19 Burst results for "Lynn Shelton"

"lynn shelton" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

07:41 min | 4 months ago

"lynn shelton" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"That was Lynn Shelton and me August. Two Thousand Fifteen g few it. Did you feel when she left that day? I called that Brennan McDonald my producer. And I said I don't know what just happened man but in some I could see some alternate reality that I was with her. There is an alternate reality. Where I'm with that person I could have been with that person at some other point in time and that alternate reality became the reality for the past year. After I talked to her on the podcast I wanted to work with her. She couldn't do the first season of Merrin but she came in on board on the final season of Merrin and did a couple of episodes and then by coincidence we were on glow together and we'd constantly talk. We always engaged. I later up. She looked me up and I love talking to her. I loved everything about her. So good at everything she so she could fuck and sing you guys. I mean we used to sit and play. Occasionally I get a little shy but we were finally breaking you kind of with hang out and sing songs ice. And she had a voice. He would sing everyday in the bathtub every day. She could Sing God. She could sing and she created films. That were so intimate and so personal and so she so acutely sensitive to to who people are and how to get who they are out of them. And I'm not. I'm not saying that just because I'm projecting it's true so we worked together on glow and then she. I asked her to direct my comedy special to Real and then she wanted make a movie with me but we never got around to finishing it so she created. Sort of trust with Michael. O'brien and I was in that movie and we do a scene together in that movie which is amazing and she did my last special. That's on now and times fun but I gotta be honest with you guys going over. I can't get certain things out of my mind. Sadly the good things are there but the bad things are just too close right now and I don't even know if I should be out in public talking but this is what I do and this is where I'm at and there's no right or wrong with grief it comes in waves. I just know that this person has touched so many lives that win. Shelton is so important so inspirational and so. She was so kind in so charismatic. In full of joy and positivity in it shouldn't I mean. Shouldn't everyone be so lucky to make that kind of impact on so many people so many lives so many people after for so many different reasons? Strong Woman Role Model. But just also just you know basically decent person good person to all people she worked with but she was also you know focused in which she wanted something she figured out how to get it. To make it work creatively but again the outpouring of love and support for me for her family has been powerful and if there's anything she taught me really is that people do love me that she loved me and that you know there's nothing I can do about that and and and I realize well I was learning how to accept it and I'm accepting it now accepted it from her and I loved her and I'm happy you all loved her. So many people have such a longer history in such different memories and I just. I hope you're leaning on those and that there all good in that you if you don't know her that well you get familiar with her work but the love coming at me. I. I'm it's helping me. I've never felt grief like this or this bad in. My brother came immediately out here and I had to say yes. Is this how this is going to go? And get my brother over and then I'm going to get covert on top of this and my brother. My have you know what I'm going to sit in here alone with my fucking sick cat. Lynn Shelton was an amazing person. In amazing artist powerful woman powerful charismatic joyful presence in the world. She's gone to horrendous loss. For A lot of people my heart goes out to her family and to her friends and anybody who knew her. And Um I guess we'll get through this. I'll tell you something. When was already separated from her husband? I was still struggling with feelings and I was trying to keep my feelings. I was still seeing somebody and we couldn't really begin anything but I had these feelings and I'm very good at not acting on feelings to be honest with you. I can shut them down. I can shut them down but could not shut down and the and the thought of of her starting some other part of her life without me now that she could which is too much for me to handle and and and I had to make a choice and I said this to her. I said you know if IF I don't try to honor my feelings for you I'll regret it for the rest of my life and I and I did. What was necessary to try to do that? At it was the greatest decision I ever made and I don't have any regrets about it of sorry. Other people got hurt but now whatever she gave me it's GonNa stick and it'll it'll elevate me for the rest of my life once they get past this horrendous loss. I know that she liked my guitar. Playing among other things she used a lot of the little riffs I do at the end of the show for the soundtrack of sort of trust and She encouraged me to compose a piece of blues piece which I did with Tall Wilkin fouled and had a bunch of pro studio guys recorded and Lynn was in the in the booth. And I just doing the guitar and looking at her watching me nervous to be playing with Doyle Bramhall. You know who is there too. And but this is. This is how we're going to go out today..

Lynn Shelton Merrin Brennan McDonald Doyle Bramhall producer Tall Wilkin O'brien Michael
"lynn shelton" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

11:03 min | 4 months ago

"lynn shelton" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"And whatever and so the next to the whole rest of the movie is just this this records they move. Well it's moving towards the fallout of having agreed to the dare you know basically daring each other and they try and let other off the hook the next day but neither of them wants to be let off the hook because they're like hey we're competing cool. I'm cool enough to do this. But you're the one I think you're trying to get out of this and it's like I'm not trying to get out of this and so it's just ridiculous because it's not they don't WanNa do it. It's like both of them are terrified to do it. So it's it's a remember that Michelle the whole thing in order and and I had the whole thing outlined but except for what would happen in the hotel room and the idea was that we would get there and then I you know I siddiqui you guys really know who these dudes are and I'm going to entrust you to to really Honestly enact the scene the way it would really play out so really Weird Sidebar. That there is a big French production company that bought the rights and made a remake of it. It's like a five million dollar remake of my tiny micro budget movie. It's not out here. Because it bombed there and they never clear the rights but we were able to get a French version of it and show it in on a DVD specialty player. Whatever like you know people or whatever and side by side so we should mind. There isn't it's I mean it's fascinating it's got kind of interest Charlotte Gainsbourg's in it and you know it's crazy was a good. I prefer mine but it's definitely it's fascinating. I noticed that there is a class. I don't know if it's a class but you know your community and your way of life and the and the way of lives of the people that you're familiar with are in your movies. It's a very it's I noticed it as being sort of specific because I notice it in Jill's movie in afternoon delight that you guys know though. Is that the type of people that your movies or people you would know and have dinner with but it is sort of specific and I mean I'm in that world too but did you ever notice that though like a lot of people don't live like us you know like even like there was something about even Ellen page You know making muffins or whatever was pulling out of cupcake tin that there is sort of an effort to anticipate that our generation seems to have. Yeah there's a book called Reality Hunger that is about that and about this. This hunger that people have to see. See Authenticity for me. I mean it just. I've seen so many films. I mean you take the wife character and Hump Day. Even though she doesn't get nearly as much screen time as the guys I wanted her to feel as fully is really important to me that she'd is fully fleshed out and three dimensional. The guys because how many cardboard cutout wife you know we had whether Harvey whore with a heart of gold or remember we saw the not to dump on it but when we saw hangover and ED. Helms's getting screamed at by his horrible Johnson and my husband Leans over to me and says I think she's post p the bitch like really you know I mean it's like hello you know give me a break and and so that is in general incredibly important to me no matter what if I'm using script I'm using partially scripted and partly improvisers only provisory. You have people who really need the taxed as the spine of their performance which many great actors are like that. They're not writers actors whatever it is that the method is. I always want to feel like flesh and blood. Human beings on the screen her that are. And that's because that's the only way that it really resonates with me. You think you could bring what you do with actors to a period piece or two plans to sorta challenge yourself in those touch to actually a period piece set. Hbo A creator. But they came to me. Now if I would direct A mini series. That has Pan Jack Black and that was announced a few months ago so I can talk about that but and I don't know when that's going to happen but one of the reasons was yeah. I was really intrigued. You know to see two to explore that territory and like I just I actually am going to do with this American Life Story. It's not a it's not a Period piece. It's a little a few years ago. It's based on a real life story. One of their podcasts that one of their episodes that was very popular. The mysterious incredible case of the Pi. Moms and amazing crazy story. That's like a comedy caper. Reminded me a little bit of dog day afternoon. Knowing that it's a real story but it's it just goes everywhere anyway very exciting and I wanted you know. It's a different genre mom and I want to continue to see how I can bring that same authenticity and honesty and grounded character based all the humor needs to come from that grounded character based place instead of like. I'm not as interested you just. Yeah right abroad comedy. That doesn't you know those. Those are hard way that that it's it's making something that's completely unnatural seem slightly. Yes and then you get like a like bridesmaids. I thought was brilliant. It's great because the women were real. Yeah exactly so you. They put into some writing and farting and vomiting. You know seen but by trout you really feel for them. You feel with them because he believe in them and like the relationship since and how old's your son he's sixteen and it's so fun to start showing him. I mean I've been doing it for a while now. But you know it's so great to be able to relive my favorite because what we do is watch movies right. So I'm going to see Mad Max. Fury Road was incredible. Go See all these every action movie but know we showed him jaws recently. It's like Oh yeah. You can see jaws. Ny hadn't seen jaws since forever terrifying. And he was like he was like yeah. It was a good movie. We comedy next like we see the Monty Python and we saw he'd already seen holy grail so we showed him. Brian and I hadn't seen again life Brian Forever. He's never laughed so hard in his life. Like continuously loves slough and. I was really impressed with like I was like. Oh my God I saw all kinds of brilliance in it that I hadn't even been aware of of Ryan. Yeah that's great real smarting such a great commentary and he's deaf deaf. Yeah totally yeah. He had meningitis uneasy. Year-old we almost lost him. It was it was really really scary. I don't recommend it but he stuck around and yeah and what did you sign with him? Like how how is that sort of change your perception of reality it changes. It changes everything. Though both the experience of having him be like he was on a he. He became basic basically unconscious. He was like a heart breathing. Heartbeat machine for Like almost a week and then slowly he was able to win off at an all in the ICU. The nurses who were just angels on Earth. There he's one. Yeah he said to has as soon as he came out of it they were like we were really worried because usually come out of it. Faster if they're GONNA IF THEY'RE GONNA come out of their ten percent of babies that age. Yeah and it totally changed your relationship to parenting. You know like my mom is the first to tell you as an early childhood educator that a certain amount of benign neglect is a really healthy thing. You know it because you give the kid a space to explore their world and stuff but in order to teach a deaf child language like you it has to all. There's no osmosis they're not gonna get any bring the zoo. They need to look right at you and get it. And so yeah. Yeah and so. Whether it's interpreting what conversations going on over here you know whatever it is and so it totally changed us as parents because we had to you know share thing. Yeah but also finding out like here. He was this little tiny. You know this little tiny body. There's you know started with very dramatically firefighters in our in our house all around him turning blue on the floor and I mean you know it was very very dramatic Russia House and all that and then he's there and we have our full time nurse. Nice you it's like a five star hotel you know you're just like And then you take a walk around the hospital and you see the two month old next door you know and the baby's this big and then you see the parents In the cafeteria. And you realize and you just you're aware that babies die kids dot. It's it's crazy like never. It's something that you really can't imagine because it's so unimaginable. So wrong but yeah you know. Kids die and And so just to know that you know I mean I still to this day years and years and years later and I still go and look at him sleeping and just like. I'm so glad you here man i. I can't even tell you I tell. I came across this journal the other day we moved houses and so it was like going through all these books. Just Open A. Here's you know Myla's hospital journals like Oh shit. I like looked plunged back into that moment when I was just weeping and weeping and I go over and try and explain to him he's he's looking at me like oh good really anyway. So yeah no. It changes a lot and you know just that sense of how mortal are fragile. So fragile is crazy. Yeah so okay. I think we're done but because now I'm like a little choked up by the that you worked with. Solloway never have worked with her. We met each other at a at Sundance. We were there at the same time touchy feely. Was there with afternoon. Delight fucking love. That movie after night fell in love with Kathryn. Hahn more than I already had been in love with her. She's unbelievable I would love to work with her. Sunday and transparent. I think is unbelievable but yes we know each other and were sort of in the same throw online. Women Filmmaker Booster Club which is awesome. Same with David. You've Rene and it's really nice to have I. Actually I was. I was on the jury one year at Sundance and gave her the best directing award for her film nowhere and had no. She was a fan and so like the two of us kind of bonded because I was so excited to give it to her and Shuzo exciting for me and it was like But yeah she's she's yeah. There's an amazing community out there. Good Y Mark. Thank you so much. Thank you so much for letting me do this and for crying weird point and I don't know what's going on with me. It's not hard to make me cry. Same Way could talk and he was really talking to mark. Thank you so much for me.

Brian Charlotte Gainsbourg Michelle Hump Day meningitis Ny Shuzo Jill Ellen Harvey Hbo Helms Filmmaker Booster Club Rene Russia House David Ryan Johnson
"lynn shelton" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

11:23 min | 4 months ago

"lynn shelton" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"A huge boy is talked about so many revelations on this show. It's a little but I was writing the script of my first Feature which is really about the way that we are different selves in different points in our lives and the the pre and post adolescent selves. We're something I was looking back on an with like. Wow that was fascinating. Because those were like polar opposite kind of personalities. When I was in my late thirty S I was looking back at that and and then I was telling a friend about this script. I was writing and she said well. You got to read this book and it was like. Oh I wasn't the only one this thing that happens when you become centralized for some some girls. Some women a lot of them were. I just felt like I was the you know. Peak the top of my game when I was like twelve thirteen and I was writing stories writing poetry painting playing music. Doing yeah acting doing all the stuff and taking photographs. And I'm had such a clarity of vision and a confidence in my voice and then yeah cut twenty. I just fourteen fifteen. It was like a gradual grinding down. And it wasn't anything to do with my folks might was always told by both of them. You can do whatever you want. You can be whoever you want. Your presence. Artists was about the culture of Highschool Feminist. And it was just it was society. Really you know and this kind of become like I got really big BOOBS and I. It's very like people were. I felt and already had the tendency to be through self conscious. No that wasn't I don't think I did. I was very androgynous tomboy before and I felt betrayed by my body like you know who I am and it felt like that was the first thing not everybody noticed about me even though I don't know if it was or not wearing tents and and then they got into this whole thing like you know were you looking at me telecommute. Look at me. Look you know that whole like I mean. That's kind of a thing that happens as well. I think and then just the sexual charge. I think of High School for sure but yeah. I don't know it just really something about that. Really kind of ground out my sense of agency and so there was really a period of time when all I really could do is act because somebody else is telling you. It's like a puppet I was saying with other people told me and all this weird attention and self-consciousness diminished your confidence and creativity. It did and so I felt like there. Was this trickle directing feature films until US thirty nine for a reason. I don't think I was capable of it back then. And I needed to shed some of that self consciousness and gain a sense of maturity and set a sense of authority. Is I have a an ex from years ago. Who actually lives in Seattle she? She's a sculptor and When I met her in Boston she she's real tough Jersey girl and she's bartend at a strip joint but she wasn't a stripper and and she quit and I said why did you quit. And she said I got tired of men looking at me like I was meat. Yeah I guess it gets a little boring but I've been women. I knew so many women who could who could I remember this woman who was I mean women who just relish sure their bodies and you know and know our people and I was just like I was so horrified by my body. I was just really. I don't know what it was it just for me. It was really enough but why you get over and why the writing go away as a form of expression just because that idiot shut you down a little bit because the shut me down. Because I just sort of didn't have as much to say I didn't feel like I had anything to say or what I was saying. We're talking about now not at all. Yeah you weren't aware of it really. It's actually I was in it. You know it's too close to it. Acting became the thing so acting became the thing. Yeah and it was a little bit my again my sort of secret. Shame that will cause because really the only thing I can do right now like I have to be an artist I always knew I wanted to be an artist but you know this is sort of it was down to this like this is all I could do and then when I moved to New York to do it it wasn't it was when I started trying to make a living at it just it was like. Oh this sucks you know. We did a year at overland year. Don't let me go to New York and go where no no. I was at the School of visual. I'm sorry it was at the School of drama got a degree in. I be drama at University of Washington. Then I moved to New York so so you went back home. After Oberlin overland for went to New York within agree and drama to be an actress on Broadway. Yeah although not Broadway I wanted to be at the New York theatre workshop Carol Churchill plays and I saw my friend Garrett Dylan Hunt in mad forest and I was like Oh my God this is it. That's what I want. That's what I want. And then I found out how much those actors made and there's no way they could possibly pay the rent on that my dream job ever and I was like what the how I don't get how is it. What is this sucks so now longer you New York I was there for nine and a half years stuck with it. No I didn't so what I did was after a couple years of doing a lot of and I did a lot of fun. Cool downtown staff and then and then really turn and it was. It had always been an addiction like I was really what it felt like. I have to be in a show. What's coming up next? I gotTA show and I really transferred my addiction to the darker and that was my got became really serious about photography so at the International Center in New York in classes and like yeah and then built up enough of a body of work to get into Grad School. The school arts. I went to the for photography so my MFA was photography. Got It you like the chemistry of it. All in the light and processed and being and being the looker and not the look that was much healthier for and it was also a time where you had to know your chemicals in your papers and your and your stocks. Yeah although it wasn't a super nerd out like what I loved about and luckily I'm probably wouldn't be doing what I'm doing today if it weren't for the case that this was not a fine print it wasn't at all about the fine print like I almost played Yale but that was really all about getting the perfect daughter wasn't digital it was starting digital was starting what was called an MFA in Photography and related media because they were just starting to learn and you knew how to minority Ronald darkroom. I did for sure and my and I was going into doing you know the Vivian Mayor. Meyer I always forget how to say your name Style photographs Helen. Levitt Robin Frank. That was how I was started with street photography black streaked but then by the time I got out I was doing. I was like I've somewhere straddling the line. I didn't really know between video art and experimental film because I was able to take those classes. And so I started by making these little started in filmmaking by making these little hand crafted movies that I did everything myself and I was like shooting sixty eight and lacking at my bathroom and cracking up with a hammer and hand developing and getting you know solar rising it and just doing really experimenting it was pure self expression. I wasn't trying to thinking about an audience. I was really wanted to be a serious artist. So you're doing like you know working the surface of the film and all that Shit. Yeah but also exploring at the things pay you. I wish was my thesis adviser and so like my worst yet. Hit me to her. He's a she was sort of the super eight film. Experimental Film Queen of the Eighties did all kinds of really groovy choose your mentor. Yay they wanted the encouraged you or they required you to find an a working artists that you admired to be your thesis adviser as opposed to somebody. The staff was great and so I saw her work and she introduced me to whole bunch of other experimental filmmakers and and at the time you know I was also like going to see Bill Viola and Gary Hill and all these people and so that was all kind of I was looking for. You know he's doing on my own sound design and shooting and figuring out what do of me and I would like. I did vhs but also so is exploring Like my first film was called White and I just got married and it was. I was sort of uncomfortable with that sort of reckoning with the idea of entering the institution of marriage which I had a troubled you know and so I was sort of made my husband dress up an wrapped him in this white paper white wedding dress and had you know swan around the roof of our building and then shot at and then slowed it down. And then reese candid and I was just fucking around. I was just trying to figure out stuff but but but but the interesting thing is in your story that I don't always here. Which is that you know. You were committed to art totally. And and at some point you must have realised how obscure that would be a life. I did and was it was. It wasn't even it was the it was so there was a transition period at came out of school digital editing was my marketable skill and I was able to freelance at it and then on the side I would build up an part time. Teach people how to how to digital at it and then. I would take that money and I would go make these little movies and in the meantime like I started. There's topic that I really wanted like second feature from was about experimental documentary about the relationship between women and their body hair. So you see the kind of stuff I was like futz around thesis phone was like you know the looking at different levels of consciousness but finally there was this one piece that I wanted to make this what I'm trying to get. There was a a topic I wanted to actually have an audience. I wanted people to see it and I want them to get it and I wanted it to be accessible and that was kind of for me right so it wasn't it wasn't like I gotTa make a living. It was more about like you know we're finding your art to a bigger audience. Because he has when you're doing a real experimental art whether it's theater film or whatever and you really start to talk to people who teaching you realize well if I don't make the textbooks or the magazines there's really no future in this at all that that it's such a small community and now was okay with me like I really. It wasn't like oh I have to be Bill Viola and get a gallery show. I just wanted to be true to myself as an artist right. Okay make stuff that nobody else could make to explore territory. That was really interesting to me but it wasn't until I almost had to. Kinda GIVE MYSELF PERMISSION TO MAKE WORK. That would that would reach. People was almost again. It was like a selling out thing like you. Every every creative person does it to themselves and self sabotage. Its own integrity thing. Yeah I it's it's sort of like the idea when you're younger. Is that that you don't WanNa take the easy way but as you realize as you get older that mainstream there's nothing easy about it and and you know but serving yourself was more important even if you were fucking your life up right and I was happy to. I mean I tempt and was a you know second personal secretary. Whatever up until throughout my twenties said okay at thirty. I can't do that anymore. Really like made a you know. The portal in was about body hair and that was one that I wanted people to see was a couple of few films later. It was but that's when he sparked obviously started experimenting with with documentary and your own a body issues and more feminine not feminist driven stuff identifying honest. I mean it was definitely about trying to dismantle showing the construction of gender like basically pointing at how much effort goes into making these smooth veneers of a feminine image on in Russian magazine. Or whatever located just seems like. That's the woman actually takes a fuck of a lot of work to make it look like that and that's accessible. Yeah well that's true. Yeah but the movie wasn't because I know what the Hell I was doing so it looks okay and the interviews are great but like the sound. Quality Shitty..

New York Bill Viola US Seattle Boston School of drama High School secretary School of visual Russian magazine Ronald darkroom University of Washington Oberlin International Center Robin Frank Meyer reese Garrett Dylan Hunt Grad School
"lynn shelton" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

13:04 min | 4 months ago

"lynn shelton" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"To available lately but I I imagine most of you know that That Lynn Lynn. Shelton died at about twelve. Forty five am. On Saturday morning. She was my partner. She was my girlfriend. She's my friend and I loved her. I loved her a lot. She loved me and I knew that and I don't know that I'd ever felt what I felt with her before I do. No actually I did not I have not and I was getting used to love in the way of being able to accept it and show it properly in an intimate relationship. I was so comfortable with this person with Lynn Shelton. And I and I'm not really that comfortable or otherwise but I was. I was able to exist in a state of self acceptance because of her love for me and I made her laugh all the time and she made me laugh and we were happy to what we played crazy eights. We Cook Food Together. We traveled. We wrote off to talk more about things we did together. But I just wanted you guys know 'cause the last time I talked to you. I thought she had strep throat. She thought she had strep throat. And we went mmediately. She went immediately and got a covert nineteen test and it was negative and she met with their Doctor Online. And you know we treated it as strep throat On Thursday. I said we got. We've got to go in. We've got. I don't know why this fever isn't going down. She made an appointment to go in the next day. So we're GONNA go to the doctor for blood tests on Friday and then the middle of night. I heard her collapse in the hallway on her way to the bathroom and I got up and she was on the floor. She couldn't move. She was conscious but delirious bit I called nine one one. They came and they got her and that was the last time. I saw her alive was on the floor being taken away then over the course of the day there was never any good news she got there. She was anemic. She had low blood pressure. She had internal bleeding. And I don't want to go into details about that day but they tried very hard at two hospitals. That were amazing Ed. They eventually had to let her go. Tried everything they could. They took her off life support and she passed away. I call the ambulance at around five in the morning on Friday. By twelve forty five. Am Saturdays he was gone and I went over there. They let me into the hospital after she died to spend some time with her. And I did that. I told her I loved her. Touched her forehead and I left and now this process is happening. She was an amazing woman. She President Spiratou to so many people so many people loved her. She was very determined artist. Who just needed to put her expression out into the world in any way tremendous love for people for her friends for for son. Milo my relationship with her as I can't even explain it but I gotTa tell you know it's got anything bad to say about Lynn Shelton. That's for fucking sure. She was amazing. Her movies were amazing. They are amazing. I've worked with their. I've worked with loved her. And everybody's reaching out to me now and it's really helping and I'm so glad that that win with so Too because you know people are like well. Let's make sure that that guy's okay has has the cranky guy so this is what we do here at W. t.f. Podcast when somebody who has been on the show passes away. We re post the episode. We take it out from behind the Pay Wall reposted. Not just out of respect or in memorial but as a portrait of a person a reminder a reconnection with an artist reminder of they were when they were vital and alive and connected and expressing themselves and talking about who they were and how they express themselves just that audio portrait of that time and I talked to win this. The first time I met her was in two thousand fifteen august August tenth is wanted air. Two Thousand Fifteen. I didn't know her and and she'd been offered to be on the show before but I was nervous because I knew she had some affiliation with my ex wife and I did not know if she was friends with my ex wife or what that would mean or. I didn't know anything but I needed to talk to. I saw some removes. I wanted to talk to. I was curious about it so I said okay. Let's try. Let's try it talked to this. Lynn Shelton I WANNA meet this Lynn Shelton. But I didn't know what to expect you know. At the time she was married. I was with somebody but at this point when I had this conversation. It's undeniable that we connected. I mean my connection with her is almost seamless. There was you know I have no self consciousness really when I'm with her. I'm totally comfortable. Even my infantile ridiculousness the whole arc of me infantile ridiculousness too cranky shadiness. I was just always better. I was definitely a better person when I was engaged with her as a comic as a Qatar player as a human the lover as everything. I was better in Lynn. Shelton's gays as an actor and she was so great. But this is you know you can witness. You can bear witness to this. This is me meeting Lynn. Shelton really for the first time in two thousand and fifteen August. Enjoy it. You should enjoy it Shoot movies seven half ten. I like your movies I do. I was hoping you might know I do. And I've watched one this morning. Which led touchy feely I've seen like three. I think three three and the the big shot movie with big shots in it like now now. Lynn Shelton's bigshot. Hey it was just Always my who is most excited of an jealous about me doing around Com with with care nightly just wondering. Are you kidding? I would love to do that. I would have so much fun. I was like I was working. I sell out me like what are you selling out. Whatever you know I know I was really. It was like myopathy. It's a you ask though. Well sure a while. I was wondering what it was the first movie. I've ever directed that I didn't write and I was like. Is it gonNA feel like one of my movies you know like what am I doing it sort of new territory. It's much bigger budget and I've worked with although it because I've done much. Tv I was comfortable with all the trailers and stuff. But still you know it's like a different thing for my baby my babies and he actually made me feel great. You know he's like you can go back to doing your little shitty art things whatever you like from there but yeah this is going to be great guy who is not done that yet. It's ugly but who I think is dying to you know to. Oh yeah absolutely. He wants to try everything he he's a great guy he is he We were in Chicago. And we were taping my special at the VIC and Bob Cat was directing it. Go Away and we just call Joe Bob. Cats are there by the way I know. I don't know you know you're from Seattle. You've been around. There might be a couple of someone who I don't know you only know his Bob Cat. All right but But no we call Joe and we were like we. WanNa do some backstage shits mean. There's some like just some stuff You around he's like yeah. Y'All come down. So he was shooting on. Both you just wandering around with me being just wondered awesome but okay how do you differentiate between like selling out and just doing all the television you do like on the level of artistic and creative expression that you need? God? No no the TV directing is always meant to be You know a way to pay the rent and the bills while I while I so give me the freedom that I can continue to make independent stuff. Here's the thing I love about television. It keeps me on the set that like I love being on set. I love directing my love directing actors love. I live for that I. It's my favorite thing working with. Actors is fantastic and when? I do my own movies. I'm like you know my my for a lot while there. I mean I made six movies in nine years. You know a fourteen months between them. That's not a long time in in sort of filmmaking. You know it's pretty good rulemaking eat director years so I'm very aside well. He's making minimum wage sweeping camera. Maybe some time but even so. That's a years over a year that I'M NOT ONSET. Right yeah so. Tv GETS ME onset. And as long as I'm really lucky 'cause I've worked on all these shows where people like each other and the work is done and it's good and I get to work with people that I've made had a revelation. I think you'll appreciate okay. Not Probably reveling kind of obsessed with A little bit with chopped this show and Just coming into that. I kind of am a little late late to the party. And really I mean you know the last couple of years but all sort of binge watch it when I can and I realized really recently. Oh my God this is why I love television directing because it's like chopped it's like I come in and I'm giving my basket ingredients. I got a script. I'm just handed the script. I'm handed a bunch. Cast a crew. You've never met you know total. Yeah roll up my sleeves. Just gotTa make the best music and it's really it really is it. It's invigorating and it's fun but I'm not the not the admiral of the fleet. I'm the captain of the ship. You know the writer is King. Sure in TV and say you know in Seattle. There's great filmmaking community. Seattle is where I live. And there are a bunch of filmmakers and all the crew that have crude my films and all the other filmmakers. Those are my buds. Like those are everybody that I hang out with and I love never lived down here now I just I just You know come down a little Kia soul and spends time working and then go back up your from Seattle. Yeah that'll really really really kind of obsessively love Seattle. Yeah and time there. No that boys spend time got next from there Yes I do And that that makes me feel really dumb too because I worked with your expert quite a while only just recently..

Lynn Shelton Lynn Lynn Seattle strep throat partner Joe Bob Bob Cat W. t.f fever President Spiratou Qatar feely writer myopathy ONSET Chicago director
Seattle filmmaker Lynn Shelton dies at 54

Own It

00:24 sec | 4 months ago

Seattle filmmaker Lynn Shelton dies at 54

"Filmmaker Lynn Shelton grew up in Seattle graduated from the university of Washington her publicist says she has passed away looks like cause of death was a blood disorder according to The Seattle Times Shelton was the first local filmmaker to have her work open the Seattle international Film Festival that was in twenty twelve her latest film sort of trust open since last year when Shelton was fifty four years old

Lynn Shelton Seattle Blood Disorder University Of Washington
"lynn shelton" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

13:03 min | 1 year ago

"lynn shelton" Discussed on The Frame

"Deals with addiction addiction racism American history and conspiracy theories and it's a comedy Marc Maron plays a pawn shop owner in Birmingham Alabama and he's asked to sell an antique sword to some shady individuals local nut jobs who believed the sword can help prove that the south actually won the civil war and as is common in Shelton's films the actors in sort of trust improvise much of their dialogue when I spoke with Maryland Shelton this morning we started. With their first collaboration when she was hired to direct the last season of his T._V. Series Merrin my recollection is that we immediately worked so well together and that I was so easy to direct and that I was completely collaborative with her and I took all of her notes insights into my performance directly to hard and honored them is that is that what happened when we had a great time but yes no every time I gave mark note he would immediately push back <hes> in a defensive manner I think because he thought I was trying to them. That is what he told me later that finally after the end of that process he realized maybe I wasn't trying to do that and that giving him. A note wasn't wasn't meant not as a as a direct of character assassinating critique of his wasn't I mean let's be honest about it. You you know I'm doing some work. There and you're sort of like well. That was interesting. Maybe if you do it my way as opposed to the you whatever you think you're doing that isn't working then. Maybe we can move forward with this yeah. You know you're right if that experiences a first date. I don't see you guys even having a cup of coffee afterward. Well you clearly don't have the the sort of wherewithal the hang in there then do you that that to me sounds like a perfect first date man. This is difficult. You seem to want something from me and you're annoying. I'm interested by the end of the experience in all seriousness. It seems like there was a certain amount of trust that was established <hes> on Mark's part he can speak for himself on my part. I was really compelled. <unk> by what an incredibly raw talent and what a natural actor mark was and I felt like there were untapped depths there that I wanted the world to see onscreen. I wanted to see onscreen myself and so I knew I wanted to keep working with him. I don't I don't know what I should just let him speak about why he ever wanted to work with me again. When I immediately was like maybe we should do this again? The process really I'm sort of that way I think I'm stubborn in a little belligerent oranges by nature but <hes> but ultimately I know in my heart that I don't. I don't know everything about acting. I don't really I can't see myself from the outside but once we developed assertive <hes> report in a trust you know her intuitions and our instincts about you know how seen should work in what's possible emotionally Im- in terms of what's going on between characters is very it's very <hes> sensitive mark. What was Lynn's ends first conversation with you about sort of trust? What did she have? And what did she present you. You know my memory's not great but the thing was linen I had been writing a script for almost three years and we're still writing it and we just kept chipping away this and she was getting anxious as she wanted to make a movie and then one day she just said all right so you know I have an idea. I have a script I had you in mind. This is your character she. She wanted to work with me in a movie and I was just sort of like procrastinating. We weren't finishing the script and I didn't think it would ever happen and then all of a sudden she's like you're going to you're going to be a guy who works at a pawn shop and and that's it and we're GonNa make a movie and Mike. How long is this going to take the my manager would call me like I think this Lynn Shelton movies going to happen? I'm like really in. He's like yeah. They're gonNA Shoot Alabama and I'm like how long is it going to take when he goes. She says two weeks. I'm like really alright. Then all right I'll do it. I'll do it and then the conversation I was having with winter like Oh. That sounds Great Glen Yeah. That's yeah okay yeah yeah. It sounds getting we'll knock it out. It's GONNA be Great. We're talking with Lynn Shelton and Marc Maron about the movie sort of trust. I WANNA play seen that mark is your character mel trying to authenticate the sword at the center of the story and this was surrendered to him I general. Girl Sherman Sheridan Sheridan it was surrendered to him by a union general. What battle are we talking about here his stick about two KABAGA CHECKUP ALGA I don't I don't think that battles? I don't think it happened. It happened. Okay I assure you thirty thousand men lost their lives. That day probably haven't heard of it because it's buried in history books and what do you mean buried. It is buried from the history books by deep state. That's also Jillian Bell and Michaela L. Watkins in the scene Lynn kind of framework. Do you give your actors in a scene like that. How much is scripted how much of it is? We have to get from point A. TO POINT B.. This is the first time I've worked with improvisation since your sister sister which I shot in two thousand ten so it was an eight year gap and I was itching to do it for a very long time. It's a scary way to work because you're writing half of the script that the dialogue and you're figuring out the scene on the day and when you only have twelve off days to shoot a movie. It's it's a little daunting and when there's four to eight people per scene. It's a little extra daunting on because you only have two cameras and only so much time but there's a quality <hes> a lived in quality that you can't really get any other way in the freshness because there's a genuine sense of surprise onset. Each actor doesn't know what the other actor is going to say. <hes> what I gave them was a fifty page what I call a script meant it sort of half script half treatment so the plot is is really tightly structured and we know what has to unfold but for the most part they're finding their way through the beats of the scene. They're coming up with it all on their own and then in the edit room is my editor Tyler Cook and I are really the ones who are writing the final draft so yeah. It's it's quite a <hes> again. It's a terrifying process because you don't know if you're going to get all the ingredients all the right ingredients to make a really good dinner when you're in the edit room but it's also a really exciting and dynamic and yeah I just exhilarating way to work because if you've got the cast the correct cast and that is absolutely essential for a movie like this it's just amazing what they'll come up with <hes> and then I just have to make sure not to not to laugh too hard and ruin every take mark. What is it like as an actor so actors find that liberating some find it terrifying some find it both at the same time I loved it? I thought it was it was exciting. I it was a little intimidating at first because of just because of the the other actors were there a real beasts when it comes to improvising and I was a little intimidated but once I realized what my emotional foundation was in the movie and and my character in how that guy would interact i. It's very comfortable for me I I wasn't I certainly certainly wasn't scared of it and it's very exciting to to be that president in something I mean I think it's one of the reasons why I got into stand up originally was that when I'm on his standup stage and I'm doing it you know I'm really in it and I'm in life and and I'm in I'm in the president. I don't know what's going to happen or what my <hes> relationship with the audience is going to evolve into in any given performance and so I got that on set with this group of actors yeah there are takes where there's like. Ah Whatever's on the cutting room for this movie is a bonafide hysterical stuff and also there are very touching moments that they just happened that had nowhere and I think you can feel that when you watch the movie when I watched it. You don't know where the story is GonNa go. Oh in all the jokes sort of happen organically. <hes> and you know it's getting big laughs. I I can't remember the last time I was in a movie where you know it was getting genuine. Laughter part of <hes> idea of the story is whether or not this Sword Award is authentic and can it be authenticated but there's a bigger idea about the character's lives and I wanNA play a clip from later in the film mark where your character Mel has been asked a question by Cynthia who's played by Jillian. Sandbelt what about the girl I guess we missed each other and you know and she said she's going to clean up. She said she was clean. She'd come down here and stay clean and we can do music down here and <hes> she comes down here and took care for a little while. He's out away.

Lynn Shelton mark Marc Maron mel Jillian Bell Birmingham Alabama Maryland president Lynn Sherman Sheridan Sheridan Mike editor Cynthia Tyler Cook Lynn kind Michaela L. Watkins three years
Union for Actors Raises Concerns Around Deep Fake Technology in Hollywood

The Frame

05:41 min | 1 year ago

Union for Actors Raises Concerns Around Deep Fake Technology in Hollywood

"Digital video technology is advancing fast and that gives Hollywood a lot more creative freedom in storytelling like the uncanny resurrection of deceased actor Peter Cushing in star wars rogue one. It's no surprise there are some frightening implications that come with eerily accurate digital simulations or manipulations of real people and the Union that represents actors is raising the alarm for how damaging deep fake video technology can be to its members. Eric Garner covered this topic for the Hollywood reporter where he's a senior editor for Law and public policy and he began explaining how even though Hollywood has been developing visual effects for years deep fake technology comes with some unique unique challenges what makes us different is the ability to really use technology to blur the lines between falseness and reality in such a hyper focused way that people really can't tell the difference. That's what we mean by. Deep fakes deserve essentially video versions of Photoshop and they've been used for political use. There's a famous deep fake video of Nancy Pelosi one of Hillary Clinton so Howard deep fakes affecting Hollywood Hollywood right now well in several ways one is in a pornographic round where you know on a lot of porn sites. You might see celebrity doing things that she never did in real life and this is a concern too many actresses who see this as a violation of their privacy we also see deep fake technology being incorporated in to explore the boundaries of filmmaking where you know you might see something in deceptively edited in in such a way that you can't really tell that it actually didn't happen so you might see documentary made where deep big are used to showcase a point it has it's pluses and minuses. It's good features sure so bad features. A lot of people are concerned these days about the political realm and the pornographic around but I think everything needs to be explored. There is obviously a potentially positive use and I'm thinking say of an actor like Carrie Fisher who has passed away and everybody who is a part of the Carrie Fisher team says that if there's a way to bring her back to life essentially in the latest star wars movie using video technology that that is okay but there are also some laws that have been proposed some New York that are trying to get to the darker aspect of deep fake so what we're New York legislators talking about sure they wanted to make the ability to control one name amy image and likeness as a property right as opposed to just a privacy right and they proposed barring things using a digital replica decreed sexually explicit material they wanted to extend the protection action ones like this past that and they wanted to create a registry whereby the heirs of famous people could document their official control over their relatives name damage <hes>. It's a very big and broad law that with really. Really shake up things and give people both the right to stop the fakes as well as the ability to license everything from the holograms and what is the industry's perspective on this and where do people like the leaders of the screen actors guild where to their allegiances fall the actors are extremely in favour of doing such a thing they are concerned about their members privacy and their ability to control exploitation but then there are the studios broadcasters journalists and others who worried that you know cracking down on this sort of thing in such a word way my interfere with free speech. We're talking talking with Eric Gardner at the Hollywood reporter about deep fakes. Somebody you quote in your article. <hes> law professor at Loyola named Jennifer Rothman and she says that there's a potential problem with the idea of assigning rights of publicity implicity is a property right in that maybe through something like a bankruptcy that could be an asset that is claimed and that the new owner of that asset could exploit your right of publicity as if it were a transferable double asset. Is that directly or is that something that could actually happen one of the things that POPs up is the potential that say celebrity gets into debt and creditors my book to obtain foreclose <music> on that celebrities likeness rights or in a divorce a spouse might claim that the likeness bright's our community property and so you get to these sorts of things and you have all these sorts of interesting scenarios happen where someone might not be able to control their own likeness and while we haven't seen too many disputes about this so far we have seen a few actually the Goldman family they WANNA try to foreclose on O._J.. Simpson like yes right. Have they been successful. They blocked him from registering official accounts on twitter they weren't but that was before legislative started thinking about ways to distinguish between privacy and publicity. You know being crosby's his ex wife tried to go to four to get a piece of his publicity rights so these sorts of issues have been popping up slowly and I would expect to see more of that especially on new legislation

Hollywood Peter Cushing Hillary Clinton Carrie Fisher Union Reporter Senior Editor Eric Gardner Nancy Pelosi Simpson New York Twitter Crosby Official Jennifer Rothman Goldman Professor AMY
"lynn shelton" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

16:05 min | 1 year ago

"lynn shelton" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"You thought my sister you this law in the mistake never known about I'm so sorry Lynn Shelton has also directed episodes of some of the Best T._v.. Shows the last decade including madman the good place and glow it was on glow that Shelton worked with of actor comedian podcast Marc Maron who knows stars in her latest film accommodate called Sword of trust. Most Lynn Shelton movies have some improvisation but sort of trust is almost entirely unscripted ripped. I haven't worked with improvisation to such an enormous degree a little bit here and there but really not an entire film that was really the dialogue between eighty and one hundred percent improvised since your sister sister which was made in two thousand ten. I'm it came out in two thousand twelve and I've been dying to get back to that process. It's a process she calls an upside down model of filmmaking in this particular form of making a film a starting point is an actor like Marc Maron for sort of trust and I'll go oh to them with a character and scenario so in this case I was driving around the city and I'm in Los Angeles and I turn my head and there's this amazing looking pawnshop and it just completely I see mark inside this punch up in my mind's eye so you have his job in the setting and the basics of his character give the rundown of the story that you ended up with with sort of trust mark plays a pawnshop owner in Birmingham Alabama and in walks a couple. How are you ladies? What do you got <hes> with an artifact Jillian Belen Michaela Watkins come in they play a couple that come in with this old sword and and it's a union sword which I don't see around here much mostly confederate swords and it is an heirloom that was left to jillions character by her grandfather? How about four hundred cash for this soared? Today knows a reasonable offer. That's a nice I toss. I and it comes along with the story. It's a civil war era heirloom in it comes along with a story okay. What you're looking at is a genuine relic lick a very valuable piece of evidence that supports the actual truth which is the south one the more okay the southbound the work shown the documentation and so that's kind of the launch of the film and then it goes from there so at the heart of this screwball comedy Caper is a nutty conspiracy Chrissy theory about the south winning the civil war? I have a special interest in this <hes> nutty conspiracies because I wrote this in all fantasy land which is a history of Americans weakness defining weakness for the excitingly untrue true yes so I'm curious about how you got there to this conspiracy being at the heart of your story for this film well once I came up with this idea that I wanted it. I wanted to film that could star Marc Maron and that what I wanted it to be a comedy caper. When I wanted to be Improv improvisational I also wanted it to be relevant? I wanted to create a film that would feel like it was of this moment and that it was saying something and adding to the conversation and pointing things out about what is going on in our society right now now obviously as you well know. Conspiracy theories have always been around especially in this country but we seem to be having a sort of a peak moment I would say with a conspiracy Chrissy theorist and chief and that would be good territory to kind of. I also wanted to make a film however that didn't make you WANNA slit your wrists after seeing it or gorgeous start sobbing incessantly which is kind of how I get enough of satphone real life. You must have done a lot of research and gone into dark places on the Internet as you were figuring this out. You know not really it wasn't really necessary. I mean I made it up folks. Did Oh yeah that whole thing was completely made a conspiracy theory that central to this is completely made up and I love it when people ask me if it's true and and I just makes me very happy because why not I mean you know now. It might be <hes> yeah but it's just so certain Meta alternative reality the you've made up even a true crazy is a true conspiracy exactly although there are ones in there there are other conspiracy theories that do exist and they are in there as well or one in particular right. You've got this character worker in the movie who is a flat earthier. Who where did you pick that notion of? I was an uber ride actually and it was a very long drive and he and the driver and I had a very long totally normal seeming conversation and by the end of this ride he started to tell me about how the was flat and I literally could not grasp montlake brain. Couldn't it just I just could not understand what he was saying to me and by the end of this of this right I realize he's completely on the up and up. He totally believes in this idea that the earth is flat and then by the N._B._C.'s look on my face and he I remember him turning around you parked in front of my apartment. He turned around and he said listen. I understand like a year ago exactly where you are today. Exactly where you want. All you have to do just start googling. I'm telling you just Google it. You go deep enough and it is all there. It's irrefutable. You cannot deny it yeah so I wanted to put that in a movie for <hes> fantasy land yeah exactly so they're these you know bad guy conspiracy theorists who had this crazy idea about the civil war but then you have one of your good guys also believe in A. Conspiracy Theory was that deliberating of Oh. I want to show that this isn't this is all Americans are prone to this. Yes I absolutely I wanted to show that. All humans are just apt to be suckers. I think it's danger for all of us. You you know and it's also something to be vigilant about. You know not to get hooked into something because it just for some reason it rings a little bell in our heads and makes us feel all hetty and then you know woozy and happy you know to even the stupid thing that's not based. He's done anything and to let ourselves get sort of <hes> drift into into this kind of little magical thinking for whatever reason whatever the motivation is but yeah. I did want to show that it's not just wrong. Minded folks folks who who think of people that we think are wrong minded because they don't have the same beliefs that we do look but you know yeah really. It's anybody so you had your story but then I want to go into some detail about your improvisational process of filmmaking how how does that that. You're doing improvisational affect casting. Did you choose other than Marc Maron all the actors specifically for their improv skills absolutely absolutely and over the years. I've found that there's a very small sector sure of actors in the world who are actually really good at that so I'd been sort of collecting <hes> this incubating a list as in my travels as a television director and you know meeting <hes> other directors and kind of just creating agnes little list of of people that I wanted secretly wanted to work with and wanted to ask to <hes> who you know interested in working with me and working in this way and so every single person in this cast was vetted <hes> as a highly skilled improvisational positional actor so do you give her some kind of of script or is the dialogue entirely off the cuff. I mean the dialogue in this film. Some of it is written. It's it's interesting. I've gone from <hes> the extreme of making Hump Day which was a ten page treatment segment. I think there were maybe you know. There really was no dialogue written at all. <hes> your sister sister was like an eighty page script that we you know basically as a safety net if they wanted to use the lines they could but they didn't have to this was about inbetween. It was like forty five fifty page age script. Some of the scenes were actually pretty well scripted and we kind of get to it and then other scenes were completely improvised and I really really heavily leaned on on the character. I'm sorry in the actors who are playing characters. Come up with yeah with the dialogue but they eat. I was asking him do a lot of heavy lifting because it was very plot heavy and so if you listen to the dailies you'll hear me saying you know all insert myself and say oh that was amazing. Could you just do that one more time and just don't forget to say the little thing that's going to set up the next thing that's going to you like it was probably pretty handy and annoying but <hes> there were so many little plot points that had to be laid down for the next scene in the next the next thing for the whole thing to sort of come together and they were just so game so you construct the story a and this this script slash treatment your actors get ahead of time <hes> has basic plot points <hes> maybe a bits of dialogue and and you give them the the main characters back stories yeah a really important morten part of making an improvised movie at all work is that I spent a lot of time on backstory I was I co wrote this film with Mike O'Brien Mike O'Brien wrote for S._N._l.. For several years he was on it for a year because I'm not somebody who likes to sit in a room and just locked myself in a room at right alone. It's it's pretty much torture for me and I've come to realize over. The years that it's nice to have somebody else in the room with me is just is that. Do you think the fact that you don't like to do that. <hes> one of the things that drove you to make films the way you do. Oh absolutely I mean even the very first feature I made I I realized oh art making his all going to be about because I've been a solo photographer and experimental filmmaker where I did everything myself before that and and I realized Oh it's all about relationship now like every I'm never going to make a piece of art alone again and I would say that when I met my best as a filmmaker it is when I am the curator of the best ideas so I'm I'm you know letting go of my ego as much as I possibly can and letting in as much input as I can in a in a kind of structured I'm in creating an invisible container where people feel emotionally safe enough to to contribute and I'm trying to make everybody feel valued and respected and you know it's all a facade odd I get I'm kidding and then and then I and then I- Prune out the stuff that's not gonNa work which is why so the which is why the edit room is the most important place arguably for this kind of process. You weren't editor before you directed as well right. Yes yes indeed so I started in a theater as an actor and then there's sort of a long circuitous route to getting long secure film school alternative films grow and it started his acting and then went into photography and then went into editing and also as I was also making experimental films uh-huh Yeah. I was an editor before and I don't i. I don't think I could work in this way if I hadn't had that experience so to get an even closer better feel. Perhaps for your process. I want you to walk us through this one very long. Seen in the middle of the movie the mid four main characters are all writing in the back of a van. Where are we in the story? And where are they going. What are they doing? There's two pairs that are kind of like dueling pairs in a way to couples. It's the couple that I described Jillian Balan Michaela Watkins Walk into this pawnshop on shop with his sword to sell and they try and pull you know kind of ally over on on the punch-up owner and then the the other pair who were bonded you know and and sort of face representatives as a unit in this case are Mark Mirren's character <hes> <hes> The pawnshop owner Mel and his <hes> employee played by John Bass named Nathaniel and there's one person on each side who are particularly suspicious pessimistic and they begin by each other..

Marc Maron Lynn Shelton Jillian Belen Michaela Watkins editor Alabama Birmingham Google Los Angeles Mike O'Brien Mike O'Brien montlake Hump Day hetty Michaela Watkins director Jillian Balan Mark Mirren Mel John Bass Nathaniel
"lynn shelton" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"lynn shelton" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"No, you will not. On demand. I have one. Well, we are password right now. Well, you know, people who know people, I do I have friends. Lynn, do you think that? Having done comedy and having done comedy with heart. What you do here. Is that where you want is that the sweet spot that where you want to continue to playing? I mean, I I feel like the vast majority of my movies have been dramatic comedies. Then my last feature before this out side is is my full blown drama the only drama really made. It has a couple of Senate. But it's not it just it really is a drama. So it was definitely in the mood to make a comedy. And I've never gone again. I've never done a comedy caper of never one done one that sort of like, I think a little a little bit is like my pineapple express like ordinary people kind of get in over their head slightly ridiculous situation. But no, I wanna keep trying different things, you know, and different scales. Different John rose, and there's a few. I probably won't go to I'm not I'm not a horror Flint fan. I'm not a fan of of real. You know, gore and darkness, and you know, there's too much of that in the world's too much chaos. Too much darkness. So I tend to like redemption, I tend to like people who characters are actually trying to do their best as flawed as they may be you know, because that's what makes us human. But so bad, but probably all stay the same. But I do I do find that the comedies that have that emotional truth to them are also dramatic and also have heart. I mean that kind of is this week from annual. Well, we always escapism as a wonderful thing and not everything has to be CASA Blanca multi like, it's really nice to just escape. It's what I think we both liked about. This film is that you is escape, you know, we had an hour and a half to just sort of relax watch this movie and enjoy it and laugh, and then when it finishes you're happy, you feel good. And that's that's the best thing you can hope to get from film. And as a lot of times, people will say, those sorts of things to us know..

CASA Blanca John rose Senate Lynn gore
"lynn shelton" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"lynn shelton" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"It's very easy for me to. You just fit one in wherever they if it's a movie about the south. Maybe when they do Mighty Ducks three, you know. As a Mighty Ducks three. God, dad. There's three what's wrong with you? Grow your one of your books. Probably I can give you three guesses who reviewed that. One of You. you. I think he's trying to what you were describing the scene from which you were cut Jesse was nodding. And because he knows it. He knows it. Well, they're great sales. I'll tell I dare you to fight either. Great film. They're terrible. I know so tell us about the feeling of premiering film at a festival like this. No less on opening night of the festival. I was grateful that we did not overlap with Jordan Peele film. Thank god. Yeah. We did a nice big, you know, which had shown my film outside and had the US premiere last year at outside in here. And it was I mean, it never looked or sounded remove it was really really happy. Thank you very much flex its on. Now, you can watch it goes mazing. But yeah, I really loved that theater. And it just has a very nice to it. They were going to be. I mean, we basically have the entire cast except Dan could make it a couple of others. But really everyone was there mostly and much of the crew, you know, and my editor production, and for me, it's it's not only the it's a huge payoff for me to watch to sit in an audience and watch especially when it's a comedy and to feel people appreciating laughing, and then there were a couple of area motion scenes in the film as well. And it's you could hear pin-drop I mean, just complete dead. Silence. People were just leaning forward in their seats marks next to be crying himself. And this good room hailed. I really it's for me. But it's also this you create went especially in you're making a movie on such a small budget. We had twelve days to shoot this. Twelve days because he said, I give you two weeks..

Dan Jesse Jordan Peele US editor Twelve days twelve days two weeks
"lynn shelton" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"lynn shelton" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"But it's true. It's exciting. When you see people that you like and respect you get to see different facets of them. It's one of the things we enjoy most. And when we come out of screening, it's the first thing we'll talk about was how so cooler who who did you say before? Who'd you say I love seeing. So who was it? Do you know what I'm talking about? No, okay. If the head boss, the boss guy, I'll go back at all. Yeah. So. When he finished the movie, that's the first thing he says because that that's what we do with each other's. I always really cool. So neither of my parents know, Jillian bell that well yet, and because a lot of what she's done skews younger, but I've shown her quite a bit just because I like her so much and seeing her do this so different than anything. She's ever done six in the same way that there are reviews talking about you saying it's the best. It's the best you got into do. So I the only one. Gladly. See married do on film. What? I've seen you deniro on. Done hardly not to make films. I was famously famous because I've told the story I was cut out of second Mighty Ducks movie. Oh talking. That's too much playing Siri. Well, it's pretty funny. My buddy, Steve bro was the director of it. And he was trying to get me. My my car like in the union, give me my sag card to get to have hardly dent. So he gave me this little part in. He created the Mighty Ducks. This is the second ducks movie, and I got this little part in it. I played a valet and I was in front of like this mall in Beverly Hills. And the bit was the ducks were wandering around trying to get into stores. They wouldn't let him in the stores, and my seem was you know, they walk up to me, and they go how do we get into these stores, and my line something, you gotta you gotta know somebody to get into anything in this town. Right something like that. So we we do a take and like, I do it. And a lot of things have to go cars movies. A lot of moving parts of this one minute thing. And you know, I they come up to ask and I do my line. And then they cut in Steve pulls me, you're scaring, the ducks. Gotta take it down a little. Exact same story, but reconduct? Dead or seven year old like just lose his mind. Oh the. Was shot that here I got a catchment that was so fucked out years ago here in Austin. You know, I've been I've been coming here for years doing comedy before. I was like back when I was just in angry had a point I was angry or comic, and I was playing out at cap city. And I don't think it was a weekend. But I don't know. But I couldn't even fill the back room. They got two rooms that got the main room cap city, and then they got this front Lange. And that's where they had the show because I couldn't sell enough tickets to do the big room. So my recollection there's about ten people in this front lounge, and I know one of them was hunt sales, which is not a great sign. But if you don't know hunt, a great drummer. But like, I he became a friend of mine, but there were these two women in the room, and I did my show, and they didn't look like they were from here. And they want to one of them is Barbara Coppel..

Mighty Ducks Steve bro director Jillian bell Beverly Hills deniro hunt Barbara Coppel Lange Austin one minute seven year
"lynn shelton" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"lynn shelton" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"I've given a little bit of lessened it because I don't wanna be too condescending or bullying, but I think some of them felt bullied, but whatever the case is literally a week after I did this brand on marvel movies. I get this offer to be in the joker movie. And like you don't. Okay. So I have principles right? Get this offer to do a scene with Joaquin Phoenix Robert deniro, Mike now fuck comic book. Real real predicament. You know what I mean? I think it took me less than a second to decide to put you go back against my principles. But in defense of the joker. It's not really a superhero movie. It's an art film kind of art film. It's about a guy. He's got problems. Didn't average guy. But what I was coming. What was coming around? So I gotta do this walk and talk seen deniro. It's really seen is like I walk down a hallway. You know? I'm talking to him. I don't want to give too much plot away. But you know, I will say that he's he's basically my boss right deniro is the character. And I'm this other guy, and you know, and canes in a room and walking towards room, and you get there, and I knew my lines and Todd. So I meet Robert deniro. It was dick day that someone delivered a bomb his house. That's my first day working with deniro. He had a great attitude about it because he did because as you call they delivered a lot of bombs to very specific people that one guy did. And it was like, well, I'm going good company. They sent one to I don't remember who Hillary and so. So anyway, get into it like meet Bob, and there's no run through and Todd like what you have one. Right. Yeah. So would you shoot was? So there we are about to start to see what Robert deniro, I can't believe it's fucking happening. And it's like action, and we go and I'm doing what I do. Right. And we do the first take and under sitting there might have. We'll have that go. Yeah. And I just see Niro slowly walk over to Todd Phillips direct there. And then walk back over to where he was. And then I see Todd come up committee. And he says you will too hot. We'll too angry. I think I think it's important to know that Bob's. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That makes sense that makes sense. But you know. It was it was the proper way to do that. Because it would have been wrong for Bob. Bob, Robert deniro talent. It was old school to go talk to the director. But I but I saw so I was like in trouble. That was a courteous thing to do. Doc, especially in front of the crew in front of the camera guy. Yeah. Go joy guy. Now, you can say, yeah. The rest of your life yet. I work with Robert I can't pictures to in my phone. Nobody can say like you show certain people show certain people the picture of a certain generation you'd be surprised that might look at that. Who sacked? I'm like who are you? So we made a movie on. So how did you deal with his pushback when you first were working to deal with him is the I was it turned patients. I just I I mean. Yeah, I've discovered as director I'm a real actor geek of a director, I love working with actors. I love being in the remote an editor before I was a director. And that's another favorite place of mine. But I probably a little bit more. I would love being on the set working with actors in in trying to find emotional truth and trying to shape the scene with an actor. I just love it. And when we would act order, so what did you do? I I was I was I had this long circuitous on orthodox film school that involved. No film school officially I was going to be a in the I was a an actor in the stage actor, and then I ended up going to grow up in Seattle..

Robert deniro Todd Phillips Bob director Mike Joaquin Phoenix Robert I Seattle Hillary Niro editor
"lynn shelton" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"lynn shelton" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"And I mean, it's just it's really. But you know, it was just nine hours of improvisation. Like that was a great thing. We're in the back of fucking hot truck Birmingham, Alabama garage with no air conditioning. I was miserable is very man. She's like proposition. Channel. Yeah. It was not so close to being such a diva you or. Yet, you stranger self. We are all grateful. Yeah. At the end this long day, everybody was visible. Everybody was really hot and tired exhausted. We were all sort of falling into each other's arms. We did it. We got through this day. We look around. Where's mark? And I'm like texting I had to kind of there. All over you and ruin everybody's experience. So. So I. Thoughtful serious if I would have stayed there one minute longer. I would have ruined the entire film for everybody. Just by being a dick good job. Thank you years of therapy of yourself. And when you're pretty sure you're gonna murder every year limit. Yeah. When you were doing your own show merit which was a wonderful show. Thank you. And you have variety of directors collaborate with a lot of different people yet. How did that change the vibe of each what's interesting like that? Because that was my first experience writing for television. I directed a couple, but it was. Producing television acting Tobin desert big owning experience for me. But it is an interesting question about TV directors because I think some TV directors is kind of go through the points. Right. But there are some people like Lynn who directed on there who have a point of view that is undeniable that they're the way they're going to shoot or work with actors definitely has style. Bob cats, like that to goldthwait like, there's no way he's gonna shoot anything that isn't a little darker than you might think it would be if he shoots something it's got a signature sort of like, you know, and, but, but there are other people that like, I can't even remember them. But but her Imbaba cat who else directed. Oh, Lukman any he's been to time. We've Muth anyone that the Oscar for best short one year. And then we hired him like that second year was the first time director TV, and he got very hung up on building this prot. So a lot of energy went into. I don't know. If you saw I think is the first season American where there's a scene where I got it go under the house to get a dead animal. So in order to get the shy he had a construct some sort of, you know, bottom of the house piece that he could shoot through where you could see the end. So we saw a lot of energy went into that. And it's a good shot. But I don't know how the rest. Receptive to the kind of notes because I know what the hell I was doing. And I wrote a lot of it was all scripted. There wasn't much improving on Merrin except for the podcast segments. We let those run a bit. But we were we were working from a pretty tight script, which I find like it's easier for me to work like this then to work with the script because with scripts, and I'm not a tremendously experience actor, but you do like memorize script. And then you do make choices about how you're going to do what you've memorized. And it's once you do it too much. It's hard to pull yourself out of that. But because so open and needy and insecure in terms of acting at that point in time, if a director would tell me what to do even though I push back initially. I usually take the suggestions and trying to get their emotionally because I I do operate sometimes at one. I'm kind of persistent intense. It's an emotional level. But it's it's just swyetly angry. And sometimes it's not what's called for. If you need to be empathized or you need to be understanding. He can't be like what what happens now. You know, that's not the tone of the scene. So I had to learn that because it's not my ends. You actually recently said to me a few a couple months ago, you're in the middle of this third season of glow, which I came into the last couple that lasts of block three..

director Muth Birmingham Alabama Lynn Lukman murder Tobin Merrin Oscar Bob nine hours one minute one year
"lynn shelton" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"lynn shelton" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"But he did give you very interesting answers and not abrupt with. But that one was funny with him because he's one of those guys like goes without the most where I'm like, no one knows anything about Paul Thomas as you like this dark wizard achey, you just think that he's white this weird kind of brooding character. And he's if these goof-balls from the valley, yes, whose dad was best friends with Tim Conway. Yup. In in his father was some sort of weird local TV person whom Lardy Goov Lardy was Paul Thomas. Jefferson's, dad. See big Cleveland crowd. He doesn't know good larvae that do Mr. Vic demonize his company is called Goulard production. The good guys already productions together with smoke house and catering giving trivia at some point. And they ask you these questions. Now, you have answers, and no one will care. But I did I tell didn't I tell him to his face at at the end of the master. I thought that that walking Phoenix's character. And what's his name's character? It was the only guy Phillips happy with that. And I told him that I think they should've fucked. Funny. I've blanked that out. Done that. But I can't be too. Do. We say I'm sorry about the language hundred. I know that's okay. People always apologize when they curse in front of him. It's really funny. Well. Ask permission. They'll is it. Okay. If I like you go right on the head. He's a grownup. Sometimes it's fine to that. Let's ask a basic question. How did you guys? When did you guys meet? Hi as you were. I was guest on his podcast on WBZ up, and we were talking about my films, and he let me know that I been directing a lot of television as well. And he said, you know, you turn down the paternity to work on my show Maron on IFC. And I said, well, let me make it up to you. And so I got to work a few months later on to direct him on the first couple episodes of season four of Merrin. And I loved directing him, and he seemed after several a couple of weeks of pushing back on every single note I gave him and then ultimately taking the note and making the performance better. He Finally I was able to gain a little bit of trust out of him. And we agreed that maybe we should try and work together again by show that she would make suggestions that'd be like what was. God damn. He thought I was just trying to fuck with them. Right troll game. You know? But yeah. But then he'd do it. And it was better. So. And so we actually started to try and come up with to write a movie together that we're still three years later almost to the end of our first draft. But it was going a little slowly. So I and then weirdly, totally serendipitous Li I had been booked to direct an episode of a new show that was going to be on Netflix called glow in two months later or something after I'd been booked Vima wrestling great he was cast. But he wasn't had been cast before that it was. I just find that crazy the episode. I ended up directing was the one that was really like the most important one for his character. In the first season domino that have a dog or. Spoiler alert. Fuck that. Events. That's your fucking thing about the way media works like you can say something about ready to desert and someone in here. It'd be like God great. From nineteen fifty. And then I directed his comedy special. And the meantime, I'm like when are we going to write the script because I want to get on set with you. I wanna put you at the center of a movie, and he said just write something else because it's going to this one will take its own sweet time..

Phillips Lardy Goov Lardy Tim Conway Paul Thomas Cleveland Maron Jefferson Mr. Vic Netflix Merrin Vima three years two months
"lynn shelton" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"lynn shelton" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"You know, I I understand absurd isn't. But I like a little story. It's not that. I'm an old, man. It's just sort of like, what's what is this about? Why is it like this? I've a little bit of a hard time with absurd. So I figure like one I'm just going to press him on it, you know. And I paraphrase you myself, but I think when he got to my house, and we're interviewing them like what did that mean? Why why did you do that tonight? You know, and I'm really pressing him on bits and pieces of this kind of violent absurdist movie. And ultimately, he said, I don't know. I have been I don't know why I did it, but he's very committed to his vision. So you've got to respect that in turn. I like the honesty, but there's no answers, folks. Sometimes there's just fucking with you because they have a vision, and they're like putting it out there. It's not my job. To make the actually I use that as an excuse for him and a few other examples of the actual the actually interviewed Mark did with der Noffke about mother on. There's this moment in the interview where he just says. I can do anything I want like it's it's artists not life. You know, I can make these characters do whatever I can create whatever kind of structure repaired on my one. And I don't have to explain myself to anybody. And I I let myself that use that as permission to go into a direction I've never gone before. Because all my movies is my eighth film and all of my previous films. I was so hell bent on it being real at every turn. Even if something unexpected happen it needed to be believable. You know, and this could happen in the real world. And this time I wanted to just say, you know, what let's do accommodate caper that goes a little off the rails and goes a little bit silly. And who cares? It's it's all right. It's my movie, nobody can tell you feel grown, right? Yeah. I wanted a tuna. And I want to be a little chalets by movie, still good. And that's that's Tyler in a situation could happen with characters who are so crazy fairly realistic and a little bit of comic exaggeration. And I think that's why play science. Except for this guy. He's always the anchor that this life. It's never, but is actually cranking interest. That's my new role. At the moment pass without saying that I love love love your interview. With Paul Thomas Anderson that was another one eight wide. Did you had you had the balls to say it never heard any really like your movies, but I don't always understand them. And sometimes I go back and watch them a second or even third time trying to figure out what they're really about. What's this one about and he answered you? Yeah. Like you asked him about magnolia and said, oh that's about. My father's death. That is been on my debts. It. With the how does that involve raining frogs? These go that was just a fun part. What about the musical number guy? Right. Okay..

Paul Thomas Anderson der Noffke Tyler Mark
"lynn shelton" Discussed on We're No Doctors

We're No Doctors

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"lynn shelton" Discussed on We're No Doctors

"You know, there was a whole other lineup of people that they wanted to bring in, and I was like, you have to bring this woman and she is, and she got the part and she's like, become a huge part on that. Yeah, on that. And I'm, it's one of my the thing I'm most proud of one of my contributions to that show that I'm most proud of is getting making sure that you never know manse and she killed it. So you never know when that's gonna win with me in new girl, like my friend Fred brought me in for that. I that I did because it was just a re. It was one line me. Sleeping on the hood of Zoe's car, and he was like, oh, we should have Steve play. The homeless guy in Aaron O'Malley who's the executive producer on that show? I've known for years because she was the executive executive producer of the. Silverman show. So I've worked with her ton and she was like, oh my God, that's a great idea. And then it just became a recurring part. And yet we were shooting that I and Zoe kept laughing. She's like, we got to have this guy come back screen. Yeah, we, we gotta do that. It's awesome. But I remember. So funny. I remember the moment I met you was in the table, read. In one of the offices over at FOX and. I was I'm early habitually early everywhere I go. So I was like the one of the first people in there and I'm sitting in there. They had a bunch of food in there. I was eating just a ton of garbage and you walked in and. Hey, I'm Linden. It's like, oh, hey, Steve, I I go. You should have some of this food. It's amazing. You're like, no, I brought my own. And you start telling me about all your weird food shit. And I immediately go, oh year Lynn Shelton because my friend Ellen page at worked with you and Ellen as weird food shit too. And she worked with unions like it was really great because Lynn has all this weird food. It's just telling me about it and I was like, oh, that's convenient that you knew that was me because I started, I knew it was because of the food like Lynn Shelton. I go on friends of Ellen and pieced together because of the weird food stuff. That's so funny. Well, yeah, the fact that Allen was good friends with you was a huge, you know, immediately giant check box like, okay, well, this guy somebody that I want to know more. Allen Allen is one of the most awesome people I've ever met the best work with. Yeah, she was really great. She semi movie touchy feely that everybody should see. It's also got Allison Janney in it. Buddies McNair low and everybody. Everybody's so great in that film. But what is your is it do you have silly AC? Is that what you're thing? What is things of yet? I was going to say, when we started before we started recording by the way we're recording. The reason we're recording is I o Lynn episode of a podcast because she did like probably the last episode of my podcast. Never aired because once feral audio switched over to starboard, they kind of downsized. A lot of their podcasts of my up hard cast is not been continued on on starvations and. So it's like, yeah, let's do this because you have a movie of outside in which is now available on all the platforms which you should definitely check net flicks. It may only be available on net window. So there's no reason you should watch this movie and it's really good. It's Jada plaza needy Falco. And yeah, I would say that right now it is my favorite film though. The film that I'm just finishing up, which I'm hoping will debut at some point in two thousand nineteen is going to be a. I'm excited and I'm super jealous. Once again that I was not chart of it because it's Marc Maron, Toby Hus and Jillian bell who I just met a week ago. Do you know? We did a benefit show together at the ace hotel. The theater at the hotel really is an incredible casts at Michaela Watkins, Jillian bell, John bass, Marc Maron. Toby has Dan back doll Whitmer Thomas Tim, Paul incredible cameo by Mike o..

executive producer Ellen Lynn Shelton Allison Janney Allen Allen Steve manse Marc Maron ace hotel Zoe Fred Aaron O'Malley Toby Hus Jillian bell Silverman FOX Michaela Watkins McNair Jada plaza Falco
"lynn shelton" Discussed on We're No Doctors

We're No Doctors

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"lynn shelton" Discussed on We're No Doctors

"To say something. Hi. Hi. Hi. How's it going? Hey, happy day the folks that's Lynn Shelton. My friend. I finally have another guest. It's been, you don't know this. You probably haven't even heard this, but I have not had a guest on. I've been the last probably three weeks have been me just reading listener emails. Talking about my own bullshit. Allergy. Also, I am convinced now that I'm allergic to something in my apartment because the past three weeks, I've been doing episodes just sitting on my couch on this recorder and microphone and. I wake up feeling okay. And within like ten minutes of me, talking all said, my nose is running. I can't stop sneezing. I'm sniffling and it's like clockwork. And I'm sitting here in your loft and I'm totally fine. In fact, Sunday a supposed to go hang out with my friend, Dave. And I was like, you know, dude, I don't think this is our geez. I think I'm I'm sick. I just gave into the fact that I was sick because I had like a twenty minutes sneezing fit. When I woke up Sunday, it was just like hard guttural sneezes to where like my neck hurt from Tensing up so bad for these sneezes. And. And then I was like, yeah, we were going to hang out that night is like, yeah, can't. I'm sick and it also made sense because I've been working so much all summer on, you know this new show and then also now superstar. So I've like had overlapping shoots where summer at night and some are day. So they're like when it's the same show, you have to have a split where you have at least twelve hours to recuperate. But when you're going from one show that shooting a five AM call time to seven PM. And then the next show you're shooting from like six PM to like three hundred morning. I was even, I mean, you can still get sick on the same show..

Lynn Shelton Dave three weeks twenty minutes twelve hours ten minutes
"lynn shelton" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"lynn shelton" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"Is this a good way to spend a friday night really good movie really good movie high linac save a hot so happy here with you god thanks for doing this are you kidding i i i have to disclose our relationship i'm obsessed is basically the relationship if you if you google my name inland shelton's name you will find many many articles it always makes but it's true many many articles will people say early in my career and even now who who was the filmmaker that you most like admire who influence you and i say lynn shelton i wanna be the black lynn shelton i say that all for years saying that for years because this the seventh feature yeah the seventh feature and how rare that is for women director to be able to continue to make work on your own terms and so i wanna talk a little bit about that and how you've been able to maintain that but first let's get into this how did this come to be and working so closely with jane did start with him start with you well a lot of times i'll start with an actor as my muse and i had known him i worked a couple of times as director with his brother mark new j as filmmaking pierre and then he just suddenly at the age of forty started to act and really blew my mind never thought of him yeah i saw them on transparent and i just was kind of blown away and i told him i think i'm going to be lightly stocking you until we work together and he seemed open to that and then this was an idea that i'd had the back story of this idea of this relationship developing over twenty years in the high school teacher and all of that had had been percolating for awhile and then when i was thinking of something i wanted to do with him it occurred to me it would be a stretch i thought you know because this character doesn't have a lot in common with him as you know but i i was curious to see what his range was and i hadn't seen him in a role yet that really tested that range and i had a belief that he could he could.

lynn shelton director jane school teacher google pierre twenty years
"lynn shelton" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"lynn shelton" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"And the reflection continues like there's a lot of did i do the right thing in my bag love the new house i gotta tell you i love it but it's not tucked away into into little hills you know we're almost feels a rustic up here it's not that place but this space is pretty amazing and i you know what i'm going to shut up about it it's just it's starting to feel it and it's about time because they're showing the house today i have sean penn on the show to talk about his book because that's what he's talking about you know we talked about other stuff but we talked about the book the new book bob honey who just do stuff at comes out tomorrow it was intense i don't know what i was expecting i'm not sure i got it but but yeah i watched him smoke a lot of cigarettes and we had to we engaged a bit before before sean my old pal lynn shelton is here to talk about her new movie when shelton's just erected a very sweet tight touching movie called outside in which comes out this friday march thirtieth in select cities maybe yours was selected i don't know but it's a great movie with eighty thousand co and the the do plus the j do plus but it's a it's a it's a very touching movie unique story takes place up in up in washington so it's gray and rainy a lot in the movie which i like but you know linen i go back and is is nice to talk to her.

sean penn bob honey lynn shelton washington