35 Burst results for "MAX"

‘Friends’ Reunion Special at HBO Max to Premiere in May

The Dori Monson Show

00:18 sec | 2 hrs ago

‘Friends’ Reunion Special at HBO Max to Premiere in May

"About for a long time. Now. Finally, the friends were union. It will debut on HBO Max on May 27th, in addition to the regular cast members Jennifer Aniston, Lisa Kodro and the others. Will be some special guests joining the re union, including Justin Bieber, Lady Gaga and David Beckham.

Lisa Kodro HBO Jennifer Aniston Justin Bieber Lady Gaga David Beckham
Who’s the Preferred Match-up for Boston in the First Round of the Playoffs?

Bruins Beat

02:10 min | 2 d ago

Who’s the Preferred Match-up for Boston in the First Round of the Playoffs?

"What team is a better matchup for the Bruins. Maybe in terms of itself cuz I mean, let's be, let's be candid. You know, lead into this at either match is going to be tough, right? Either one of these ones, you're like, all right? Well, that's what it is, right. Is it thing though? Like, so I feel like the looming thing with capitals is that, you know, any team is going to play them is going to give the shit kicked out of them. But yes, you know, they're finishing their big team. They've got Tom Wilson, they've got Hathaway, they've got Dylan Char, all these, all these big guys, but I think you look at how you best exploit a team like that. It's easier than 14. Like the Bruins, what their strengths to land punches against a team like the capitals on the ice in terms of you know, the X's and O's and it is the Penguins. Now, Penguins may not be nearly as big but you look at just the way the Capitals defense is, you look at how Scholl they are on defense, how the Bruins right now especially up front, all of a sudden have all this speed in their line-up. I mean they've God Top six is the top six even though Richie Crowley coiler the physical track and wine, those guys can move, you know, really Sean Crowley is, you know, a very good skater and events or fourth line. Now. It might depend on the match of, you know, do you want to roll out debrusk and kacchan? The 4th Line? Or is that one we go with Lazar with Frederick and Wagner so that, that can change a little bit in terms of the max but you look at the, the, the defense of the capitals have. I mean, the Bruins average close to three, three point six goals per game, against the capitals. The only team that scored more goals against against Atlantic division. Foes our East Division, foes was the same Choice which makes sense, not surprising, but the fact that, yeah, the fact that, you know, Washington who has a slow defense who do not really have to lead goalies in that, which, I mean, I think the biggest equalizer for how much the cap wasn't given the Bruins trouble of these has been because of brain. Hopefully now you've got vanicek and samsonov two guys who don't really ski all that money. Trade. I just look at the matchups and what the Bruins are going to go up against. Yeah, you're going to get knocked around quite a bit but it's

Bruins Dylan Char Penguins Richie Crowley Tom Wilson Sean Crowley Hathaway Scholl Lazar Wagner Frederick Atlantic Division East Division Vanicek Samsonov Washington
Mike the Headless Chicken

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

01:56 min | 2 d ago

Mike the Headless Chicken

"How did mike. The normal chicken one of a billion normal chickens. How did he become like headless chicken. So it's nineteen forty five and there is a farmer named lloyd olsen who farms in colorado and. He raises chickens. He's slaughtering chickens for market and he grabs one five-month-old checking and chop set off and the next morning. He loads up his wagon to go to town to sell these chickens and he notices that one is still alive so this is a thing of heard of right like running around like a chicken with your head cut off. It is something that happens rate. If this happens when you cut a chickens head off this has been happening. Since people have been cutting chickens heads off which is like a long time. I chicken with its head cut off. Usually they live about fifteen minutes. Max but mike was moving around and this. This just continued for days. What made mike special. How did this even work. There's a couple of different theories over the years. One is that you know. When olson dropped the axe on mike it only cut off basically his face and a little bit of his skull and so he was walking around with eighty percent of his brain and that controlled his digestive system his breathing so all of the necessary functions were still there and other people think that perhaps a lucky blood clot kept him from bleeding to death so quickly and so they think that kind of the combination of those two factors kept him alive and moving around for the next few months so as much as this was sort of a an oddity it was also a little bit of a science or like medical mystery. I honestly think that's why people are still interested in him is because it is a mystery. He was in his own right. Kind of like a wonder if kind of terrible one

Lloyd Olsen Mike Colorado Olson MAX
How To Rise Above Fear and Regret

THE BRENDON SHOW

01:57 min | 3 d ago

How To Rise Above Fear and Regret

"What will i do today if there is tomorrow there is no ruin if there is tomorrow. There is no ruin. So what do you do soon as you start feeling yourself catastrophe. Remember to ask yourself better questions and say okay. Not what i wanted. So what should i do today. Not what i wanted. What am i going to do tomorrow morning tomorrow afternoon tomorrow. Evening to start moving forward to making that next dollar or that next right action of integrity to make that next call that next email. There's always the next right always a next. It's like it's one of the great four letter. Words of all time maxed right so ruin shouldn't be stopping you fear of ruin. You just have to know where that is because what you're doing is you're catastrophes and this is really important if you don't feel like you made big leaps this year you were scared you're like i'm going to jump off this cliff and take this action and i'm gonna fall on my death ruin destruction instead of saying i'm going to jump up this clip and i'm gonna five eighty. I don't know. How am i fall for a little bit. But i'm flap those winds and some point. I'm gonna catch that win. And here we go. Your expectancy was in the gutter versus in the air. You're looking down versus looking up. You're feeling down versus animating yourself. So you felt better and that you moved further so my friends be wary of the ruined. His thoughts those global catastrophe. Zing dad negative forever things that you have soon as you hear it. You gotta flip suji here. You've got to flip it

Suji
Why 98% of Businesses Never Break $1 Million in Sales

Growth Experts with Dennis Brown

01:58 min | 3 d ago

Why 98% of Businesses Never Break $1 Million in Sales

"Yes. The first thing you want to look at right is the plan. I talked about that earlier right and get it out of your head. You know what you wanna do. It's in your head. It doesn't have to be perfect. It just has to get on paper because once you realize when it's on paper you can see 'em mitt charging when i need to charge. Seventy nine percent of small businesses are undercharging for their product and service. I know everyone that's listening right now. You know you need a pay raise because you pulled that pricing out of your hiney. Let's be clear we all pull it out of her honey. What is dennis charge. What a charge. What is bomb charge. When was jim charge. I'm gonna charge this basma. Nothing nothing to do with your pricing. So i go through a formula. 'cause even my business when i first started right i was undercharging. Five dollars right. Which doesn't sound like a lot of money but five dollars times three hundred customers. Right was fifteen hundred dollars a month. I was losing times twelve months. That was eighteen thousand dollars a year. I was losing and that was off a one service. So you you look at. You're losing money because you won't take the time to get clear on what it is. You're doing eighty eight percent of small businesses. Don't hit that hundred thousand dollars. We can go get jobs. One hundred grand. So i want to if you're going to do this and if you're going to sacrifice your time your money your retirement account hawk your home right. Get a home mortgage max out your credit cards. Let's do it right so it's looking at. Who is the ideal client back in the day as a hairdresser i was like where do i find my ideal qualified customer. So we all know our avatar and you put together but the missing piece that i see is you. Don't get clear on how much money they make. And how much disposable income. They have doesn't matter if i make one hundred grand if i'm spending two hundred gram it doesn't matter how much five hundred thousand dollars if you're spending five hundred fifty thousand dollars so do they have the ability to swipe that card and pay your prices and services. You'll grow your business quicker and faster if you get really clear. So i'm really clear who my avatar is

Jim Charge Mitt Dennis
Victory for Hamilton: Spanish GP Review

The Autosport Podcast

02:03 min | 4 d ago

Victory for Hamilton: Spanish GP Review

"Louis. How much combat is one hundred po position into a victory mocking his fifth consecutive winning spayed and his ninety eight th career win attract. That doesn't often provide us with the most thrilling race. But today we strategy keeping things interesting between the two title contenders. The start of the race to lead is nearly touched as max stop stop-and-go his hours out at the fast corner and took the lead from lewis. Meanwhile charlotte bucer managed to gain a position after taking outside line of time freight overtake boundary. Brought us a safety call was out on eight in order to recover yuki snow just call off to his appeared to shutdown and max manage to hold onto the lead. The safety car restart and it wasn't long before maximum. Lewis pulled away from the rest of the pack. Louis stayed max tau with around one point. Five seconds of him before max pitted on lap. Twenty four switch onto the medium tires and suffering an uncharacteristically. Slow pitstop a four point. Two seconds as his left rib was not ready when he came in mercedes chose not to hitler straight after and instead he stayed out for a few more laps before pitting returning to the track. Six seconds behind max. It took no time a tool for lewis to close that gap. But despite being in and out with max's d. r. s. couldn't quite him and instead mercedes tries to flex their strategy calling lewis in for another pitstop. This left lewis with twenty three snaps to go in around twenty three seconds to find whilst red bull tries to keep max out front. Lewis did what he needed to repeatedly setting fastest laps and taking the time out of max's lead but there was a moment of time as he approached his teammate. Who was told not to hold lewis up but we didn't seem to to make it too easy on instead. Lewis had to make the post into ten ten. It was lot sixty. When lewis took the lead for max who just didn't have the pace or tires to hold him back and instead max pitted again to get about foster slot point which he did. Despite initial losing position to show vouch we managed to get the position back and ended up finishing three with show a solid p.

Lewis MAX Charlotte Bucer Max Tau Yuki Louis
459: Spanish GP Qualifying Report

The Autosport Podcast

01:36 min | 5 d ago

459: Spanish GP Qualifying Report

"Qualifying day in spain. And it's an absolutely incredible one hundred pole position for lewis hamilton. An amazing achievement finance another pole position for mercedes. You have grabbed po at this track. Every essence twenty thirteen newest will be joined on the front row by max stopped with three hundred between them whilst battery blocked us and charlotte lock will be lining up behind on the second bar. We didn't see top three improving on their final runs with how much actually don't want at the exit with an ultimate corn by didn't matter as neither the stop an off as managed to improve that times either charlotte did manage to set personal bests in his final lap with alpine of estevan splitting ferraris. M p five and call signs behind impe six daniel. Ricardo bounced back from last weekend's qualifying finishing seven fastest beating saggio perez. Who spun at tom fatty on his last. Run and ricardo also out qualified teammate. Landau norris who came in p. nine. The top ten was rounded out with finanza alonzo and notable absence from keith rate was gasoline who despite looking quick in key. One was eliminated in q two for the first time in twenty twenty one and he will line up p twelve tamara in-between the aston martins launch. Tro and sebastian vessel antonio g. of nazi came. Mp fourteen ahead of mr saturday. George russell mp fifteen who again managed to make out key one and in doing so we saw. The elimination of yuki sonoda was quite the surprise about quite straighted team radio. Finally we had kimmy ryan. Mp seventeen ahead of schumacher nicholas fiamme nikita miles

Charlotte Lewis Hamilton Impe Saggio Perez Tom Fatty Landau Norris Finanza Alonzo Spain Keith Rate MAX Ricardo Antonio G Daniel TRO Tamara George Russell Yuki Sonoda Kimmy Ryan
Kershaw Goes 1 Inning in Shortest Start, Cubs Top Dodgers

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | Last week

Kershaw Goes 1 Inning in Shortest Start, Cubs Top Dodgers

"David Bowie came through with the game winning RBI single in the ninth inning as the cubs defeated the Dodgers forty three for a double header sweep the lead see sawed throughout with Ellie tying it at one in the seventh time Max Muncy is home run and then they took a three one lead in the eighth inning with Justin Turner also going deep but healthier by is tied at three with a two run blast of his own before bodhi came through in the night in the opener to Clayton Kershaw lasted only one inning his short distance ever in the regular season the Dodgers have now lost eight of ten David Shuster Chicago

Max Muncy David Bowie Justin Turner Dodgers Cubs Ellie Bodhi Clayton Kershaw David Shuster Chicago
How Archie Gips Lives "Unrealistically" and Creates Value Along the Way

Dose of Leadership

02:06 min | Last week

How Archie Gips Lives "Unrealistically" and Creates Value Along the Way

"Archie. Gipps dose of leadership show archie. Hey richard thanks for having me this ecstasy yeah and we have a co host tin win my business partner for the up and coming inside five podcast. Launching in in sometime in may welcome ten. Thanks for joining us as well. Thank you let me crash today. Well chicken and say this is a thrill because particularly because it's so fresh. Because i literally just watched the show last week on. Hbo max wall street that your production company. Congratulations on that very captivating binge worthy congratulations. Thank you so much. I really appreciate it. And the response has been really great. And that's really what's important when you you put a show together in like this you want let the world kinda get an inside glimpse marks life and just happy. That people really responded to it. What about i mean you're kind of you kind of you in the early stages of reality. Tv i mean if you think about real world came out what in the mid nineties and then you kinda came out with that blind date which i talk about a guilty pleasure me and my wife used to watch that and then i learned that you were writing a lot of the bubbles which was hilarious. That's did you were the only guy that did the bubbles or team. They're going to do them. There were four of us that originally wrote the thought bubbles. Which i think to this day i think is still a most famous People it just a guilty pleasure of a lot of some full and I i have some crazy stories about that. They could take a podcast. But i would go out in los angeles and had run into people knew spent so much time watching them. You know you'd watch these dates and dates would last like six hours. I don't think people realize now and then sudden you get You go out and you see one of them. And i think it's like a friend of mine or someone that i knew it stood of became a it was an ongoing joke almost but yeah it was. It was a fantastic experience. Really got to learn a lot about human psychology and how how men and women

Gipps Archie HBO Richard Los Angeles
One Pot-Earning Play I Love

Smart Poker Study Podcast

02:19 min | Last week

One Pot-Earning Play I Love

"The first pot earning play is floating flops to steal turns in this. Play the general way it works. Is you call the flop seabed with the plan of bluffing when they check on the turn. So it's a very simple call now bluff later plan and i absolutely love this play and i wanna share with you how to do it properly. There's five aspects that really help. If all of these things are in place really help this place succeed number. One is to be in position. Everything in poker's easier when you're in position you all know this right and being in position makes it more likely your opponents going to fail to seabed from out of position on the next street when they show you that weakness it's your time to pounce aspect number two is to have some equity. Now you can do this Call the flop. Beloved the turn with absolutely no equity. No draw no good pair. Nothing potential right. It's like holding eight. Seven on an ace king deuce flop but i really liked to do this with some sort of pair or even a backdoor draw or over cards on the flop that kind of equity just in case they call back into something. Good for example. You're holding the king. Spate queen of spades and the flop is nine three deuce with one spade so there are some really good. Turn cards for you. A king a queen gives you top pair. A jack or ten gives you a gut shot draw and any spade gives you a flush draw now if he checks to you on any of those cards and then you decide to bet and he calls. You can hit a good card on the river completing astray completing a flush giving you a top pair hand even a two pair trip kings. Now the third aspect is that the razors range missed both the flop and the turn so your opponent they raised pre flop and you called in position. They have plenty of. Ace king ex-queen x. hands in their range. So what kind of boards are they going to hate seeing probably low in dry boards. Things like nine do's and four or five seven also like monotone boards and even to tone boards couple of spades out there. That's going to be pretty scary if they don't hold a spade

Pacioretty Scores Twice, Golden Knights Beat Avalanche 5-2

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 2 weeks ago

Pacioretty Scores Twice, Golden Knights Beat Avalanche 5-2

"The golden knights widened their lead in the west division is Max patch ready scored twice in a five two win over the second place avalanche Vegas's won a team record ten in a row and moved six points ahead of Colorado with the apps having a game in hand the knights of outscore teams forty five seventeen during the win streak William Karlsson mark stone and Jennifer Marcia so also scored for Vegas Marc Andre Fleury made thirty five saves while improving to fifteen eight and two lifetime against Colorado Devine tames Arion graves scored for the apps I'm Dave Ferrie

Max Patch Golden Knights West Division William Karlsson Vegas Jennifer Marcia Marc Andre Fleury Mark Stone Colorado Devine Tames Arion Dave Ferrie
Apple Q2 Earnings Crush Analysts' Estimates With iPhone, iPad, Mac Sales

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:59 min | 2 weeks ago

Apple Q2 Earnings Crush Analysts' Estimates With iPhone, iPad, Mac Sales

"Tech giant reporting fiscal second quarter sales of $89.6 billion that was up 54% from the same period in 2020. Bob O'Donnell is president and chief analyst of Tech Analysis Research. He told us that Apple strong performance was fueled by sales of Ipads, Max and five G iPhones, especially in China. China numbers are also looking really good almost double from a year ago. So that's that's a clear sign of the fact that the iPhone 12 having five G. That's what was critical for China because Five. The networks are very widely available in China, and without a five the phone Apple was at a real disadvantage. IPad in Mac sales also nearly doubled. Analysts say these results show Apple's control over the supply chain and its ability to outmaneuver competitors. Apple shares are up 2.6% in extended trading quote. Coma, the world's largest smartphone chip maker,

Bob O'donnell Tech Analysis Research China Apple Coma
Boeing Pauses 737 Max Deliveries Due to Electrical Issue

Papa and Lund

00:18 sec | 2 weeks ago

Boeing Pauses 737 Max Deliveries Due to Electrical Issue

"Unfortunately, Boeing announced today they're pausing deliveries of their 7 37 Max, as a fix of an electrical issue that grounded the jet earlier this month is taking longer than expected. The company said the delay won't be long and they do expect to catch up on deliveries over the balance of the

Boeing
Google vs. Roku Over the YouTube TV App

Talking Tech

02:12 min | 2 weeks ago

Google vs. Roku Over the YouTube TV App

"Either listeners. It's brett molina here. Welcome back to talking tech by co host. Mike snyder is off today now. I thought one of the benefits of switching from cable to streaming was. We'd avoid a lot of these carriage deals you're about you know the case where you see an ad maybe for your carrier from channel saying you're gonna lose this channel by the end of the month. Let your cable provider no familiar with all that messaging will it seems like that kind of stuff has carried over now into the streaming world and the latest example of this is roku versus google roku has warned users of its devices who are also subscribes to youtube tv that they might lose access to the app citing quote unfair terms and quote from google according to a copy of the email that was obtained by usa today which you can read about tech usa today dot com the company behind the popular media streaming players told users that recent oceans with google to continue to carry youtube tv broke down because roku cannot accept what they call google's terms as we believe they could harm our users The email also says it roku is committed to reaching a deal so that they can keep youtube tv on the players. Now of course. Google has responded to this day in in their statement. They say they're disappointed that they chose that roku has chosen to make these kind of claims while they continue to go and that they are trying the best they can to offer a deal that benefits the viewers of tv as well as everyone that owns a roku Now this isn't the first time we've heard with roku hosting other apps as you recall when hbo max launched in may twenty twenty. It wasn't on the platform for quite a while. I think it was several months. Wasn't until december of that year ahead of the

Brett Molina Mike Snyder Google Youtube Roku Usa Today USA HBO
Self Service Data Exploration and Dashboarding With Superset

Data Engineering Podcast

01:07 min | 2 weeks ago

Self Service Data Exploration and Dashboarding With Superset

"Your host is tobias. Macy and today interviewing buick max spokesman about superset an open source platform for data exploration dashboards and business intelligence. So max can you start by introducing yourself for sure while i said thank you for having me on the show again. So that's to back to back in short period of time but yet quick intros for people missed a previous episode. Mimas max dr journal creator of airflow patchy superset projects that i started in two thousand fourteen. Fifteen while at airbnb. Since then i worked at will airbnb lift. Lift that facebook before doing did engineering. So involved in the world of engineering overtime in since before did engineering was data engineering. Since then i started a company called preset. That basically serves super a service in all sorts of bells and whistles Completely free so we're very strong contributors in the eventually supersede community and then we're strong operators because we operate the software at scale. The cloud is a cloud service.

Buick Max Mimas Max Dr Tobias Macy Airbnb MAX Facebook
Apple and Facebook Are All Ears

Reset

01:41 min | 2 weeks ago

Apple and Facebook Are All Ears

"Okay fair warning. We are about to get a bit meta this. Podcast episode is about the future of podcasts and why to tech companies apple and facebook are plunging feet first into the audio pool recruits. Peter kafka's. you're talking about. Hey peter so over the last couple of weeks there's been a bunch of talk about how big tech companies are getting into audio. There's apple and facebook. Let's start with apple which has more experience in this space. Tell me what apple is doing in the world. Podcasts apple mostly created the market for podcasts. And i say that knowing that people in the madame because apple did not technically invent podcasts. But they're the ones who sort of brought it to the mainstream back in two thousand five and then they pretty much left it alone. They have not tried to do much with podcasting. They have not assigned many people They haven't put much resources toward it and they haven't tried to make any money and now that's changing a little bit. They are going to allow individual podcast creators and publishers to sell subscriptions to podcast within apple. And so there might be a sm- they're gonna say smallish business. I think it's gonna be a huge business but it's gonna be something for apple so they've gone for making no money on it to making potentially some money so apple's going basically take a cut of podcast revenue that's made by a show host or pretty sure is that is that right. That's exactly right. It's the same same model. They have for apps and services like hp max etcetera. The publisher over makes the thing keeps seventy percent. Apple keeps thirty percent if you keep doing it for more than a year that cut goes to eighty five and fifteen

Apple Peter Kafka Facebook Peter HP
Boeing's Latest 737 MAX Headache

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

01:59 min | Last month

Boeing's Latest 737 MAX Headache

"Welcome to the czech six podcast. I'm joanne somo editorial director. For the aviation week network. Boeing seems to be a company that just can't shake off bad news late last year. The seven three seven max was cleared by us regulators to return to service just as the company had to halt deliveries of its seven eight seven wide bodies to quality control issues seven eight seven. Deliveries resumed late march. But now sixteen max. Customers have been forced to temporarily ground their airplanes due to production issues with power units certification of the triple seven x wide body has been delayed by last minute. Problem with the design of the aircraft flight control system and on the military front blowing continues to write off losses on the tanker program and was just ousted from a three way competition to build the next generation of ground-based us missile interceptors. It's safe to say boeing's leadership team and is board are on the hot seat as the company prepares for its annual meeting on april twentieth. Joining me to make sense of all this are for aviation week. Editors sean broderick michael bruno guy norris. And yen's floto sean. Let's start off with you Dissuade is max. Problem has nothing to do with the two crashes in the nineteen month grounding that followed. So what's going on. How many airplanes are effective. And how long is this going to take to get resolved. Yes first of all. That's absolutely right. This has no this latest Production slash design issue and. We'll talk a little bit more about that in a minute. A predates both accidents It dates to early two thousand and nineteen and it has to do with Grounding and bought and wire bonding in a standby power control unit so backup emergency power. Let's call it when the airplane is either on the ground and has no power or more critically when its in flight

Joanne Somo Boeing Sean Broderick Michael Bruno Guy Norris United States
Interview With Jon Damush, CEO of Iris Automation

Airplane Geeks Podcast

02:18 min | Last month

Interview With Jon Damush, CEO of Iris Automation

"Okay our guest is john damage. He is the ceo of iris automation. They produce the cassia which is platform agnostic. Three hundred and sixty degree radio computer vision detect and avoid system for you a. s. and they also have something they call the regulatory resource center. Which is an online tool that manages. The bbc loss waiver application process. How john's got a really nice long. Fantastic aviation technology career. He led new. Business ventures at boeing next. He was chief growth officer. At boeing's subsidiary in situ and he was a boeing executive liaison and board observer to sky grid which was a joint venture between boeing and spark ignition. John was also the ceo of two d three sensing they're a leading provider of computer vision based image processing software for aerial surveillance in on top of all that he's also an faa certified commercial pilot. He has multi-engine an instrument ratings and he's a cf. I the certified flight instructor. John welcome to the uav digest. Thank you very much. Max and i'm calling in from southern california to stay on team there. We go which probably makes both of your little bit jealous. This time year. I grew up in new jersey so i definitely remember what late february early march felt like This tease of spring but winter holding on for dear life. Well we were at seventy three degrees today. So i actually had the hanger open at the museum which was kind of a nice thing was on the teas. Get the punch is coming all right. Well john why don't we start off talking a little bit about the products and services that irish automation offers Detected avoid is certainly a big part of what you do. Yeah i would say. Detection is primarily what we do we at our core our computer vision and machine learning software company and what the founders of our business realized is that the drone industry was not going to be able to grow exponentially like all the hype held for so many years until drones were allowed to fly more like regular airplanes

Boeing John Damage Iris Automation Regulatory Resource Center BBC John FAA Southern California MAX New Jersey
"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

03:22 min | Last month

"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Sophisticated sometimes when we as adults look back on our youth we forget how sophisticated we were because we seem a little silly now but you know. Young people are very sophisticated. There's so sophisticated there so Some of the pieces are political. Some of the pieces are deeply powerful And i'm excited for the world to hear what these young singers these young musicians have to say about the world around them And And i think we'll all be the better for it this weekend. We also had had a concert with our littlest composers. We had twelve twelve world. Premieres of instrumental works. They worked for about four weeks with aaron bush who was in a young composer from philadelphia. Amazing woman who runs the women's composer project which is a choir camp. I mean come composition camp for For teens and young adult young adults who identifies as female gender non conforming and so she worked with them for about four weeks on graphic score notation and then we had a full performance of those pieces this weekend and also we also had a song presentation as well another thirteen world premieres so it's been incredible incorporate performance so you know learning about composers full idea and finding yourself in a composer idea and then also composition and sharing your full idea with others right and also then giving the feedback from a performer as they bring themselves to your idea and how the ideas change and being okay with that so it's been a really great I we have no no praise for cova but we do have praised for the online learning space just kind of allowing for some different ways of thinking and and i think that's good and and i'm excited some excited for people to hear this music it's blows me away with they've come up with and so check it out. I'm to give me so many great links to pull down there. I'll make sure they're all in the episode now a look at that. Well thank you so so much. This has been robin on by a flash. And i glad for this perspective and appreciate you sharing and i appreciate your energy. Thank you so much. This was this was awesome. I love. I love this format and just being able to share with musicians. Keep going keep going on right to close out episode. Here's a short clip of a leashes composition. Say her name. You can find a link to the full performance in the episode notes off a twenty twenty one theme music for the max q podcast created by metro neb ish..

philadelphia aaron bush about four weeks twenty this weekend cova thirteen world premieres metro neb max q twelve twelve world one
"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

03:24 min | Last month

"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Is so weird so you need sometimes some foiling and so i was like i went home thyroid that for days i was like we do have a mass to great. Oh my gosh. I could write music. Composer m i composer so anyway so The that in tandem with looking at the maryland state fine arts standards which i am obsessed with as well. That's a whole meeting. But i am obsessed with the standards and creativity has to be part of the music classroom in your orchestra program if you're not creating opportunities for students to create new works in response to the repertoire. That they're that they're performing. And i don't mean just improvising. Sometimes i mean revising and elevating a piece all the way to the end. If you're not criminals opportunities than you are not in alignment with the mail and say fine arts standards. Your you know your program is not. It's not an alignment just generally i think it's a this is a yet again. Another whole nother meeting like the threads of music education at all levels that are disempowering. So i mean. I love yes. This threat of creating empowering music happening at the collegiate level to it should be happening everywhere from p to twenty one. We should see student creating responding connecting and performing so so that to say so. We started that goal and so of course we took so much time with at six years so that the first two years teachers could really elevate their skills in composition And so we really invested in that and This year so this year two things happened in twenty twenty number one. I i Published my first piece. Say her name Through how leonard In two thousand and twenty one elevation of that is. I'm starting my own series. Sue how leonard. is very exciting. And it's called exigency for young voices and it will be a coral series for elementary middle school and early high school. I'm singers that uplift black and latinx next composers for that for those for those young voices really exciting opportunity. We're also of course going to be sharing student composition so this year In a couple years ago. I guess now it's been two years ago. We we wrote in any a grand partnership with intercultural journeys And the project was for twenty twenty twenty twenty one right the right in the middle and i was like we still do it. But we commissioned a twenty minute song cycle from the students and the music is beyond anything. I could ever imagine music with sound like that. Came from young people for their first. This is their first full composition. We scaffold it. We'd had scaffold approach. They worked with todd. Mac over from mit to to share his full of thirty minute New composition of voices philadelphia. A lot of their musical ideas were shared in that piece of again. They weren't then finishing the whole thing off. Then we premiered that work at carnegie hall with the new york with the philadelphia orchestra really great opportunity. We've worked with local singer songwriters to sing their pieces and talk through their process and do some small activities. We've been scaffolding it up and this year it was great. You got to feel twenty minutes And they've done it. And that concert will be april thirtieth of this year and And it's four original works. That are jest.

six years twenty minutes twenty minute two years ago two things first first two years thirty minute first piece todd. Mac couple years ago this year four original works twenty This year new york april thirtieth of twenty twenty number one maryland two thousand
"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

05:48 min | 2 months ago

"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"And i feel like i think a couple years later after you know some people had had moved on from san max other things. I don't think. I don't think i would have been a even a candidate if we hadn't had those kind of really positive experiences playing together back back when we were nineteen or whatever you know it's funny how those those feels so sort of like pivotal now and at the time. That's totally what i was thinking about it. I was just thinking about trying to play my part as well as i could. You know But hindsight is always you know is is sort of this. You know interesting. Perspective for us Yeah i think that gets to a really A really good point and something for students to think about as they're in school like the colleagues that you're working with in school. Those are the people that will be your contemporaries as you graduate. And as you move on easy to forget because everybody is a student together just trying to make it through the semester but in terms of sandbox. What what would you say Your roles look like within the ensemble. Do you divide and conquer different responsibilities. You all do a little of everything. How does that look for you. Especially being non-profit absolutely we definitely. I guess we all have different jobs. Basically agassi divide and conquer a little bit but we. It was a long process to kind of figure out exactly what certain corners people were going to sort of manage themselves and since becoming a nonprofit that has become i think even more defined more clear l. I think i was like to think of it. Like into categories. Like there's jobs that people kind of just gravitated towards over time because maybe they really good at particularly at one area where they were really interested in one area and then there's the other category which is like things that like you know nothing about but you kind of rise to the occasion like you know what this is something that we really need to get done. I feel like i want. I'm ready to take on that responsibility art. I'm at least ready to learn about how to do that. Specific thing you know. So i guess to give you some Some specifics i i manage although the money in the group on my kind of like the financial coordinator. I guess And that was kind of i. Guess kind of in both categories like it was just sort of like from the first ever dollar that we made it was just like oh like because i i guess i was the one who liked kind of gathered. Everyone it was just kinda like. Oh like i'll i'll just hold onto the dow hold onto that one dollars right now. Let's just say that. And then that one dollar turned into dollars and then eventually like that grew a little bit more and more and more end. So i just kind of always manage the money in Absolutely by by no means. Is it something that unlike By particularly gifted at like. I don't think unlike in a a not like amazing nath. I'm not like. I don't have an accounting background. So i guess it has been something that personally. I've i've kind of decided like. Oh i'm gonna rise it occasion. 'cause this is where they need me. This sandbox needs me. And i think we each the four of us all have an example of that. Like for terry for instance. I know like he. He manages all the grants and for for after becoming a nonprofit. That started out as being like a lot of work. And then then transitioned to a nonprofit. It became a ridiculous amount of work. So that has definitely been something that is like kind of rising to the occasion tack. More grants split. Yes kinda having opera. Not i mean it. Sorta attracts a lot of a lot of facets of the organization..

nineteen one dollar one dollars first both categories each one area four a couple years later san max dollar
"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

04:07 min | 3 months ago

"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Best and whatever <Speech_Male> and who's <Speech_Male> most successful. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> what. I realized <Speech_Male> when i had my first <Speech_Male> concert at <Speech_Male> the great <Speech_Male> lakes music festival was <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> my audience <Speech_Male> who i was really doing. <Silence> This for. didn't care. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> They had they <Silence> didn't. It wasn't <Speech_Male> about <Speech_Male> shallow stuff <Speech_Male> anymore. It was just <Speech_Male> about. They like <Speech_Male> the music <Speech_Male> and that <SpeakerChange> was incredibly <Speech_Male> liberating. And <Silence> it actually <Speech_Male> made <Speech_Male> my life <Speech_Male> more productive. <Speech_Male> I wasn't <Speech_Male> Caught <Speech_Male> up in these sort of mental <Silence> traps of <Speech_Male> just obsessing <Speech_Male> over intonation <Speech_Male> or whatever <Speech_Male> as <Speech_Male> musician and <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> get the feeling of <Speech_Male> being free you know and <Silence> as a conductor <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> it's a really. <Speech_Male> It's a tough thing to learn <Speech_Male> how to do. Because <Speech_Male> you don't have an instrument <Speech_Male> to practice on <Speech_Male> except for very <Speech_Male> rare opportunities <Speech_Male> in class <Speech_Male> and peabody gave you <Speech_Male> a lot of experience <Speech_Male> during that. But <Speech_Male> you're getting your lesson <Speech_Male> your private lesson front <Silence> of fifty people <Speech_Male> in a <Speech_Male> room and it's very <Speech_Male> personal <Silence> and it's very <Speech_Male> you have <Speech_Male> to have a lot of hits <Speech_Male> but you have to have a lot of <Silence> grit <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> just say you know what <Speech_Male> i'm gonna put my ego aside <Silence> you <Speech_Male> know i'm <Speech_Male> gonna suck and everyone's <Speech_Male> going to think i saw <Speech_Male> but you know it doesn't matter <Speech_Male> that the process of getting <Speech_Male> better but once you <Silence> get out into the world <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> your confidence i <Speech_Male> think goes way up so <Speech_Male> i think <Speech_Male> for those of you guys <Speech_Male> that are still in school <Speech_Male> it <Speech_Male> gets better <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> but there are things you miss <Speech_Male> about school. <Speech_Male> You don't have. <Speech_Male> You're not surrounded by <Speech_Male> people who are passionate about <Speech_Male> the things that you're passionate <Speech_Male> about <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> Your life <Speech_Male> is not as structured as it used <Speech_Male> to be. But <Speech_Male> but you know. I <Speech_Male> i look back fondly <Speech_Male> on my time <Silence> in college <Speech_Male> and what i <Speech_Male> miss most is my <Silence> my interaction with my friends. <Speech_Male> But <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> there's so many great <Speech_Male> things you can do. <Silence> I mean we. <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> the future of <Speech_Male> will classical music <Speech_Male> is incredibly bright <Speech_Male> because <Silence> we're starting to really <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Chip <Speech_Male> away at <Speech_Male> the old institutions <Speech_Male> in the way <Silence> that they've they've always <Speech_Male> been <Speech_Male> and we're really creating <Speech_Male> new things. The internet <Speech_Male> is given us those opportunities. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> there's a whole <Speech_Male> class of people that have a <Speech_Male> health aria. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> There's a whole class of people <Speech_Male> that have <Speech_Male> a hunger <Speech_Male> for this music <Speech_Male> and for new <Speech_Male> ways of <Speech_Male> presenting that music <Speech_Male> so i think the future <Speech_Male> is very bright <Speech_Male> We just gotta survive <Speech_Male> the current virus <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> put put food <Silence> unable. <SpeakerChange> And we'll get <Speech_Female> there. Yeah <Speech_Female> well thank you so <Speech_Female> much. Thomas really <Speech_Female> appreciate this <Speech_Female> and It's been <Speech_Male> a pleasure speaking with you <Speech_Male> today. Thanks for <Speech_Music_Male> asking me. It really appreciate your <Speech_Music_Female> seeing. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> You can hear <Speech_Female> more from thomas <Speech_Female> on his new podcast <Speech_Female> called the state <Speech_Female> of art which explores <Speech_Female> music <Speech_Female> the past present <Speech_Female> and future. <Speech_Female> Please see a link <Speech_Female> in our episode notes <Speech_Female> to close <Speech_Female> out our episode. Here's <Speech_Female> thomas leading <Speech_Female> the peabody conductors <Speech_Female> orchestra in an <Speech_Female> excerpt of <SpeakerChange> stravinsky's <Speech_Music_Female> firebird suite <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Twenty twenty one <Speech_Female> theme music <Speech_Female> for the max q podcast created by metro neb ish.

Thomas fifty people thomas today first metro neb Twenty twenty one Speech_Male
"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

06:27 min | 5 months ago

"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"See what. An audio engineer could do In terms of snow shaping. The art is crafting is Is the artistic craft too. And that's when my priorities shift from being a pianist trying to be a pietas while not trying trying to be a concert. Pianist as career to being nabiel edgy art. And i think that's all that's that's there's nothing wrong with changing career while you're in college s with your And i don't regret not being of yannis. Do you feel like your experience as a performer. Informs your work as an audio engineer. Yeah i the twenty years of musical training that i received a Pena's that has. It helped me so martian in my career as an engineer because right especially nowadays people trust engineers who are musicians who knows southbound and who knows the music and just being a musician you have so much more I wouldn't say leverage but you know it's so much better than hiring someone who came from a background doesn't know anything about music and only the technical side and i've been doing a lot surprisingly i'm doing you a lot of tuning these days for for engineers and i know that i've worked with and I think my training as a musician. You know all the the side reading the site saying old acquire actually helped to Just have a pair of trained years would help you so much as an engineer. You mentioned that you do quite a bit of freelancing as well what are some of the strategies that you have or experiences good or bad you've had when negotiating with clients so it's very normal. It's a eighty percent of the times client. Couldn't pay you for what you asked for. And you know it's very understandable because it's hard to be a musician making money so oftentimes they would give you a project and it was a. Hey i can only pay you three hundred dollars but you know it's the if you're to call them it's going to be. Let's say a six hundred dollar fee so in that situation you don't wanna lose the client But you also don't want to put yourself at the lower value than what you deserve. So oftentimes i will tell them. Hey like for this project. I will normally charge amount of feet but i understand your difficulties And i like you as a client or as a musician. I love you. I would do it for your fee as a friend discount or as a musician discount. And that way you know you're not lowering your value. And they know that you're doing them a favor which would probably come in handy in the future. They will appreciate your help. Your understanding is always good to just make a friend. But i don't know i wasn't able to. I mean sometimes. I try to stick to my feet just because i think they could afford it like you've l. Asked me to do something. I wouldn't give them a huge discount but you know for independent musicians is really hard for them. So i try you know. Try to to to to to to stick to a lower fee and to do the project instead of you know not working with them and that's kind of a. It's a constant struggle and it's a compromise. Do you find that by Making those compromises you end up with more clients. It's kinda hard to tell because you don't know what didn't happen. You know you know what's the otherwise situation. But i think that makes me feel better because we are not in this music. All of us were not in this music industry to be milliner. We're doing it for art. So tell sometimes is very necessary to sacrifice the money and the income for for other more important reasons as an artist. And it's easier for me now. Because i have this giga snl. So i can afford to take a lower rate at other gates. Which is what i want to do in the future Or have a source of income. That i can support myself and have another outlet where i can support my artistic needs by. Yeah i understand. it's a it's difficult. it's a balanced. We all kind of have to just keep working on it. Yeah and probably finding your own like balance point of value versus time exactly exactly. Yeah well tom thank you so much for joining us in for sharing all of your experience a lot of great stuff here and i hope that the students really take your words to heart. Thank you thanks. Thanks so much. I'm really happy to be talking to you and maybe give some. Hopefully the students will something helpful in our conversation. Thinks tongue have a great day. You can check out tongues. Recent work with the philadelphia or tre in a free online concert series called our city your orchestra. You may also find traces of her work in current episodes of nbc's saturday. Night live.

nabiel yannis Pena milliner tom philadelphia nbc
"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

07:52 min | 5 months ago

"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"About who you know So i started going out. To clubs and meet musicians need engineers Just reached out to all the people. I know who are working in new york city area And eventually A friend of my or someone. I know introduced me to a recording studio in story. Call some hotel They were. They focused on jazz recording. Mostly nine. I will say ninety percent lowest jazz recording so i started intern called intern there. just to see how the studios are operated a new york. I wasn't getting paid at first. And then they paid me a little bit And that was when i was still doing the job so i had that in the studio the first studio job going on at same time and in a couple months later i was at a show and i saw Michael formanek he said faculty. Ed peabody was be a faculty at fiu. Id theft a couple years ago He's bengals play and he was actually doing a session at october and Studio the day after so he asked me if i wanna go check all the studio at meet the owner so i did and left my contact with him And i followed up i. I emailed owner multiple times saying. Hey i if you you mentioned that you need someone you need help I think i can do this job like you know if you want me through. Could you let me know if you back. So that's how. I got the second gig at october And in a couple months later i was added show again a show and i run into this engineer that i met once who was also recording the the show that day and we started talking and he mentioned that he Well i don't i. Don't he mentioned it. That time But anyway we started talking. We exchanged contact numbers a couple weeks later. He's the workspace that he has a opening opened a spot so he asked if i wanted. Joy share basically share a working a studio with him. just know a mixing. Mastering studio just shared a space And read and stuff. So that's how we Kind of connected in october of two thousand eighteen a year after moved to new york this engineered and i met. He gave me a call and turns out he worked at snl and there was the open the a very basic level position open and he asked. If i'm ready for this job and i was like yes definitely. yes definitely. This is what i've been waiting for So yeah that's how. I got the gig. Nbc that's amazing. Yeah it was a it was i looking back. I think i was very lucky Maybe i mean maybe people maybe part of it is locked but i feel like a lot of it is also. You really reached out as yan's like you talk to a lot of people and you developed relationships and then you kind of you didn't let down either. You're following up. Yeah exactly so. Tell me more about that. Process like the following up and the networking. What are the things that you did that. You felt like made that process successful for you. Well i'm you know me pretty bubbly person. I love to talk to people to start with and It's kinda hard to put a formula. Honored is mostly you know you. Just you have to fundamentally you have to put yourself out there and you know i might have had like ten bad conversations with ten people who would never help me or who you know but if you have one conversation that this one correct person that changes so you just have to put yourself out there and be genuine and just present yourself. Show them who you are. Yeah and Follow up is very important too because you know especially in new york. Everybody's running around everybody's meeting twenty thirty new people a and this. You know you give them your cart. They might not even remember to call you back or held two days later that they met you even though he had this hamas. So it's very horton that you have their contact and maybe you know if you don't hear back from the way for a couple of days mary. Hey we've met at this event. And i really enjoyed talking to you. I will act to stay stayntouch and maybe you know what you've been doing what you're working on what you're what you're looking for in the future. You know stuff like that. Yeah yeah so sort of making sure that you're not afraid to have those conversations even if not all of them are successful and continuing to poke those people when you don't hear from them. Yeah so outside of your training in school in audio recording and sciences What are the skills or areas that you found most helpful as you develop your career So the the things that we've learned in classes and what a teacher hamas is steph weighing. You know you have to know those technical things to be an engineer but outside that's just ten percent of started or to our and ninety percent of it. Is this your crafts and go out to the real world and just do. There's just no other way you just have to. You know you know all the theories you might not everything about audio on buddies alte sessions every single debuted long else. Mike's you're not. You're not going to be a good engineer. So what i learned is that Internships and summer jobs. Or you know any job that you can get on while you're in school if that's very helpful. I started my first inter shape in mice software summer of fart after my sophomore year. And i've been doing. I've been working in autofill reporting every single summer and while i'm this too So i went to tanglewood and once you bev sent one year i went to reward one year after of after i finished my coursework i lead. I was leading off program at the atlantic music festival. And while i was a student i was working at a church running lifestyle and doing recordings for them so all of that helps you see what the real world looks like and learn from professionals who are actually doing their job out there and not just from the confessors who teach you know what they know or what you what you need from fox so as a student.

Michael formanek Ed peabody new york fiu bengals new york city snl yan hamas Nbc horton steph mary tanglewood Mike bev fox
"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

07:10 min | 5 months ago

"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"With tongue. Chen a twenty seventeen peabody graduate. Who is a freelance audio engineer. Currently based in new york city in addition to her work as a studio engineer she has also a music production mixer and editor at saturday night. Live hey tom. Thanks so much for joining us today. Yeah thanks for having me here. Really good to see you again Do let's get started. And i'd really love to hear what your life looks like right now. Okay so i actually just started working two weeks ago We i took a very long break while. Not you know not that i want you. But because of covid oh. My work got suspended at the end of march. And there hasn't been any work that i was able to do because a lot of stuff is in the studio lot of interacting with people So i was on break up until two weeks ago An an snl started to get ready for the shows which happened The first show happened last week so we started preparing for died And there's another place that i worked at the medicine for Classical music so I work at a studio there. And we did a couple of sessions last week and the week before so right now things are still kinda as still picking up Getting busy but not as busy as before covid. Yeah that's why. I'm glad that you're able to get to work and do some more of that again. I yeah me too. It's it's really a feels a little strange Getting back to work but you know it takes time to get used to. Yeah so what was the. What was your schedule. Like before covid. Just throw comparison sure Before kobe i was very busy I was working almost every day. And i was traveling a lot for work too so I work at now doing show week for two days a week before but right now i doing a different jobs. So i'm working three days a week so Before covid i had two days now two or three weeks a month I was working at a recording recording studios one is called up tavern and they focus on New music jazz classical also work at dimona center. I just mission They do. Broadway shows cast albums. A larger orchestra recordings Emphasized that i also worked for this company called music. Mix mobile there A broadcast Recording company they travel around the country. Doing a rita shows things like you know. The iheartradio concerts super bowl. Nba all star and a bunch of summer festivals. So i worked for that company. Doing portal's operations. So i've been traveling a lot with them swell and besides that is just you know. Little mix and editing gigs. That i get from engineers that i know a musicians so yeah life before cohen was pretty busy and then you know i got to take a break from that and pick up you know my life take plans sometime with edwin. So that was nice. Yeah probably sounds like you had a lot going on so that was probably a bit of a relief in so yeah it was it was it was getting. It was getting really busy. I think before covid. I was working two months straight with no break. Oh my gosh have yeah. It's good to be busy but you know when you're working every day and just trying to find a day to do laundry it. Yeah so how did you keep yourself organized especially with traveling and going from place to place. Because i can imagine. That's probably yeah a lot. That's the challenge I rely on a calendar. Allot google calendar of. That's that was ninety percent of my life Whenever i hear about a giga half depending on calendar immediately because after why otherwise you know few minutes later you forget about it and is also very important for me to keep a good balance between my and work I tried to go to the gym day before a read That's impressive yeah it is. It's very hard because sometimes you you know you go to work At night or at eight. Am and you finish at eight. And you're like oh. I could go home. Relax or i could go to jam and work on my body and what you do. So it's it's definitely it takes disciplines but it's very important especially for the line of work that we're in. It's very important to stay healthy Have a good diet that will make everything better So you mentioned a bunch of different organizations that you work for do. Could you talk a little bit more about how you got from graduating school to now working for all these different places in. You're based in new york is that right. Yes yeah. I'm here full-time all the time. So kind of a. It's a journey i graduated. I finished my school. Coursework for recording arts An acoustic semesters acoustics in two thousand fifteen But dot year. I didn't do my piano recital. So after two thousand fifteen. I was working at the company doing audiovisual system design. Telephone system designed An acoustics is office job. So i was doing that for almost fulltime while preparing for my recital in two thousand sixteen. So that your i. After i finished my side my recital. I realized that i hated that job. A not where i wanted to be. I have to make was telling me that i have to move to new york and just pursue what i want in life and also just start a career that i really love so after my settle was stunned I it was actually. I got lucky because the company that i was working for. They opened an office in new york city. And i asked to transfer this office. So i can you know have income while looking for other jobs in music and audio so i moved to new york That summer the summer of two thousand sixteen and still working for that company. And i just started to go out. I know that have a new york. Everything's about connection pretty sure everywhere is the same is.

dimona center Chen new york city tom super bowl edwin Nba cohen google new york
"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

02:53 min | 6 months ago

"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"They have written pieces About the life cycle of star and have been paired with scientists from the institute To find images that relate to their pieces so we'll be recording Will be recording album with them in baltimore partially in baltimore as a video. Shoot in new york towards the end of the semester. Where really excited about it. It's it's fun to start closing this out. What advice would you have for current students. Sometimes i feel hesitant to even offer advice to current students because i have so much to learn from them but maybe that's part of my advice is to remember that. Yes you are students but you're also artists and musicians in you already. Have artists musicians dancers. Researchers you already have so much to contribute I wanna say that. I that i also want to reiterate to be curious and ask questions and look for experienced the experiences that you haven't had before Whether that means seeking out collaborate collaborations with peers. Whether that means seeking out mentorship taking a class that has or elective that has very little to do with your major There are so many things to learn that can inform what we do in getting out of our comfort zone or out of kind of our routine plays such a large part in that and transferable skills are a very real thing in a very important thing both taking skills from other work or other projects in applying to our artistic practice and also taking skills from artistic practice in applying them to other work. Both things are really Really useful and i can often be really fulfilling so i think my two biggest pieces of advice are remembered that you are already in artists and also remember that. There's a lot more to learn a lot to be curious about. Thank you so much. Sarah so glad you're here with us today. Thank you so much for having me. You can learn more about sarah at her website. Sarah thomas violent dot com. You can also visit bergamo quartet. Dot com to hear the group's music and subscribe to their newsletter A theme music. For the max. Podcasts composed by vincent fasano..

Sarah thomas baltimore vincent fasano bergamo new york
"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

04:51 min | 6 months ago

"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"But making sure. I make a point to prioritize what i care about what love doing. I think that's a great perspective. Do you have any tricks for staying organized with all of these different activities that you are balancing right now. Honestly google drive drive. Great much lifesaver. you know. That's still something. I'm figuring out. I i am serious about google drive. It's it's really. It really help is helpful with collaboration. End with keeping myself organized keeping different projects organized and being able to work with others in this projects when needed that's kind of a very practical organisational thing as far as more about Time balancing and time management organization. I will say that is something. I'm really trying to figure out right now because my life has changed a lot in the last couple of months. settling into a schedule I have a good friend who always helps me. Make my schedules to make sure that i scheduled time. Time to eat and sleep I recommend finding a friend to help you do that. Because sometimes we tend to forget to allow times for those things So i worked with her to to make a kind of ten of a schedule and now trying to follow that assess. What's working about it. And what's not. My general theory is far as organization. Time management is make a plan but also be patient with yourself and understand that your plan might not work and if it doesn't work then change it. Can you tell me a little more about how you started teaching and has evolved into for you. Sure so i started teaching knows pretty young assisting with group classes i grew up suzuki method kit and as i kind of grew that that method i started working with the younger group classes and assisting with those doing some private teaching in high school And when i came to peabody for the first couple of years. I didn't do much teaching but my third year in peabody i took a pedic pedagogy class and that kind of opened up some opportunities for me to start teaching more regularly in my fourth year at peabody i started teaching at chamber encounters music academy which is a school in pike's bill on does group classes and private lessons. I taught group classes for them for a couple years of violent students and After a year. So i kind of transitioned to teaching primarily private lessons which worked well for me it just based on my schedule and being able to have a little bit of flexibility there and i've been teaching private violin viola lessons.

peabody google pike suzuki
"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

05:20 min | 6 months ago

"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Great. I must be really exciting to work with them on a daily basis really is it's been so wonderful for the last month already even though it's remote in can Weird circumstances but still really exciting for us. Yeah so you talked about moving to new york during the pandemic which is of course. I can imagine an adventure. D- what are you feel has helped you prepare for your current situation where you're freelancing and moving to a new city pursuing school. What do you think has helped you. The most as you are in this new place. I think a lot of the things that i'm doing now are actually things that i started doing while i was in school in the last two for years of my time peabody not everything but a lot of the things and because of that i feel like it's been a really interesting transition from being in school to being out of school because well sometimes people say that you never have more time the do while you're in school but i like to think that depends on. How many things you do while you're in school for me. I kind of felt like after graduating. I was doing all of the same things without homework. So i felt like i had more time. Actually nice Now i'm in school. So i have homework again. But as i feel that the connections i made in school and a part time work that i was the freelancing is doing the chamber groups. I made a point to play with a lot of those continued into my life after graduation and have also continued into my life in new york outside of baltimore. So it's been an interesting process in that way. something. I think about a lot. How did you started with those things while you were in school. What were the first steps. You took the first steps for me while the very first steps from us being curious and trying to learn about things that i'm may not have thought i would be interested in at first Case in point..

new york peabody baltimore
"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

04:26 min | 6 months ago

"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"There are so many things to learn that can inform what we do in getting out of our comfort zone or out of kind of our routine plays such a large part in that This queue podcast peabody's launch paddle dedicated to demystifying life after graduation every episode. Sit down with the recent peabody lama to get take on what life is like for working artists in today's world. War jobs book balance finances time. Angela we discussed that and more. Hi everyone i'm christina fancier. Today's interview is with sarah thomas. Who was a violinist and chamber musician. Who graduated peabody twenty. Nineteen she currently performs with the bergamo quartet who are pursuing professional studies. Diplomas as the graduate string quartet in residence at manas school of music in new york city. Sarah is also a teacher freelancer and works with us at the peabody launch pad office. Hi sarah thanks so much for joining us today. Thanks so much for having me. It's our pleasure so to get started. Could you tell us a little bit. About what your life looks like right now for sure So about two months ago. I moved from baltimore to new york. City has been a really exciting in a big life. Change in the middle of what is kind of a strange time. These days I moved to new york to start a degree at the mannes school of music with my string quartet. The bergeman quartet where. We're studying with the jack quartet as the graduate string quartet in residence. So that's been a really big part of my life in the last month or so getting started with school. I moved here from baltimore there for seven years. And as i've been settling into new york I've been also teaching remotely working launch pad remotely and getting back into a hertzel's with After several months off which has been really exciting for us. Socially distance with masks Can you tell me a little more about bergamo and how that journey has been for you. So bergamo.

new york city sarah thomas bergamo peabody baltimore manas school of music mannes school of music christina fancier Sarah Angela
"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

04:32 min | 7 months ago

"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"The thing that makes me happy personally that didn't work for me but I was able to at least identify here's blunting I was spending a Lotta time on that I don't like and then stringency how you fill up your time after that don't focus on what's perfect focus on with not perfect and then just don't don't be afraid to be yourself and put yourself out there. be you know really caring about what you do? Be Persistent keep up a good schedule. You know it's every week him at yourself to working for your career certain amount of time and you know if you give up for a month, YOU'RE GONNA lose a lot of momentum easy to especially out of school. Okay. So that's my general advice and I think, honestly, it relates to the Kobe advice because it was going to say that. Pieces is figure. Because now, more than ever, we have to like find a way Christina put this to me the other day find a way to break through the noise find a way to get people to recognize you from an image or a sentence you right on the internet or something you say video. And it's something I'm still learning about is like how do I make myself seem authentic Caddo and make myself seem worth it not just some random advertisement somewhere on the internet Thinking about just how you can connect with that environment and not being afraid to try it especially, not being afraid to try something that no one else is doing. Yeah is if everyone? I mean I've seen a lot of people posting about free lessons recently. And I'm not really doing it much anymore because I stopped getting students from it like around April so. I don't know if you see everyone else posting about free lessons I mean, maybe maybe don't worry about it. Think about something new you could do that you would enjoy. What you're doing. Work sometimes. Okay I think the only thing I want to ask you here just to kind of close up because I know for me. One of the things that has been really pleasant during Our mutual social isolation is I've been able to read and listen to a lot more music, and so I'm curious if there's anything that you're currently reading or listening to or watching that you kind of want to explore talk about a recommend. Okay. So I have been finding new sources of entertainment. Recently, you know because I was typical like at the end of the day watching Netflix's episode type person. But I'm really able to acknowledge. Now the other things felt my time like cooking during a lot more cooking a lot more baking when I'm not hungry. And listening to more podcasts. A lot of good podcasts out there cleaning this one So like ask your friends for recommendations and I honestly like besides like Max q I've been listening to office ladies the in-depth analysis of office. I love. The office. I'm not listening to a whole lot of else other stuff I am following some new facebook.

Christina Kobe facebook social isolation Netflix Caddo
"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

04:46 min | 9 months ago

"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Is with Taylor. Davis, who is a percussionist educator and recording artists who graduated from peabody in twenty nineteen. Taylor currently teaches at Texas. Woman's University and Flower Mound High School is the founder of an educational organization called Percussion Pale and he continues to freelance as a recording artist and percussionist. Taylor. Thank you so much for joining us today or really grateful for you sharing your experience. Could we start by just hearing a little bit about what your life looks like right now. Shirt so all talk. As if we aren't in a covid nineteen time just to give some perspective on what it was in speak a little bit to what I'm doing now. so It's a little bit complicated just in the sense that I think right now at least where I am in my career, I'm doing a lot of small things and then Michael would be a couple years to kind of thin it down and put my focus into specific projects a little bit more So right now, I teach at a high school and then the three feeder junior highs. Role there is the assistant percussion director, which means it's part time. there's a full-time percussion director but. Each day there's about thirteen classes, worth of students that meet with percussionists. So it's just not logistically possible for one person to do it all. And so that's why my position exists and that looks like a couple of things I teach masterclasses in sectionals across all the schools. And Teach. Marching band when that's going and then it's just a lot of private lessons across the East campus. The other thing I do. Is I'm the Adjunct Percussion teacher at a university in didn't end. So that's Texas Women's University I work with percussion students, stare private lessons, percussion methods. Chamber Music This was the first year that we had a studio class. So that was new for the students but I kind of insisted on that when I took the job I thought it was important for them to all be in the room at the same time And then I I do this other thing, this recording business a called by one media and I do that with a colleague that I met in. UNDERGRAD Met On Line and.

Taylor Percussion Pale Flower Mound High School recording artists director Texas peabody Davis Texas Women's University Michael founder
"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

1:40:07 hr | 11 months ago

"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"The biggest thing for me was realizing man. There's so much of a learning curve of just how to market myself and how to brand myself so that I can be successful on my own, and so that I can connect with other musicians. This is Max Q. PODCAST peabody's launch paddle office dedicated to demystifying what life is like after graduation. Every episode and sit down with the recent peabody. To get their take on what life is like for walking artists today's word. JOBS LIKE BALANCE FINANCES TIME ANGELO! We discussed that. Key, pockets. Hi Everyone I'm Christina, answer. Today's interview is with a special guest Chris Johnson who graduated from Michigan State University in two thousand seven with a Master's degree in Jazz Studies, he has since toured the legendary count. Basie Orchestra appeared on five grammy nominated albums, and served as director of Jazz Studies at the University of UTAH. Chris is currently a freelance composer, trumpeter and educator back in Detroit Michigan. Wondering, if we could get started, could you just tell us what your life looks like right now? Absolutely thanks so much for having me really appreciate it. Right now I'm working as a freelance composer, performer and educator. Most of my freelance composing consist of some commission projects for various ensembles whether it be orchestra. Band went on SAMBOL etc.. actually just finished up a musical. Working as the. One of the CO composers co lyricist for musical also of course releasing a lot of my own projects as a freelance performer, I'm not really doing much touring, but a little bit of touring. I am doing Are you know things with more personal projects? Whereas before I was torn with the Count Basie Orchestra Right now I'm really focused on my own personal type projects. As an educator I'm working freelance, so I am doing a residency at troy high school here in Michigan and addition to that also doing a skype lessons as well as in-person lessons masterclasses at various schools, adamant artists in residence at the University of Utah, where I'm going and four times during this academic year to do masterclasses on performances with students..

"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

10:11 min | 1 year ago

"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Making this much money or something like that. I do have these kind of philosophies that I check in with about every six months and And if I feel like something is getting off track with one of those those pillars that I talked about that I sit down and reassess the situation in see what I can do to make sure that I'm I'm fulfilling those needs And I can look like a lot of different. Things is being opened with people as one so meeting with my boss and and making sure that. We're both feeling good about the work that we're doing you're talking to my partner about what their needs are in how that aligns with mine didn't where compromise might be So so I don't. It's the very long term thing is so hard for me but taking these smaller steps to able to look into what the future might look like. Help me a little bit and starting to save a little bit of money to. It's always hard but starting with the littlest bit. Yeah Awesome You mentioned in there that you that making art is important to you as well as the administrative work that you do. Could you talk a little bit about how taking a fulltime administrative job has affected or impacted your performance career? And you always so I play with New Music Group in Baltimore called mine on fire. And they're dedicated to playing the works of contemporary composers alongside other art. John Rose in the community. I I lo- play different. Things like church gigs or Sometimes people need ringers for orchestras things like that. But I will say when thinking about performance in having a fulltime job the the idea of time management and just work life balance really comes in into play here And that's something that I got to kind of figure out in school little bit because I was. I had so many part time jobs while it was a student so it was kind of learning how to manage that a little bit but nothing compares to having a fulltime job times when you we've school all of a sudden you don't have this community all the same place at least that was my personal experience. So here's if you stay in touch with your friends and colleagues from peabody or your previous jobs and if so how do you stay in touch with them? Sure so networking has been a really interesting thing for me I don't really the idea that sometimes people will tell you when you leave school when you enter. The workforce is like US Lincoln. I personally don't use Lincoln very much other. It may be good for other fielder It's been crucial for me in my experience. But I think when we hear the the word networking very like sterile business down to business kind of professional word and we really WanNa like have an intention with every interaction that we have and at least. That's the idea that I had of networking when I was in school. And that was very intimidating to me. It was a very scary idea. And as I've entered the workforce I I kind of realized the at least for me. Networking is understanding. What somebody else does. And how that relates to me in finding the common ground so not necessarily approaching somebody in saying you have something that I need to. I want to throw my resume your face. I hope that that we talk soon. It's kind of productive. Yeah that's what I always thought. Networking was like everyone just treating business cards and then I don't know what you're right but instead it's like. Oh you know you do this thing. I do that thing kind of different. But in some ways they connected like let's have a productive conversation about that on in. Maybe maybe see where this goes through those more meaningful conversations of. It's it's much organic to me. And I kind of embrace that that blurred line between social and professional relationships. A little bit when it comes to networking especially in the music field. Because I learned that by by having really good friendships with people you can help people out professionally too. It's like Oh you know. I need to audio engineer. Last minute and Okay well I don't know any like super professional references that I have but I have a friend who I know is great. I knew their work. What we call them up and see if they'll do the favor for me and then later that friend is gonNA need to favor and I'll be happy to return it Other Times Staying connected to two different people. Maybe even in a professional sense is is checking in to say even if you don't you don't have to receive something from every interaction so sometimes it is just sending holiday car. Oh Hey are we haven't talked in a while. How're you doing I saw this thing that I mean. Social media is a really big one Following everything that your contacts doing on social media and and different outlets and just saying oh. This looks great like or. Could you tell me a little bit about your thought process for programming? This and you not necessarily trying to seal their program but Just having informed conversations about the work that you're doing with other people Can really lead to more meaningful relationships other than just. Hey I see that you have the skill or this resource and we need that from you. Here's my email by or something like that so I I kind of approach it more organically. Is there anything that you want to share with current students? Yes So some advice that I have cried students no matter what your future might what you feel like your future might look like or what you're doing now is to use the resources that you do have while you're in school because they are invaluable and especially at somewhere like peabody they are? They're so plenty but to also look outside of school. How little bit look at the community? See what's happening of theirs especially in Baltimore. There's so many things arts and culture here that I never even realized because they weren't necessarily happening in Mount Vernon or they weren't advertised at peabody and it's so easy to get caught up in the bubble of only things happening here within your network and you're so busy it makes sense but when you're out of school it's kind of hard to connect to reality a little bit and I think that starting to understand about certain to understand the ways that your art and cultural experiences can connect to to a greater community or even just take place in a way that is not in a in a conventional setting that you would expect the way that the conservatory sets up for you. So you know Like I said I play a lot of new music In programs connected to different art forms. And that's not something that I was one hundred percent exposed to a peabody. Even though peabody did some great efforts it feels more organic coming from a place of my own interest. So just just looking looking around and seeing what? They're just going to a different neighborhood and trying different coffee shop It you know sometimes are really informs my place in the in the community a lot more even even if you don't plan on Sega Baltimore. It's you know learning how to be a person in the real world. It can start with as easy as going to free me. They have you know. So that's that's number one and the number the number two piece of advice that I have is that it's okay if you don't know what you want to do or where you're going Sometimes it's nice to have so many options and you anything could fall in your lap if you're open to it Who knows who knows what could happen. and I think there's a lot of pressure on especially music on getting that that Solo career or becoming. That were Kestrel musician or making leaking that. Cd or those recordings Playing all these venues that sometimes it doesn't have to look like that or sometimes it can and but maybe the road is a little bit different than you're expecting. That's okay because all you see is the finished product and you don't see the journey but probably everybody has some sort of stumbling of along there. So it's it's okay to not know which I kind of wish somebody told me Vanessa. Thank you so much zoe. This has been awesome. Thank you for sharing. Thank you so much and good luck with your job at Shriver thank you. He was posted. I will out to yes. Thank you Theme Music for the Max. Hugh podcast composed by Vincent Fasano..

Baltimore peabody partner Lincoln John Rose Vanessa New Music Group Shriver zoe Mount Vernon engineer Max Hugh Vincent Fasano
"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Thought I would like. Somebody things I didn't really know existed need an out of peabody largely largely out but I did feel really inspired by what I was doing at school to print out especially through some jazz courses that I was taking here and that was really life changing because now let's mostly what I do is experimental music proposition. Jazz writing my own stuff Contemporary classical music. What about any setbacks? Do you feel like there has been any significant obstacles that you faced either during your time at school or afterwards and if so how did you get past those? I think that this career really demands that you know yourself really really well. And that's been a pretty big source of stress for me coming to terms with what I'm capable of when not capable of and which things I can change which I can't and that's changed throw my whole life. I'm sure but it's time management. That's really bad at that. Something could freelance. It's gotten better through much hard work. I can say that But also mental health stuff is definitely gotten in my way the last few months especially and I'm not sure how much of that is directly related having graduated been out in the world fully. And how much is that? It's kind of coincidental. But that's something I'm starting to learn. You can't just power through. You have to find some kind of way of gently addressing it like as soon as you start to notice a pattern and I've kind of thought points where I powered through enough that by the time it really gets to me. I can't have no defense against it and takes me weeks to feel like I recovered and I haven't really found it yet. There must be a way to become more conscious of those cycles in emotional health and and in finding ways to boost yourself before I can control to recognize it and then be able to address it sooner and to talk about it with people you trust as there anything in particular that surprises you about your life after graduation. Well I had kind of forgotten what it was like to have any sort of free time so we other than that. I think. Probably just what you'd expect in terms of person now in the real world. How do I knew that taxes are really hard worrying about taxes while you're in school before you have to pay them on that note? I'd like to thank you very much for sharing your insight and your experience. You're welcome. Thanks for being here. Lido recently WanNa new music. Usa grant with the Bergamo Quartet for peace in the brink for string quartet and percussion which the group is performing and touring.

Bergamo Quartet peabody Usa
"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"max" Discussed on Max Q from Peabody LAUNCHPad

"Helps you gain skills not only in your craft but also how to teach that craft as well again. You're in school to learn how to learn so you know ultimately to be able to teach yourself how to do something how. When I opened up the score does my experience at peabody studying with Mironov How is this going to you? Know How is my experience going to help enrich the experience from how Muhammad I going to approach this gorgeous? How am I going to prepare this or show this sound show this and and so now? I've got all these questions and not necessarily all the answers because as I mentioned a lot of that comes with experience but those kinds of questions are great so that I can help teach those things later on her. You know approach different issues on So I I think that's a along along limited way to answer your question but i. I think that each person's relationship with our mentors gonna be different always assumed the best and come with earning questions like some kind of two things one touch on. I don't know if there's anything burning that you would want to say to current students any advice or words of wisdom. It doesn't have to be. I think I mean there are things that I want that. I want to say that I should say gopher both adjust Strike that don't let your curiosity for music. End at the start and end of your lessons. Classes classes and ensemble rehearsals for me coming out of school understanding what it really means to be a professional musician What it really means to grasp performance practice style. Things like fat. It really comes down to Listening a lot reading literature about composers that interests you or About Music and trying to find your own way. I think it's really easy when you're at school to go with the flow to especially if you're in a program that's really busy doing a lot You know you're required to do all these chamber ensembles. All these large ensembles all these courses in classes seminars and these new initiative classes. You know you're you're now taught you need to think entrepreneurially you can't let that inhibits your love for the music and your desire to know more about it beyond music needs to also be a hobby outside of the class as outside instead of just you know this is my job therefore I do it at these times and that I turn off Don't get me wrong. I think it's really important to have a life. Goodness knows that I don't know how to really make that balance. It's really hard to work music and live there. I think I think I remember seeing a A Pie chart of you can pick to. Hopefully you can pick work in life and live music but you know you got to find some way to to have have a balanced sleep somewhere in sleep somewhere. There's probably since we spoke Ryan has moved to continue his conducting education at Yale School of music. But he's still the music director here in Baltimore for the Occasional Symphony. You can check out their upcoming projects at occasional symphony dot org.

Yale School of music director Occasional Symphony Baltimore