18 Burst results for "Lynn Novick"

"lynn novick" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

05:01 min | 3 months ago

"lynn novick" Discussed on How I Built This

"Difficult to work with, I don't know. I don't know for sure I'm not saying mean things about you, but if we must, because we don't have any yelling, that's my number one rule, and at lunch, I wash the dishes at the editing house. And so we speak to people about that. The intensity is shared by everybody. They want to do that, and nobody is because there's no yelling. This isn't brain surgery. And I actually don't think yelling during brain surgery helps either someone drops the instrument or hands you the wrong claim. I don't want the doctors yelling. No, we don't want we don't want that to happen. So, you know, I mean, I know a lot of filmmakers who are yellers, and I don't get it. I mean, we try to have as good a shot, but it is, it is intense only in our shared dedication to get it right. And I am difficult. I'm sure, and other people can tell you that in ways that I don't even see. I mean, my ancestor Robert Burns said oh, with some power of the gift to give, as, to see ourselves as others see us, but we have happy rooms and people who the young intern who worked on that Statue of Liberty film and was in that room when the ad guy said, don't worry, it's not a puff, it will keep it from being a puff piece. She is my senior editor. And Lenovo and Lynn novick I've worked with came in at 89. We still co directing film, Sarah botstein, who came in in the mid 90s, Jeff Ward, who wrote the first script in the early 80s, Dayton Duncan, who came in and also were refreshed by new folks in people retire and they go on and so I think it's a really good environment. But how do you how do you maintain the quality of what you do and your demands that the quality is so high? But also, be willing to sometimes, because I think we all all leaders deal with this, right? Deal with the pushback sometimes of like, hey, just let it go, or make some comments. Yeah, well, I think we all do that. And I think we're learning. And I think one of the places where I learn is to try to hear that weak voice that says that shot's not working. You know? And even though you loved it, the last time it may not be great, this time and I think PBS is the real answer to your question. There's no other place where any of these films could have been made. You know, I could go out to a streaming service or to a premium cable channel and say, hey, I'm making a film on Vietnam and with my track record, they'd say, how much do you need? And I would say, we need $30 million, which is what it costs to make our Vietnam series over ten and a half years. And they'd say, no problem. And they could write it in one check, not the, you know, the 25 that I took to get. But they wouldn't give me ten and a half years. And PBS does, and so that allows us to incubate this constant desire to get it right to always improve and after a while, it's self fulfilling for everybody. Yeah. I do miss a little bit of those old days when we go out to the archives with the scoop lamps and we'd put them up the pictures up with magnets, everything's now digitized and scanned and, you know, there's a little bit of Gertrude Stein's comment about her hometown of Oakland California. There's no there there in a digital world. Yeah. And we're desperately trying to make a bear there. When we come back in just a moment, how can and his brother decide to take on their own family history project to reclaim the memory of their late mother Lila. Stay with us, a guy rise and you're listening to how I built this. Bomba's mission is simple. Make the most comfortable clothing ever. And match every item you purchase with a donation to someone in need. Baba is designed their socks, t-shirts, and underwear to be the clothes you can't wait to put on every day. Everything they make is soft, seamless, tag less and has a luxuriously cozy feel. So you'll look good and feel great knowing you are helping someone in need. Get 20% off your first purchase at bombas by going to bombas dot com slash podcast that's BLM BAS dot com slash podcast. Everyone's morning rituals are unique and whatever your favorite part of getting ready is. Level up your routine with Harry's. Harry's is giving their best offer to listeners of this podcast. First time Harry's customers can redeem a starter set for just $3 at Harry's dot com slash wondery. That includes a 5 blade cartridge awaited handle foaming shave gel in a travel cover to protect your blades on the go. A $13 value all for just $3. New look, same incredible offer. There's really never been a better time to give Harry's a try. Just go to Harry's dot com slash wondery today to get your starter set for just $3. That's.

Lynn novick Sarah botstein Dayton Duncan Jeff Ward Robert Burns PBS Vietnam Lenovo Gertrude Stein Harry bombas Bomba Lila Oakland Baba California
"lynn novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"lynn novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"Already so big. It seems ridiculous to add some other layer of mythology to it. Like the whole thing seemed absurd. The government favors that allow him to just. You guys are dropping as an aside. I think that he was. I don't even understand that. He was dealing with. Russia is getting all sorts of government access to things just because he was the famous hemingway. And and you haven't one point just in a war voluntarily sort of running and screaming across some sort of jungle landscape. What was that. He's living plane. Crashes on the surviving. Two plane crashes on one african trip. His life was plenty interesting and big without the mythology. Ising it. yeah well. He outed himself and a lot of his public life and he put himself into situations. I think he had these. Just you know what we now call grandiosity. So he knew he was important. He thought he belonged to these certain places. He had a lot to say people should listen to him. And so he put himself into all kinds of situations running with the bulls in pamplona which has become such an iconic thing in world war two. He was a correspondent but he so dedicated to the cause and he was so excited to be there ultimately. Even though we didn't want to go in the first place that he ended up actually becoming a combatant and shooting guns and trying to kill people. Germans the enemy obviously but and thinking that was okay really wasn't and he got away with it which she didn't love things of his life. You can't make this stuff up. You can't anything that you regard that you would put number one on sort of most shocking like in terms of revelations because it it was replete with them every. It seemed like there was a whole lot of. You've gotta be shitting me. How many times is this dude gonna get hit in the head. Like what like are you kidding me that he's going to continue to have that the the greatest american writer of our time..

world war two one point first place Two plane crashes Russia one african trip number one pamplona american Germans
"lynn novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"lynn novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"Fall where they may not going to tell you what to say. When i'm sure there'd be parts of this movement like and i'm sure there are so we had to kind of carry. That did you talk to him afterward. Do you know how he felt about the phone. Yes they love the film and they've gotten a ton of great responses from friends and people they know and don't know so the family as far as we know very happy with the film which i think says a lot about them because as you said. It's tough on hemingway. Well you are so exhaustive though and you're trying to be fair and the detail you're clearly you're bending over backwards trying to just tell the story and not be judgmental about it. Has there been a criticism that you have seen. That has been fair. I haven't seen much criticism because you guys you guys. I don't know. I don't wanna say that you're immune to criticism but you tackled subject matter so thoroughly that it is hard to criticize. We'll we welcome criticism. Frankly i always appreciate really thoughtful critiques of our work. Because i learned something and often a writer or critic is looking at something from a different perspective than the way we chose to look at it. I haven't seen too much criticism of hemingway and frankly i expected that there would be more because of his very nature of who he is. He's a white man of privilege who occupies or had occupied a very high position in the fall of literature. And we're in a moment where were questioning and challenging that privilege and that right to be considered a great writer given who was and given his misogyny given the racism of his work and anti semitism. I think i'm not surprised. But i'm i'm glad that we were able to present a portrait of him as nuanced and complicated and doesn't shy away from holding him accountable for these things so that criticism out there but hasn't been as much as i thought it might be. I don't know how long you have to work on something like this year's seems obvious. So how much did the story change with. Just the way. America changed over the last thirty six months. Yeah that's a really hard question because we did start working on this film six years ago and we were well into editing. You're almost done with the film last summer but the questions of me too and systemic racism and reckoning with our history have been around for a while so an hemingway. Scholarship has certainly been engaging these questions for the last generation. So it's impossible to really answer that i'm sure that the moment were and or have been in the last five years effects who interviewed what we asked them what we put him the film what questions we want to know about hemingway why he matters today or does it. We see the world as we are now through the lens of the world. We live in a possible not to. And how do you imagine for the people who have not seen the film and are just listening this with a curiosity. What will you say to them. They will probably find most problematic. Because there's a lot of ground you're covering here object matter it's all very nuance but to the people on have a familiarity with the subject matter would say they're gonna find what to be the most egregious stuff here to say. I have people watching up their own mind. I you know. He's a human being struggling to make sense of the world and he sees a lot of aspects of life. That aren't pretty as he wants to. Put it in the big and the bad and the ugly as well as what is beautiful and otherwise his work must be true. So i think the most one of the most fascinating is this whole question of nasty levy and how it became kind of a straightjacket for him We haven't talked about this. But you know as scholars have known this for a while..

six years ago last summer today last five years year last thirty six months one America ton of
"lynn novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"lynn novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"Vietnam war is that the most fulfilling project that you have done because of the terror- and because of that or would you regard something else as the most fulfilling just something that when you're done with it you were like man that was just really rewarding work and i'm a little extra proud of it for whatever your reasons. Yeah the vietnam. War was a profound experience and i think getting to know so many vietnamese people who lived through an american veterans and keep who protested the war in knowing that it was such a traumatic experience for so many people in so many different ways figure out ways for them to share that story with us and to kind of absorb it was often very painful and completely devastating but also it felt like this really matters. People need to hear this story and people are going to be grateful for the way we've told hopefully and we were grateful to be present when the people that we got to talk to. You told us their stories. And i liked to hope that it helped them to so i interviewed a woman jeanmarie crocker. Who's a gold star. Mother of the vietnam war her son moby had died in the mid sixties when the war was still kind of the beginning of the big escalations. And you know forty years later. She was still remembering the day. She got the news that he died like it was yesterday and asked her to tell. That story was well just hard. And i worried afterwards that you know. Maybe that wasn't the right thing to do to ask someone to relive a trauma like that up but after the film came out and speaking with her. She said it really helped her. Just tell the story and she found that help other people who'd been through that and she heard from people who also had lost children in vietnam and other wars and that somehow her generosity of going through that pain again. It helped her to heal. So that's not always true. And i don't wanna be overly simplistic about it. But i hope that sometimes you though we're asking people to share extremely painful experiences. It is for the greater good. Was there anything in. Hemingway not hard like that but that was a moral challenge or something. Yeah should we be doing this. Is this the right thing. Like how many of those crossroads when you're when you're exposing so much of a man's life and this is a public man but and he's gone and and you're you're trying to be fair at every turn but did you find yourself in any moral crossroads there not to the same degree i would say because hemingway's gone like you said. And he made his own bed so to speak. I was very acutely aware. And i know cannon seren jeff were shoe of just how the film land for. Let's say his family. I mean he's a real person. His son patrick is still alive. I interviewed him. I know him pretty well..

patrick cannon seren jeff forty years later Hemingway yesterday vietnam war Vietnam war jeanmarie crocker vietnamese hemingway vietnam american mid sixties so many people
"lynn novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"lynn novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"These are great short stories. The people who he sort of represents could not have thought anything about her. I would imagine you feel any loss of respect in going through everything in his life for the work or are you able to. You know separate yourself. Be non judgmental as a documentarian and the work is the work and it stands alone so great question. I don't know that i can really fully answer it. I don't think there's an easy answer for that one. you know. We were interested in his life and who he was and how his life affected his work and vice versa. So it's hard to separate. I'm not of the school of thought that just leaves art and isolation than the person doesn't matter and i don't think there's a way to reconcile it so i guess i hope we can kind of hold in our heads our hearts this is a complicated problematic person and he heard a lot of people and he took what he wanted and he ended his life tragically and he also left us with some timeless works of art. That are worth reading. Can you explain to me your process with ken on what you choose as subject matter because it seems like you guys are going to degree of difficulty dry places told over longtime that requires the viewer to be discerning and committed to. This is gonna be something that is slow and heavy. but you're going to immerse yourself in it. I'm just curious about your process because you guys choose things that are so ohlinger impossible. They must be making difficult choices on purpose. Every topic every subject where every film we've made has its own particular reason why we chose it and not for the degree of difficulty but i guess news for myself feeling the more you do this and the more you feel you understand how to make these kind of stories come alive onstream the more you might aspire to something that's going to be hard so for me. The hardest thing wasn't hemingway but was the vietnam war. That was an unbelievably difficult project. Because of how unsettled the history was and how divisive it isn't how people don't agree on what happened. Let alone why or whose fault it was or anything and then on top of that kind of grasping really trying to understand the vietnamese perspectives on the war and what their experiences were and how. We didn't know that as americans trying to pull all that together was enormously hard. And i think for myself i'll say was excited. Provoking doesn't begin to cover it. Just you know. Terrifying is actually what the word i would say. It's terrifying at the beginning. But having some degree of confidence in the process we go through. The collaboration with jeff ward writer sarah thoughts on our producer or vietnamese producer. Jianghua and just feeling like we're going to figure it out as we go along we will keep our minds out ben. We will try things out. We'll just see where it takes us and hope it works out. Philosophically one is your relationship with terror. Is terror where you have to go because you cannot choose things like the war. Baseball prohibition the vietnam war college behind bars are not things that you can choose. Unless you're deciding..

sarah jeff ward vietnam war college Jianghua vietnamese every subject every film ken one americans
"lynn novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"lynn novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"And then when you do that are you gonna likes guy or not. And all those things just as storyteller and biographers trying to make sense of the person was also hugely challenging are you. Are you going to like the person well. I hope the audience for the film will make up their own minds and we will tell you what to think and probably i would imagine people come away with mixed feelings you know maybe some compassion for him because he really did suffer from some very challenging things mental illness head injury repeated had injury and potentially cte as a result of that alcoholism loss grief war trauma..

"lynn novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"lynn novick" Discussed on Le Batard and Friends - South Beach Sessions

"Hello and welcome to south beach sessions. You know we are growing around here at meadow lark media. We are adding a lot of voices and people and talents and expertise is that are someone and people that. I think that you're are going to really grow to admire and love their work. If you don't already and lynn novick has been someone who has been making great documentaries with. Ken burns for a long time. The latest is hemingway. It is exhaustive. It is profound. It is humanizing his complicated and i want to talk to her about that because it like much of what she makes is artful on subject matter where the degree of difficulty. I don't believe people understand how hard it is to go through archives and keep that visually stimulating when you're going through such dense and complicated subject matters so anyways i'm thrilled to have lynn. Novick doing advisory stuff and consulting stuff for metal arc. Median thrilled to have her on with us now to talk about her latest work which is as i said as all of them seem to be len and thank you for joining us exhaustive. Did you enjoy this process. Are you someone who enjoys the meticulous thoroughness of having to go through every piece of dust and particle in. Someone's past and bring it to life. Thank you for having me. And i'm really excited to be working with all of you and you know just to say that i don't think enjoys probably the right word. It's totally absorbing and captivating and just lose yourself in a story in the material and that's a wonderful feeling i. I think it's almost ken to what i've heard described as flow. Where you sort of lose track.

Novick lynn novick lynn meadow lark media Ken Median south beach
New Documentary Examines Ernest Hemingway's Complicated Life

Kickass News

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

New Documentary Examines Ernest Hemingway's Complicated Life

"If you've never picked up a hemingway book in your life you probably have no trouble conjuring an image of the man himself. The fighter the lover the hunter the fishermen the living breathing punching shooting cursing drinking bundle of tropes about manhood but the myth that ernest hemingway created was both a blessing into curse. It turned him into a global celebrity. And it certainly didn't hurt his book sales but it also became an avatar of sorts. That master far more complex man and became more and more exhausting. Live up to as age. Alcoholism and countless injuries took a physical and emotional toll on him now revealing new three part documentary from award winning filmmakers. Ken burns and lynn novick attempts to separate the myth from the man. Hemingway airs on. Pbs tonight april fifth through seventh from eight to ten pm

Ernest Hemingway Lynn Novick Ken Burns PBS
"lynn novick" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"lynn novick" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"Strictly on the statistics he's close but not enough money. But for what he did as a coach with Bernie Williams, you keep hearing stories Lou. Brock the people that he helped discover and stood as a role model for and brought into baseball and was then the first. Black coach within the major leagues he deserves. You. Know the accolades. That that were heaped on him sort of in the press, but never within the baseball world to the degree that he deserved. Maybe even an unwitting ambassador. So to speak given his exposure baseball series, right? Yeah exactly. So you know, and then now they're they're putting people for all sorts of things. Of course was great and deserved to be in there as an important person to show that the the you know the female component was. was there they loved the ball players they love the game that came to the Games they dressed for the games etc.. and. They followed the Games and So. There's there's that whole dimension as well. Okay I hear those sort of baby round round here. we could go for hours on all of this, but this is a great. Sort of seen set for you know another angle frankly of of the whole Negro League Baseball Story. What what. I guess there are two main questions that I have sort of. To kind of still throw out there number one is. Why did it take? A you know a massive documentary to kind of inject perhaps or maybe even for the first time generational early. Inform people about these. Negro Leagues and. The. Not. Only the importance of it to the history of baseball but the cultural significance why was it and I know I'm sort of projecting this but it feels like it was relatively dormant. A topic until around then. Obviously your your book and and Peterson's book certainly. Stoked. Or began sort of the the flames of that. Why did it take? I guess that sort of. Media phenomenon to kind of. Put It on people's radars perhaps for the first time you're you're part of it because The power of the media is so strong. And the power is a visual media so strong. and. The the when you see something you kind of know it. I think that Greek word for. To know comes from seeing or something so can as skillful. Filmmaker artists that he was. Of this story, but it was the right time. You know now we have so many channels so many choices. But at that time. The whole country picked it up and Ken was building on the civil war story which nobody expected either right But he had he had a real knows for the right. Person in the right interviewing and he and Lynn Novick. And so. You know it it sort of exploded but I think it was already percolating a bit. You know the men the fire was burning, but but he he made it a flame. So the other question that I would say is You know obviously, this is the third. Version of your of your book. So it's kind of our hopefully the. The gift that keeps on giving although I know authors thirty argue otherwise Sunday especially these. Okay. Yeah Don't we hopefully we can get extra book sold, but you know I be able to retire on that but. What's left I guess to tell about. This sort of multi-flavoured and multilayered story right the happy to say that. Happy. This is a good one. Okay because First of all. Peterson's book came out then John Hallways. then. Invisible man. So we were kind of..

baseball Peterson Lynn Novick Negro League Lou Bernie Williams Ken Brock John Hallways.
"lynn novick" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"lynn novick" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air I'm Terry gross let's get back to the interview fresh shares Dave Davies recorded with Lynn Novick director of the new PBS documentary college behind bars and Sebastian noon and I want Pedro to graduates of the bard prison initiative unit Teatro earn college degrees taking rigorous car courses taught by Bard College faculty in a maximum security prison college behind bars airs tonight and tomorrow night on PBS stations there was a time when higher education in correctional facilities was pretty common and then this changed in the nineties when we had the crime bill right yes indeed and before the nineteen ninety four seven crime bill there were college programs in almost every correctional facility in America and the Avengers for over a generation and it was well understood and accepted that education was a central part of criminal justice and of rehabilitation and in the context of the nineties and tough on crime rhetoric and the super predator kind of you know demonization of people who have have been convicted of crimes as part of the patent crime bill there was an amendment to withdraw eligibility for Pell grants for people who are in prison and that's L. program just be based on economic need so once that happened almost all those programs vanished went from about eight hundred programs to fewer than ten and there was a tremendous void recidivism rates skyrocketed for a variety of reasons including this and slowly some privately funded program started to come back again and the bard presentation of which was began in nineteen ninety nine Max Kellerman started it was an undergraduate at bard and just for saw this need and and you know convince the college that would be something that they should try to do and so it's a pioneering program not innovative in the sense that there had been higher education and present before but unusual in the sense that very few institutions were joined us at that time part of the crime bill Dave was comprised on allocating ten billion dollars to build more prisons and ten billion dollars at the time was enough to pay for higher education in prisons for more than two hundred years by the way you know the recent research shows that for every dollar state investing college in prison it saves four to five dollars and re incarceration calls and I think that just about that that that the the button or the final notice that you never said it was in rates for the general population are between fifty and sixty percent that means that there's a fifty to sixty percent of the six hundred thirty thousand people to get out of prison every year are back in prison and three years and the bard prison the service at six hundred graduates be released over the last twenty years and fewer than four percent have gone back to prison you know this is tough material in these classes and anybody who watches this film will thing gosh I don't know if I could handle this stuff in one of the things that I I saw as I watch the four episodes in this reminded me of when I taught middle school and high school many many years ago was saying what happens when students are first confronted with until it seems really daunting and they have to learn to think critically and express ideas that are kind of uncomfortable in that over time you see them they're they're you know they're thinking and expression become sharper and more sophisticated and you can just see it you can just see this intellectual blossoming yeah and I'm wondering I'm asking Sebastian did you feel yourself changing as you move through these questions yeah without a doubt in the beginning you don't even know how to use a comma and the next year you you realize that you're writing ten page papers with correct grammar and throughout this process we're constantly talking with each other helping each other out because unlike the outside here you have the internet our peers become the internet they become the support system that we need to rely on the school also has graduation Sir what he's in this is very moving I mean there's it's it's in the prison auditorium right with you know caps and gowns and photos and parents in the audience and I want to play a clip here this is when you Sebastian Yun are speaking at the graduation and there's I'll just let the the listeners are there there's an emotional moment here where you start to speak of your family and you have to stop and compose yourself and then you address your father directly let's listen my fellow graduates my friends let me remind you that we have an obligation to share our stories and hold the idea that if we wish to have a better world as we all do then we must first change ourselves our story is our lives they are influenced by a great number of people for me my family has been how far I'm sorry for having this on our family for calling your through such on.

Dave Davies director Terry gross Lynn Novick ten billion dollars sixty percent two hundred years five dollars four percent twenty years three years
"lynn novick" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"lynn novick" Discussed on KQED Radio

"With encouraging results students accepted to the program take classes in prison taught by Bard College faculty using the same materials and meeting the same standards as students on the college's main campus our guests today are Lynn Novick who directed the documentary and to graduates of the program Sebastian noon and I won T. trail they spoke with fresh ears Dave Davies Novak is a Peabody Award winning filmmaker and long time collaborator of Ken burns she spent four years in prisons taping material for the documentary which is her solo directorial debut Yun and Pedro both entered prison as teenagers and both earned bachelor's degrees in the bard prison initiative the documentary college behind bars airs tonight and tomorrow night on PBS stations and will also be available for streaming Lynn Novick Sebastian noon and die one tape for welcome to fresh air great to have all of you let's start with a clip from the documentary this is a scene where there's a group of brand new students at the eastern correctional facility which is a maximum security facility in New York just been admitted to the program after a competitive admissions process and what we see is a not terribly large classroom in a group of fifteen to twenty men in blue jumpsuit seated a typical classroom desks and Max Kenner who is the founder and executive director of the program is welcoming the new students let's listen welcome to bar college congratulations we're gonna start course work Monday morning and I think we should just start being really clear about the scale of the commitment first of all that we're making to you and secondly that we expect of you this is a full time and the long term and total commitment when that door closes your bar college faculty are going to be evaluating what you do as a student exclusively that is to say the college has no interest in the nature of your criminal conviction the length of your sentence how much time you have left in prison not our business where in the business of education this is the thing we know how to do and we happen to do it here and when you leave this room tonight there is now something that can be taken away from you that's completely different than when you walked in and that's from the documentary college behind bars directed by our guest Lynn Novick also with us or die one take throat and Sebastian noon graduates of the program.

Lynn Novick Dave Davies Novak Peabody Award Yun New York Max Kenner founder and executive director Bard College Ken Pedro Lynn Novick Sebastian four years
"lynn novick" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"lynn novick" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Done I would get emotional they are like congratulations good job and then they're like strip and then you know you approach in the search area you're in this liminal place and you know they like stripped and they trust you right back in the prison a rose remember not a whole lot I'm a college student you know if you know I'm a brother I'm an uncle on the sun like that's why in this is not me this is not my identity I'm not going to wear you know I'm not taking it back myself I'm going to sleep with and that's what I want to draw and Sebastian Yun from the PBS documentary college behind bars which premieres tonight on PBS also with us is the director of the documentary Lenovo Sebastian you how long after your graduation did you have to Sir before you released are two more years after my bachelor's degree in two thousand seventeen what was that have what was that time like for you I never some innocent even after you graduate all as long as you are in a prison in which part prison initiative operates you're allowed to take courses and was incredible is that you can also serve as tutors so you're constantly working with other students who are trying to obtain their associate's degrees or bachelor's we've all stayed in touch with folks you know from the program and help people you helped I would say that all my friends right now or my peers from the B. P. R. program and our network is really growing when you come home now I'll be off to help each other get jobs that's how I got my job at open society foundations and we're just a really is tied court and we see each other as family because we've been to the same struggles it was not the same education we're talking about the new PBS documentary college behind bars with Lynn Novick who directed the series and also with us our Sebastian Yun and die one Teatro two formerly incarcerated graduates of the bard prison initiative that both are in college degrees and are now employed we will continue our conversation after this short break this is fresh AIR.

Sebastian Yun director Lynn Novick Lenovo B. P.
"lynn novick" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"lynn novick" Discussed on KQED Radio

"With encouraging results students accepted to the program take classes in prison taught by Bard College faculty using the same materials and meeting the same standards as students on the college's main campus our guests today are Lynn Novick who directed the documentary and to graduates of the program Sebastian noon and I won T. trail they spoke with fresh ears Dave Davies Novak is a Peabody Award winning filmmaker and long time collaborator of Ken burns she spent four years in prisons taping material for the documentary which is her solo directorial debut Yun and Pedro both entered prison as teenagers and both earned bachelor's degrees in the bard prison initiative the documentary college behind bars airs tonight and tomorrow night on PBS stations and will also be available for streaming Lynn Novick Sebastian noon and die one Teatro welcome to fresh air great to have all of you let's start with a clip from the documentary this is a scene where there's a group of brand new students at the eastern correctional facility which is a maximum security facility in New York just been admitted to the program after a competitive admissions process and what we see is a not terribly large classroom in a group of fifteen to twenty men in blue jumpsuit seated a typical classroom desks and Max Kenner who is the founder and executive director of the program is welcoming the new students let's listen welcome to bar college congratulations we're gonna start course work Monday morning and I think we should just start being really clean about the scale of the commitment first of all they we're making to you and secondly that we expect of you this is a full time and a long term and total commitment when that door closes your mark college faculty are gonna be evaluating what you do as a student exclusively that is to say the college has no interest in the nature of your criminal conviction the length of your sentence how much time you have left in prison not our business where in the business of education this is the thing we know how to do and we happen to do it here and when you leave this room tonight there is now something that can be taken away from me that's completely different than when you walked in and that's from the documentary college behind bars directed by our guest Lynn Novick also with us or die one tape throat and Sebastian noon graduates of the program.

Lynn Novick Dave Davies Novak Peabody Award Yun New York Max Kenner founder and executive director Bard College Ken Pedro Lynn Novick Sebastian four years
"lynn novick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"lynn novick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Would get a motion of number they are like congratulations good job and then they're like strip and then you know you approach in the search area you're in this liminal place and you know they like stripped and they trust you right back in the press a new browser member not a whole lot I'm a college student your normal brother I'm an uncle on the sun but that's why in this is not me this is not my identity I'm not going to wear you know I'm not taking it back to my so I'm going to sleep with that said I want to draw and Sebastian Yun from the PBS documentary college behind bars which premieres tonight on PBS also with us is the director of the documentary and flick Sebastian you how long after your graduation did you have to Sir before you got released our two more years after my bachelor's degree in two thousand seventeen what was that have what was that time like for you I never stopped being a student even after you graduate all as long as you are in a prison in which part prison initiative operates you're allowed to take courses and was incredible is that you can also serve as tutors so you're constantly working with other students who are trying to obtain their associate's degrees or bachelor's and if people stayed in touch with folks you know from the program and help people you helped I would say that all my friends right now or my peers from the B. P. R. program and our network is really growing when they come home now I'll be off to help each other get jobs that's how I got my job at open society foundations and read just a really is tied court and we see each other as family because we've been to the same struggles it was not the same education we're talking about the new PBS documentary college behind bars with Lynn Novick who directed the series and also with us our Sebastian Yun and die one Teatro two formerly incarcerated graduates of the bard prison initiative that both are in college degrees and are now employed we will continue our conversation after the short break this is fresh AIR WNYC is supported by the vision zero initiative in New York City one in three pedestrian deaths or serious injuries involve a turning vehicle vision zero encourages drivers to turn slowly and always watch for pedestrians and cyclists.

Sebastian Yun director Lynn Novick WNYC B. P. New York City
"lynn novick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"lynn novick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"With encouraging results students accepted to the program take classes in prison taught by Bard College faculty using the same materials and meeting the same standards as students on the college's main campus our guests today are Lynn Novick who directed the documentary and to graduates of the program Sebastian noon and I won T. trail they spoke with fresh ears Dave Davies Novak is a Peabody Award winning filmmaker and long time collaborator of Ken burns she spent four years in prisons taping material for the documentary which is her solo directorial debut Yun and Pedro both entered prison as teenagers and both earned bachelor's degrees in the bard prison initiative the documentary college behind bars airs tonight and tomorrow night on PBS stations and will also be available for streaming Lynn Novick Sebastian noon and die one Teatro welcome to fresh air great to have all of you let's start with a clip from the documentary this is a scene where there's a group of brand new students at the eastern correctional facility which is a maximum security facility in New York just been admitted to the program after a competitive admissions process and what we see is a not terribly large classroom in a group of fifteen to twenty men in blue jumpsuit seated a typical classroom desks and Max Kenner who is the founder and executive director of the program is welcoming the new students let's listen welcome to bar college congratulations we're gonna start course work Monday morning and I think we should just start being really clear about the scale of the commitment first of all that we're making to you and secondly that we expect of you this is a full time and the long term and total commitment when that door closes your bar college faculty are going to be evaluating what you do as a student exclusively that is to say the college has no interest in the nature of your criminal conviction the length of your sentence how much time you have left in prison not our business where in the business of education this is the thing we know how to do and we happen to do it here and when you leave this room tonight there is now something that can be taken away from you that's completely different.

Lynn Novick Dave Davies Novak Peabody Award Yun New York Max Kenner founder and executive director Bard College Ken Pedro Lynn Novick Sebastian four years
"lynn novick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"lynn novick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And flannel available at pajama Graham dot com this is W. NYC good morning I'm John Carlson with a look at our weather forecast it'll be sunny today for Monday high hitting about fifty two later this afternoon tonight it'll remain mostly clear will have lows this evening in the mid forties tomorrow Tuesday sunny today the high reaching fifty seven by Wednesday forty percent chance of showers through the day it'll be mostly cloudy that day high fifty nine and then by thanksgiving on Thursday will be mostly sunny that day high forty six it will also be breezy throughout the day on Thursday on the next fresh air college in a maximum security prison unlike other schools it has bars it has gates that close and open it has doors that must be locked the PBS documentary series college behind bars tells a moving story of prisoners taking rigorous courses and earning degrees while serving their time we'll speak with director Lynn Novick and to graduates of the program join us weekdays at two on ninety three point nine FM W. NYC obscure laws allow for some people with disabilities to be paid sub minimum wage I know people who are making six cents an hour so we're the minimum wage is significantly more than that we know that some people are getting paid once touted as a training program now seen as exploitation I'm tansy to Vega and that's next time on the take away weekday afternoons at three on ninety three point nine FM yes morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Rachel Martin the morning the civilian head of the navy is out of a job Richard V. Spencer is his name he was caught between the president above him.

John Carlson Lynn Novick Vega Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Richard V. Spencer president NYC director NPR forty percent
"lynn novick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"lynn novick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Borstein and Tony salute episodes are available now for guild members at consideramos on dot com for tonight in our area it'll be mostly clear and chilly low thirty three degrees tonight with wind chill between twenty five and thirty sunny tomorrow high near forty six with the rain likely tomorrow night love about forty one it's forty six clear right now in Central Park you're listening to WNYC at five fifty you're listening to All Things Considered on WNYC I'm John Carlson for nearly twenty years a program run by Bard College has given hundreds of incarcerated people in New York state access to a college education students with the bard prison initiative get a chance to take the same courses offered at bart's main campus and finish the program with the same degrees for many of the students it was the first time they even consider higher education as a possibility where would I be today if I had been doing what they are doing at that age you know what I'm saying since I had been able to get up there and articulate myself like that I'd been able to get into Harvard where would I be today so die one teacher he's an alumnus of the program and a new documentary called college behind bars follows a group of students as they manage classes a mid life in prison he joins us now along with Lynn Novick who directed the series hello to you about good afternoon.

Borstein Tony Central Park WNYC John Carlson Bard College bart Harvard Lynn Novick New York thirty three degrees twenty years
"lynn novick" Discussed on The Documentary Life

The Documentary Life

10:58 min | 2 years ago

"lynn novick" Discussed on The Documentary Life

"Of how one goes out even setting up production to go into a prison. What how did the security access work? What was the overall process? who were the sort of the key individuals that you had to begin contacting with in order to make this happen? It took took us. It took us a while to get permission. Both from the state and the Department of Corrections but once we had gotten that permission we have an extraordinary producer Mariah durant who took the lion's share of the just call sheet organization which I if you are a documentary filmmaker. This would make anybody's heads spin. We became a very lean very compact crew. We brought in as little gear as we possibly could and small footprint as as we possibly good both for the complexity of this space and the complexity of security and we have an really talented team. Amen we got permission to come in and out and we were extremely organized and tried to be very very efficient and we shot really really long days. We would make the most of our time there because the students the students and incarcerated individuals time is so carefully choreographed and manage that figuring out how we it could maximize how much time I could spend with the students and also in the facility at a time that we were allowed to be there was not simple. Can you give us a snapshot of what of what a day looks like so when you enter in the morning the other crew assembling outside together and then everyone's walking in together do they have. Have you SORTA handlers that you're working with give us a snapshot of what that looks like going through the security and getting into the building to begin the day we both talked about because we usually went in very early. Always as T- we processed in together we cleared our gear together. We went through the gates together. We got to the part of the prison. We were shooting in usually as a group. You have a number of subjects of course in this in this doc series talk about initially any meeting people what that process was like. And then how you decided who you're subjects would be and I'll take a savannah monitor cerebral jump and cheer this essential to the whole project. We appreciate the opportunity to do the film for this. Very reason we recognize you know immediately that this it's GonNa be difficult because we couldn't pick up the phone and call people or send an email or just hang out. Everything was very carefully controlled so we started before we even started added filming or really planning our project. We met with a number of alums of the Barker's initiative who had already entered the program and at least from prison were out in the world and we just for background this month. Ask them what was it like for them. And what did they think. Felt like this should be about and what should or the pitfalls to avoid and they were extremely generous is with us to just help us get a little bit Ranjin before we sort of went into prisons and started talking to the students without really knowing anything about their lodger their experiences. That was his background research homework so to speak. But then we just we got permission or we ask for the opportunity to just go inside inside and watch the classes for a while and not really talked to anyone too much and then we kind of noticed certain for people that may be seem particularly animated or interesting or a a particular aspect to their personality that we thought was interesting and maybe their academic life and we just started sort of noticing. Different people in wanting talk to them and spent time with them without a camera there and then in addition there were when we started filming there was a cohort of women that were starting the program of women's president and a cohort of men that were starting parting so we knew we were going to choose people from those two groups who were just beginning the programme and so we spent time with them kind of as a large group and broke down. You know little little bit individually each meet with different people just kind of take notes in and again a sense of where they were at and then there was a group of men that had already finished their sensitive degree that we're starting with bachelors degrees through the last two years of the program and so we were thirty seven of them. We couldn't get to know all of them what we try to get as many as we could and overtime probably a few months kind of zeroed in few people that we thought would be should focus on in evolved over time as well okay and were you filming that entire time early on when you are you know. I know you're you're in and out of the prison doing the research. You're spending time with potential subjects. Did you have a camera there during that time or was it. Once you had decided who you're subjects would be that you actually started to roll little votes. We shot early on. Lynn was just saying these two cohorts of students who were or just starting the program and the students who were just starting the BA. We didn't want to lose time tracking that process so we filmed early on before we knew some of the subjects as well as we obviously got to know them very well over time but we wasn't one size fits all. We spent a lot of time without the cameras but we also did some very surgical surgical shooting that felt like it would be the launch for the film it was about. We started building in the summer of twenty fourteen finished in the summer twenty seventeenth so it was four years. Okay Okay Finan. That was you know that was kind of big into the whole idea of the project was that we believed absolutely that. FM about this subject needed to show the transformation that happens when people have access to education and that happens over time even if we had wanted to stop working on Vietnam just spend six months working on this. It wouldn't have worked for the concept of what the film could do is just one of my favorite documentaries stories of all time is twenty eight up and the magic of that of seeing people change so extraordinary can say that. We aspire to be Michael APP ted. But I think that's the power of development away too you know and so we wanted that to be part of this project and so we had to start when we started in basically had to get all the way to graduation. intuitions was four years later. That series is a huge inspiration series. The seven up series in fact as a side note we had You may remember. You may remember one of the subjects Nick Nick Kitchen who has lived in the US now for a long time we actually had him on the program because we wanted to talk about what it what. It's like like for the documentary subject on the other side of the cameras. And if there's one thing that I have learned to fear in this. Is Mike A to that because we think about that a lot you know. That's really what. Yeah I will send you a link to that. It's a wonderful conversation nation. You will recognize the voice immediately and you your heart will open immediately. It was he was. He was a conversation to have. And and DOC as consumers members of that film and then as doc filmmakers yourself you will appreciate the conversation four years. Four hundred hours of footage. How do you even begin an editorial sense to start? Whittling this footage down Alice Dongting credit to are really extraordinary editor for Sharabia. Take her assistant chased. Horton helping US inexpensive all this material but you know in a way we kind of approached it to some degree at least start the way we work with material historical films and that we had a lot of interviews and sort of group conversations. We just pulled select so we watched that the transcription picked out the sections that we thought were interesting. Jiang and then we kind of build Lucon assembly just really more the the interview in the conversation the talking what people had to say sort. What was the stories? We put all the best material together in this. I think it was eight hours long or something. And that didn't include any there taper to actually just the The content talking shame that we got to be in the film were being considered and then we start to break that down into episodes. And you know we're gonNA boil it down and let me start to add the cheik scenes and that net. We could move some of the sort of talking. That was explaining things that we were actually gonNA show instead so it's It was a very organic process and none of us has made it sound like just before that narration and without you know a building instructor so we'll along those lines. What's what's an approach that you brought to this that you would have taken? We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA WE'RE GONNA answer this into his. I'm I'm GONNA ask you. What's an approach that you brought to this that you would have taken from all of your years doing films with Ken? And then what's something that you may be consciously did differently gently in your approach from the years working with Ken. No you should answer. That was a very dramatic pause. Talk about that. A lot was what's similar and what's different so I think what similar was that. The approached the the people in the film with interests and an open mind and open heart alone. Speak Present and hear what they had to stay and understand them. You know who they were and just be be open to that so that the film could reflect what we think people should do but they actually are. And that's changing over time. And that's been true nicer that we hope when integrity of that process that is consistent and everything that we do and then there's the dynamics of just pure storytelling you know. I think stories can always says a beginning middle and end you have to edit out but extraneous material that you have to keep the audience engaged and how you do that. It doesn't matter whether you have a nation or not on whether using old photographs or not just a pure kind of craft of storytelling. You know how you use your characters. How do you set up? What's at stake? How do you you know? Reveal what you're going to reveal as you're going along those kinds of just peer narrative devices. I guess are really more or less the same. It's just here. We didn't know what they were going to be when we started right. Yeah I think another piece of this that we've been talking about. Is You know we were also. Oh nervous when we started that how you know the visual landscape is pretty the same pretty much the same it is the same. The school flora doesn't change much. The clothes lows they wear are pretty much the same. They're in the same location and how we were GONNA make that visually interesting repetitive. But end up being you. You know both beautiful. And I think ultimately a strength of the film that both are cinematographers are amazing and Tricia 's Lynn was saying but just just to sort of lean into where we were and what we were doing and follow it both visually and from storytelling perspective in some various simple ways. Isn't that much more complicated ways..

US Lynn Ken Department of Corrections Mariah durant producer Nick Nick Kitchen Barker president Vietnam Alice Dongting Michael Jiang Mike A Horton Sharabia Tricia instructor editor four years