10 Burst results for "M. S. V. A. N."

"msv  a. n." Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

The Autosport Podcast

04:06 min | 5 months ago

"msv a. n." Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

"That from the I don't think it was from the very first race, but from the early in the first year of thunder sport we'll see right. I think my dad looked up the grid and somewhere I've got a picture of it and I was there. And I'd just like to point out that Derek bell was the winner of the first fund sports race. He drove a Porsche 9 O 8 free with sigi bruun. It was so goodbye and his car. And they won the race. And Derek put it on pole as well. But yeah, let's say full initial sharing with Brian Cox in the first season before John brindley became his usual driving partner. But it wasn't until 86 when Burke ratcliffe racing acquired a couple more C 5 30s. And then over the next over the next year, we had the March 8 two 7, which was bought by the Italian drivers stingray. Otherwise known as Stefano sebastiani, his real name. Gary, do you remember what stingrays actually stood for? Yes. He was a British based Italian worked in the hotel industry. He was manager of one of the big hotels, and why he didn't I don't know if he really wanted to hide his identity because it was because he had a big job either. I don't know, but he it stood for Stefano in Great Britain race. Exactly. But he was stingray. But I always thought that if he pronounced it as an Italian would sting brachi. That would be worth a second to lap, I think so. Quite frequently lacked. Of course, he wasn't bad. No. He was about a second off the face, but there were many other drivers in thunder sports here. We're upwards of 5 seconds off the pace. And don't forget that his son still races in this country in MSV, former free cup. Really? Yeah. Oh, I didn't know that. I haven't done relatively recently. I couldn't tell you in the present mad world of the last couple of years where he has been racing. But certainly a few certainly three or four years ago he was racing here. But there was also the March 8 four 7 and a couple of years younger, which would in the Texas home care livery. And Richard piper was the guy he raced at most of the time with usually Tiffany Dell as his co driver. And I always, that was always my favorite car. I thought that was the best looking car Antarctica. So interestingly, because that car was made by an operation that was known as RK racing, of which bob fernley subsequently of force India and various other Formula One teams and I think now at the FIA is now president of the FIA single suitor commission. Yes, exactly. He was very much behind that project. And they were made out of old Indy cars. 82 March IndyCar. Well, let's hope that the future of single seater racing looks like single seat cannon cars. And all that bombshell I think a good place to end the podcast, a bunch of cars discussed today that if this word translates to our international listeners can all be described as a bit hairy. And hopefully if you haven't got the chance to pick up the magazine, obviously we're trying to do them justice on the podcast today. And of course you can go online and their digital editions and you can look at stuff online, of course, but hey, I just love to sit down and I get 5 minutes to myself with a magazine and just some of the pictures we've put in this week's edition are absolutely stunning. So if you can, go and pick yours up. If you're not already a subscriber, go and take a look at those because they are some fantastic images that our team have pulled together. Thank you very much for listening to another edition of the auto sport podcast and we'll see you on the next one..

sigi bruun John brindley Burke ratcliffe Stefano sebastiani Derek bell Brian Cox Richard piper Tiffany Dell Porsche Derek bob fernley Stefano FIA Great Britain Gary Antarctica Texas India
"msv  a. n." Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

The Autosport Podcast

05:47 min | 7 months ago

"msv a. n." Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

"Than the formula UK main series and both of those it was a time when they were both very successful championships and worked alongside each other. And there's no reason why that can't be the case again with F four and G before. And ultimately it will come down to driver preference drive interest and budget as well because if a driver has dropped unlimited budget, then F four is probably the more natural choice to go to. But how many people are there in that position very, very few? And that's where GB four comes in. If GB four can attract people in that otherwise wouldn't have done single seaters at all their switch to tin tops or GT cars, then that will be anything can keep them involved in this side of things. That will be a massive boost to the UK scene. It will make a real difference. And the question that we wait and see and wait until the season begins is how many drivers are there in that position? And that will be the key factor, but on paper they are very different championships. So there's no reason why they can't succeed. Now it's just down to the sort of interest levels from perspective drivers and teams and which way they end up end up going. But as we said, it will be fascinating to see how the next 6 to 8 months will shake out and how the championships are all looking by the time they start next April. I think something that is really important I suspect you guys would agree that fundamentally we have to recognize that we are here as championship organizers to try and provide the drivers with the best package for them. I mean, it's their money. I mean, it really should be. It should be an open market. You need open market competition. An opportunity and different offerings at different prices. To actually serve the marketplace. It's not just about having one product, so that's all you can buy. It's the only championship you can do, or that's the only road car you can buy, or that's the only magazine you can buy. You know, life's not like that, you know. And any sort of approach like that is just cost inflationary. We know it is, for someone to have a monopoly on a service. But fortunately, motor racing is not like that. And nor should it be like it. And there will be therefore, to the benefit of the competitor, there'll be pressure on all of us to be pressure on us as MSV to be pressure on motor sport UK but with British air force and make our championships appealing to make them good value to make them attractive. And that's if one doesn't have that competition. And there is a bit of overlap, sure, but there isn't everything. You know, no one's got a right to have a patch of market, totally protected. And that competition is good for the consumer. It's vital for the consumer, and we're going to get a we're going to get more more challenging, British drivers, making it through to Formula One because of this sort of approach. And that's what the most important thing that we should be thinking about as an industry in this country is what can we do to help get the most to get the most British top talent coming through and when they do get a Formula One, win world championships, like Lewis has done. It's so important for us all. I don't think anyone can disagree that the more opportunities there are for young drivers at a lower endpoint a lower financial point to enter, is no bad thing. And as you say, you know, it means that we can find the next Lewis Hamilton and George Russell's then again, I don't think anyone's going to the championship of existence for that reason. I mean, we've mentioned various points in the podcast about the illustrious history of British F three and sadly that name is obviously no longer being used. But obviously it's been around for decades before that Jonathan and this year is a very special year because it's the 40th anniversary of when you actually won the championship in 1981 looking back and start remembering those races from that season. What do you remember sort of the most? Well, certainly, yeah, Stephen, I've got great memories from that year 1981, British F three. It was a fairytale year, really. You know, it was my first year of professional racing 1980 I was still a doctor on hospital awards in Sussex. I was trying to fit in formula Ford racing with working a hundred hours a week, which was a bloody challenge, but somehow managed to do it. And then I decided I'd take a year off. If I was gonna go with F three and justify it, I'll take it, I take a year off, but the whole way it happened, I said it was fairytale stuff. I managed to persuade my sponsor at the time, Jack called Mike Cox with a little engineering company in formula for this was that we got to go form a three next year Mike, you know, I'd always try and excite him about doing the next step. And I said, what do you want to do? Is. I mean, somebody was like, I came out of my relationship with dick Bennett. So the little workshop where Wes area engineering were based in summary. That became our little workshop base alongside Mike's engineering factory. We went and I found, I thought the best thing to do is get let's just see if we can buy the temperature winning car from this year, Stephanie Johansson's route. So Mike Cox and I went down and we bought the car. Actually, the first thing that happened actually, I think before we even launch it was that we said Mike said, I want to see how Jonathan goes in a test. So we went to Goodwood. Project four, which was run by Ron Dennis at the time. Dick Bennett was the engineer. They took the card out of Goodwood, Stefan Johansson was the benchmark. And Stefan drove around and I think he did a 14.8 or something, probably not far off the truth..

UK British air force George Russell Lewis Hamilton Mike Cox dick Bennett Lewis Jonathan Sussex Mike Stephen Stephanie Johansson Ford Jack Wes Ron Dennis Goodwood Stefan Johansson Stefan
"msv  a. n." Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

The Autosport Podcast

07:41 min | 7 months ago

"msv a. n." Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

"Oh I'm really pleased too that we've now evolved with motor sport, UK. We've got a good relationship with them now. It hasn't always always hasn't always been like it in the next month, but we are there now, I think, and we want to work together. And have our range of championships, GB four, British F four, and GB three, all working together to really pull back the center of gravity of single seater. Driver development to the UK. Just I just want to pick up on something you said there Jonathan about the budget for British F four and what you believe it to be around the 300,000 pound Mark. I don't think we've actually said what do you sort of estimate teams will be requiring for GB four? Because it's, as you say, substantially less, but sort of what sort of figure is it? Is it between sort of about a 100,000? I think obviously depending on the team, Stefan, I think you're going to be between a 120 and a 150,000. For championship. I mean there would be one can wonder where the cost savings are. Well, of course, the actual cars, first of all, there are a lot of these genuine cars around now because of the gen two coming car coming up, and they are not expensive. You can buy a complete tattoos current, formula four car, with engine for 25,000 pounds, 27,000 pounds. And a new gen two car is going to be 60,070 thousand. So there's a big difference there. And you know, look, of course, to an extent you get what you pay for, but the performance of the car is going to be pretty similar because that's the whole, that's the whole ethos of it. But then on top of that in terms of where we can make we can make savings. GB four will run alongside GB three at the British GT meetings and the team's ability to a GB three team's ability to have one side of their own in GB three, the other side of their own in GB four. That in itself means that one team manager, the engineers can spread themselves the mechanics can be involved in both championships. It's one car's a big shunt, things like that. But another big saving is on the spares, because both the GB four car and the GB three. Well actually use the same they use the same suspension components. The wings admittedly different. But we all know that corners are the most likely things to get bent on these things. There's also a big stock of old parts for these things, whether it's front wings, rear wings. It's important to say that, while they call these cars old, they're actually current. We're not like they're resurrecting a 5 year old car here. And they're great cars, and they've got plenty of life left in them. Some of you guys remember, I don't know how long when my son will was in Renault eurocup. I think they were in about the tenth year with that car. It certainly we of MSV have got a lot of experience running championships. We've got a business that owns 6 circuits. We've got a lot of other things we do. So we can absorb the overheads of running a championship pretty easily and keep the actual component that needs to go into the costings for things like entry fees and fees. We can keep this minimized. And just generally in the way that we own the circuits, we can help drive. We can help the teams help the drivers by keeping cost minimal and it's really important we will do. We don't want this. He really important this doesn't that it doesn't have budgets rising up to British formula four levels. And indeed, it would be stupid to do so because British F four footage F four would be a great championship. Anybody with 303 150,000 pounds will logically go and do British F four. I guess with any championship the proof of how successful it's been is the number of teams and cars that are on the grid. Current GB three teams such as Carlin and Christopher and racing have already said that they won't be doing GB four and they're going to be doing British chef for next season. You concerned about entry numbers for next year at this stage? Are you confident that it's going to be successful? That's a very important point, Stefan, how big the grids are going to be, which teams are going to be there, which drivers. Is the bottom line of it? That's what's going to make it a success or not. Am I concerned, not in the slightest? I know that we've got. We've got a very compelling proposition. And in terms of the number of teams that are signed up at the moment, and on it, our launch has been our launch has had to go on hold a bit in reality whilst this issue of the 15 year olds was resolved because the teams wanted to know and it was very important. The teams wanted to know that they're actually that they could accept 15 year old drivers because it was going to be rather perverse to have a 15 year old driver. Able to do or only able to start single seater racing if they could find 353 100,000 pounds. And so that was an important step. Now that we've got there, we're seeing a rapid build up now of interest from teams and drivers. There's one thing having the teams in it, but the other things you need to do is get the drivers doing it. And I don't think there are any too many drivers announced in anything yet pretty chef for GB three. GB four is Jan fed before you really start to see how these things are going. But as I said, what we've got with GB four is such a compelling proposition for those with sub 200,000 budgets. And as I now that we've got the 15 year olds competing, we've got quite well over the next over the next few weeks, we're going to have quite a lot of exciting news coming forward about GB four. With various announcements, all of which will make it clear that this is going to play a major role in the spectrum of British single seater championships. It's a very interesting time for top level genius racing in the UK with three for next year. Jonathan mentioned back in the day, you know, it wasn't unusual to sort of have three from the four championships. And competition was good. Both Jonathan and when we had Corona on a couple of weeks ago, you know, they were saying that GB four and British F four are not rivals to each other the very much sort of taken up their own space in the marketplace. Obviously, you cover British airflow, you know, you've done it for a few years. You know, how do you think it's going to get on with GB four and British air for both being championships next year? Do you think that they can I guess survive together and not take from each of those grids in a way? Obviously, Jonathan says, you know, very much a different sort of entry point with budgets. But it's always the same isn't it? If it's the same driver through the championships are going for, you know, one could quickly have more many more numbers than the other. How do you think it's going to go? Well, that's the big question now, isn't it? But I think as Jonathan and you mentioned Karen as well, I've said there is that clear difference between the two of the two of the series in terms of budget and that does mean that they're not direct rivals in terms of that side of things. But at the same time, we do have to obviously realize that those are limited number of people out there with the budget to go single season racing, even if it is considerably less than the 200,000. But that's not to say that both of them can't be successful. If you look back at 20 years ago, there used to be two formula Renault championships in the UK former owner UK and former Renault BARC. And one of those had a slightly older car was a lower price point than the formula UK main series and both of those it was a time when they were both very successful championships and worked alongside each other..

eurocup Jonathan Stefan UK Renault Jan fed Carlin Christopher Karen Renault BARC
"msv  a. n." Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

The Autosport Podcast

05:46 min | 7 months ago

"msv a. n." Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

"Four is a disagreed the name is agreed to 15 year old drivers can drive with the cars. And I'm also pleased that motor sport UK have now taken the position that we can work together. We can come up with the championships can complement each other. And I really think we can do. I have to say, things it hasn't always been that way. If we've been brutally honest, you know, you've got some little bit in the background. I think a few people were surprised when UK announced they were going to be the promoter back in back in June. Of the British air four championship without it going out to tender. But anyway, nevertheless, that's happened, then they're clearly very motivated to make it work. I think it is a difficult position when you get and it's a rare one, frankly, and it's almost unprecedented in this country for the ASN, the regulator to also be a promoter, and of course it puts on big responsibility and pressure on them when they're in this situation. There shouldn't be a conflict of interest. When we launched GB four, the signs, the signs, you know, weren't that they were instantly supportive, shall we say? And we've had to work quite hard to make it clear that. This championship with the current cars is entitled. It's a logical name. It's a logical championship. It's a fair championship and one that should still have 15 year olds driving in it as you can now. We had to make a few points clear. The fact that the FIA had given a two year transition period anyway for the current gen one car that they will not be able to be used from 2024 onwards, but they can for next year in any market and 2023. And we also listened of course to make sure that we got feedback from the medical committee as a safety committee to make sure that the specific characteristics and challenges of 15 year old drivers and in single seaters are recognized and adopted. At which we were very clearly would have done anyway. But anyway, we have finally got there. And it's the right thing. And we look forward to cooperating too with motor sport UK. But what we really want to get back to, is if we could get even some way back to how things were single seater racing in the 80s, when we used to have when I started formula four, there were three formula Ford championships, you know, which is you can argue is a bit like F four level. They were all they were all operating, and there was the P and L and the town's interior and the VR D.C.. And they all recognize there's a degree of competition, but that was healthy because a bit of competition gave the drivers the opportunity to choose which championships they thought could serve them best. And that's important in any marketplace, whether or not whether you're choosing a single seed or championship, whether you're choosing a holiday or choosing which magazine divide or read about motor racing, you know, let's go on to, isn't it? You know, most of us are in that market of which circuit you want to race on, yeah. So yeah, so it was important that that will happen. But anyway, so where we're at now is I think by some way towards going back to having the UK being much more of a center for single seater racing. So BRD, C, I thought did a very good job in that. But if it wasn't for if British F three and us would just say us with British F three and GB three, you know, all you would have in single seater racing in this country is British air force starting at 300,000 pounds and you know it would be that's gonna have that would have had a major impact and I mean a major deterrent for the UK finding the next Lewis Hamilton's in the next George Russell's Lando norrises. You know, some would say some guy's gonna fold it, but an awful lot can't. And the other thing is with regard to age, I think, apart from driving the cars. Apart from the fact that current tattoos, you know, it's got an exemplary safety record. Yes, it hasn't got the halo on it, but this is a start. This is not a Formula One car a formula two. You know, it is a formula for with a 160 horsepower. So very modestly performing car. But it has got a whole raft of safety features that were part of the whole approval when it started to have 15 year old drivers. I mean they still exist started in prep protection. You know, the head protection has got wheel tethers. These have these are very strong cars. And in the 150,000 race laps that these tattoos F four cars have done has never been a serious injury. Now, of course, no guarantee there won't be. But the track record is there. And when you think for the alternative, if when you've got 60 year olds can actually, if you've got your national a license, you can jump in a 500 horsepower formula 5000 space frame car from the 70s and be running around park. And of course, we've got we've got a motorcycle racing which takes half of MSV track activity. You've got 12 year olds, 13 year olds, 14 year olds, racing motorcycles out there. And I think the other thing that's happened and I was tracking to Derek work about this is that it's actually turned out that 15 year olds have got a lot of ability and a lot of maturity these days and so and of course the teams are the teams of very proficient and things. So you can see from genetic juniors at 14 years old at some there's quite a lot of skill levels and emerging very young anyway. So overall we're really, we're really excited about where we're at with delighted we got there with the 15 year olds in GB four..

UK ASN FIA George Russell D.C. Ford Lewis Hamilton Derek
"msv  a. n." Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

The Autosport Podcast

08:30 min | 7 months ago

"msv a. n." Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

"Going to be cheap, but it can be made much more affordable for young drivers who actually want to get on the single seat a ladder and you think you can do this through this championship, don't you? Exactly, Steph and this is the key thing and throughout the history of MSV and even prior to that really, frankly, throughout my history, of involvement in single seizure racing, which is extensive. The common theme through everything we've done is providing great value for money. I'm a driver who has probably vaguely recall. You know, I had no money coming in a motor sport, my father was a GP. He didn't he couldn't afford to spend a pound on what I was doing. So I had to sort of sell fun myself, which is good, but nevertheless, I know what it's like trying to raise the money and it's buddy difficult. And also, I just know it's such a thrill for me and I don't know for you two guys as well and I think a lot of people a lot of people love to see the best drivers the real talent coming through flourishing and doing well. I mean, it's been Luis Hamilton, of course, in the past, it's been we got George Russell now, which is so exciting. You know, George Russell came through his first single seater championship year was in 2014, I think it was. When we launched BRD CF four, those sort of budgets were 18 90,000 pounds then, and that's what George could find the money to do. And he won that championship and that launched him into F three F two and of course F one and now Mercedes F one. And that's so exciting. So look, I love seeing I love seeing young talent come through. And the reality is, there's more young talent without big budgets than there is with big budgets. And everything I've done in that we do as a business tends to be around providing value. You know, the real lower the lower budget value end of it. And that started off with formula Palmer Audi. Hit the scene in 1998 when F three budgets were three, 400,000 pounds, and we were doing, it wasn't as high performance car, and in many ways it wasn't as sophisticated. But it was pretty good performance look good and for 85,000, it was absolute bargain, and we had 27 cars in that first year. Of course, and he proved to be a championship lasted 13 years. FIA F two. We did, which was 200,000 pounds, and originally 450 horsepower formula two car and then BRD CF four. We've had about 26 years, I think, could do these championships. So and that's really what we've clearly British F three as we have it and now evolved into GB three does provide an F three level of performance for a budget that's around about 300,000 pounds is what 300 maybe three 50. I mean, British chef three, when the last bit when it was in the old and the old configuration, they were up to half a 1 million 600,000 on that. And if it was today, it would be 700 probably with the same rules. So again, GB three and with us running GBP is done a great job on that. And then obviously there's the FIA F four championship in the UK, which motor sport UK are running. You know, and they have set themselves. And I can understand, you know, they've set themselves the target of trying to be the best in the world with it. Obviously, Italy tends to dominate at the moment, but those sort of budget as you cha was a set, a budget for primer with the top team in Italian F four is 450,000. And there are certain number of people who are going to afford that. But they're all going to be a lot who just even 300,000 is far too much for the first step in single seater racing. And whilst I fully respect what formula falls down, it's been a very successful championship for the FIA globally. There is a need for a lower cost championship as a starter point. And that's where our GB four championship will fill that niche. It's not designed to compete with British F four. Clearly, clearly there'll be a bit of a rollout with the front end of GB four on the bottom end of formula four. But we're going to have budgets of half that. So what we'll be providing with GB four is the opportunity for young drivers coming out of karting at a genetics. If they can raise a hundred, a 150,000 pounds, they got no chance of getting into British air force, but they have got a chance, not just a chance they can get on a single seater ladder in a really great car. We all know the tattoos is the current car, for example, it's not, you know, the new gen two car's not here yet. We still got races going on. The Chan championships finishing this weekend at Monza, the Spanish championship with these cars, the current taxes. It's a great car. The current FO car. And we are basically taking that car, clearly the values of drop right down because of the advent of the new championship. And this provides an opportunity together with running alongside GB three with a British chef British GT championship and with careful management from us as MSV, the ability to really provide a starting point for those people that just can't raise budgets over kind of a 152 100,000, which is all very exciting and fits in very much with our kind of philosophy. For those who aren't aware, obviously that's what you care that the sport's governing body in the UK. And for any championship new championship, you know, they have to get permission to run and obviously GB four has gone through the same process. But it's quite interesting because as we said in the first part of our podcast on single seats, we're current chandok a couple of weeks ago. You know, most about UK have actually taken over the organization of British F four. Some people might say, you know, there might be perhaps a conflict of interest. I know Jonathan has said, you know, GB four and British F four aren't direct rivals. But by no means, I guess was it a fog on conclusion, especially in terms of 15 year olds being allowed to race as well. But the most UK would actually grant GB four that permission to run 15 year olds and actually have the championship. There's so much change in the world of UK single seasons for next year with Rachel now being run by motor sport UK. And that meant for an interesting situation in terms of them as a governing body. You're now also commercially involved in the running of a championship as well. And that changes the dynamics quite significantly in terms of what their role involves. But having said that, obviously, GP four is a great idea and as Jonathan said, it's completely it's targeted at a very different sort of driver to what F four is in terms of the budget. But the interesting point is, as you say, on the 15 year olds, because at present, only one championship in the UK at one single safe championship in the UK can have drivers aged 15 and that is British F four, but for next year, the new GB four championship has been granted the ability to run 15 year olds as well rather than the standard 16 year old starting point. And that's a big and that was no guarantee that was going to happen. I know Jonathan's worked very hard to make that case for that to happen. But considering the various different commercial interests, the various different involvements of K there's no guarantee that that would be the case. And that is quite significant because it just opens up GB four to another group of drivers who can now take part whereas if that hadn't been the case in the same genetic junior driver who was 14 or 15 at the end of the year it wouldn't be able to make that step up into GB four if they wanted to, whereas now that avenue is open to them. And that's quite quite significant, I think, in terms of even more options to drivers, what they can do depending on their budget. And Jonathan, that's just one of the areas that you've been looking at. But how important do you think it was to get the 15 year olds into GB four? I think it certainly was very important. It wasn't vital, but it was very important. I'm very pleased to say now as you guys know that now, as of last week, following a championship following a motor sport UK Championship control panel meeting, but it is all agreed that GB.

George Russell FIA Luis Hamilton UK formula Palmer Audi Steph British air force Jonathan George Italy Rachel
"msv  a. n." Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

The Autosport Podcast

04:54 min | 7 months ago

"msv a. n." Discussed on The Autosport Podcast

"It could be a number, but it needs to be a number to denote a level of hierarchy. We accepted the fact that we had to move away from formula three rather formula. So I thought about what would be very hard when we came up with all sorts of names as you guys would if you're trying to come up with something that was going to stand the test of time. And we decided I decided actually that name GB three would be good. It was succinct crisp. And it had the level. And the FIA to be fair to them, we're in agreement. I mean, I think they were. They were not completely comfortable with the position that they were in and they wanted to find a sense of resolution with us. So we were like minded on that approach. And the FIA and liberty agreed the name GB three with motor sport UK. So that came about. Now some people may have felt it was an odd thing to do in the middle of a season, but I think actually it was a very good thing to do in the middle of the season because we had we had all of our teams. We had the drivers. We have the history. We had a good grade. And actually just changing it over a race to GB three meant that there wasn't any uncertainty about who was going to be on the grid, which teams were going to be doing it and all those sort of things. And it's morphed into formula British formula three as morphed into GB three. I think superbly. I think people in the sport were actually calling it GV three. It's a very crisp name, it's crisp, but really, the British formula three. And so I think that's worked well. And it's been, I think, partly because the car itself is so good. The racing's so good. The drivers like the car, the teams like the car, teams, drivers like the way we run the championship. That the name, the new name of the championship has been very well accepted and now it's there it's done. We'll come onto the car in a second Jonathan, but I just want to bring Stephen in here and ask him, basically, as Jonathan says there, Steven, you know, I guess there wasn't going to be a good time to change the name. You know, you could have either done it in the middle of the season of the end. What do you think about it being changed in the middle of the season? Because I know when sort of the news came out, we knew that obviously MSV had been having discussions with the FIA about the name for a few years. But it came as a bit of a surprise towards the it was going to happen mid season wasn't it from British F three to GB three. As you sort of hinted that it's always difficult choosing when to make these changes. But as Jonathan said, changing it in the middle of the year, it does really bring some advantages. And it means drivers who are looking at what their options are for next year. They've already know what GB three is, what it stands for, whereas if it changed to GB three, say now there'd be questions about what is that? Is that actually what British F three used to be? Is it something different? So I think the timing of the name change whilst it was perhaps a surprise that it did happen midseason. I think that actually has worked really well and as Jonathan says already got used to it. And it's already sort of stacking their minds. And I think having that three in there with the back to British F three, that works really well as well. So I think considering it was a difficult situation to deal is I think it's had a good outcome was good and outcome as it could do. I think I know when the name change happened, there was still a few people in the paddock. I think even myself who would continue calling it British F three sort of inadvertently. But I think by the final round that donnington, everyone had kind of nobody was saying British chef three anymore, so I guess that's sort of a success in itself, isn't it that people have actually taken this new name on. An appoint in particular as well is the fact that it was changed mid season Jonathan is because, you know, for next year, you know, you mentioned the success of this car that was used for this year in the last couple of seasons. But for next year, there's going to be a new car as well in GB three. So I guess it was important to get the name change out of the way before this new car came in and people perhaps had a bit of uncertainty about where this championship was in the pecking order of UK single seaters. The car for next year then what was the decision to change it for next season and what can you tell us about the car that's going to be introduced? Okay, first of all, pride is just addressing your final question there, Stefan about the new car. I have to say I isol occasionally we'll call it formula three, but like you, the number of times we do is fading, but then you see, I'm still calling, I'm British, I'm sorry, FIA F two and FIA F three. I mean, I'm still calling FIA two GP two half the time because that was a strong name and a GP three GP two. They were strong names, weren't, and they lasted well, and I'm sure many people when the FIA have two and FIA of three came along, we're still calling it GP two and GP three. So it's a question of if it's a crisp easy name that people understand..

FIA Jonathan UK Steven Stephen Stefan
"msv  a. n." Discussed on Telecom Reseller

Telecom Reseller

03:45 min | 10 months ago

"msv a. n." Discussed on Telecom Reseller

"Too. So how would you cast providers see or access this EPA? Well, this is this is a funny thing about private data of any form Doug. It bleeds is the expression that we have the tendency to run and bleed. In theory, right? You know, your typical U cast provider, your typical voice provider would say, I have no way that I'm going to touch this EPA. That's doctor is dealing with patients. Let's say, for example, I leave a voicemail. I've got an appointment this afternoon. I'm not gonna make it. Hey Doc, this is Paul Redding. Here's my birthday. I'm not making this appointment today. Everything I just said is the PHI for my name to my birthday to the fact that I had an appointment in the right circumstances in the right records call logs. The IP address connecting. There's 18 possible identifiers that fall into this EPA bucket way beyond just the actual medical record. And I know that we probably have a lot of the managed service providers and the MSSPs in the world that are out there. I'll give you an example from my own personal experience. I understand MSV for about 14 years. And I had a technician come in and go, Paul, what do I do with this? Because a Doctor Who had an issue with outlook, you know, he keeps getting a pop up and drives him crazy. He gets to pop up. He's being smart. He thinks, you know what, I'm gonna make sure my health does fixes it this time. Screenshot attached to ticket and start to take it. Well that's great, except for the fact that he was looking at somebody's medical record on the PDF when he took that screenshot. That is now in my RM, if I took it through this RM tool, it's in my PSA, my tech has seen it. It's in my office. We are now as I said, that PHI just bled over to me as a service provider. And that's why they passed and found all the techie for a second bear with me, folks. It's why they pass what's called the omnibus rule. The omnibus rule sounds like a weird word. You'll never forget this again, Doug. It's how all these vendors fall into the box. I call it the on the bus rule. The omnibus rule basically says, if you have a single client and there is any possible way you can touch EPA, you get on the bus with them too. They're in the healthcare bus, get on the bus with them..

EPA Paul Redding Hey Doc Doug Paul
"msv  a. n." Discussed on Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"msv a. n." Discussed on Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

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"msv  a. n." Discussed on Podcasts – Telecom Reseller

Podcasts – Telecom Reseller

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"msv a. n." Discussed on Podcasts – Telecom Reseller

"You help us with the understanding how that's changing in the channel today? Yes. So so customer experience was not really something that we were focused on in the change and I would say that it's probably because of the fact that some of those Trends in in terms of customer experience were coming from the BDC space that was a lot more competitive and people were dead innovating a lot faster, but that is coming right now in the industry and its say the fact that there are so many layers to get into the customer is probably why I thought we lost track of it because oems are kind of dealing with Partners. So I'd say that probably more focus on the partner experience and the partner relationship management and the vote themselves. Or the msv. They're pretty small there nor the client well, but they don't have an automated way to go bad customer experience that say that it's probably something that has lost a little bit in the equation but it had to be more systemized. It has to be more more organized now, especially now that everything is digital and customer experience is is really the name of the game when it comes to digital marketing customers are really educated. They are very, yeah almost demanding like they they really want to have the same type of experience that they have in the beauty SeaWorld with giants like Amazon, they are educated and wanting convenience. So now it's how do you bring that into our world? How do you create customer experience in a way that is manageable and scalable and and actually affordable for smaller companies. So I make sure that I I educated myself in my teams on on what is happening right now in the customer experience world and who is innovating that space a dog?.

partner SeaWorld Amazon
"msv  a. n." Discussed on Telecom Reseller

Telecom Reseller

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"msv a. n." Discussed on Telecom Reseller

"You help us with the understanding how that's changing in the channel today? Yes. So so customer experience was not really something that we were focused on in the change and I would say that it's probably because of the fact that some of those Trends in in terms of customer experience were coming from the BDC space that was a lot more competitive and people were dead innovating a lot faster, but that is coming right now in the industry and its say the fact that there are so many layers to get into the customer is probably why I thought we lost track of it because oems are kind of dealing with Partners. So I'd say that probably more focus on the partner experience and the partner relationship management and the vote themselves. Or the msv. They're pretty small there nor the client well, but they don't have an automated way to go bad customer experience that say that it's probably something that has lost a little bit in the equation but it had to be more systemized. It has to be more more organized now, especially now that everything is digital and customer experience is is really the name of the game when it comes to digital marketing customers are really educated. They are very, yeah almost demanding like they they really want to have the same type of experience that they have in the beauty SeaWorld with giants like Amazon, they are educated and wanting convenience. So now it's how do you bring that into our world? How do you create customer experience in a way that is manageable and scalable and and actually affordable for smaller companies. So I make sure that I I educated myself in my teams on on what is happening right now in the customer experience world and who is innovating that space a dog?.

partner SeaWorld Amazon