprecedented results for patients who really had no other options. James Allison started his career at MD Anderson in nineteen seventy seven. And then he returned in two thousand twelve to work on the MD Anderson moon shots program, which we've talked about before, basically allowing people to work on things that might pan out and might be game changers or maybe they won't how many examples like this? Have you had of the moon shots

Md Anderson James Allison Anderson JIM Twenty Percent Three Years Ten Years
"md anderson" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"md anderson" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Is bedbugs New York's WABC TV is reporting that at least six and gave buses have been taken out of service recently after drivers reported that the critters were spotted crawling on the seats. Effected vehicles are in isolation at a bus yard of the northern tip of Manhattan. With words, bedbugs written on the windshield. One bus driver tells channel seven at one point the buses were fumigated with that hasn't happened for some time. One bus writer says she plans on taking the train for awhile, Sherry Preston. ABC news, New York WBZ news time, one Twenty-one new research from the MD Anderson Cancer Center pointing more concerns over breast implants, the FDA's not sure about it and wants to set up a meeting to review all the data study published in the annals of surgery found a higher rate of skin cancer among women with implants as well as auto immune disorders and other health issues. But all the study showed a correlation says LSU New Orleans breast surgeon, Dr Ashley Hendrix, because MD Anderson researchers didn't know the identities of the patients they studied contact. Fifty five patients. An ask them. What's your family history? How much exposure we had Dr Hendrix said silicone implants popularity seems to be as high as ever since they came back on the market in two thousand six Chris Miller, four CBS news, New Orleans and the Texas creator of the three D printed gun. He's no longer with that company. He helped to create defense distributed announcing today that Cody Wilson stepped down last week after he was arrested in Taiwan on sex assault charges. Molson's accused of paying a sixteen year old five hundred dollars for sex at a Travis county hotel after meeting online he was currently out on bond after being returned to Texas this past weekend defense distributed says they have no plans to shut their doors..

Dr Ashley Hendrix New York Cody Wilson MD Anderson Cancer Center WABC New Orleans Texas MD Anderson Manhattan Sherry Preston ABC LSU Molson Travis county hotel writer Taiwan CBS FDA
"md anderson" Discussed on KSRO

KSRO

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"md anderson" Discussed on KSRO

"Percent in, fact it's four hundred percent more absorbable in a syllable than the average turmeric out. There that's not in a life form delivery and the opera attached to. It, now as this particular, earn we've talked about it on the show before the effects of using turmeric and the active ingredient Senate the curcumin as it relates to. Cancer here's a, quote Dr Byer that you might be interested in according to one of the world leaders in turmeric research from MD Anderson Cancer. Center this is a doctor Aggarwal he says I have seen no cancer that has. Not benefited by. Turmeric I mean that's this MD Anderson Cancer Center I just I, just hung out with a bunch. Of the researchers in. Northern Japan I was at a symposium with these guys these guys are serious about what. They do down there they do good work here. You have one. Of the, leading researchers in terms in the world talking about how it has an impact on. Cancer which is outstanding I'm gonna let you take it from there from. The, cancer to the diabetes, go yes Dr Martin in fact there's over two thousand published studies showing the anticancer benefits app tumor in fact a recent one just came. Out from the, university of California researchers showing that it slowed the growth of tumors and significantly reduced the tumor sized and it did this by. Stopping the cell reproduction The cancer cells and, even reduce, the size of those tumors from. The university, of California researchers recently showed that very important study is okay. And you, know when you when you're talking. About an herb like this it sounds like it's too good to be true are. There any potential known adverse side effects of. People taking this particular plant this herb or are there. Is there any interaction let's. Say somebody's taking a certain pharmaceutical drugs or other herbs are there any interactions that people need to be concerned about, as early no. Interactions that consistently aware of people that might be on anticoagulant medication might be cautious. With, the amount that of, use also people take too much it was they might get a. Little loose, stools perhaps he's been the only side effect otherwise it's harvest and completely capable of most people taking with no problem at all well I gotta. Tell you I've I've I've challenged that theory myself Swigging the liquid future farm turmeric and no problem in that area whatsoever and I I'm like the canary in the. Cage I like to. Test these, things out to make sure that they're, safe, and effective, on my own, body because I've taken a lot of different products most of which was a waste because it doesn't absorb and assimilate this. One I was one of those things where you know you felt something, change you just couldn't put your finger on it. I don't have any known disease that I'm aware of but I don't want any that's, why I use? Future farms liquid turmeric? Personally and my family does because we don't want these diseases. That seemingly come out of nowhere but yet they're chronic they simmer there underneath the radar scope and then suddenly people who go into their doctors year after year told they're perfectly healthy and now. All, of a sudden they have this catastrophic disease diagnosis and now they're spinning. Trying to figure out how to get, out of it and there's not a good.

Cancer Anderson Cancer Center Anderson Cancer university of California Dr Byer Japan California Dr Martin diabetes four hundred percent
"md anderson" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"md anderson" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"That we can harness to be able to disseminate knowledge that could potentially prevent catch cancer early or get you to the right treatment centers when you say artifices intelligence can be used to disseminate technology is that actually happening right now because in in my work we hear a lot about say ibm watson but then there reality of ibm watson doesn't measure up to the hype what you're seeing now is you're seeing one off applications it's not integrated as much into the entire workflow and fabric but what you're now beginning to see our platforms that allow for a patience with a particular molecular profile to go on certain clinical trials so using artificial intelligence to take the the sea of information from a patient and then looking at the thousands of potential clinical trials and then working through those algorithms that identify the highest priority most appropriate clinical trials for that patient artificial intelligence strategies to identify patients that may develop toxicities to certain drugs where they could be intervened with much earlier at a stage where some minor modifications in either the drug or drugs that can handle the side effects could have a dramatic impact on the quality of life for patients who announced survive their encounter with cancer so specific strategies like that are being applied in ways that are helping manage various aspects of cancer care but i think what you're gonna see relatively quickly over the next half a dozen years is the application of a cloud based technology mobile connectivity be integrated into the fabric of consumers where patients are going to understand how to prevent cancer what they should be doing based on their risks be it smokers and so on to get screened at the appropriate the stages and also if they do get cancer where should they go and are they getting the right kind of treatment strategies the moonshot program is one of your legacies at md anderson where you step down about a year ago there's speeches your resigning i've i've never seen a resignation speech quite lake it i could have done a better job administratively a better job listening a better job communicating forgive me for my shortcomings i regret them what went wrong m d anderson i think it was you know so i'm a change agent came into an institution with twenty one thousand cancer fighting champions was an institution that was at the forefront for cancer treatment than care one of the great engines for research and i was very passionate about pushing progress very rapidly and very quickly for patients my family was affected by this disease i have a high sense of urgency on an innovator i am comfortable with change not everybody is comfortable with change and i raised the bar and and that worked well with many but some it didn't and i needed to do a much better job in communication i did not communicate my story as effectively as i should have and that lead to anxiety confused asian and the ability for others to establish a story in a guy an an an a a strategy that that eventually made it very difficult and i've reached a point where i was able to accomplish the things that we accomplished launch the moon shots we had done extraordinary well financially we had this very significant margin that we were able to plow back into our mission record philanthropy recruitment of star faculty significant increase in funding for research as a reflection of the competitive faculty that we had but there was a period of hundreds of millions of dollars of loss over eleven months sixteen months near the end of your tenure that's right and that's coincides with the launch of the electronic health record and so that in fact you have to be clear here that was the operating loss that year we still ended up with five million dollar margin overall and then the following year which is the year in which i resigned it was a seven hundred million dollar margin one of the healthiest balancesheets in all of academic medicine so that was the operating margin which we anticipated would be below as a result of the launch of the hr which has been the case for virtually every academic institution that's launched any hr what do you know now about running a major institution that you wish you'd known when you first started was it that political infighting piece wasn't out know what category characterize it as political infighting i.

cancer seven hundred million dollar five million dollar sixteen months eleven months
"md anderson" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"md anderson" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"Nobel prize winning discovery that genes cancer genes reside within our genomes and so that gives you a perspective genetic paradigm that now dominates the way we think about cancer had not yet been articulated so we've gone from a state of near complete ignorance of what makes cancer tick to identifying the genes that are barent than cancer through the human genome project and the human cancer you know project which has given us an atlas of genes that are altered in various cancers to converting that knowledge into targeted therapies that are squarely directed against those rogue genes and two now increasingly showing that patients that are enlisted into precision medicine that is we know what genes are altered in their specific cancer we ply the right drug to the right patient that those patients are seeing tremendous improvements in their survival i'm sure there were well meaning researchers and scientists who in the nineteen seventies on their equivalent of this podcast would be saying we have unlocked key answers and yet that wasn't the case we're still talking about these issues fifty years later what if we're wrong about using the atlas to find the solutions what what if we are as far away from getting to answers on cancer as researchers were twenty thirty forty years ago again i think the the proof has already occurred at the level of patients where these new knowledge has been converted into new therapeutic strategies that have had a profound impact on the natural history of disease so just a half a dozen years ago advanced melanoma metastatic to brain and so on ninety nine percent of individuals were dead within a year today the majority of patients or surviving ten plus years out as a result of these new therapies.

cancer Nobel prize twenty thirty forty years ninety nine percent fifty years
"md anderson" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"md anderson" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"The cancer moonshot program at that hospital which became a model for the obama administration's moonshot program was the obama moonshot program which is still ongoing and now a private sector form wasn't that program a sufficient response looking back i think one can always do more and i think the critical thing is that it is adding a much to the dialogue of cancer by highlighting it and i think would vicepresident biden into really highlight the tragedy that cancer inflicts on families is perhaps his greatest contribution but what he did was the galvanize the community to begin to work together and collaborate in ways that were really necessary and many times what i see from where i stand either as an administrator a scientist or an entrepreneur or or other interactions that i have with the community is that there is not enough convening and communication collaboration across sectors that are needed to make an impact on the cancer problem and so the moonshot gave a attention more than anything else to the problems and the opportunities that collaboration could seize but to look at it from another angle the moonshot program and some of the rhetoric that you and others have used about ending cancer and ten years does that set up false expectations that can't possibly be realized i think that there is a real difference first of all we do have a long way to go before cancer becomes routinely quelled by any strategy early detection treatment but this time is truly different and it's different because there's clinical proof of concept there's no longer a supposition based on science what we've seen over the last half a dozen years is that science has been converted into either new policies that can prevent cancer because we understand what causes cancer in the first place or new technological strategies that can detect cancer at were early curable stages and in the treatment front as we mentioned earlier the revolution that's ongoing immunotherapy is curing patients of disease with advanced disease that otherwise would have been lethal and that's what's different is that this knowledge of how the immune system works the knowledge of the genes that are mutated in cancer has developed into new therapeutic strategies that are curing a fraction of patients now the challenge now is to not have only twenty five percent of patients for example who haven't tractable disease be cured has resulted me no therapy but raising that percentage is too much higher levels and also voiding toxic cities of these drugs that's really where the challenges so what i feel now is that the knowledge and technology has reached the point where we can drive actionable information to clinical end points and save as many lives as possible with the different climate that when president nixon was talking about ending keep in mind back then that was before the.

obama administration biden administrator scientist cancer nixon obama cured president twenty five percent ten years
"md anderson" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"md anderson" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"Great science impacting patients today with advanced disease otherwise incurable in my role at politico i'm talking to public health groups advocates from across the spectrum and i hear every day about the opioid issue a year about vaping e cigarettes they're all these health concerns that might come in through my inbox and conversations i'm having cancer usually is not near the top of anything this might be the longest conversation of already had about cancer in the past week do you think that there's enough mindshare devoted to cancer when it comes to the policy political world obviously her cancer researchers you may have have some bias how much attention do cancer issues need in this crowded space of looking at all these other public health problems cancer itself extracts very significant social and economic toll quarter trillion dollars per year so it's a significant issue for us one and two men wanted three women will get cancer in their lifetime so it is a major issue for our nation and the world and it is something that has to be put towards the front in terms of doing something about it either from policy perspectives or from treatment perspectives because we do have a lot of actionable knowledge today that if applied could make a huge difference so raising this in the consciousness of the public that cancer is not a fatal disease that there are opportunities for us to change the history of the disease but also our legislative champions that can fund research such as through the national institutes of health or raise awareness of the issues facing cancer patients to be able to improve their quality of life they've chances i survive and so on these are all things that if the nation were to make a national priority would impact the cancer problem mightily for many when you were leading md anderson you helped start.

cancer trillion dollars
"md anderson" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"md anderson" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"Here what brings you to washington dc what is a famous cancer researcher doing in the studio right now well we're organizing an effort to make a decisive assault on brain cancer we brought together a diverse collection of stakeholders that can actually develop a strategic plan and implement such a plan and the nci has led this effort to convene this group so that we can make an impact on patients today with the great science that's emerging an nci being national cancer institute for listeners who might not know that's correct and the new nci director dr ned sharply was present the whole time this effort to combat brain cancer how how do these projects get targeted what is it about brain cancer right now that warrants a special effort well first and foremost it's been one of the most intractable cancers we see a lot of high profile individuals beau biden senator mccain ted kennedy and others that have been flicked by this disease it's universally fatal for forty plus years has been very little increase in the survival of patients afflicted with this disease what's the survival rate essentially fifteen to eighteen months and it extracts very significant toll because you know essentially at affects your brain and who you are and so there's a lot of neurological side effects that occur as a result of the tumor and in fact the treatment as well and so there's a lot of new science that's emerging the genes that are abnormal in the cancer how the immune system works and how it could be harnessed through drug manipulation to reawaken the immune system to attack the cancer certain viruses that are now engineered to be able to tack cancer cells but leaving tack normal cells so we wanted to try to harvard harvest some of these new scientific insights and apply them to inventive clinic trials testing these agents so that we can see who can make an impact on the streto disease looking across the specter of.

researcher assault brain cancer nci washington director dr ned beau biden senator mccain ted kennedy eighteen months
"md anderson" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"md anderson" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"You a recent conversation that i had with cancer researcher ron pino it's a little different from our usual fair but he's someone that i was looking forward to catching up with if you're craving news analysis check out our bonus episode this week where we discussed the nomination of brett cavanaugh to the supreme court and were planning to be back next week with a special episode the digs into healthcare's fiercest battleground abortion when you are boldly moving into a direction where you want to effect change idiot to understand that certain fraction of individuals will let be less comfortable with that change i'm dan diamond this pulse check and that was ronald aquino the former head of md anderson cancer center in houston at md anderson do penal helped conceive of the idea that became the basis for president obama's cancer moonshot program and opinion join me recently to talk about that program when it was like running one of the nation's great hospitals and where he thinks cancer research is going we'll get to that conversation in a moment but first reminder if you like politico pulse check help us keep it going rate at review at share with a friend we read all the comments on itunes and elsewhere so be sure to leave us your suggestions can find me at diamond at politico dot com and now here's ronaldinho doctor rhonda pino welcome to politico pulse check it's great to be.

brett cavanaugh anderson cancer center houston obama rhonda pino researcher ronald aquino president politico ronaldinho
"md anderson" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"md anderson" Discussed on WJR 760

"Kept fighting with stephen luigi piazza and we have a piece of tape that i think an found on facebook uh i've said before that dan gilbert does a heck of a job interviewing people he's done a great job in we had and filling here a few times uh but we found tape that they put on facebook of dan gilbert basically is interviewing steven luigi piazza at md anderson cancer center let's let's listen to little of that since great stuff on failure so tell me about failure and people why it you know i've never found how you have to fail and just some guy never want to try and then if they now try they never fail and so i i talk about gnamin to them about one for the money to the show a three to get ready three iranian through the rain through to get ready inning and they never move off ready and they feel safe and ready but ready never moves you anywhere and never stretches you so knowing no one if you feel that this near a dime whole world's it's all over and you can come back and actually be better next the thing because you don't know what if you've never fail raising it might be the end never see failure fares alert experience but more importantly and never see failures failure as an opportunity to perfect my sense is rumored to hammer the need permission to know that it's okay that they can be a better future which you can drew baker that hope is becomes a reality with the execution if you're willing to do the work and most of the guys just went to solve for today and we only saw for today we have blessed the tomorrow hence all about creating momentum menu as a leader once your momentum you can't and the biggest thing that i see it was leaders over plan her hand and then massive not because the guy correct some went on one thing compared to the whole bodywork selfmocking are not about living in where can you do for me now which new it's bob more of i'll let you bill for me for the future is about building wealth building suffered permanent legacy for someone else see been you have left a legacy.

stephen luigi piazza dan gilbert facebook baker anderson cancer center