27 Burst results for "MAG dot"

How to Help and Support Your ADHD Child

Mama, Take Heart

03:56 min | 10 months ago

How to Help and Support Your ADHD Child

"Talk a little bit about the strategies talking about combined forces so some of the strategies parents can do at home draft so my first and foremost suggestion would be to learn as much as you can about. Adhd kind. Of like how you and i just be that sponge just read read read. I'm and i have some good sources for for parents so there is A magazine called attitude magazine. So it's add okay you've heard of out Add attitude magazine There's a website that is just attitude. Mag dot com. This is an excellent excellent source For very relatable articles for parents for adults For anybody with adhd are really recommend that And to be leery because there's a lot of information out there on adhd and a lot of it can be so. There are three people that i would recommend anything you see by these people you can trust. So why does doctor russ soul barkley. As second is dr ned halloween. L. and third is dr thomas brown. Those are three very well very well known names in. adhd community. Anything you see by them. You know you can trust so so first and foremost learn as much as you can about. Adhd the second is and some people are gonna balk at this but the second is to lower your expectations of your child and not to compare them to their peers. And let me tell you that. So hard to do. Even as an adhd coach. I would catch myself. How well gosh look at look at his friend. Why can't he do that. And i got you know i catch myself and i'd have to remind myself note. Nope you can't compare on so to understand that your child is going to be anywhere. From three to five years behind his peers in many of the executive functions as well as maturity both emotionally and mentally. So when you look at your child's age subtract three to five years and then that's what i mean by lower your expectations so take three to five years off in. That's what you should be expecting of your child Agree with that. Yes and also just so you all know. I will put all of this information of resources in the show notes. Part home but yes. I agree with the lawyer expectations. I remember cus. My daughter was high functioning on the honor. Roll and that sort of thing And then but when my son when he got on a roll we just flipped our leads. We just size our honor. What happened had one time and we were just so. We're like wow. This is an even with our daughter was like this is this is like gum. It wasn't like how a lot of other people like. Oh well yeah. This is what they do. We were just so excited because we're like. We know the effort that they had to put in to get there and so we were just like you know for us. it wasn't. We did not take that for granted. We were like really worked hard for this. We want them to know you. We know you work hard and this did not come easy so let me tell you you're blessed that you had kids with. Adhd at the honor roll. Because that isn't very common. Actually they are usually they usually functions a low their intelligence gig of the delay their executive functions.

Russ Soul Barkley Dr Ned Dr Thomas Brown Adhd
Africa's Great Green Wall to combat desertification secures $16.8 billion  in international finance Impact

Science Magazine Podcast

11:48 min | 10 months ago

Africa's Great Green Wall to combat desertification secures $16.8 billion in international finance Impact

"Now we have science writer. Rachel danske with an update on africa's great green wall project which will soon see an infusion of billions of dollars from the world bank and others this project. The great green wall is intended to serve as a bulwark against desertification of the land south of the sahara desert while at the same time supporting communities that live in this region. Okay rachel how're you doing. I'm doing well. Thanks for having me sure. This is a rape big wall. This is a big project. It's basically supposed to be this green band that spans about seven thousand kilometers across the whole hop of africa. It launched back in two thousand seven. Rachel what would you say. The progress has been since two thousand seven now to two thousand twenty one almost non-existent which is why they launched this new round of funding last month. There was an assessment that found that a fraction of the goal had been achieved so far and the goal is for twenty thirty so they realized that time was running out right throughout this piece. You make this really important distinction between planting a tree and growing a tree. Why is that so important to think about when you know thinking about restoring lands or planting trees to help prevent desertification. The first time. I heard it. I just thought well. That's a really good way to put it. And then when racer after another would phrase it that way that we don't plant trees we grow them because that's been one of the missing pieces in restoration. Efforts globally not even specific to the great green wall but just in restoration landscape and forest restoration. Generally there has been this focus on planting trees but little focus really on looking at what gets planted in the first place in paying attention to the species diversity in the planting material and making sure that it's the right tree for the right place. There's also last follow plus maintenance of the tree then there needs to be talked to someone in west africa who was saying that. He's traveled to so many countries throughout the continental. Seen so many trees planted. But where the forests. Yeah that's a really interesting way of thinking about it. Basically tree planting mania that's been happening has come from all these different projects foundations quotas. That are saying oh. It costs a dollar to put a tree in the ground and we're going to offset our carbon. We're going to green the world but no one's looking after these trees and making sure that they live beyond that for sheer gas so now that we know that. That's not a good way to go about this. There's actually a lot of research. That's found some of the best practices for restoration projects. What are some of the recommendations have come out from research. In the past ten years when paper published last year talked about ten golden rules for reforestation. And they think those summed up a lot of the recommendations really well in addition to just protecting existing forests which probably sounds obvious. But there's a lot of research on the new. I don't have the same benefits that existing ones do and it's hard to replace that beyond that involving local communities has been just incredibly important component that researchers are saying was not really part of the focus before because the restoration ecologists are focused on the physical research and they aren't trained to think about how people play into the picture and it's just so important to the survival of the trees because it's people who are planting trees and it's people who are maintaining the trees and if you don't have community by an investment in rye these trees there and interested keeping them there. The trees aren't going to last and the trees only have their benefits when they last going back to trees here for a minute you mentioned keeping old us in place for protecting them. What else is being looked at. So that's when using a diversity of species so that there can start to be restored. Biodiversity rather than just monoculture of trees. They're starting to be focused now. Also on the quality of the seeds. And what you're actually planting. And how do we build. The systems and infrastructure for collecting and improving. Seeds is going to be the most resilient seed for that species but then it's also about the genetic diversity because there can be inbreeding with plants. If you're not collecting from wide enough geographic area than you can start to sort of limit. The gene pool and that can be problematic. You talk about this example in ethiopia of a seat initiative a network that is supposed to improve the quality of seats. Can you talk about how that would work. And how it would involve the community. The provision of adequate trees deep portfolio or pets. Bo is a project in ethiopia that they're calling it a functional trees seed system. It's a multi-pronged effort. They're trying to develop standards for seed collection and sharing that. There's high quality seed that will ensure that the trees that are planted can be their most resilient they're developing maps for how to source those seeds they're trying to strengthen the research system the infrastructure and the the research system to improve seed quality and they're linking all of that to the people who will use the seeds seeds there's technical training for farmers and the local language and there are diagrams of how to store different types of seeds. They're really trying to get that knowledge to the community to farmers and local nurseries to scale up the capacity of local decentralized infrastructure. Is there another model project that people might be looking at to expand as the money comes in. Are there other areas. That are doing good things. Yeah there was one of their project that i came across the one billion trees for africa project. And it's led by this man from cameroon tabby jota. He talked about how he grew up in this thriving economy system and he went off to university and when he came back the lands that he new as a forest with no longer for us. He started planting marina cheese and cola nut trees and mingo trees and all these different trees that would restore some of the soil health that he thought had been lost but also produce food and income generating opportunities for people so that they would be invested in keeping the trees there. He called his approach. The contagion approach. Because it's just sort of caught on. He got a bunch of men and women in this one community to be involved in the tree planting the neighboring communities saw what was happening and he was very clear that it's not like a drastic change where their community sedley rich where they weren't before but the small benefits were noticeable and so the neighboring community wanted to do something similar. And so it's just been a word of mouth approach so as he developed this very grassroots success he's gotten funding from more international sources than use it to do the work on the ground in these different communities mostly in west africa. And he's starting to do more and more with the great great wall which seems very exciting so there are a couple of different findings that we talked about that suggests the way forward for this type of restoration project involving the community diversity of. They're planting making sure that they're not just putting stuff in the ground but they're actually supporting plant growth and the communities around it but another thing that comes up a lot in your story is now we kind of what should happen. Researchers have come to a lot of conclusions that are very useful. But then there's the practice what's actually happening on the ground and maybe even what will happen on the ground. What are some of the biggest impediments to implementing the results of this research. One interesting comment. That i heard was that the implementing partners people with the money don't have scientist on their teams. They don't realize how complicated it is to plant a tree into get it right and to make sure that grows the lack of knowledge in the right places and the lack of communication between the people with the money and the people with the knowledge and also the community who is going to be involved. Those conversations aren't being had something else that a here is the expectations that donors have. They want fast results. And that's not. How trees in general work. But it's especially not how effective restoration works because all of these things need to happen and they take time getting communities involved. There's a lot of upfront investment. That needs to happen. In developing all of this infrastructure and research systems with a lot faster to just go and say just plant a bunch of eucalyptus trees. Because that's what they have the seeds and planting materials for. There's a disconnect between the speed that donors want to see results and the reality of what needs to happen. I've seen that you've written about this project for years now. What do you think you're going to see if you check back in two years. I hope to see that things. Like the pats project and this other effort the one billion trees for africa a hope that they have scaled and and that they inspire or serve as models for other projects. I don't know where. I'm placing bets. It feels like there is enough of a resounding message coming from the research community about the importance of this and the importance for the effective ecosystem function restoration and the community development but also for the climate benefits and if the global fenders governments who want to plant trees for the climate benefits if they are serious than they will start listening to these researchers. This is like thousands of miles. Four thousand miles. That's like the us plus another third right east west a huge huge area to cover an across countries. And all these different people's. How is this. possible. Rachel i mean this is a global scale. This is a huge project. it's huge. It's huge and that's probably why it sounded like the great idea when they announced it. And why didn't go anywhere for ten years but it's the partner agencies that i've spoken with involved in this project. The great queen wall are really clear that it's an environmental program but it's also the social alliance when that's meant to economic development but also really impart some resilience. See into these communities. Who are the most vulnerable to the effects of climate change. That's why they're really ramping. Up this funding now because they see the value for the planet from a climate change perspective but also for the millions of people across this gigantic area. Pinks rachel thanks for having me. Sure rachel Danske is a science writer based in denver. You can find a link to story on the episode page for the podcasts. At science mag dot org slash podcast.

Rachel Danske Africa West Africa Sahara Desert Ethiopia Marina Cheese Rachel BO Cameroon Cola East West United States Pinks Rachel Denver
"mag dot" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"mag dot" Discussed on KTRH

"In the oil patch radio show is proud to bring you this week's energy minute produced by shale mag dot com the U. S. watched a large number of jobs in history last week three point three million according to Thursday's report from the federal government this trend is expected to continue next week as coronavirus figures continue to hold a large portion of the US population at home federal markets grapple with the market disruptions prices remain low this week WTI range between twenty and twenty five dollars per barrel in historic events last week the secretary general of OPEC spoke with one of the Texas railroad commissioners about the need for international action to stabilize markets but in the end the big question is how soon will work social and business restrictions be lifted this is Ryan Stanton and batch your interview minutes listen to in the oil patch radio Sundays at eight PM on newsradio seven forty KT R. H. and final cast on the I heart radio app and keep up with the oil and gas industry online at shale mag dot com this is news radio seven forty KT R. H. Houston and I heart radio station now the latest weather and traffic from the gallery furniture made in America studios really the economic tension well more like a big squeeze from corona virus I'm sure a prior it's eight o'clock on newsradio seven forty KTRE let's get traffic in our weather together your skyline are you we go share a two eighty eight north bound at the south loop look out that's is a stalled vehicle in the interchange ramps up fun to say and tough to get around if you're north found watch out for those records they have cleared a wreck off the south loop at forty five it's out of the way maybe it's two minutes away if you're coming up the ship channel bridge I'm sky Mike in the Gulf coast windows dot com twenty four hour traffic center we've got rain possibly strong even severe storms developing as we head into the afternoon as a cold front gets closer it's a sixty percent chance of thunderstorms later.

federal government OPEC Ryan Stanton KT R. H. KT R. H. Houston Mike US Texas America Gulf
"mag dot" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"mag dot" Discussed on KTRH

"At shale mag dot com join the fight for good give a Westwood dot org that's give Westwood dot org sponsored by the salvation army he's call your radio let's face it there's no such thing as private browsing even in incognito mode even if you clear your browsing history your internet service provider can see every single website you visit that's why I never go online without using ExpressVPN express VPN server and they make sure your I. S. P. N. that is internet service provider can't see what sites you visit instead your internet connection is re routed their express VPN secure servers now each express VPN server has an I. P. address that shared among thousands of users that means everything you do is anonymous and can't be traced back to you ExpressVPN also encrypts one hundred percent of your data with the best in class encryption even when you're using public wifi like a cafe or hotel use the internet in confidence from your computer tablet or smart phone simply tap one button and you're protected ExpressVPN is the fastest the most trusted VPN on the market it's rated number one by TechRadar by wired by the virgin countless more so protect your online activity today with the V. P. N. that I trust to secure my privacy this is my special link at express V. P. N. dot com slash mark you'll get an extra three months free on a one year package that's E. X. P. R. E. S. S. V. P. N. dot com slash marked ExpressVPN dot com slash mark to.

"mag dot" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"mag dot" Discussed on KTRH

"Shale mag dot com what's happening here and there things can change in the world the latest news and local seven forty because you getting to talk to Richard Serra called wildcard line five zero one four one zero nine the first time caller line is eight one eight five zero one four seven two one to talk to Richard from east of the Rockies eight hundred eight two five five zero three three west of the Rockies toll free call eight hundred six one eight eight two five five this is.

Dog noses detect heat, the world faces coronavirus, and scientists search for extraterrestrial life

Science Magazine Podcast

06:04 min | 1 year ago

Dog noses detect heat, the world faces coronavirus, and scientists search for extraterrestrial life

"Up this week. I talked with online news editor David Brim about how dogs noses may be able to detect heat next. We have international editor Martin answering. He's GonNa tell us about the latest news on Corona virus finally in an interview from the triple. As annual meeting producer. Meghan Cantwell talks with Jill. Tarter about the latest technologies being used to search for. Alien Life. Now we have on news editor David Griffin. And he's here to share his favorite online story from the week. Hi Dave Sarah. Okay so I think I know this is your favorite. It involves animals doesn't just involve animal. Seren involves one of my favorite animals which is a dog domesticated animals domesticated animals. Yes yeah so yeah so we love to do dog and cat stories or as much as we can and this is a really cool on because we sort of feel like we kind of figured everything out about dogs and even cats. I mean we've lived with them for ten thousand fifteen thousand years doesn't like there'd be any more surprises but the study says there's Least one surprise left with dogs. We didn't know about right. So if your dog sitting there looking at you funny tilting its head. And you're like what if it what is it might be sensing an odd heat signature in the room. We already know dogs. Noses are super amazing hair smells sensitivity is about a hundred million times more sensitive than ours. Were this new study showing that actually dogs don't detect sense can actually detect heat as well They detect heat with their nose. That's right. They're sensing weak thermal radiation in so dogs like a lot of mammals. They have this kind of naked smooth skin on the tips of their noses around their nostrils. Our noses are wet and cold as quite as innovative as dogs are and so. This coldest is actually kind of a clue because you know in order to sense heat. You can't be hot right otherwise you wouldn't be able to tell if something is like if you have a fever or if you have a warm hand you touch somebody with a fever. You're not gonna be able to sense it very well but if you spend five minutes outside it's really cold and you touch something head. Even if they're normal temperature it's going to feel really warm to you and sort the similar idea with dog noses because it's cold and wet it's able to be able to text up even just sort of marginally warmed hasn't even super warm dies had cold wet noses and actually have a hard time thinking of another animal. That has a nose like this but I know there are other animals that can sense thermal signals. Have the same kind of thing going on right sir. Like vampire bats can actually sense thermal radiation Certain species of snakes can do that and they also both these also have colder noses and so the fact that dogs also had these sort of legendarily cold those sort of gives a hint and researchers wanted to test a new. Study that we're going to see. Well can dogs actually do this? This is something that's always tricky testing the senses of an animal their ability to perceive something. How did they set it up in this study? Will they work with dogs who please So this was mercifully. Not An experiment done on. Cats were much different outcome but the first experiment. They have three pet dogs and they had that choose between a warm objects and my warm. We mean about thirty one degrees. Celsius so slightly warmer that room temperature and then a room temperature object and he please objects about one point six meters away from the dogs. The dogs were touching these objects. They actually had to be able to sniff out this heat at a distance The office looked and smelled exactly the same. Or How do they know? They smelled the same. I assume they controlled for that. I mean I assume that these these are basically objects. I don't think we described in the story but these are pretty bland object. I think it's a couple of boards with a heat thing in the middle of it so these are not very olfactory interesting objects and they're exactly the same Dave. When you heat something up it does smell different. How do we know that? The dog isn't king and on that. And they have these amazing sniffers will the researchers another set of experiments this time with thirteen dogs and they were able to get them in an effort. Marai scanner which measures brain activity and they saw that when the dogs were sniffing out objects that were slightly warmer. There were areas of the brain. There were activating there. Were not the same areas at activate when they smell something so it was if specific region the brain. It's to be lighting up but again it was only when the dogs were detecting thermal radiation. They did not see these regions light up when the dogs were. Just try to sniff out an object. That was just room temperature. So that combined with the previous experiment does not conclusive but it really adds up to this idea. That dogs really do have. This can actually sniff out. Warmness a not a sense with their with their noses. Why am I that BE USEFUL FOR DOGS? Or THEIR ANCESTORS. Were we know that these other animals like the vampire bats stakes these it in hunting? So they're not just hunting by looking at things but since emotional smelt heat especially for stakes is really important and so what this suggests is dogs and we all know. Dogs are descended from Gray Wolves. Who were very effective hunters and rules need to be able to sniff out pray and you can imagine that if if they're just relying on smell alone they may be missing something. That's maybe hiding or may be covered up by other odors but if they can sense heat as well especially heat at a distance that's GonNa make them much more effective hunters of any warm blooded prey and so the feeling is that dogs may have inherited this ability from their ancestor of the Grey Wolves. I guess they can try to test out next they can. They can try to experiment with wolves. It'll probably be a little trickier thank you so much. Dave thanks David. Grimm is the online editor for science. News you can find a link to this story and the related research at science mag dot org slash podcast stay tuned for an interview with international news editor. Martin answering with the latest on Corona virus.

News Editor Editor Dave Sarah Martin Fever Corona Grey Wolves David Brim Meghan Cantwell Producer David Griffin Gray Wolves Jill Grimm David
Getting bisphenol A out of food containers

Science Magazine Podcast

12:56 min | 2 years ago

Getting bisphenol A out of food containers

"I up in our Green Chemistry special edition of the podcast. We have contributing correspondent. Warren Cornwall here with the story about finding a replacement for the common can lining chemical this funeral a or commonly known as EPA these days high. Warren you start with this fulcrum this point where the tab of a can of soda attached to the body of the Cana Soda. Why is that a good place to start the story? I never knew how amazing the science and engineering around making I can was started reporting this story in this particular case. Ace this point where the pull tab is. Attached to the top of an aluminum drink can is subject to these huge stresses. You have to imagine that the inside of this whole can is covered in this. Thin layer of plastic can't break in order to attach this poll tab to the top of the can Dan basically after pound with a machine on the can top to create this little bump and then the pull tab sits on the bump and then you mash that bump flat because the what is saying. It's the most difficult fabrication in the whole universe. But I think he says in their whole universe okay that makes you and the whole universe the people at Sern would appreciate that but in the universe can fabrication for linings. That's their crux. We're GONNA talk about the lighting's the special liner inside of these cans usually contains. BPA OR A. What exactly is the purpose can't ends contained all kinds of material that can potentially be corrosive all kinds of acidic drinks? I don't know if you remember from elementary school. Well experiment where one of your teachers would put a nail inside of a jar with coq a few days later. It'll be gone so yeah stuff is corrosive And apparently the kinds of stuff that we're putting into cans now is even more corrosive than it used to be. All of these kinds of fancy craft beverages energy. He drinks so they don't want to eat holes in the cans and then the flip side of that. Is that if you've ever put a piece of aluminum in your mouth. It tastes weird and you don't I don't want that flavor to go into the food or drinks so the properties a can lining material have our resists corrosion. Obviously obviously what other things are important. Doesn't create any weird flavors of its own. Ideally it's inert so it doesn't react with anything It's inside the can in a perfect doc world. It's not at all toxic. It's still a benign. It has to be as cheap as possible and it has to go on the cans really easily really quickly quickly because they're cranking out cans at a rate of two thousand a minute so BPA. Which I think most people have heard of at this point because of concerns about its effect on health? Health checks these boxes except for the health one. What are the health concerns when it comes to? BPA well the main concern is that it can mimic estrogen when the body encounters BPA it can bind with estrogen receptors. Enough that the body. Can I think that it's binding with estrogen. There's a lot of debate going on about how much of a health risk is really posed by. EPA in the levels that it's founded pardon people's bodies the FDA still allows it to be used in most food related containers with the exception of baby bottles and sippy cups so the is said that the science suggests that it's not really a problem in other settings said the chemical industry and other industry groups have taken that got same message but you have consumer groups environmental groups and some university researchers that have done work suggesting that it can be problematic one of the stats. You mentioned in your story. About how more than ninety percent of people who live in the US have EPA in their urine. We pretty much that'd be a and US And some governments non. US governments have also decided to ban PBA right. You know the only one that I know of its flea abandoned his France right and you know one of the thing. I should know just going back to a comment that you made earlier about. BPA and cans. I've been told that for food cans in the United States about ninety percent of it is non. BPA At this point so food cans like peas and corn drink cans to or know for aluminum. EMINEM drink cans. It's about fifty fifty. Okay they've cut way down on this but about how much. BPA is still out there. Do you know how many cans with US liner are made. Every year they are every month. Yeah estimates are worldwide that we crank out about four hundred fifty billion with a B. Tans every year yeah three hundred hundred and fifty billion of those are aluminum drink cans the other one. Hundred billion are food cans some not small percentage are lied with. That's right you talked to. Scientists at a company called Thou spar that came up with a a new alternative a few years ago and a very unusual way. How did they get involved? Vow Spar in two thousand seventeen was purchased by Sherwin Williams. Okay this company had a business. Making chemical can linings and and one of the significant parts of that business for them was making BP based linings but they and other manufacturers were seeing the pushback from consumers and some governments guest EPA and so they were looking for alternatives. What they were finding is that? The alternatives had drawbacks right. Some of them were for more expensive or didn't hold up as well or did perform in some way that Kanye manufacturers wanted or for if they were trying to find a replacement in the same family of chemicals as BPA that family abyss females. There was concern sern that those chemicals were going to have some of the same health related concerns that beep at everybody was pushing to find a replacement because the biggest fear fear is that governments are going to step in and say no more. BPA Right. I mean the thing that's interesting to me is that they decided to go for it. Because you can imagine a company saying Oh man that could be a really expensive yet and there's a guy in the story who kind of figures in the Tom Tom Mallon and he's interesting because he's very much industry insider he's worked at. This company is whole life but he from the outset said look. We're going to have to go about this a different way. We're GONNA have to reach out to people outside the industry people outside. The industry don't necessarily trust US anymore when it comes to things like BPA safety so we're going to have to think about this a different way. People tell me that this is really unusual. This is a real culture shift. So what did they do to narrow the pool of chemicals out there to replace. VP aligning so they bring in a chemist from the outside who has experience in the pharmaceutical industry and the pesticide industry. So basically he had this long list of bisque dolls. That might work as can liners and the first green that he did was running them through a computer program that would see whether they were likely to fit in the estrogen receptor or not and then the ones that came out as potentially a non estrogens they then sent off for a series of slab screenings. The basic one was a yeast screening where these yeast cells have been engineered to glow when they're exposed to estrogen compound. At that point they have to do more tests to find out if these chemicals are also going to work well as a can liner they finally narrow it down to one candidate. Wow it's called Tetra. Methyl BIS Funeral F or T. Mbps they narrowed it down to this one mechanical and it had passed them basic tests when it came to its ability to affect estrogen receptors. And it was able to stand up to The harsh environment of inside a can. This is where they turn to. Basically they turned to their critics and said you tell us that this isn't safe to wasn't said they were challenging them the way they described it to me as they were coming to scientists and saying we want to build a better molecule for this. What should we do to make sure that it's actually going to be safer? Yeah they posed this question to environmental and public health advocacy groups and they impose that same question to researchers who have done a lot of science studying BPA and they actually took the chemical to their labs and tested faceted out and a bunch of different ways. That's right they set up the payment in a way that the scientists said they kept their independence so so the best example is a endocrinologist at Tufts. Anna Soto has done a lot of work on. EPA and its effect on in breast tissue the company made a contribution to tufts with no strings attached so it was not hurt to her lab specifically and then she came to tufts and said give me money for my research search and she found that there weren't Astra genetic effects from this alternative to be. Yes right she didn't find any evidence that was stragetic And then the secondary element that that was interesting is that she didn't find evidence that the can lining was leaching any of its T. M. B. PF contents into into the liquids. This letting him ICAL has been approved by the FDA for use in food product container. So it's already on the market. It's already something that people have probably encountered in their day to day life. The company has their chemical has been used to line twenty two billion cans since twenty seventeen nine. Wow so a lot of cans but a small fraction of the overall universal cans right going back to the safety testing that we talked about. I think it sounds is wise to approach people who have built up the skills to test for Indian disruption in their labs but is there ever a way to know if something is safe. It's kind of like the bigger question if the FDA's testing aren't necessarily rigorous enough. What should be happening to show that a chemical a safe to go sit next to food that might absorb it? That's an open question. Part of what was interesting to me about. This story. Is that when val spar went looking for an alternative Bernard route for testing their product. There was no road map for them to follow And that's still the case. They can't point to a battery battery of tests and say look. We have jumped through these hoops that everybody has agreed are the hoops that we should jump through did it successfully and therefore we can declare our chemical to be a gold star. Green label chemical. Is there a movement to codify. Something is an endocrine disruptor if it does this and if it doesn't do these things these five things or these ten things and it's not an endocrine disruptor. There are various efforts to come up with better more more rigorous more detailed ways of screening chemicals for possible construction. Regulators would argue that they currently have tools for declaring declaring whether a chemical is an endocrine disruptor or not and they're working on improving them so it's not like they're saying that their ways the the only way and there's no improvement to be done right our other companies going to follow this model of looking for chemicals to replace something that people have a lot of questions sweat and then turning to people outside industry to test it for health concerns. I don't know I mean I've talked to some people who've said that they think it it's a promising model. They think that the experience of Alice bars had suggested a company can do it successfully. But you know I've talked to other people who've said that there are companies who are working to develop greener safer chemicals but have really chosen to do it internally and keep it to themselves salves partly because there is a concern that if you say that you're trying to replace one of your chemicals with something safer you're bringing attention into concerns about safety of the clear curly us. Well thank you so much more and I sure thank you Sarah. Warren Cornwall is a contributing correspondent piece in Washington State. You can find a link to his article and the rest of the special section on chemicals. Tomorrow's Earth at science mag dot org slash podcast

EPA United States Warren Cornwall FDA BPA Green Chemistry Tufts Cana Soda Sern DAN France Vow Spar PBA Tom Tom Mallon Eminem B. Tans VP Kanye
"mag dot" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"mag dot" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"W. dot fate mag dot com are they happen to be on Facebook they can literally type into the search bar the search Facebook bar the best of fate magazine and hit search and we'll take a right to our site where we have things about we have a entry for every book we've done so far and wide as each new book is issued will be senior to fate and if they want to you know get a good taste every once in a while we were on one of the articles from one of these books free yeah posted to the site they go there are probably fine does three or four or five articles already posted to the site that I believe like Stephen King they will find fascinating fabulous thank you so much for sharing your behind the scenes insight to the cosmic reporter named fate the world's first paranormal magazine to explore the mysteries of the universe thank you Cheryl it was great to be on fascinating Cheryl yes yes it is a racial stories never did get older they George not at all and I've got an idea by the way why don't you approach a gene and ask if they would like to do maybe a monthly little segment force on coast to coast we can call it you know the fate magazine moments or something like that that would be fabulous yes night with some great stories good good story ideas and things like that story arc in life what with cash on tonight is just a tiny tiny tiny tidbit of what they have done and covered as you know and I think it's fabulous as they are evolving with the times keeping up with what's happening in our digital world now we're going to audio and and hopefully they'll be around a long time to come what is so amazing I think their timing was right when they began we were talking.

Facebook fate magazine Stephen King reporter Cheryl George
"mag dot" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"mag dot" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Mag dot com and Joanna the house has formally voted to go forward with the impeachment process and we'll talk more about that in a second but in the weeks leading up to this the been a couple of developments president trump's decision to drop his plan to host the G. seven summit at his Florida resort and his family's announcement that they want to sell their controversial Washington hotel kind of makes you wonder if they're part of an effort to clean up the president's public image is it possible that they're worried about Mr trump's low character ratings in the polls really interesting I mean the president who does not like to admit he's wrong that conversation with the Ukrainian president was perfect in his mind so there is a sense that he's getting pressure from somewhere whether it's from within his own soul or more likely from somewhere else within his party everyone knows impeachment is coming he's got to stay on the good side of the Senate even the Republican senators and I think he's getting some advice from people who actually listened to within his own party so in the meantime surely impeachment is not something this president wants he's made that clear how high is the risk that this process might wind up backfiring on the Democrats politically certainly Republican distantly betting on that they're betting that in swing states among people who aren't following this closely that there's that same kind of level of cynicism about politics I got trouble active in the first place people think all politicians carry on the shenanigans and this is just one kind of partisan effort on the other hand for people who are following the news closely the more you see about people you know it with in the White House raising concerns about these Ukrainian conversations as they were going on the more me looks like this on the phone that's Joanna Weiss of experience magazine I'm John Keller that's all I politics is eleven fifty seven the surrounding state of Rhode Island and New Hampshire have legalized sports adding but as we hear now from WBZ's Kim Tunnicliffe she tells us Massachusetts lawmakers are apparently taking a snail's pace approach to the matter several bills under consideration in the legislature that would legalize sports betting remains stuck in committee one of the measures was filed by governor Baker who believe sports betting should already be in place at the state's three licensed casinos Baker doesn't think lawmakers will take up the issue until twenty twenty I really do anticipate that this will get the attention.

"mag dot" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"mag dot" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Of front page mag dot com one of the smartest sharpest websites ever well the truth is that that's why the media would never go there it's the truth to it live their lives here to when ready the color three to six PM eastern standard time every day through Friday I'm going to give you another example left we come back how absolutely evil they are they they really want to murder we think they do a lot they have their own families you can Spencer murdering the acquisition done that throughout recorded history I was sure that the live you're on the your kids have a very small summer your spouse you can't get the same vacation you need to get away cut through the Hansel planning a vacation and start a new summer tradition don't waste time and gas driving up north trying local portage lake you're on chain of lakes in the dexter Pinckney area you can still get the word choice quiet change of pace at the lake or relax on a huge deck overlooking the water ran two beautiful two bedroom house in.

murder Spencer portage lake
"mag dot" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"mag dot" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

"Sport mag dot com the issue insider is standing by live just down the road Michigan state football media day is taking place is mark Dantonio and the Spartans meet the media of the twentieth ranked Spartans accomplish would you agree with me that in the last couple weeks there seems to be some momentum that a lot of people are thinking the Spartans are going to have a better than average size football sees I think that's the nature of talking to use it you know they call talking these days that's that's what amounts to a we're talking he did begin in earnest I guess July with those some of those conference media days in sometime after three Julie baseball all star game everybody gravity the usual suspects Clemson Alabama Georgia Oklahoma he was wrong with you as he works for the worst Texas restores lasting through all that paid state survey talks about it okay I'll triple play off with somebody but after that he does after three or four I get tired of talking about those things really start looking at that extra you know the the next the next group of people thank you Sir bye have a chance to do something you know that I will stick to a lot of the you could make you stop as they waited for the kind of get there before the forty three big ten title so you know for people to keep account helping people tell those up but people remember seek this state with the division title the plague the big ten championship game playing in the Gulf of all playoff once so that's a natural for people for some people to get on board our records to make the billing to those look closer widow that this three two years ago with a lot of soft for a lot of seniors and or part three key two years ago a lot of those guys were hurt last year which led to sixty now where are they okay three baby.

mark Dantonio Spartans Oklahoma Michigan Julie Clemson Alabama Georgia Texas three two years two years
Can we inherit trauma from our ancestors?

Science Magazine Podcast

11:17 min | 2 years ago

Can we inherit trauma from our ancestors?

"We have Andrew Curry. He's a journalist based in Berlin and this week he wrote on inherited trauma. I Andrew Okay so this is about be genetics. It's been around a long time but it's kind of morphing in its definition. Can you give us the latest on that different. People mean different things when they talk about epigenetics with the the basic concept is there are ways in which organisms inherit traits that are maybe not genetic so we have DNA the strict genetic code but increasingly scientists are finding other ways in which traits are passed down through generations and they're trying to figure out what the exact mechanisms are and some organisms. It's really easy and the more complicated the organism that trickier it is figure out how these things are passed on outside of the genetic code <hes> so for example some of the EPA genetic mechanisms might involve modifications to DNA or it might be a different set of molecules altogether that are being inherited through the cells that make up the offspring yes so so it's all modifications a two D. N. A. in the thorough lots of different kinds of proteins in the cell that help when the D._n._a. is telling the cell what proteins to make how to develop and their different ways that these small proteins can signal signal the cell to read more or less off of the genetic code or can turn off gene so to speak so that certain traits aren't passed on or certain traits are passed on in amplified ways. You know it's not something that's in the the D._N._A.. itself it's more things that affect how the cell reads the D._N._A.. Right at the very moment that the cell I divides now that's one of millions of subsequent divisions. If you have a tiny impact after the very beginning right it can have a massive consequence down the loan. Let's talk about when epigenetics this different form of inheritance. I got linked to the idea of trauma. What are some of the early examples of those lakes people started looking at how the environment chain diet exposure to extreme colds or exposure to high level of chemicals could affect what was inherited and then probably about fifteen twenty years ago some researchers? Started looking or noticing other effects during experiments and one researcher in particular who I spoke with Isabelle Swing. She's at the University of Zurich and E.. T. H.. Eric created a mouse model because she wanted to study borderline personality personality disorder and so she was traumatizing baby mice by separating them from their mother at unpredictable intervals and then she noticed that the offspring of those baby mice often hadn't same behavioral symptoms of trauma that the parents Prince two and sometimes those behavioral symptoms went on for several generations. The idea here is that it's not just physical deprivation of food or exposure to a lot of coal. It's there's something about the psychology or you know emotional states of the the mice that are being passed down the ideas that the stress of trauma the stress of being separated from from your parents the stress of traumatic childhood you could be with your parents. Your parents could be neglectful. Those levels of stress caused chemical changes in your body that then affect how your d._n._A. is encoded and that those changes can be so powerful. They're passed on even to your offspring that didn't directly experience trauma right so this this researcher that you mentioned she has looked at this for generations and generations of mice she does some experiments where she's gone out five generations and she still sees behavior in the offspring of traumatize mice that she doesn't see see in control mice and that's even when she does the separation but then like the children are the children of the children have been exposed to separation from a parent. This is kind of the crux of the the question that's that was a challenge challenge for her in terms of the experimental design and it's been one of the main criticisms when people look at humans is really hard to separate what is EPA genetic trauma what is sort of biologically transmitted and what is just the stress yes of living with a parent that has been traumatised because your parents are that are part of your environment so these kids environmental effects exactly so how she the way she controlled for that is she only studied the mail so she would traumatize is male mice and then breed them with females but take the males out but the females the mothers of the subsequent generations hadn't been traumatized so there was no bad parenting so to speak and yet she still found differences teams in the mouth behavior so this is all behaviors you can you know judge based on that that something is being inherited but the biological mechanism is is still is still pretty far away from being understood in mice and in other organisms they've also so found changes in sperm and blood and other tissues of things called small non coding Arnaiz which are these things that help the body re- D._N._A.. And this small all non coding are in a in a traumatized mouse or David looked at traumatize. People is different in specific ways than in non traumatize people okay so there is some and those those are passed down subsequent generations yet outing sees changes in the Arnaiz later as well. The big question is how does it get from for example the blood of the parent to the sperm of the child and later than to the brain of child let alone. Alone the child's child that sort of that whole middle bit is what is still really unclear. Let's turn to the human here for a minute. One of the first places this was talked about was with respect to the Holocaust so can you talk about what what the research has shown with respect to Holocaust survivors a few years ago a researcher named Rachel Yehuda looked at the children of Holocaust survivors and found that they had higher levels of depression but also lower levels of specific stress hormones and different kinds of EPA genetic markers called D._N._a.. methylation than people whose parents had been born in the U._S.. <hes> from sort of similar ages in cohorts and argued that this could be evidence of EPA genetic trauma but that study was criticized at the time for the reasons that that I mentioned earlier you know a lot of people said well. It makes sense intuitively that if your parents survived the Holocaust they might behave differently at home that might be stressful in a different way and so that is solid enough evidence of this biological mechanism that they found in mice. There is an ongoing project that you talked about with <hes> children in an orphanage. How are they looking at that situation and asking questions about EPI genetic inheritance? It's really hard in humans to do ethical L. experiments over multiple generations so basically what they're doing right now is looking at humans who have been traumatized to see if they have changes in these EPA genetic marks and then using those to design mouse studies to understand how that might be carried across multiple generations and in the Pakistan example. This is now orphanage. This is the orphanage in Pakistan so a researcher WHO's part of Isabel Might Matsui's lab is working with orphans in Pakistan whose fathers have died and they were forcibly separated from their mothers because their mothers weren't able to earn enough money to support them and they're put in orphanages which they argue is fairly close to their mouse model that had how they're separated from the mother as children and they see different levels of these are in these kids blood and they're using those kids as sort of a starting point to then design better mouse experiments to understand how that it might be transmitted through different generations but to do a human experiment you would have to look at those kids kids and follow refer multiple generations and so for a whole range of reasons. It's extremely difficult coulter controlled intervention experiments in humans right. We should point out that the children in the orphanage are there's an intention from the people taking care of them to make sure that they're not traumatized. Yeah I mean this is a situation. The already happened this was not they didn't separate them from their mothers for the purpose of the experiment of course and they're being given great care they go to the same schools. This is actually another interesting part of the experiment they go to the same schools as local kids. It's who still live with their parents so they're also looking at the local kids who still live with their parents to see if there are differences and it's voluntary. These kids get good care New York's fridges by there still something about this experience that they. I went through that is really difficult seems to have biological backs. I WanNa ask you what it means what we should do about it but I feel that the really big question you know it's it's a great question. <hes> <hes> I think one of the most hopeful things to come out of the story for me was again something that seems sort of intuitive but has been lost a lot in the discussion of epigenetics because I think a lot of people here this idea that Oh my my grandparents parents were traumatized and therefore have this unavoidable legacy of pain right but there have been some early experiments again in mice where if you intervene with basically sort of happy cages they call them enriched environments governments. You can reverse this biological process. Yeah we actually had I think we had a segment on happiness in in mice and rats and how giving them things to do and making them comfortable in their environment can yeah it can change the way experiments turn out yeah and so one of the arguments that several the researchers made is rather than looking at this as a sort of a stigma and a mark we should maybe you know if we can identify by these things use them to identify people who will benefit from therapy or maybe we should just this is where it's sort of intuitive. Maybe we should just give all children in which are yeah and that this is not <hes> an unavoidable burden but something that we can look at as reversible and that we should be looking at it as reversible not something that we should be working towards. Thank you so much Andrew Thank you Andrew. Curry is a journalist based in Berlin Orlando. You can find a link to his future at science mag dot org slash

EPA Researcher Andrew Curry Pakistan Berlin Behavioral Symptoms University Of Zurich Colds Arnaiz Isabelle Swing Eric David N. A. Berlin Orlando Coulter New York Rachel Yehuda Isabel Matsui Fifteen Twenty Years
"mag dot" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"mag dot" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"The whole story at MSG mag dot com it's kind of interesting but it is it is I mean you have to kind of it's it's your choice suspension of disbelief and an openness to believe other things our rates when that is there for you for the reading we're gonna go ahead take a break and we'll be right back it's true in even at any time in your life in the same as you age you should pick up an instrument or learn something completely new the band yeah I want to do something different with you like in addition to that what we so many years we don't have any and I feel like maybe you when I try to pick up an instrument with the band yeah I need talent yeah you need to I think you know what I'm saying bringing you everything entertainment Lori and Julia on my top one of seven one black along it soul I've talked a lot about Tattersall distilling and they have an app so if you are wondering like Hey I heard stuff you talk about how to make love region and tonic you can find it on the Tattersall app they have tons of cabin recipe is and batch cocktail recipes as well as just single serve drinks I learned about aqua V. from Tattersall and I was like okay other than putting this in a bloody Mary I don't know what to do with that and they said just think of it as Scandinavian Jen so you can use it on bloody Marys you can use it in place of Jan for more complex cocktails so you could use it with another type of flavoring yeah and it makes a delicious dirty martini also they've got the orange come out great for grandma.

Lori Julia Tattersall
"mag dot" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

The Steve Warne Project - Sports

16:14 min | 2 years ago

"mag dot" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

"It sends head coach DJ Smith. Checkout faces MAG dot CA now, an interesting week for the Ottawa Senators they hold development cap as we record this podcast. So I thought we might check up on how some of the prospects of doing with post media's Kenny, Warren. How you doing Kenny? I'm doing great great summers here except for hockey exactly. I wanna talk a little bit about the sense development can't because. Well, there's not really a lot else for sends fans to kinda hang their hat on. Yes. The average sends fan with they're excited about with the Ottawa Senators, the kids, and well, this is a week for the kids for sure. Let's begin with the player that you have found to be the most impactful, the player that is impressed you most at development Cam. I like I guess Eric brannstrom on defense when we heard about a lot about him because of the stone trade. And I think just in.

Kenny Ottawa Eric brannstrom MAG dot DJ Smith hockey Warren
"mag dot" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

The Steve Warne Project - Sports

12:25 min | 2 years ago

"mag dot" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

"Checkout faces MAG dot CA Kay, former NFL tight end Kellen Winslow junior. We're gonna talk about here. He's a thirty five year old and he's the son of a former NFL great who bears his name. An honestly if you remember the NFL in the eighties, there was a playoff game between the chargers were killing Winslow seniors playing for and the Miami Dolphins. And it went into overtime it. Was one of the best NFL games I've ever seen. And Winslow was a star of it. And that game was probably the crown jewel of his career while his son is made forty three million dollars as an NFL player, he should have it made instead. He's now after being convicted few days ago, he's now going to spend years in prison for the rape of a fifty eight year old homeless woman who's also convicted of exposing himself to a fifty nine year old woman in the middle of spring, day while she worked in her garden and making lewd gestures toward a seventy seven year old woman while she worked out at a gym. There were eight other charges as well. But the jury was deadlocked. So there was a mistrial, although they were all in all eight cases leaning toward guilty. Winslow has been charged with raping two more women, those incidents, taking place, fifteen years apart and the list for this guy just goes on and on. And apparently, it comes as no surprise to those who knew him during his time in the. NFL you know, horrible story horrible story about this guy and back to his dad. I think he was the guy who wore the glasses. I gotta wear glasses member didn't have the dark dark glasses. The frames. When you played for San Diego, you can look that up. I don't remember that you look that up in a all have that memory. Correct. The deal here is in this guy, Steve, I read the article, I read, most of the article is that this guy was a cereal cereal. Lascivious guy, you know, in his day he if you read the article you're gonna you're gonna say, how, how did nobody stop this guy? How did nobody stop them? Even even. When I read it I couldn't repeat, what this guy was doing, you know, like, like, pleasure himself everywhere. Steve everywhere in like you gotta read it. You gotta read it. You're gonna go this is crazy. Oh, I did even players who were on his team. And they looked at their room assignments. They all share rooms, they said, don't put me with this guy. Do not put me with this guy. He's, you know he's he's. Freedom Riyan, or these a terrible guy, a terrible guy and apparently could count on having an empty seat next to him on any team flight as well due to his ritual, and it's the same with the hotel rooms, his ritual of watching pornography on his portable DVD player. Yeah. And doing things. Yeah. I think even the team, let him bring this crazy story of, of a torso mannequin that he could bring with them on the road. An anatomically correct one. Yeah. Yeah. All over the place. All this guy could bring it. There's some talk in there about in that article about this a result of, of concussion. You know. I don't know what, what to say about, although it's, it's a crazy ass story. But this I get a feeling when I read it that it might have been able to be prevented that future rapes that this guy committed might have been able to be prevented with, with how obvious Lee. Problematic. This was beyond that, you know, that's the sense I got under this thing is where where was he not stopped in this thing. But you can you can you can you stop someone who doesn't think they have a problem with it. You know. Well, I mean, the thing is, if you're dealing, and what a what a conversation for a coach to have to have, right. Like Romeo Cornell was Cleveland's coach imagine him having to call Winslow into his office and say, yeah, maybe stopped pleasure in yourself in front of your teammates so much. Yeah, just do it anywhere in his car and his hotel room on the airplane. He had an issue. I don't know if sending them off to therapy would have been enough for the road that this guy was on. Yeah. You know, you say, well, he he obviously has a problem, you know, when they when they first discovered this, which would have been years ago when he was playing. So what do we do about that? Now, they look at it and someone goes, maybe shit of because he became a rapist. Why wasn't this coming out while he was still a player while he was still a teammate? You know, coaches are talking to us. I now maybe if you talked about it earlier, maybe come to, to light earlier, it might have ended his career, but it might have it might have helped it might have helped him it might have helped his victims. Yeah. Well, there's a line there, right to where you want to protect the families of the victimize her. Right. You wanna protect his wife and children and all that stuff. So it's a it's just from from the start to the finish. Just a gross gross thing to have to deal with. But, but there, there are a different standard. I guess, you know, professional sports leagues have to have to achieve a different standard and have to make them accountable. If a guy's got a problem, okay? An an addiction problem. Like, like he does that, that ran amok, you know, that got to the most heinous spot ever that negative consequences of that stuff will will will not affect the guy. He doesn't think he has a problem. You know. I'd mentioned that before in, when we talked about it in my in my own issue that losing your house. Losing your family losing your job losing. Whatever is not always enough is not always enough for guy to straighten out, you know, so terrible story man, absolutely terrible story. And the heat of that story is this thing's been going on for a long, long, long time. Yeah. The people around him who knew him, you know this as Celia to real passions in life and that was video games in pornography. And one would suspect, though it will be sure speculation from me that maybe he didn't have a lot of supervision during his formative years. And it's just an unfortunate story across the board to be thirty five years of age. He may like he might still be playing just wrapping up his NFL career. Instead, it's just this awful story and tale of unreal. Realized potential and it's too bad. Terrible. Well, that's a sad way to end the show. Got to help us out here. I'll tell you what the, the. You know, one of the greatest things about the rapper victory, raptors Sewri rapper. The wrapper. I there's no transition from the Winslow story at all know is everybody on that team everybody on that team said, the, the only reason they won that they got to the place and that they got to sign quite Leonard made that big trade is because of the president of the team. Right. What's his name messiah Jiri? Yeah. That this guy is the guy who was the whole architects behind that whole team and everybody agreed with that. You know, so it's nice to see in a day whenever the bearing general manager all the time, or the or the president of a club was made all these personnel decisions, you know. So that was sort of cool that was sort of cool that without him. They said they would have never got near where they did. And then the poor bastard, trying to get on the get on the floor after the victory to sign on a celebrate this thing, and he's got his credential in his hand not draped around his neck and aqap goes. Stop. And I guess he pushed him I was reading today. And now, they're now they're gonna look at this bodycam video from the cop to see whether they should press charges for a guy, you know, making physical contact with, with a policeman so poor bastard, up this thing negative IRS head. But yeah, there's, there's conflicting stories if the if the officer doesn't fact his body, Cam on that should put everything to rest, one of the fans that was watching the whole thing says the cop got awfully aggressive with a guy before even asked for his accreditations. No, he can't come this way can't come this way. And maybe making a sumptious some people will put a racial spin on this thing. I don't know. I, I wanna reserve judgment until I know more or maybe this body, Cam footage will come to light, and we have a form of better opinion of things I, I don't want to necessarily painted as something other than a misunderstanding for the time being the guy made a little bit of. Of a mistake. You know, you can't touch a cop, there's no doubt about it. You can't do that. But by the heat of the moment, here, hope it's not Oakland trying to take away from the victory. With creating this big star drop. It was done is done. No big deal. The guy lost his mind for a second, but, but ima- break, nap no question, and certainly everybody involved in the raptors family having an incredible day at the championship parade, and the whole rally at Nathan Phillips square under if you had a chance to see Nathan Phillips square in Toronto. And how many people were jammed in there like it was just a sea of humanity and everybody was pumped right? If you watch the US open, for example, speaking of crowds, and you just talked about this about downtown Toronto. Go to the US open, man. You, you. You are guaranteed guaranteed. You're not gonna be able to see the players. Okay. Like, the, the large percentage of people like ninety five percent of the crowd are can't get on the ropes. Okay. Can't get in the front row here. Okay. So you're gonna you're gonna miss all of it. You're gonna miss all of it. You know you see people with their iphones. When, when a guy comes to the T they're freaking out, and they're, they're trying to get their little, little picture of guy, not. So I'm always asking myself. Why, why would you why? If you're big fan of golf stay at home. Mom stayed home and watch this thing. But people do it all day. Well, we can't do this all day it is time for us to call it today. Yeah. That wasn't my best. Take by the way win. Win win. K before you leave today. I'm hoping you can help with something that takes like two seconds. It's a simple matter of hitting, like subscribe follow and leaving an ice review. And I know that seems like a hassle of stupid, but it's really something that matters to the internet robots, the more feedback you leave the easier, we are defined when people are searching for a podcast like ours. And that's every podcast biggest challenge just being found almost a billion.

NFL Kellen Winslow rape MAG dot president US Miami Dolphins chargers San Diego golf Steve Nathan Phillips square Kay Toronto Cleveland Lee Romeo Cornell Celia
NASA overcomes military's GPS tweaks to peer inside hurricanes

Science Magazine Podcast

06:17 min | 2 years ago

NASA overcomes military's GPS tweaks to peer inside hurricanes

"Now we have Paul vision, a staff writer for SCI. He's here to talk to us about gauging the speed of hurricanes, or at least trying to gauge the speed of hurricanes using satellites. Hi, Paul, okay. I've never thought about this before. But I have seen images of hurricanes. You know, on the Weather Channel they show me. Here's the I in the have the different winds Fay's kind of labeled with color where are they getting those winds? Be measurements. Well, whenever a hurricane moves close enough to the US, we still have the, the fleet of hurricane hunter aircraft that fly into the hurricanes to make direct measurements of the wind. So that's gone on for decades, but for hurricanes there further out know there's a limit to help much you can do this. And once the water dense enough time, deflects satellite measurements opens the traditional measures of wind. Okay. So one way, is with a plane that flies dangerously close to a store. Yeah. Great. That sounds awesome. And then the other is to look at the surface of the water. So we're gonna talk today about a different way of measuring. Hurricanes speeds. Can kinda summarize, how that would work? Sure. So this is a technique was first tested on these hurricane hunter planes, actually, but it, it takes the GPS radio signals that are beaming down all the time everywhere, from above those reflect off the surface of the ocean. And this array of eight satellites catches, these GPS signals, and uses their roughness to infer the winds above them. Okay. That's going to be more accurate than the other measures. We talked about before it's not so much accuracy is about where it can look can look into the heart of hurricanes because these long GPS radio wavelengths can penetrate through clouds and as I t's at the top of the show. There was a problem here where you're trying to use GPS. Did you this precise measurement? But then they ended up having some issues with military tweaking. These GPS signals. Yeah. So the turns out the newest generation of GPS satellites have the ability to boost the signal strength of what they're beaming down. And some of these GPS is still run by the US military. They started doing this soon after this mission launched as the satellites were traveling over the swath of Africa Middle East in eastern Europe. And this really kind of screwed with the calculations that the researchers had because they had assumed that it would not at the strength was constant now Busse said that we're specific location. Interesting. So how did they account for that? They couldn't ask the military to stop doing that for whatever. No, they had to figure out a way around it. It realize they have these small antennas on the top, the satellites that are taking the normal GPS signals in, and the essentially wrote the software for them, so that they would measure the strength of the signal in addition to using it for location and time that took about two years of work, and they had upload new software toll the satellites to actually. Make this happen. And you say all the satellites are eight their acronyms cygnus. I believe, yes, this is the constellation of eight micro-satellites, and who owns those satellites, psalm the NASA program. Okay, 'bout about one hundred fifty million dollars launched a two and a half years ago. So our micro-satellites cheaper than say, a big regular size sidelight was definitely much cheaper than the, you know, billion dollar weather satellites, but it's also very focused on this one application, word and modern whether satellite has a bunch of different instruments, mounted on it. But this was a way of testing this new technique, and it could eventually cheaper because this is the first round doing it, you know, if you want to do this for weather agency. Maybe it could be a bit cheaper will if we know more about the inside of hurricanes further away from the US, we know more about these wind speeds, what would that help us understand what, what does that do for us? It's all about the prediction of storm about both the path. It will take an especially the intensity of the winds and how it will develop the law. Trim hope is that by measuring the inside the guts of these wins fairly frequently can really improve your because this data is then ingested into the models used by the weather service to look at future of these storms. And if had a lot of issues with getting intensity the strength storms. Right. And this type of Queant could boost that I also read in your story that this confused over land, as well to understand more about storms. Yes. So this is about us soil moisture actually. So they're satellites that look at soil moisture purpose built, but infrequently this the consumer the same place, maybe every three days. So that doesn't allow you to ask questions about the short term Lucien of soil and kind of how response to water and gets rid of water. So we care about this because of flooding flooding and soil water in the soil feeds back into rainfall and all sorts of connections. What are some of the broader questions that these satellites could answer when researchers realized that? These would be able to measure wins beneath storms. It's not just about hurricanes. There's this thing single. The Madden Julian oscillations is series of storms that March across the belly of the planet from the Indian Ocean east, and they've really kind of tell connections from an help control a lot about the weather year to year and researchers can't see the winds underneath these storms. But now with cygnus it seems like it can start to see that wins are actually feeding the precipitation that allows these storms to continue which some have thought was one reason, but there have been other through now. This might really start to help people figure out how these storms could change with climate change. What's the next step here? These satellites are going to die at some point, right? The limiting factor of the satellites are the batteries likely in those should lasts for seven years there in low earth orbit. So they will descend into the atmosphere and burn up. The big question going forward is will Noah start to use these satellites or satellites like them in the future to inform weather forecasts? So. This is a NASA mission. It's only supposed to last seven years. Noah's unlikely to use these satellites for their own weather predictions because they like to own their hardware. But this could really make the case firms Montaigne something like this in the future. Okay. Thank you so much Paul, my pleasure. Hopefully sent as staff writer for science, you can find a link to story at science MAG dot org slash podcasts.

United States Paul Nasa Staff Writer Hurricane Hunter FAY Indian Ocean Noah Queant Busse Montaigne Europe Seven Years One Hundred Fifty Million Doll Billion Dollar Three Days Two Years
"mag dot" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

The Steve Warne Project - Sports

15:48 min | 2 years ago

"mag dot" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

"They came together to support tornado relief efforts in their community and then later on, they ended up being the winners of the Chevrolet, good deeds Cup. Check it out today faces MAG dot CA and there you can as well. Find out how you can get issues mailed to you. So our question today is about DJ Smith? No sense. Head coach, he was officially hired on Thursday, at the big media tour on Friday as well. Are you happy as a sense fan with a choice of DJ Smith, essense coach? It's a simple. Yes or no? That's our RB computing web poll and it's funny Jimmy. How when you sit down and talk to somebody how they can kinda veer you in a direction, I was keeping an open mind, I was non-committal on it. You were kinda worried about it. I mean he's only been here a couple of days, but his big media tour. He came off extremely well. You know, this is the big bad ass business of sports. And whether you like it or not. But professional sports is all based on wins and losses and say what you want about the guy. That's good that he's, you know, you need a media savvy guy. But it you know that's what I like to look at twenty games in, you know with a guy and it's it's can you win hockey games. Right. The same thing with a player, you know, as good trade. Have they done this thing, very well? If the guy goes, minus twenty you know, and as in his first ten games, or something he's toast, you know. So that's the big unfortunate side of it, I guess, or or on another hand a good reality about a good reality about it that, that we're not into the feel good situation here. But typically, the Ottawa Senators gotta do something quick and get a going. But we'll see you know, we'll see. He's got a track record of winning. Here's a great track record of winning from his junior years. His OH L resumes. Outstanding he won the twenty fifteen. Memorial Cup is a head coach. He went to other memorial cups as an assistant coach. And so, yeah, you're right. I mean, of course if stuff goes wrong, and, and there's no success on the ice this fall, then I'll feel differently. If things come apart from that perspective, but you can't do anything he can't win a Stanley Cup. You can't compete in the month of may. When your team's been limited for month and a half. So the here and now he said, all the right things, and I would say that I'm relatively optimistic. Got some good feedback. Good member Graham Ramstad said I wasn't sure when I first heard the name DJ Smith because like most I didn't know much about him, but after doing a bit of research and listening to the interviews. I'm more optimistic about next season with Smith running the bench. Matt grant rights. I think it was the cheapest choice doesn't necessarily mean the worst. But it doesn't make me think it's the best. I'm disappointed in who Dory on. Didn't interview that being Bradshaw. And finally, what's the deal hiring candidates after marathon interviews of over seven hours? Maybe add a little structure that interview and Matt Cox, finally they picked a good coach, but until they start giving their top players, long-term contracts. It wouldn't matter if it was Scotty, Bowman or jungle behind the bench. But think of it this way, you know, could you imagine what it must be like to, to be interviewing John Tortorella, right? And it'd be gone this fucking nuts. Man. Who we are here, although that guy strikes me as a guy that can really turn on the charm when he needs to have seen enough of him to know that when it comes time to be prickly. He's awesome at that. And that's his rep. We've seen it again. And again, but I've also seen him in moments where he was just extremely charming and likable. So he can turn it on when he needs to. But back to the poll on DJ Smith being hired by the sins. What do you think? I don't like the higher. I don't like the higher. I think they had to get a big ticket guy. I think the team is in dire need of. Like that, to get get the get the attention away from all the ownership stuff. So granted nice guy and all that stuff. I just don't like. I just don't think it's a very good idea. I think they should try to get someone with more experience. Yeah, that's me. Nobody knows for sure. And it's about the combination of the two. It's is right coach and high enough calibre of players, and then get some breaks after that. That's Stanley Cups are one. So there's nothing to say that, you know, a tried and true guy, who's coached six hundred games in the league is, is an automatic success with the thirty first place auto a senators either. So it's just all. It's all preference at this age. It's all I could say this though having sat down with DJ Smith on Friday for half an hour. I understand why the Ottawa Senators were impressed by him. They all would be, you know, they all would be, you know, they'd all be impressive in an interview, you know, I hope DJ Smith listens to this. Right. And then goes on to win fifteen of his first twenty games. And he can give me the finger and the reason I bring that up, which was hilarious. I think. Brooks, KEPCO course who won the PGA apparently, Brandel Chamblee didn't give them a shot. And of course, he shot twelve under for the first two rounds of I shot seven under. And then Brandel the next eight had come back on there. And Brando said I just feel like the guy gave me the finger for four and a half hour straight, you know how played it was. It was hilarious. So I was gonna say, I don't know if you're on social media today to see some of the all the basketball analyst, all saying after the raptors had fallen behind to nothing in the eastern final like just absolutely taking a spadeful of soil and dumping it on the raptors. They're done. They're done. And some calling the box, all the bucks, are actually gonna go on to win the whole thing talking heads. Don't know everything. Obviously. Right. Anyway, I I've got nothing against E J Smith. I don't know him. So, and I can only hope for the best for the team, but I think it's a big tall order. Well, it's pretty clear based on are Rb computing web poll today that the people that voted anyway are down with it with seven hundred one votes. And the finale of the poll is sixty eight percent. Yes, they like to hire thirty two percent. Say no. I lot of write in votes of I'm indifferent. I'm numb to the Ottawa Senators right now. But most people were kind of on board with it. So that's today's web poll for Rb computing. If your desktop notebook or phone or giving you trouble, I recommend going to see my friends at Rb computing for over twenty years. They provided high quality computer and phone repairs for the Ottawa region are computing dot com. One, oh six Menton place in balance corners, again, on Friday morning at a chance to sit down with a new sense head coach DJ Smith. And he was obviously pumped I can't be anymore excited. You know what? Yeah, it's been. It's been a, you know, a wild say thirty six hours for sure. I've waited a long time for this and ready. So, you know,.

DJ Smith Ottawa Rb computing Matt Cox MAG dot CA Brandel Chamblee Memorial Cup John Tortorella hockey Graham Ramstad Dory Bradshaw Scotty raptors Brando Brooks
Nonstick chemicals that stick around and detecting ear infections with smartphones

Science Magazine Podcast

11:57 min | 2 years ago

Nonstick chemicals that stick around and detecting ear infections with smartphones

"Hello. This Welcomes the science podcast for may seventeenth two thousand nineteen. I'm Sarah Crespi this week show Meghan. Cantwell talks with science writer Saratova's about a nonstick chemical that sticks around in groundwater, and I talk with sham. Ota about his science translational medicine paper on using a smartphone. So listen for ear infections. I'm here with Sarah helps who wrote this week's feature to talk about how a small group of citizens in Rockford Michigan uncovered groundwater contamination in their town. And with the greater implications of this discovery are thinks much joining me. Sarah, thanks for having me, Meghan, of course. So could you talk about what prompted these citizens to investigate whether the shoe company factory in their town? Wolverine worldwide had contaminated their water in two thousand and nine wolverine worldwide announced that they would be closing their tannery, which had been inoperational for over a century. And the citizens were requesting the company I do a comprehensive environmental assessment of the property before the demolition. They knew from other tannery closures that Henry's often use hazardous substances when they're transforming rawhide. Hides into leather. And so they wanted to be sure that those same substances had not been sort of left behind on the tannery grounds. They were told that because there was no evidence of contamination on the property, that there was really essentially, no way require that testing be done. Meanwhile, will Verena had said there was no known contamination on the property. They asked the city to assess the site, but they did not want to instead they went and got the help of a scientist and launched their own investigation. What did they find from this, they uncovered helped uncover some of the highest levels of Pecos contamination in drinking water wells anywhere in the country and after many years of trying to get the company to test, the tannery grounds discovered that the tannery grounds are also contaminated with pitas, what exactly is p fasten? How long is this chemical been in production p bosses are a class of chemical? Nls known as per in Pali fluoro- alkyl substances. They were first synthesized by American chemists in the nineteen thirties and forties and their salient chemical feature is that they have a carbon fluorine bond, and that's among the strongest of all chemical bonds. It doesn't degrade naturally an environment that can be very useful for some products at lens durability. And also, these compounds can repel water and oil and stains, and so they're widely used in products, such as firefighting foams, nonstick, coatings, carpets, food, packaging, even dental floss some dental floss, it was discovered recently, there are over four thousand of these compounds. But the two most widely studied are called PF OA sometimes referred to as PICO and PFOS those two are no longer in production in the US. What are the impacts of these? Goes on human health were still looking into that. There was a massive epidemiological study called the seat health project, fat looked at people exposed in West Virginia and Ohio, they were exposed to fella, and their drinking water. And in that project what they found was a probable link to six conditions that included high cholesterol, all sort of colitis by ROY disease, stickler cancer, kidney, cancer, and pregnancy induced, hypertension initially, a lot of the Pecos research, focused on these communities, where there had been this high level of exposure, more recent studies, have started looking at the general population, and I think that that's where this gets really interesting because what they're starting to find is that studies are suggesting that even people exposed to what might be referred to his background levels of p fusses show, negative health effects, most interestingly and may be most concerning laid. Some of these negative effects are on the developing fetus babies. So researchers are saying that it can affect, for example, the immune system and these populations. Is there a standard level for what's considered a dangerous p fast level or is that something that's still also being determined? That is very much being determined and a believe it was two thousand and nine the EPA established a health advisory level of six hundred parts per trillion of PF. Oh. A and PFOS combined drinking water. And then in twenty sixteen. They dropped that level significantly to seventy parts per trillion and that in twenty eighteen a branch of the CDC came out with a new study suggesting Twenty-one parts per trillion for PF away and fourteen parts per trillion for PFOS, and then you have some researchers one at Harvard saying one part petroleum is where that level should be. So there's a lad of conversation around. What is a protective level in drinking water, this investigation in the small town has also prompted other areas to look into what their p Fasces levels are, and what has this unveiled one of the interesting consequences of the concerned, citizens work is that shortly after the state of Michigan launched what I believe is the most comprehensive statewide survey searching for pizzas, and they found is that here in Michigan. Nearly one point four million residents are drinking water from orces, contaminated with pitas. It's also showing up and things like foam, that's on our rivers. And so there have been a number of advisories. Do not eat befo. Don't touch the phone fish advisories, dear advisories. It's really extensive ubiquitous exposure to these compounds. And then other states also. Oh, are just starting to look, but nobody has looked quite as comprehensively as the state of Michigan has right. It interesting that all these investigations are being prompted but this also isn't the first time that p asses have been under investigation happened several decades ago as well. Right. Are you referring to the DuPont trial? Yeah. Sometime around nineteen ninety nine early two thousands a cattle farmer in West Virginia suspected that something was going on. Some of his farm land had been purchased by DuPont and not long after that his cattle died, and he wasn't able to get much help locally. And so he ended up going to a Cincinnati-based Turney who sued the company and in the process of that he was able to obtain a lot of internal documents from DuPont. And what he found in those documents was that both DuPont, and three who. Had been making pieces as well. Head Ben documenting negative health effects from exposure, experienced by humans and animals, and that they hadn't done enough to make this available to the PA, for example. And so the attorneys sent these documents to the EPA, and subsequently DuPont, was fined, and three m was fined believe a year later, was around that time that both companies agreed to voluntarily phase out PF away and PFOS. So when they phased them out, they replace them with a different chemical is this one actually safer persists lessen the environment. Well, that is a matter of conversation. They replaced PF away and PFOS those two compounds are known as long chain pieces. They replace them with shorter chain passes. So molecules with fewer carbons and. What we do know is that those carbons don't bio accumulate the same way as the longer chain compounds. And for that reason, there's an assumption out there that these are safer, but there are studies, just starting this is just starting to be studied suggesting that this might not be the case and the national toxicology program. For example, is in the process of starting study of believe it's one hundred twenty five of these lesser known. Short chain compounds to see if they really are safer than the longer chain compounds after this, this fine that they received were their cleanup efforts, or is there, a way to clean up these P asses from water supplies. What we know is that you can use something called granular activated carbon to filter out in particular longer chain passes, so PF away, and PFOS from drinking water, however. That approach. It has variable success with the shorter chain passes which can sometimes break through the filter and they can break through more quickly. So one of the things that water systems are starting to look at is using perhaps a combination of granular activated. Carbon with reverse osmosis, which is a little bit more effective at filtering out short chain passes. All of this though is very expensive. And so that has really put especially some of these smaller municipalities in a tough spot, and others Superfund cleanup sites that kind of thing is there any sort of fund that these local communities can tap into that ole pay for this remediation, one of the things is that because pizza's is not as needed as a hazardous substance. It doesn't qualify as far as I know for cleanup funds through Superfund now, some states are starting to pass their own legislation. In New York, for example, does designate FOSS as a hazardous substance so you can get funding through there. And then the other thing that states are starting to do is actually sue the manufacturers to try and recuperate some of the costs of updating their drinking water systems. Would you say this whole investigation all across the country is still kind of the first step of finding where these sites are? And then the next step of cleanup is still a little bit murkier. Yes. That's very true. Historically are understanding of pizzas and exposure has really been concentrated in these areas around particular very few limited number of military, bases, and also communities that are near manufacturing facilities, and what we're starting to find now is, especially as we have the tools to detect passes at lower levels were finding that these are in drinking water supplies and places, people would never have suspected. But not everybody is looking. And so that's one of the things that I think different states, and different municipalities will be grappling with for years to come. Thank you so much. Sarah. Yes, thank you. Sarah helps is a freelance, writer and senior editor at undock. You can find a link to her story at signs MAG dot org slash podcasts. Stay tuned for an interview with Shaam Gula KOTA on using phones to listen to erections.

Sarah Crespi Dupont Pfos Michigan EPA West Virginia Writer The Shoe Company Meghan Verena Cantwell Rockford Michigan Wolverine Saratova United States Shaam Gula Kota CDC Henry
"mag dot" Discussed on Learn English with Cullen's podcast by EATT magazine

Learn English with Cullen's podcast by EATT magazine

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"mag dot" Discussed on Learn English with Cullen's podcast by EATT magazine

"Hi and welcome back to English with Colin. And in this listen, you'll be able to see a video of two words. I am now speaking, and if you can't see the video, then please look for the link inside this listen, and it will take you to the video. So in this video, listen, we are going to do a memory taste, and in this memory taste, the taste ongoing to ask you. The same question as I did in the last video. But this time you will be able to see the words, and you will see the link is to answer this question. Okay. So you ready for the taste and after the test, please clink the link inside this video. So in the last lesson I asked you what is your biggest challenge? Or what is that thing? You are having most difficulty with learning English. And I want you to be able to tell me inside the link in this, listen, so what you can do is click the link inside the listen and in that link I'm going to ask for your first name and your Email. Male. And just tell me in three or four sentences. What are the biggest challenges for you, learning English? And what is the or what? The things that you are struggling with the most. What is the most difficult thing for you at this point in time, learning English? So please click the link inside this listen, and if you can't find the link, please contact us on our website at eat MAG dot com. That's EA TT image E dot com.

Colin MAG dot
"mag dot" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"mag dot" Discussed on KTRH

"With the oil and gas industry online at shale MAG dot com. Welcome to in the oil patch presented by shale magazine and sponsored by steer broadcasting from the oilfield expert studios, oilfield experts where you get the right products right now in the oil patch is where together weeks four topics that affect us all in oil gas business, and in your community every week your host Kimball auto will visit with the movers and shakers in this fast paced industry, you'll hear from industry experts elected officials and many more right here on in the oil patch and welcome to in all patch radio show. I'm your host Kimball lotto, we have a great show lined up for you. Of course, we will be joined by the editor of show magazine. David Blackman will also be heading to the women's energy network conference in Denver, Colorado and catching up with Dr Darden retired from NASA and president of win Aaron mckie. But first I'd like to tell you about the latest issue of shell magazine. It's a wonderful issue. It breaks down the topic of natural gas. Talks about importing exporting. So if you have questions on what's happening. There's a lot of media attention around this clean burning fuel. So you definitely want to go to shale MAG dot com. That's spelt S H A L E M G dot com. Again, that's S H A L E M G dot com. And remember, it's free. And did I mention for less than eighty dollars a year? You can get a full year subscription to shell magazine. And again, all you have to do is visit shale SHALA dot com and get your subscription Mel directly to your officer home. And now it's time to bring on our editor of shell magazine..

shell magazine shale magazine editor Kimball auto show magazine Aaron mckie David Blackman Dr Darden L E M G Denver Mel NASA officer Colorado president eighty dollars
"mag dot" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"mag dot" Discussed on KPCC

"LA MAG dot com slash whisky festival. Welcome back to the frame. I'm John horn coming up later this week on the show, captain marvel composer PR to- prac- walks us through how she came up with the music for Marvel's latest superhero film. But now a movie where the lead isn't a superhero, she's not even anything that extraordinary, which is part of her and the film's charm. She's Gloria belt and she's played by Julianne Moore. And this clip she talks with her mother played by Holland Taylor. Wake up one morning and find yourself a wrinkled old lady. Just like me. You're not old. You look beautiful. Do you really do because life discuss by in a flash? The same thing every ten years. See what I mean? Gloria bell is directed and co written by the Chilean filmmaker Sebastian bellio. It's a remake of his twenty thirteen movie, Gloria, which starred Paulina Garcia in many scenes. Gloria bell is a shot by shot copy of the original Gloria both films are about a divorced woman who spends a fair amount of time and clubs where she really likes to dance. And she's especially fond of nineteen seventies. And eighties disco. Everybody should know. That's gory. Gainer? I never can say goodbye. And this song. Really? I think sets the mood for your film. How.

Gloria belt Gloria bell Gloria Holland Taylor Marvel Julianne Moore LA prac John horn Sebastian bellio Gainer Paulina Garcia ten years
"mag dot" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"mag dot" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"To crack or break when exposed to harsh environments were chemicals are extreme cold super durable construction. It eliminates any creep. So it's not going to spread apart. If you store it long-term fully loaded they come with a lifetime warranty and are available now for large frame glocks N P five air fifteen. They have sig P three twenty p shield if you want durability and reliability, and you're just tired you just want to switch it up from the boring. Black max you need to check out ATS MAGS dot com. That's ETS MAG dot com. Don't forget. To use code Dana and get free shipping is ETS MAGS dot com, promo code Dana. When it comes to costly car repairs unit options, you can't sacrifice your family's safety on the road by bargain-hunting for the best deal. That's why you need. Extended vehicle protection from CarShield. Carshield makes the process of fixing your car for a covered repair super easy. You can have your favorite mechanic or the dealership do the work. It's your choice. They also provide twenty four seven roadside assistance and a rental car while yours is being fixed for free. If your car has five thousand one hundred and fifty thousand miles it doesn't mean you have to pay high repair bills. Carshield's administrators have paid out close to two billion dollars in claims. And they're ready to help you. Save yourself thousands and future car repairs. Get covered by the ultimate and extended vehicle protection. Like I did. Call eight hundred car sixty one hundred and mention code Dana or visit CarShield dot com and use code Dana to save ten percent. Call eight hundred car sixty one hundred mention code Dana or. Visit CarShield dot com and use code Dana to save ten percents. A deductible may apply..

Dana Carshield two billion dollars ten percent
"mag dot" Discussed on Eating For Free

Eating For Free

03:51 min | 3 years ago

"mag dot" Discussed on Eating For Free

"But I just wanted to say this was very interesting. If you go to town and countries town country, MAG dot com, and you read this article, you know, with with the philosophy with the expectations. You would see from a magazine told town and country talking about Anne Hathaway and his like editorial moment, but it's not really notorial because I don't know what town country magazine is really in the sense. But I just wanted to say some great quotes here. They feel like really just sold it on a warm day. The last gasp of San Francisco's fashionably late summer Hatheway breezes into tea manufacturer with nary a whiff of Daphne Kluger, her movie star character in oceans, but this Hatheway in town visiting family blends into the casual crowd clad in jeans, a plaid shirt tied around her waist and beat up conference sinkers Hermosa. Portent accessory a FedEx envelope with her ballot for the midterm election. Like. Absolutely. And then right next that over rose limited computers, halfway talks openly thoughtfully, but her career stopping to say, thank you so much to every eager weight or who comes our way. I love it. But but I'm ready for the in Hathaway Assan Slyke, fringe BAC. I want the Scorpio energy back in my life. I'm here to say, I'm here to say, I'm ready to accept and out the way back into the fold. I think generally, I think she's ready. I mean, the Rosa future like I need. I haven't even tried that yet. Like, I need to find out like that brand. I've been seeing everywhere vibes. Spelled with a y God V Y be like V Y is all like lower case in the KOMO thick phone swings. Buckton? Can I also mentioned real quick go just so, you know, the kind of caliber this magazines operating at their feature article there featured articles in this issue include. Let's all just moved to New Zealand is exercise making fat and my favorite mummy. Are we rich the right way to talk to your kids about money? Sometimes co says he knows. Yeah. Prevalent five two things that we're going to get into okay? Some press releases just came out of the Pete Davidson camp. Oh, what is the update on that? Isn't it funny? How he kind of just truly them. So here's our. Deers are bad bleeds job updates. You really were waiting for that one. So this comes from Twitter from an account called pop alarms don't care about what that is all about. So Pete Davidson wanted a second opinion about the size of his penis. And he got one during a stand up comedy show at Tarrytown music. Call in New York over the weekend, the Saturday Night Live star revealed to the crowd that he hooked up with a friend after his split from Arianna Guerande who wants to the world he was packing ten inches. I got with my friend, who's how do I say a fast loose woman. The we hooked up and I asked her, okay? What is the size of my penis in comparison? So she goes on to say that you know, what I'm not to say. Just not going to say, I mean, is it just not a cry for help? What goes on to say something that is shocking in the extreme. So go look up for yourself. What she says is I will not be saying it is it safe to say that around it was exaggerating. Or not she was exaggerating. Okay. I also wanted to say that in the same article. I read that his mom who's a school nurse gets bullied at school. Sing thank you next or the Holloway..

Pete Davidson Hathaway Assan Slyke Anne Hathaway Pete Davidson camp MAG dot Hatheway Daphne Kluger Twitter KOMO New Zealand Arianna Guerande Holloway San Francisco New York ten inches
"mag dot" Discussed on Learn English with Cullen's podcast by EATT magazine

Learn English with Cullen's podcast by EATT magazine

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"mag dot" Discussed on Learn English with Cullen's podcast by EATT magazine

"Welcome back to learn English with Cullen and today I wanted to explain to you how classes work so classes come out on the audiobook file thirst. So that's the Impe three. You can listen to that. You can download onto your phone or you can push play. And you can listen to it. So that it's actually playing on your phone and those listens come out on the website at MAG dot com. MAG dot com with listens. Come first. Then you can go inside our app step to and get the notes, listen that appositely on ice agents on Android, and gives you more detail. Inside the listens inside the audio. Listen, so you getting more detail from that listen in there that stint to and then lastly step three the listens come out on video. So the video listen on YouTube. It will always be the last listen that's with the listen Aden's. So please by all means stop with the audio files. This into the audio thirst Dame second Goto app and get you will note, and then certainly come to YouTube and to get an update of listen he had on YouTube. So please, I o means though to the process step was audio out audio at ease. Mag dot com. Stick to is posting app the notes inside the app, which really help you can download that app. It's completely free. And then step number three is listen comes out here on YouTube. So we'll catch you in the next lesson.

YouTube MAG dot Aden Cullen
Where private research funders stow their cash and studying gun deaths in children

Science Magazine Podcast

02:38 min | 3 years ago

Where private research funders stow their cash and studying gun deaths in children

"For science this week. She wrote a feature on a new grant to jumpstart research on kids and guns. Hi meredith. Hi, sarah. How big a problem is gun violence or gun injury in kids in the US? It's the second leading cause of death and went nineteen year olds in this country. Second only to motor vehicle accidents guns kill about between eight and nine kids a day and this country, roughly thirty one hundred kids slow more every year cancer. By comparison kills about eighteen hundred fifty kids a year. So fifty eight percent of that number and yet when you look at the research funding and just to take one example, not hang it all on the national institutes of health because the CDC has a huge role to play here if it would but the national statistics of health spa. Spent for hundred eighty six million dollars in twenty eighteen studying pediatric cancer, which I'll remind you kills about eighteen hundred kids and spent three point one million dollars studying how to prevent kids from getting hell with comes. You actually went to Michigan to attend a meeting where people were discussing what kinds of experiments this bunny from the NIH to go towards can you talk a little bit about who was there and what they were trying to figure out. Sure there were roughly thirty gun researchers and trainees in this conference room at the university of Michigan trying to hash out what pilot studies they should take full 'word as part of this four point nine million dollar five year grant from NIH is child health institute there Amos to jump start research on how to prevent kids and teenagers from being killed by firearms is seems from your story that one. The changes here is treating gun deaths and gun violence as a public health issue rather than you know, how to treat them or how to prevent them with laws sits other tactic. It is it's not new to about three dozen gun. Researchers who've really been working in the trenches for a quarter of a century attacking this as a public health problem in the much the way that motor vehicle crash. Studies led to Vince like side airbags and child restraints and seatbelt laws. The idea is to use a dispassionate inquisitive scientific based mindset to get at how do we reduce injuries from guns not to take people's guns away at this point? I want to introduce one of the principal investigators on this grant. Okay. So I have Rebecca Cunningham here. She is a professor of emergency medicine at the university of Michigan medical school. And also the principal investigator of the firearm safety among children and teens consortium more facts. Hi, rebecca. Hi, when they net did come up in the story was that you did residency in Flint, and you saw a lot of gun violence there. Can you talk a little bit about that? Sure. In a not disturbances. So I worked there as the resident. But then also as a staff attending physician for about ten years in Flint, Michigan, and in Ann Arbor, really the world that we practice in our firm urgency medicine are two very different worlds when a suburban worlds here in Ann Arbor and one very urban world and Flint Michigan and in both places. I've taken care of many young teens and children who have been victims of firearm violence in. It's just heartbreaking in. So those youth that we take care of at that point. There's very little that can be done almost you're doing some NCA JR. Lifesaving maneuvers and more often than not I was spending time in sort of small waiting rooms Tele giving very bad news to parents that their child had been shot and killed that day. And in here in Arbor had been the victim of finding a gun and using it when they. Had a suicidal moments and had devastating injuries. Endore was not going to make it that day. And delivering that news any number of times, she families at some point. We wanna work up stream. What can we do to stop? Having these discussions. We do to stop having these youth arrive in our trauma bays. What should we be doing? Because once once they arrived there there's very little that can be done. And we do amazing things in medicine, but really to have an impact on this. We have to work upstream from the trauma bay outside in our communities. Right. That's a really good segue to this grant. And the meeting that you had recently where you discuss different ways of spending that money and doing different kinds of research. Can you talk about the kinds of topics that might be addressed with this money? Sure. So understanding that there's been very little research in this field over the past twenty years, we really need to jumpstart the capacity for research families want to store guns safely overwhelmingly, they don't want their young children to be shot. They don't want their suicidal teens. Find a guns in their home. How we can help get that message across to them and help make it feasible for them to do. So in the same way that we help families thirty years ago, understand what the best car seats were. And how to have those applied in their cars and find it to be feasible and not annoying for them to do. So that's health behavior research that can be done that can help families around safe storage other types of work that can be done with the grant we have a lack that we don't know about for example, the built environment, and how are cities and streets are laid out in terms of parks and buildings that are in disrepair, and how that sort of environment can affect firearm violence in those areas, we have a lot of work to do with better data collection on youth. Do come in for example, through the emergency department. Very little is known on how they do from their mental health after the are after a school shooting that say we know that those have massive impact on kids across the country in terms of how they're feeling about being anxious. This about going to school the next day PC, they might be experiencing either for witnessing those events or from hearing about them on the news. We don't yet have best practices to understand how we can help those youth through those times the reason that funding was clamped down on about twenty years ago was a political one. So I'm wondering what's your approach to dealing with some of the political blowback that you might get from embarking on this kind of research. Yeah. I think it's really important that we don't see this as a political issue at all. We've you this a'safety issue. So as a physician, we all the time talks are patients are worried about our patients safety were worried about whether they're in a car seat for their kids were worried about the temperature their water were worried about whether or not they're smoking. How that affects their asthma worried about the safety and welfare of our patients in in the same way, I'm worried about the welfare of the patients that I see arriving in our trauma bay what we can do to have them not being our China bay. I don't think at our core. When we put aside the deep divide in the country right now that anybody really sees. Children dying firearm violence as a political issue. We all have that coming goal has the wanna say really clearly that our grant fully respects the second amendment rights. We understand that in our modern age just as that we have cars, and that our cars are going to go away our country has strong support second amendment rights, and that we are going to work within that framework. All right. Well, so now that you've had this first meeting what are the next steps for you? And for the facts group where rapidly gaining momentum. There's a lot of interest by smart young researchers now in the country, and how they can apply their skills to this injury problem that they really have have not been focused on for the past twenty years. So our team is working diligently on training, the next generation of researchers who are joining our work groups, we are working to get those early projects off the ground. So that we can start to provide some early answers both for the country as well as to lead to larger scale. Solutions. Thank you Rebekah. Now, I just want to get back to Meredith Wiedeman for a couple more questions. She's a staff reporter science so Ma'arif. Do you think that we're gonna see a rise in funding for this type of research is just the start of something bigger? I think it's a possibility lot will depend on what the congress does you could take for example, Nita Lowy Republican congresswoman from New York who has summer tried to put ten million dollars for gun research your marked for it into the centers for disease control budget, and the Republicans voted down in committee now Democrats are going to be controlling that committee, whether they can get it thrown into a funding Bill approved by the Senate remains to be seen. Okay. Meredith. Thank you so much for talking with me. You are so buckle. That was Meredith Wiedeman a staffer Boerner here at science and before that Rebecca Cunningham, professor of emergency medicine at the university of Michigan medical school. She's also a principal investigator for the firearm safety among children. And teens consortium you can read meredith's feature on gun injury prevention research and science MAG dot org slash news. And that concludes this edition of the science podcast, many comments or suggestions for the show right to us that science podcast at AS dot ORG. You can subscribe at the show anywhere. Anyway, get podcasts or you can listen on the science website that science MAG got org slash podcast to place an ad on science podcast, contact mineral dot com. The show was produced by Sarah, Spey, Negga Cantwell and edited by podgy, Jeffrey cooked, compose music on bath of science magazine and its publisher for bless thanks for joining us.

Meredith Wiedeman Principal Investigator Rebecca Cunningham Michigan University Of Michigan Medical Sarah Flint Professor United States Ann Arbor University Of Michigan CDC NCA NIH Arbor Vince Flint Michigan
Researchers find bacteria residing in guts of mice come from mother and remain nearly constant over many generations

Science Magazine Podcast

09:23 min | 3 years ago

Researchers find bacteria residing in guts of mice come from mother and remain nearly constant over many generations

"Transmission more than a real world setting because the mice never come into contact. So mice from one line never come into direct contact with different line. And so we know another people have also have shown apes we've looked at this in chimpanzees and other people looked at this in that Boone's that social interactions allow the transmission of gut bacteria two so for this paper, we didn't allow contact between the lines. So in that sense. We're favoring vertical. Transmission? Yeah. Inbreeding them. Also do that to exactly and the experiment was designed well to identify bacteria that can be horizontally transmitted in the absence of direct contact things could be transmitted through the air, for instance, with through the through vector like Nantel handler. And what did you learn about those articulate bacteria, the ones that were coming into these mice on this horizontal route one thing that jumped out right away was that more closely related gut. Bacteria tended to be more similar in their transmission. Okay shroud. At least for some parts of the bacterial lodging. That's interesting because it suggests that there are some traits that are nearly conserve that determine transmission mode of bacteria. So that opens up some questions about what the streets. Are. We were look at that a little bit in this experiment. And we found it perhaps not surprisingly aerobic bacteria bacterial that can live in the presence of oxygen were more likely to be horizontally transmitted than obligated Anna robes, which dive they're exposed to oxygen. We also found several bacterial genera- in mice that displayed evidence of horizontal transmission. Those bacterial genera- tended to be the same 'Bacterial Jenner are known to cause disease and humans. There would be something that would be damaging to the animal maybe prevent it being passed down is actually bad for the microbes, fitness. If you're a bacterium, and you have all some kind of pathogenic effects to your host, your vertically transmitted and you kill off your host. Evolutionary dead end for you. Right. So vertical transmission is thought to disfavor the pollution of pathogenicity. Whereas horizontal transmission kind of opens up possibilities of your because you no longer rely on a single hose lineage, you can just jump to the next lineage. If you kill off your initial host that prediction is exactly borne out by our data in help us better understand or investigate new bacteria or infection and say, oh, well, it looks like it has some characteristics already familiar with these types of studies. So we looked in particular foodborne infections and hospital associated infections, and what are exist is that a lot of those infections arise because of opportunities for transmission. And it's it's simply just the propensity of microbes to be horizontally transmitted predicts the rate at which they cause infection humans, and so it it's reasonable to start to think about ways that we can cut. Those transmission routes could study like this ever be done in people. I know we touched on this briefly before I think the difficulty with people is the long generation times of humans the generations twenty years or so in humans, it's going to take two hundred years or more to conduct analogous experiment. Humans that we just had took three years in mice. Yeah. And of course, the control environment. Art, right. Yeah. And that's a whole nother issue. That would be impossible. I think eventually we will be able to start to understand the long-term. Inheritance? Multigeneration inheritance of gut microbes as time progresses and techniques for characterizing the gut microbiome humans continue to improve. We're going to eventually have long-term multigenerational data sets just might take take some time. Fifty one hundred years. Okay. Andy, thank you so much for talking with me. Oh, thank you. Any Muller is an assistant professor in the department of ecology at biology at Cornell University, you can find a link to his research science, MAG dot org slash podcast, say. Tuned for gen Bill Beck's interview with David Lazar about his book politics with the people building directly Representative

Andy Boone Anna Robes Bill Beck Cornell University Muller David Lazar Assistant Professor Representative Fifty One Hundred Years Two Hundred Years Twenty Years Three Years
Google declares Android phones can have two notches at most

This Week In Google

05:23 min | 3 years ago

Google declares Android phones can have two notches at most

"August fifteenth. And then I leave again to go to bath and then. I know I do anything I can to avoid. Texas Banff is a fortieth birthday present to myself. My best friend. Sounds fun. It will be yes and almost happy birthday. Oh, happy birthday than forty. I. Hey, hey, we're not there yet. Come on and happy Wednesday. How about old? Hey, how do you guys feel about notches? I think I know how. Not shes as it. You just kinda go blind to them, but three notches. Where are they putting all these notches? That was my question. I'm not sure that we'll see three. Well, we definitely won't on Android because apparently only two notches are allowed in Android p they've mandated a requirement of only two notches, only the bottom and top and only one per site. So you couldn't. So in other words, you couldn't have your two notches, both on top, not sure why you would want to do that. But Google has gone to the lengths to make sure that you don't because who in someone might design a phone, it's all notches. Yeah, that's kind of what I was thinking like a like a border, a border much. Why? 'cause we can. This is for the lover. Oh, you don't. Did you guys read it was in logic magazine, I thought this was really fascinating. And here is my copy of logic magazine t- do you actually have that? I've ever heard of it. I was like, do you realize I had never heard of it. So I was like Russia. Shinsen and this whole creation of how Chinese manufacturing is like change. Basically, how Chinese manufacturing has grown to this like wild and crazy world where people just build on top of bills and they're talking about like people designing phones that have a compass that points to mecca and its popular in this logic world, it was just like it felt like science fiction, the the world that they were describing. It was such a fascinating article in. So now I'm sad that I cannot find it, but it was logic magazine letter from Shinsen, I think, and I highly recommend everyone check this out because it was just a glimpse into this culture that. Wow, you know, that's what's the company that makes all the phones. Yeah, Foxconn friend of mine went there for means high executives, and just the story of going into the the belly of the beast and Foxconn is amazing. Yeah. So this is logic, logic MAG, dot. I o. is in this is called letter from Shanzen. At the bottom of the dot, it's called Shanzai, which is. Like knockoffs, but now they're calling it the new Shanzai in. It's like this concept of basically cutting like open source hardware where people just build on top of other stuff like the long tail Chris Anderson's long tail in physical goods in technology. So super crazy Superfund. I wanna live. I kind of made me wanna live there just to see all the crazy stuff, but I don't really wanna live in China casino maternal list. I like saying things uncensored Google. I do like Google. The parallels they were making. Like we think like in urban areas, we might be used all this, but even at super rural areas, these guys are can do all this crazy stuff with their just their mobile phones in. I don't know, go read it and be like, dang it. No wonder China's gonna kick our butts. That'll be included in the shrew that that'll be included in the show notes as well. Let me think here else to well, we're probably also going see. Not that it really matters to very many people anymore. A updated daydream of viewer at the event. I'm guessing because apparently the headset is now seventy dollars off that began today. So they're blowing out the daydream view. It's thirty bucks. Now at Verizon, the description lists the item as e o l. skew so end of life. Imagine that a new daydream viewer is around the corner using it phone though, was opposed, I'm guessing. I mean, they have the standalone one by his Lenovo. I believe, of course it's Oculus. Instead he out the Oculus go, so Dr, Android. What do you think in this pixel watch. Dr Android. I like that. I, I mean, I'm having a hard time getting excited about watch any more. I suppose that the where thing kind of pass me by at this point, but I'm really surprised that up until now. Google hasn't done their own pixel watch of sorts..

Google Foxconn Shinsen China Logic Magazine Chris Anderson Texas Lenovo Verizon Shanzen Russia Seventy Dollars