35 Burst results for "Lyndon Johnson"

'Better America': Biden's Campaign Launches New National Ad

All In with Chris Hayes

04:30 min | Last month

'Better America': Biden's Campaign Launches New National Ad

"In one thousand, nine, sixty, four Lyndon Johnson ran a now iconic campaign ad against Barry Goldwater where a little girl counts daisy pedals until her counting becomes the countdown to nuclear explosion idea being present goldwater has become elected and started a nuclear war because he's a madman. said. It. there. Is, are, the stakes. You'll make a world in which all of God's children can live. Aren't to go into the dark room, we must either love each other. Or we must die. Vote for President Johnson on November third, the stakes are too high for you to stay home. The stakes are that you're adorable daughter gets nuked. Now. Even though we're not living through a nuclear winter, we are living through a version of disaster. I mean a a national disaster resulting in thousands and thousands of deaths day after day after day and a new Joe Biden goes against the grain in many ways the opposite of the grand life and death scale the daisy at. The new the biden relates what a bummer. This current disastrous doesn't focus deaths, evictions, closed schools. It says, this virus is ruining the little things like seeing your grandkids. have been gifted with two beautiful grandchildren. We try to see them as often as possible and it's been six months. And it's way too long. And while I don't blame Donald Trump for the virus, I blame him for his lack of action and because of that, we're sitting here zooming or facetime ing with our grandchildren instead of hugging and kissing them. And that's hard. Joe Biden knows every moment is precious I trust you Biden to get this virus under control? I'm Joe Biden and I approve this message. Seems like a really real smart relatable ad for a portion of the population that Joe Biden is trying to focus on. This is for all the people who were sold on idea that there was some normal around the Ben. During the trump years because there is no normal during trump that was false join me. Now for more on the different approaches, the two campaigns are taking is Adrian Shropshire. She's a veteran democratic strategist and executive director of black pack had a lot of experience in politics community organizing and ads as well and I just I was so struck by this ad agent because it's so understood in. So many ways given how terrible things are and given the kind of micro targeted median voter. He's trying to reach you know elderly couple or senior citizen couple in Florida. Yeah I mean the reality is that. Voters understand where we are. They understand the crisis that we're in. They do not. WanNa see campaign after campaign ad reminding them of our national. Right. I've said he focused move after folks. And what? The message that voters say that they want to hear is one of national unity. They WanNa hear message about a path forward how this mess is going to get fixed and I think the brilliant thing about that ad is that. while. It appears to be targeted at one segment of the electorate. The reality is that that is all of us, right? That is my entire family every Sunday night sitting zoom call, right so it is it is. There is a moment where the multipronged crisis that are facing the country are literally touching every single one of us and what's brilliant about the ad is that. You know it's it leads toward that unifying message right? It is it in every message quite frankly every ad I would hope to see that comes out of the campaign on is a way to unify to tell a message to tell a story that connects people about the moment that we're in. It's really if you think about it in this in this way having a national unity being a campaign strategy all by itself.

Joe Biden Donald Trump Barry Goldwater President Johnson Adrian Shropshire Executive Director Florida
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:17 min | 3 months ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Of Lyndon Johnson at two years now between sixty five the trouble and what's which everybody agreed with a catastrophe and the trouble in Newark did Johnson not respond in any fashion well you know Johnson did worked his heart out getting the civil rights law and then the voting rights law of sixty five along with the billion dollar poverty bill and many other efforts so it yes he was deeply disappointed at the watch right where's the gratitude right that yeah I mean it's a little bit of a a little bit selfish if you went into in a serious pout we know this because his aide Joe Califano who later became a cabinet member trying to find Johnson and swaps went up in flames and on the characteristically for Johnson he couldn't find Johnson Johnson one telephones you know it's called everyone all the time a red button on but Johnson was a wall because Johnson was effectively pouting and digesting the horrible news of watch and it was horrible the numbers turned out to be even higher and then the numbers initially cited that you quoted by the time you get to sixty seven Johnson is disillusioned he sad he's struggling with Vietnam all the time and he cannot understand why his big hearted efforts were working and the rights of the sixty seven contributed to Johnson's decision not to run again in sixty eight Detroit is swept by riding in fires New York times Monday July twenty fourth nineteen sixty seven Romney calls in guard seven hundred arrested at the same time in New York disorders erupt in East Harlem mobs disperse the thousand police rushed in to end me lie eight shots fired on a hundred eleven street we're looking at a catastrophe in the summer of nineteen sixty seven you say that Johnson was in retreat let's leave it there where was Sargent Shriver where was the where was the economic opportunity act while he was in battle and you know Johnson and thank him threatened him prayed over him to get Sargent Shriver take the job the courtship by Johnson was one amazing thing he was a charm offensive that it you know if you you know exponential charm offensive driver in taking the job in and of course Johnson began to blame them for the failures so Shriver was angry too what's sad about for example Detroit is the police violence was still there the jobs were not there the people were arrested and there was terrible destruction in that city today we wonder why destroy it was Detroit was so wrapped one reason was that Ryan people moved out because they didn't want to be around for another ride another reason though once all of the big three automakers were beginning to realize they were facing international competition and you know in the years that followed foreign automakers would begin to easy to choice lunch so the jobs were not there for the people of Detroit the people in the machine tool centers of Missouri or Ohio the people around Michigan and the big automakers I would say out of state liberalism and progressivism said we're going to make this all about high wages for our workers the unions want us to do that we're going to do it and again who was conned out less skilled workers often blacks and they knew it so they were demonstrating at this time there were some very angry black led unions in sixty seven sixty eight the the leader of the United auto workers who would actually contributed to Martin Luther king stale in Birmingham jail once absolutely disheartened because he felt he'd done a lot for black civil rights in unions and yet it black unions were now turning against him and his union are they called in the red hat it should be had the red head very violent talk as of today so those who are liberals and progressives and tried to help didn't supply the the right help and we're headed for that fifty six years later Johnson thought assigned August twentieth nineteen sixty four the SEC eight K. poverty building known as the economic opportunity act Sargent Shriver I believe died in twenty eleven did a Sargent Shriver did the people who work for him regard the poverty build economic opportunity act of failure I think so or much of it a failure Daniel Patrick Moynihan at once and I'm paraphrasing said on the texture but when I called me we who picks up but some snippy miss college girls what he meant was this is a limousine liberal programs are run by people a jobs program for people's daughters at the headquarters and run by people with scant scan understanding what's going on the street morning hand who later became a senator also said our programs are wrong because they are feeding the horses he disparaged eating the horses to be disparaged by which he meant the horses were the social workers right really poor people people really need many of the minorities are not the main beneficiaries the social worker's status meant are the beneficiaries and that brings us to today and the question one might have about the new emphasis on community work we have thirty seconds of your measure of the great society today is it is it understood is that much talked about your book is very careful about it is it right is the memory there we have thirty seconds the memories not there and that's perhaps why we're summoning the old remedy a failed at that time nothing is new it's just forgotten yes the only thing that's new in your life is the.

Lyndon Johnson Newark
How did America get to its current state?

Between The Lines

05:06 min | 4 months ago

How did America get to its current state?

"The scenes across the US in the past week or so, they have been profoundly disturbing heavenly. The protests are in response to the horrifying image of George. Floyd an African American man and Minneapolis. Police officer who killed him by kneeling on his nick for close to nine minutes to spot. He's pleased that he could not brave. Those demonstrations as we all know turned into, want him violence and destruction, not only in the twin cities, but all across American CDs. Today's are quiet and peaceful, but it's really the evenings in the night, so usually bring that fury. Those frustrations attend to boil over in the results or these fiery clashes that we've seen across the country, and of course here in New York. We've already seen dozens of people injured. Hundreds of people arrested in tonight. The expectation is that we could see more of these demonstrations. How did America get to this point? And who precisely are Antioch, the militant left wing political protest movement that part of these rights. Face because Nazis, thank. and. That is a very bad thing because harass people Lemay Organiz they kill. People hurt people. They fight people. And we're the ones who fighting back there. The second coming of Hitler for several decades America has I deeply divided nation. Just go back to the mid to late nineteen sixties when America experienced those long hot summers, protests and riots, Vietnam Rice and Martin. Luther King's assassination. The American people are deeply disturbed. They're baffled and dismayed by the wholesale looting and violence. That has occurred both in small towns and then great metropolitan centres. No society can tolerate massive violence. Anymore than a body can tolerate massive disease to me that black people are in the streets. Has Do the lives air force lead in this country? And unfortunately lead these lives by the indifference and the apathy. And a certain kind of ignorance, willful ignorance on the part of their citizens. According to British historian Max Hastings Pass guest on this show in those days quote. It seemed that rice the election and the Vietnam. War would tearing asunder the greatest country on earth. And to think is deep divisions in America have clearly grown since the sixties especially in the trump era, just think of that toxic polarization, hyper partisanship in Washington and elsewhere not to mention the crisis engulfing American cities. So. How did America get to this point? Robert DALIC is arguably America's most distinguished living presidential historian. He's author of fourteen books including on Presidents FDR JFK, LBJ, Richard, Nixon, and Ronald Reagan. The latest book is called. How did we get? He from Theodore Roosevelt? To Donald Trump it's published by harpercollins. Robert Delic joins me from Washington DC hi Bob. Hi Tom Lovely to hear from you. Great to have you on the show now they adopt is in Washington and across other use CDs, but America as I mentioned, before has experienced similar protests in violence. What do you think distinguishes this crosses? The widespread unrest in nineteen sixty I'd. Well, Tom. One of the things that distinguish did was the fact that Lyndon Johnson of course was. President then, and was presiding over the Vietnam War, which was at the center of what? Disturbed so many people in the United States and triggered so many of these. Demonstrations but Johnson had the good sense. To? Give up running for president. He was very skillful politician. Now we have a president who will not give up who would not resign and the only way we're going to get him out of office is by feeding him in the election. Night comes up and five months from now it's very disquieting situation and the demonstrations across this country. I believe on not. Simply a response to the tragic killing of that black man in Minneapolis, but it's also a protest against Donald Trump's presidency. You Know Tom. He's never reached fifty percent approval. And the going on for years he's been office. And this is unprecedented. No President in terms since we've had polling in the Mid Nineteen Thirties. Has Gone through a whole first term without ever reaching fifty percent approval.

America President Trump Lyndon Johnson Tom Lovely Donald Trump Floyd Robert Dalic Minneapolis United States Mid Nineteen Thirties Washington Vietnam George Luther King Officer Max Hastings Lemay Organiz New York Ronald Reagan
Washington - White House butler who served 11 presidents died of coronavirus

The Opening Bell

02:06 min | 4 months ago

Washington - White House butler who served 11 presidents died of coronavirus

"Wanted to mention so today passed away but a remarkable person you may have heard of Wilson German in the past he was a Butler at the White House who served eleven presidents history was sort of cold in the the movie the bottler with forest Whitaker in Oprah and not so many other big names pretty good movie from a few years back but this gentleman Wilson German started working in the White House as a cleaner in nineteen fifty seven under Dwight D. Eisenhower and then worked for John F. Kennedy was promoted to Butler under JFK but also worked for Lyndon Johnson Lyndon Johnson liked him so much that when Mister Germans wife was very ill he sent that President Johnson sent his personal positions to treat her to to take care of her and then the worked for president Nixon and president Ford and I mean the the the list goes on and on Jimmy Carter George W. bush said that he was a lovely man he was the first person that we saw in the in the white house every morning the last person we saw when we returned at night he worked for president Obama and of course took a great deal of pride in working for president Obama being African American himself that the there was an African American president but a a rather remarkable man who served as a cleaner A. and and elevator operator at the White House apparently they haven't put in the automatic elevators at the White House for at the time at least did not and then ultimately bottler which is you know I I guess quite a prestigious position there he died of coronavirus sadly age ninety is

Wilson German Butler White House Oprah Dwight D. Eisenhower John F. Kennedy Lyndon Johnson Lyndon Johnson President Nixon Ford Jimmy Carter George W. Bush Barack Obama President Trump Mister Germans
Robert Caro on How He Does It

The Book Review

09:47 min | 6 months ago

Robert Caro on How He Does It

"Robert Carroll joins us now he is the Pulitzer Prize. Winning author of many books. New Book is called working researching interviewing and writing. He's also the author of the years of Lyndon Johnson four volumes of them thus far and the powerbroker Robert Moses and the fall of New York Bob. Thanks so much for being here. Pleasure to be here all right so everyone has been greatly anticipating a volume five of the years of Johnson. But instead you have written this other book working researching interviewing writing. Why did you decide to do this? Ever since the powerbroker I kept myself out of the book. I don't think the word I appears in there many times. If soon as the book came out people started asking me. What was it like ten of you Robert Moses and I realized that I should have put in something to tell people what that was like so for like forty five years. I've been hearing that question and people ask me what it's like to work in presidential libraries were. Can you find out from interviews? This isn't the adviced anybody but it's sort of. I said we'll I WANNA give people some glimpses into how I work so. I took time out to do this book now. I'm back doing the volume. I mean it's an interesting question about interviewing Robert Moses because you had read five sessions which women seven sessions with him. Which was very different from the Johnson. Biography where he was dead already for several years. Before you could get started and I'm curious you write about it a bit in working what the difference was like for you. Writing the book writing a biography of a person who was still alive versus writing a biography of someone who was already gone in one sense. It's great to write about someone who's still alive because you get to meet Moses. Didn't talk to me for the first couple of years of the book. Then we had seven interviews. Soon as I started asking questions. Pamela the interviews were over but they will long sessions and I really got to look at him with Johnson. You felt okay. I came along just too late. He had died just three years before was great about him was that he died so young he would have been only sixty seven when I started. He darted sixty four that everyone was still alive. He had I think twelve people in Johnson City High School. When he was there they were all there to be viewed. But you can't make up for not meeting and talking to the person writing about you just can't do feel that absence and working on the Johnson. Yes you do everything you can to overcome that you know you interview the people closest to him over and over and over again constantly asking them what was he like. If I was standing next to you what would I see him doing? So you try to get a feeling of him now. We have these telephone transcripts where you hear him talking hundreds and hundreds of hours you can listen to him talking and see how he deals with people and how he gets what he wants from people. That's always amazing to me. Has that changed the way that you've been doing your research having access to those types a change the writing of history in general like on the Gulf of Tonkin incident which has been sort of mystery. What really happened there. How many attacks were there? On our destroyers. You know that led Johnson to launch these launch bombing attacks on North Vietnam. Now you actually hear the communications between Robert McNamara. The Secretary of Defense Cincpac the admiral at Honolulu and the commander of the fleet. That's an in Viet Nam. You hear this and what was really going on in real time the other aspect of your interviewing that. I thought was so interesting that you write about in this new book working is the delicacy of interviews and especially when you get to touchy subjects. And they'll you didn't interview Johnson for the book did Interview Lady Bird and tell the story about how you and when you approached the subject of Johnson's longtime affair with Alice Marsh. Well when Johnson is in the Pacific during World War. Two year allowed easing Australia. You're allowed one telephone. Call the senator from Texas. Just Johnson has to decide whether to run again for the House of Representatives or to run for senator. I'm going through all the correspondents and suddenly in the middle of it. There is a telegram from someone sewing. Alice I've never heard of Alice. She appears in no book and it says Lyndon everyone else that happened to me in the White House. Everyone else thinks you should run for the Senate. I think you should run for the house. Please try to cool love Alice. I said WHO is Alice. Who was the person that he makes the only one telephone call? And who's giving political advice which he follows shortly after that? So that's you know. An example of going through the papers by luck her sister and best friend show up at the Johnson Library and ask to see me and I go down to see them and they say you know we wanna tell you about a woman named Alice Marsh. We don't want to portray to some Bimbo. She was really very important in Johnson's life. And they told me the whole story of this Lauren and significant relationship and his life. So how do you then? Ask Lady Bird. You know panel. That's the only interview I ever had in my life where I couldn't bring myself to look at the person I was interviewing. Alice was a small town girl. She turned herself into the brilliant Washington. Hostess Brilliant Brilliant Salons and she came from a little town called Morlin. Now no one would go to the mall. And unless they were looking for inflammation analysis a little town in the middle of nowhere and I never know I went up there and we learned about her. And how remarkable she was but all of a sudden we have a mutual friend. Who lived in Morlin? Who calls me in a panic and says the bird in Texas? Everybody Calls Lady Bird Bird. Bird and always. You've been in Marlin. So she knows you know about Al. Assad said well that had to be if it doesn't concern me but her secretary then shows up at my desk in the reading room says Mrs Johnson would like to see you out at the ranch this weekend. We had been meeting in her office so we sit down at the dining table. She's at the head of the table. I might her right. Hand my stenographer's notebook like like the one you use is is down on my right hand taking notes and without preamble. She starts to talk about Alice Quiz. How elegance she was how sophisticated she was how she taught. Linden things and everything that she taught him. He followed the rest of his life. You don't hear these lawn when she met him. He was this new congressman very awkward with Lorne Gang Leo Arms. She said turn them into an asset. Always wear shirts with French. Cuffs and very nice cufflinks. So when people's attention is cool to them it's called in in a in a good way. She told him. We're kind of Necktie to favor. Countess Myers Tie. But most of all at crucial elements in life. It was her advice that he followed an in a number of cases one in particular. It's not exaggerating. Very much to say she saved. His career is takes a moment to tell. But it's it's interesting his early careers financed by a very fierce huge Texas contractor. Herman Brown Brown and Root and Herman was prepared to keep financing his Roy and in return Johnson was getting huge contracts for Brown and root when all of a sudden they had a falling out Lyndon Johnson was getting them authorization to build a dam which they wanted but Linden wandered low. Rent Housing Project built in Boston in what was a very poor Mexican American neighborhood. The houses in that neighborhood were owned by Herman Brown. The tenants were paying rent to him. They were very profitable and he was enraged at Linden wanted to condemn them for his housing project and his chief lobbyist and his chief lawyer talked. Instead you know Herman was about to turn on Linden and when Herman turned on you he never turned back when Alice here is about this and invites them both down to Greatest Stadium Virginia. She sits down at her table. And says why don't you just compromise give Herman the damaging winds and the land and all of a sudden everything was okay. So Lady Bird starts talking not only about her elegance. She says the quotes are in the book. She was so sophisticated so beautiful. I remember her neck succession of wonderful beautiful dresses and me in well not so wonderful. And and then she said you know Lyndon Basically Linden always followed Alice's vice during that whole interview I have to say my head. Just stay down and I took notes. I couldn't look at her so that was done. The next week we went back to ordinary interview she just launched into it without you. Even though I you know I sometimes think I know something about politics. I'm really glad I don't have to write about. Women never understood why she did

Lyndon Johnson Alice Marsh Lady Bird Robert Moses Texas Johnson City High School Herman Brown Brown Johnson Library Pulitzer Prize Robert Carroll Robert Mcnamara Secretary Brilliant Brilliant Salons Gulf Of Tonkin Australia Linden New York Viet Nam
Trump’s presentation of changes in black voting is largely ridiculous — but not entirely

1A

05:32 min | 7 months ago

Trump’s presentation of changes in black voting is largely ridiculous — but not entirely

"Instance how did African Americans com so it becomes so closely identified with the Democratic Party pointed back to Lyndon Johnson fifty six years ago what's the what's the origin of what I'll call the synergy between black folks in Democrats I now right you know it's been a process I mean black people have not always voted Democrat there was a time when we voted and our own best interests and coming out of the civil war Democrats I mean blacks are recognizing that it was the Abraham Lincoln a message that they we're the party of the abolitionist they were Republican SO we align very closely to the Republican Party and then as we began to move into the Great Depression you began to see now you have Franklin D. Roosevelt black people at that particular time they would have been but need that the bottom rung of the economic ladder in here you have a Democrat president FDR's same will listen let's start social programs I ask you about some food and things like that welfare job programs SO black people began to pay attention to the Democrat party not in mass yet but they started looking at it and then you have the civil rights movement with Lyndon B. Johnson in nineteen sixty four Civil Rights bill that passed and although it was a Republican Party that made sure the bill could pass into law because Democrats wanted nothing to do with it it was of a democratic president that was that was leading the charge of the party the parties were not nearly as polarized at the time right southern I think southern southern racist Democrats were were very much oppose they were northern Democrats who were with Johnson and northern Republicans in western Republic yeah if you are a black person coming from the Emancipation Proclamation in eighteen sixty three down to nineteen sixty four of the of the civil rights bill that's a hundred a hundred plus years of Democrats being very enthusiastic in their desire to impede the the movement of black people so whether so whether it was some that was nice and some that maybe wasn't so much it didn't matter the fact is a hundred years between emancipation and the civil rights movement it with the Democrat party that was with great gusto impeding the life of black people so we asked our listeners who are conservatives of color to share why they joined the GOP here's what one person had to say hi there my name is Brian I'm not a black conservative but I am a conservative of color I used to be a Democrat it was a liberal but college I had sort of change of heart and what sort of sports my change with the Facebook group that said minorities that though the public could make me cry and it made me think no wonder the person feel that way and it made me also think you know why do I vote Democrat and so it kind of got me questioning my values and yeah and then you start thinking maybe I should start shopping around for parties and the lead now today fundamental conservative and had to be there and that is encouraged people other people of color to think yourselves if democratic card doesn't own your vote Kathy any part of Brian's story sound familiar to you I love it I love all of it and that's exactly what happened to me I've been I've been voting Republican primarily for over twenty years so this is a brand new I know we have a lot of black folks who are coming out now where at all their Medicare and I'm so excited to welcome them to the other side of the aisle we'll talk in a second about whether it's actually a lot when we look across the country but I had I'm excited about it I'm excited about it nonetheless but what but what the caller said exactly where I found myself when I was in college in my junior year I had the Pitney I wanted to get involved in politics so where did I go Hey I'm black I'm a Democrat so I went to the to the to the first Democrat office I saw sat down the white Democrats man who was running started talking to me and and the piston me a bubble popped up in my mind what what exactly does he believe what he believed doesn't align with what you believe and for the very first time I started thinking through what what do I believe and does his policies align with my policies and that was the seed that was planted that many years later has turned into me being very adamant about rescuing black people off the Democrat plantation and helping them to see what is in their own best interests but I get why black people vote Democrat I mean I was born into the Democrat party just like I was born into brown skin there was no point of separation I never remember a conversation it's just what you do here black we built this way and to step out of that essay why I'm no longer going to vote Democrat many black people like in it to me rejecting the color of my skin so it's very difficult for black people to have that appear Finney and then to have the boldness to say excuse me I'm going to think for myself that is a big deal for people to react and say it's like you rejecting the color of your skin have you ever heard that pushback from all my goodness I had that a lot I have been called every name under the bus Hey do you get all kinds you know I mean it's rhetoric right but everything in an instant and its rejection I lost all of my black friends except for two during the two thousand sixteen election when I came out saying I'm voting for president trump I mean it is literally a ten to rejecting your race and so it's very difficult we're live at the conservative political action conference on Todd's

Democratic Party Lyndon Johnson
White House or Fight House? Tevi Troy’s new book looks at tiffs and turf wars among White House staffers

THINK! America

08:20 min | 7 months ago

White House or Fight House? Tevi Troy’s new book looks at tiffs and turf wars among White House staffers

"With us and we're gonna talk about that you know the fussing and fighting vet says going on in the White House and don't think for a second that that's exclusive to Donald trump's administration you know it's kind of interesting anytime it's its whatever you're closest to write in history and other things they have to be the worst you know and so Donald Trump his administration's wise it just has to be the worst all the fussing and fighting in in fighting that's going on like no other president before well before you really jump that shark and think that that is the case then you start believing you're hyperbole I once you get your hands on this new book called White House from doctor Tevye Troy bestselling author and former White House adviser okay he's been on the inside he's known as and researched and studied this and he's right about now with his book White House rivalries in the White House from Truman J. trump Dr Troy welcome to the show good to have you with us thanks bill Bradley on talk about played out hello this is this is it this is exciting you know that you know to put this out because you know this conversation has come up from time to time and you always hear from you know the hyperbolic that downhole trump is the worst ever and then you you start bringing back some of the the stories and histories and now here it is you've documented it I imagine if you wanted to go back even before Truman we we have to do episodes inch you know volumes of all the fussing happening in the White House right no absolutely and and we know that they were fighting before experiment where we are perfect I mean you look at the administration of Washington and Hamilton and Jefferson murder each other's throats but the difference is they were cabinet members and when I try to get that in my house how the dynamic change once we had the creation of a White House staff there was no real White House staff before Roosevelt and Truman the first person to enter the White House staff and make change the dynamic in that certainly you have the people who are close to the president meaning in the same building advising him on foreign policy and economic policy and then you might have a treasury secretary or spectators biggest ticked off that somebody else is inviting in his area that was one thing that changed in that that meant that I wasn't quite interesting to note that that the dynamic in the entrance of more humanity just because the more issues right yeah look and government was growing mistake became higher and then also you have this right the best celebrity White House aide the whole idea of a White House staff was supposed to be people with a passion for anonymity but that went away pretty quickly especially in the Kennedy administration when he hired people who are already famous like orcas lessons or to work in the White House is suddenly how celebrity White House they had its own reputation has long ties to the craft and they they could get their word out there if the policies were not going their way and to suddenly you have this idea of leaks and counter leaks you can make you look good in the press and that also at the White House right now make that I talk about the book in the course that is continued and become almost like a to the degree of a tender green black belt when you talk about all this and leaking and stuff going on you know but bad enough that it happens in DC but now of course with the most recent refill we understand that even ambassadors in our state department is running rampant with it as well yeah well you talk about ten degree black belt and that that was Henry Kissinger I'll tell you one great story that's been quite how's that Kissinger was dating Jill St John a very attractive bond girl actress Mandy comes out in the papers that Kissinger's dating this woman and Kissinger ghost and extending complains that his rival Christy William Rogers leaked the information about your retaining but the truth is that your lease it because a he wanted everyone to know he was dating that the truck the bond girl would be he wanted to hurt Rogers any internal wars and bribery deposit so what happened what was it what was the conclusion that well well written exam would rail about all the leaking that happened at the state department and constant complained about it but just not your fat it but at least some of the time we know the kiss your will the guy doing the leaking and then blaming the state department and of course everybody knows because your date of birth second longer up there with a win win corrective measure like you would can degrade black belt in Plato's exactly so he gets the he gets the reward and the award let's talk about president Truman we touched a little bit on that I mean he he he was I guess the modern era of the expanding the staff and and really kind of bringing this into play and of course it's just been kind of kind of a a monolith that like the blob is just been growing unto itself right yes Sir but instrument you have the right there were just unbelievable I don't I'm a presidential historian I've been putting this stuff for decades and the story behind in spite house were were things I'd never even heard of and one breaks during the ministration is that the secretary of state George Marshall as opposed to the recognition of the state of Israel which is flabbergasting to update the business interest on July especially right there at that critical time because it was true and that led the battle for inferred knowledge meant of Israel that would that would be very fight with marshals on the wrong side of it Clark Clifford a junior White House beat it on the right side of it make an argument in front of Clifford Clifford and Truman and Marshall are all arguing out in the White House Clifford wins the argument Truman recognized Israel Marshall is still mad that he never again the clippers or mentions his name for the rest of life right yeah right because so it's pretty petty but yeah such as such as you can't be the government the illusion of the Kennedy Camelot regime you said was not devoid of conflict as well of course in Kennedy do you have this notion of Camelot music wonderful people sitting around a table can you never even heard the term Camelot elections administration that comes from our interview that took place after the administration after he was dead yes but even in the administration there was fighting taking place especially between Lyndon Johnson and Robert F. Kennedy canteen was the product any would be turned general and the president brother Lynn Johnson vice president that you hated each other going back to their time in the Senate together when we can't even the lowly staffer and Johnson with the Senate Majority Leader and they had these nasty nicknames for him brought Robert if they reported Johnson is ruthless corded phone and get a canny referred to by Johnson as bunny boy really didn't like each other and they're always trying well anyway and we've known that that that tension what is it was pretty extreme there between them what else within the Kennedy at Camelot compound anything else that you discovered yeah there was a a a a rivalry between artists less intervention before they collect their prize winning historian who came to the White House when the first intellectual ever worked in the White House and then there was Ted Sorensen it was not as well known but he was closer to Kennedy and there was tension between them that continued even after the administration because the two of them we're kind of bracing to get their books out first hand stories then asked her to stop and stop writing his books but it's different in different book out first plus you're obviously would not agree and there were and the race was on and it it colored their relationship there's tension between them that went on for a long time and I got to imagine especially after the assassination these rivalries it would increase all the more would they not yeah and if there is one great story that dean Rusk with the sector state did not like that Slazenger called him brutalized in silence in meetings during the Kennedy administration implying that he wouldn't say anything that's a rough put it out there the only reason he was silent in meetings this lessons are within the facilities are respected leaker and we would talk about everything that he heard needing three wins Mr this is this is great fun Dr Chevy try I'd say it's good fun because you know the politics is just right for comedy it's it's when we take it too seriously like at times we're doing right now in this current environment then we deprive ourselves of of the little bit of humor in thank you Dr drive for presenting

White House Donald Trump
New York: Longest-serving federal judge, named by LBJ, retires at 98

The Takeaway

00:31 sec | 8 months ago

New York: Longest-serving federal judge, named by LBJ, retires at 98

"And a federal judge in New York City was nominated by president Lyndon Johnson is retiring at age ninety eight the New York Daily News reported at U. S. district judge Jack Weinstein was the longest serving incumbent federal judge he was known for favoring lenient sentences in favor of rehabilitation after law school once you work for Thurgood Marshall at the end of a Lacy peak contributing research briefs to the landmark case brown versus board of education which struck down racial segregation in the

New York City Lyndon Johnson New York Daily News Jack Weinstein Thurgood Marshall Lacy Peak President Trump U. S.
What exactly are 'war powers' and why is Congress voting on them?

Weekend Edition Sunday

05:05 min | 9 months ago

What exactly are 'war powers' and why is Congress voting on them?

"The United States moves with me to translate into action the United Nations call to arms against the aggressor American occupation troops in Japan are hurried to the defense of the Korean Republic combat units of the United States Marine Corps arrive in Vietnam joining other marines already there the peak in the pattern was Lyndon Johnson's Gulf of Tonkin resolution in nineteen sixty four that led to the escalation of the Vietnam War last year act of aggression directly around persons okay brings home to all of us in the United States once a restaurant of the peace and security in Southeast Asia nearly a decade later as that conflict had stretched into another president's second term Congress rallied to reassert its constitutional role good evening the Congress of the United States in a historic action today made effective a limitation on the powers of the president to make war in nineteen seventy three democratic majorities in both chambers past the war powers resolution requiring the president to notify Congress within forty eight hours when troops were sent into harm's way that legislation also required president to end any foreign military action after sixty days unless Congress had declared war or passed an authorization for the use of military force a phrase that's come to be known as in a U. M. F. since then however the law has fallen short of its author's intent in part because presidents found ways to work around it and also because Congress has shown itself willing to follow the president's lead in matters of foreign conflict there's a new war this morning in the Persian Gulf a rock turns to blood shed to settle its oil price dispute with quite a different level of difficulty arose after Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein invaded his neighbor country of Kuwait in nineteen ninety this is the seventh week of operation desert shield and now they're about a hundred fifty thousand American military in the region and the number is growing every day president George H. W. bush deployed hundreds of thousands of US troops to the Persian Gulf region before Congress had taken a vote to authorize I know what it's like to have fallen comrades and see young kids die in battle and it's only the president it should be asked to make the decision Congress did authorize that use of force by relatively narrow margins in January of nineteen ninety one and the first Persian Gulf War began just days later since then we have seen presidents outmaneuver Congress again and again president Bill Clinton in the Balkans and later president Obama battling ISIS in Iraq and Syria president George W. bush called for two authorizations for the use of military force the first just days after the terror attacks of September eleventh two thousand one I was immediately approved military action against terrorists wherever they might be and bush soon send forces to Afghanistan good afternoon on my orders the United States military has begun strikes against al Qaeda terrorist training camps and military installations of the Taliban regime in Afghanistan the following year Congress debated and approved another authorization this one focusing on a rock the debate was emotional but in the end the vote empowering President Bush to go to war with Iraq was larger than the vote eleven years ago authorizing his father to take on Saddam Hussein one or both of these measures has been cited to justify it literally thousands of drone strikes and other military actions against those the US has labeled terrorists ever since it appears the US military has launched a missile strike in a rock including the one that killed Iranian commander customs money this month a revered Ronnie in general and one of the country's most powerful military leaders is considered by the you asked to be a terrorist president trump has often describe bush's two thousand three invasion and occupation of Iraq as quote the worst single mistake on quote in the history of US foreign policy but President Bush can at least argue he submitted his request to Congress before his invasion of Iraq began trump has yet to seek congressional approval for any of his actions in the Middle East very very nearly three thousand additional American troops have been ordered to the Middle East tonight at midnight and in the latest instance in the did not even inform congressional leaders of his plans other than via Twitter he said some of his opponents among the leaders in Congress could not be trusted with the information in that atmosphere of mutual distrust it is hard to see how the founding fathers ideal of shared powers could succeed in war making or any other aspect of national

United States
The Biggest Tech Flops of the Past Decade

The Tech Guy

05:20 min | 10 months ago

The Biggest Tech Flops of the Past Decade

"Here's the verges article. The eighty four biggest flops fails and dead dreams of the decade. INTECH think the biggest disappointment in tech doc really is Big Tech and the disappointment of you know twitter and facebook not really living living up to the promise the Internet in general not living up to the promise it offered at the beginning of the decade. We could safely say or reasonably say. Oh it's going to bring thus all together it's going to be the ultimate democratizing medium. Everybody will have a voice will be heard from and that turned. Got To be the big problem. Because everybody's being heard from the Internet's being used to Polarize us to some some degree right. Sometimes by outside forces I mean you can it be. Don't facebook just clobbered a bunch of accounts twitter to from you you know outside groups from China and Russia trying to influence our our internal discussions in the United States but also sometimes from inside forces you know out in a way. This is exactly what we thought would happen. That there are many different voices in the United States and some uh many of them are jarring to many of the other people. Right it's You didn't know your neighbors thought these crazy things right and And who's to say who's right or wrong. I mean I don't WanNa make a value judgment. You know the people right who agree with me. Obviously we all say I think if that's if you're going to pick a disappointment maybe this isn't such a disappointment. Maybe the Internet is a disappointment in one regard. Another regard. We're we are learning what our neighbors think it's not it's not a it's not the unified sought. We saw it. It was only because we lived in a bubble we. You know before the free flow of information I I would argue. There's this there's this whole notion Called the filter bubble got an ally pariser even wrote a book called the filter bubble and his premise. was that the Internet fosters kind of these bubbles of thought where you just read stuff that you agree with. I think it's kind of the opposite. I think that's what it was before the Internet before the Internet you made the magazines and newspapers. TV channels and and they kind of fostered a uniformity of sought. And there are some moments is very famous moment when Walter cronkite. The most trusted voice in news in But wins oops probably Late sixties now. I Guess Johnson was still president so it was So it must have been sixty seven or sixty six Walter cronkite finally on the CBS. Evening News said we can't win the war in Vietnam and the nation pivoted people. When Walter said it everybody in fact Lyndon Johnson very famously said well we've lost now off if we if we've lost Walter? We've lost everybody but that those are those are remarkable moments because they're so few so far between are they. At least they were in those days there was a uniformity of thought. And if Walter said something well the nation kind of pretty much went along now now. We're very fractious. Because every voice is heard he's had a bad thing well it's certainly not comfortable in the way that nineteen fifties America America was. It was very comfortable right. We all kind of well thought we thought we thought the same thing we didn't know it was all the stuff on the rocks. It was going on. It's never stopped going on. It's always go there. And now thanks the Internet's not under the rocks anymore. It's out there in the open. I suspect that's a good thing in the long run. There's no mysteries and secrets. And we don't have the illusion that we all agree on everything and you know what I th. I predict. I'm getting optimistic here. A hope you'll forgive. Let me but I keep seeing these stories the biggest flops. The end of the decade is just disappointing with the Internet. I I I held up this magazine and holding up a magazine radio silly. I hold this magazine up from the New York Times last month. That said so. The Internet didn't turn out the way we hoped that was that was the cover and then The whole supplement this week the flops and failures of the twenty tens. Maybe it isn't such a flop. Maybe in time we'll adjust and we'll understand yes. There are many kinds. There's your neighbors think differently than you do. Maybe be Certainly people in your state your county your city and certainly in the country they all have. There's many varying opinions of. Maybe we'll find a way to embrace that. It's just that we used to. We have this illusion that we all kind of agreed on stuff not anymore. They'll we'll have that illusion anymore. Do

Walter Cronkite Facebook Twitter Lyndon Johnson United States Intech Big Tech New York Times Vietnam CBS America President Trump China Russia
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

03:03 min | 10 months ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Lyndon Johnson was sworn in immediately the plane right after he was a Kennedy was declared dead was because there has to be a president yeah and worse so it was for a brief moment there was from from Kennedy stuff until the swearing in there was no president and I mean if if this whole thing has gotten to the point of thirty in terms of facts and Kelly and prediction about their alternative facts well currently there are alternate back but not in a court of law right now in a court of law and less and less and it thank heavens for our court because they have really made clear that they are standing up to the facts and the law and they're not ignoring it two would you like a historical fun facts regarding Lyndon Johnson before we go yes what is that he played a little bit of grab **** with my mom on the dance floor it is not two hands he will hand the LBJ my goodness gracious that wonderful well yeah no no me two times up back then well we'd about that in Watergate girl I know yes there are plenty of me to the way they had one on the radio that I I was on a show with a new defense lawyer for Donald Trump and just like you can name right no I mean and she she was very defense for like but she was also very fox news like folk over the host and didn't answer questions she said what she needed to say and wanted to say and then I was on with someone named Bobby on he who is the former New Jersey prosecutor and we were talking about the case for impeachment and he said well you know I I I actually know her and she's a nice girl and I I I never interrupt another gas but I did and I said I can't believe you just that they are they said what what should I have called her I said you should have called her a defense lawyer she is I said well she's a nice woman that's why I still have to step up from nice girl but it's not a step to where we need to be exact that's why he deals with shock that's what Joe's because ironically named Watergate girl after the seventies my foot it should not capture today thank you thank you happen to think of it like last week Dan Abrams so I was like stone Jill we're out of time I we always go too long because we love you so much wonder if you are perfect for every year that every era that girl reference you are timeless okay all right great talking to you too honey thanks Joe by she's warm this lady Lassie's lady she giggled at your little story there that was hysterical well it was one degree of Stephanie Miller separation well it's always.

Lyndon Johnson Kennedy one degree two hands
Runners battle 500 miles to raise awareness of veteran suicides

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

01:58 min | 11 months ago

Runners battle 500 miles to raise awareness of veteran suicides

"Two runners are braving the rain snow and injury on a five hundred mile journey from Cape Cod to Virginia the raising awareness for veterans who don't get the help they deserve the story from CBS's Errol Barnett marathon and Susie S. Brian church Lyndon Johnson millage are on the longest run of their lives five hundred miles in twelve days from Massachusetts national cemetery on Cape Cod to all international cemetery in Virginia that averaging more than forty miles a day we got a twenty to go rating rain snow and injury to raise awareness of veteran suicide we caught up with them in Philadelphia so you want to do something outrageous something people would stop yes what is the response been so I've been fantastic it's it seated anything that we thought would happen church Linden Milledge a using that passion for running to raise money for mission twenty two a nonprofit organization providing treatment to veterans suffering from posttraumatic stress and to a veteran sitting out there watching from home who has been struggling what would you say it's okay to not be okay and no one's going to judge you for feeling the way that you do seventeen veterans commit suicide every day in the U. S. more than six thousand lives lost a year former Indiana army national guardsman Brian Westerfield who served in Iraq was almost one of them what was it that made you contemplate suicide why gets all the failures over and over again I stayed on hold for so long hi I didn't see a way out Westerfield is now helping mission twenty two counsel of the vets he's also backing church Linden millage on their mission to spread hello there's people out there that need to hear this message and it's worth every ounce of pain that we're experiencing these two weeks giving it their role to make sure no one runs life's course

Cape Cod Virginia CBS Massachusetts National Cemeter Philadelphia Linden Milledge Brian Westerfield Iraq Errol Barnett Susie S. Brian Lyndon Johnson Indiana Army Twelve Days Two Weeks
The Mission Act looks to give more healthcare options to veterans

All Things Considered

05:24 min | 1 year ago

The Mission Act looks to give more healthcare options to veterans

"We're going to spend the next few minutes talking about something that we don't often see in washington these days a bill that passed congress with overwhelming bipartisan support it's called the mission act and starting this week it will bring big changes to the department of veterans affairs particularly when it comes to health care the law expands the number of veterans who qualify for private care that is reimbursed by v._a. today i spoke with the secretary of veterans affairs robert wilkie and he told me the number of veterans seeking healthcare outside the v._a. has actually gone down recently so i asked the secretary if that's the case how many people does he expect to take advantage of this expansion i don't see that large arise the way the system is set up is that the veteran will come to us we will tell him that we cannot provide a service and because he lives outside a certain number of minutes from v._a. facility and we're telling him that the wait time is greater than twenty days then he has the option of going into the private sector as you know critics are afraid that this is a move towards privatising v._a. healthcare explain why you disagree with view well just presented a two hundred twenty billion dollar budget a budget that also calls for an employee base of three hundred ninety thousand ten years ago the budget was ninety eight billion and we had two hundred eighty thousand employees so if we're going about privatizing this we're going about it in very strange way but on its surface doesn't expanding eligibility for private care constitute a shift away from government provided health care whether or not this is part of as critics would accuse some kind of trojan horse larger project well no not if you read the mission act my goal is to provide the best possible healthcare because it's not only the right thing to do but the congress said it right there in the legislation and because of the nature of our patient base people like my father suffered terrible combat wounds cambodia there's nothing in the private sector that is going to understand or take care of someone who has suffered that kind of trauma in battle there's just no other place like i'd like to talk about another important topic which is expanding efforts to prevent veteran suicide the v._a. has had this is the highest clinical priority something like twenty veterans die each day by suicide and this number has for the most part been pretty consistent why after years of making this a priority hasn't the v._a. been able to make a real improvement in this area well i don't think the country has made it a priority i've said that we need a national conversation on mental health homelessness in addiction you're in charge of the v._a. so let's talk about what the v._a.'s doing yeah well the v._a. has got very specific programs every veteran who comes to us gets a mental health screening every veteran who comes to us has same day mental health services so why haven't the numbers improved here's the problem all of these cases are not related give you an example fourteen of the twenty take their lives are veterans that we have no contact with a couple are on active duty several are on guard and reserve duty and never deployed and the bulk are from the vietnam era lyndon johnson left washington d._c. fifty years ago in january and many of these problems have been brewing ever since that time so we're not going to be able to get these numbers erased but we have to change the culture that we start training troops from the time they get into boot camp to the time they leave not only on their own mental health but to see signs in their buddies and also say veterans crisis line get seventeen hundred calls a day of those seventeen hundred we act on two to three hundred calls where we send people out and we get those veterans help does the have enough mental health providers right now well we are in the same position the united states is in we were able to hire thirty nine hundred mental health professionals last year i think n._p._r.'s covered the fact that most of our medical schools are sending their students into the most expensive specialties out there and v._a. i just as the rest of america sucks secretary wilkie the last thing i would like to ask you about is surprising moment that happened on the campaign trail recently where congressman seth monta massachusetts he's a veteran running for the democratic nomination did four combat tours in iraq and at a campaign event last week he spoke very frankly and openly about his experience with this is what he told n._p._r. about that moment now applying to leave the country and i think it'd be different anyways not to lead by example and share my own story about my own struggle with the issues what's your reaction to seeing this kind of an honest conversation happening in a form as prominent as a presidential campaign well it is about time it is about time we are seeing a generational shift in the armed forces of the united states where we finally talk about these things we don't hide them the military is a conservative institutions for many reasons and one of them is it takes a long time to change but the more we hear voices like this the more we talk about it i think will be in a much better

Washington Three Hundred Ninety Thousand Two Hundred Twenty Billion Dol Fifty Years Twenty Days
Trump kicks off his first state visit to the UK

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Trump kicks off his first state visit to the UK

"President Trump's been greeted by the Queen at Buckingham Palace to kick off his state visit to the United Kingdom and let's go there live now to CBS news. Correspondent Steven Portnoy in London. Stephen good morning. And what can you tell us so far about the president's visit fellow so far? We've seen the president first lady being greeted by the Queen of England Queen Elizabeth ninety three years old. You know, there's only one president that she has not met with over the sixty seven years. She's reigned over the United Kingdom and that was Lyndon Johnson, but every other president she has met and she's meeting right now with president and MRs Trump, the president was greeted by Prince Charles and Camilla's. They got off Marine One. The president's spec an honor guard British troops as so the Royal family is regaling. Trump's with all of the pageantry that the British monarchy can offer tonight, a state dinner here outside on the streets of London. Thousands of protesters were expected to show how unwelcome the president is here. And as Air Force One landed the president had a message for the mayor of this city said, eek con called him a stone cold loser that after con- called, Mr. Trump a threat to democracy. And by the way, the president said that mayor con reminded him of mayor de Blasio, only what half the height. I think was the other part of that tweet something like that. I also saw Steve Mnuchin along the trip and it's very important giving looming Brexit that the US and Britain have a good, solid trade relationship. This trip is a mix of ceremony and substance and trade direct free trade between the US and the UK may come up. It's certainly something. The President Trump would like to see a free trade agreement struck between the two countries, especially in the wake of Brexit. If the UK. E U trading relationship might decline. The presence as the US is ready to step up and step in as a really strong trading partner of the, you're the, the United Kingdom. One of the things it's very interesting here is the extent to which the president has directly inserted himself into British politics. He's meeting tomorrow with Theresa May. He's already said that Boris Johnson would be an excellent successor to her as the leader of the

President Trump United Kingdom United States Steven Portnoy London Buckingham Palace Marine One Queen Elizabeth Mayor De Blasio Boris Johnson Stephen Lyndon Johnson Theresa May CBS Queen Of England UK Brexit Air Force
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

11:28 min | 1 year ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on KPCC

"This is one eight I'm Todd's willington Washington just rejection is on assignment in the Senate chamber on Capitol Hill here in Washington in the gallery. Overlooking the Senate floor there's a place just for journalists who report on the Senate every day. It's where they go to watch the big history-making moments. The votes that send us to war or enact a healthcare law on a desk above where the Senator stand. There's a book that sits like a fixture. It's a permanent reference for understanding what's really going on below. It's a biography. It's the story of Lyndon Johnson. And how he used power to bend. The Senate to his will and become the greatest majority leader in history. Master of the Senate one poet's surprise in two thousand three for its author. Robert Caro in eleven hundred pages Carro uses president Johnson to explore how power Crete's how it's used and the impact of that power on the everyday lives of Americans. It's one installment in the series. The years of Lyndon Johnson Carro was already a Pulitzer prize winner for his thirteen hundred page nineteen seventy four biography about New York infrastructure mogul, Robert Moses, it's called the powerbroker cowers fans. Now eagerly await the last installment of the Johnson books all about the presidential years, the sixties civil rights and Vietnam. In the meantime, Robert carrot is out with the new much shorter book, it's called working, and it's all about the interviews the discipline, and the method that have helped Robert Caro in thrall his fans for decades Robert Carroll joins me now from NPR in New York mister car. Welcome to one A. Nice to be here. Very nice to have you, sir. I know that people constantly ask you when the final LBJ book is going to be finished. And and I promise you're going to be spared that here, I'm not going to ask you that give you a break from that perennial question. Even though you never give your sources of break from your perennial questions. That's okay. The years of Lyndon Johnson have been a forty year plus project for you in Robert Moses, many years before that when you were a young reporter there. There are lots of people with real power in this society. What drew you to these two powerful men? Well, I was a young journalist that was a political reporter. And I got interested in Robert Moses, I started to realize we live in a democracy. So we think that power comes from being elected for votes at the ballot box. But here was ago. I Robert Moses who had never been elected to anything, and he had more power than anyone who was elected more power than any mayor more than any governor more. More than any mayor in governor put together and he had held this power for forty four years. And with it. He shaped New York all the highways the modern bridges, the porks. And I said, I don't understand I'm supposed to be writing about political power. But I have no idea where he got this power. And I realized that that anybody else, and I realized that have to write a book to try to find out what it was that. I didn't understand what it was. And to explain a similar impulse for Lyndon Johnson. Well, by in a way, similar. So the power broker you could say is about urban power power and cities, then I wanted to do national power. And I learned I hoped with the powerbroker that if you pick the right man, you could show a lot about political power through his life. And I knew I wanted to do national power next. And I knew I wanted to do it through Lyndon Johnson because I felt his life. He understood national power. I felt I could do a lot through his life of you mentioned those early days as a young reporter a young political reporter when you looked up from your daily deadlines in your daily stories and realized wait power is important. And and why does this unelected man have so much of it? You got your start as a beat reporter at Newsday on Long Island to take me. Take me back. If you can how do you remember those days in the clattering teletype in the grumpy editors in the newsroom, you know? I. I love being reporter, then as you say the newsroom was full of shouting back and forth. I work nights for awhile. I think by hours seven thirty at night to three thirty in the morning. And if you look around the room about three o'clock, you sort everybody with the headsets on and you knew they were making dates for when they got off at three thirty. You could tell who is dating who by who is torturing the headset, and who who is listening, but I had an editor who is like an old out of the front page days in Chicago, tough old guy named Alan halfway. I had never done any kind of investigative work in through a real accident. The meaning everyone else who's on the Newsday picnic on fire island one could get them on the telephone. Because this was guess about nineteen sixty six sixty seven no one had cell phones. And a tip came in a very important story. We're working on they couldn't get any of the regular investigative reporter. So finally, the editor said to me you'll have to go down and do it. It was looking through files secret files that was suddenly being made available to us at the Federal Aviation agency at Idyllwild airport late at Kennedy airport, and I went down. I just loved the. But I didn't know that. I knew what I was doing. I wrote a long memo for so that the real reporters who came in later could write the story and the next day. The this old guy secretary he was managing editor calls and says Allen wants to season Allen halfway she says island wants to see right away. I said to my wife, I I'm glad we didn't move about to be fired. And I went in there, and he was reading my memo, and he looks up at me. And he says, I didn't know someone from Princeton could do digging like this from now on you do investigative work. Todd with my usual southwe fair times. Like, I said, but I don't know anything about investigative work. And I remember he looked up at me for a very long time. And he said just remember one thing turn every page. Never assume anything turn regard them page. And I think I've carried that advice in my head of since you get a byline on that story on the. You ask the right question. No, I didn't. You remember who did? No. Well, I. The two reporters who were covering most of this will Bob green in on Brophy. But I don't know who's lying on. They probably oh, you a bigger than maybe even they would acknowledge their later years. I wonder since they were at the company picnic, and and you for the first time turned every page that was advice. And you you write about this in the book that that was advice that has stuck with you throughout your entire career. Turn every page assume nothing always get the next interview read, the next document. That's a moment. It's pretty clear that has that has never left you. No, I I wish I could recount all the times that that advice has proven just right? I mean, I could tell you one incident. Diana, the Johnson library. Your course, you can't turn every page. They're they're there. They say they have forty five million pieces of paper there. And I believe that I believe that if they go on endlessly. But I decided to look in the boxes of papers that related to his first three years in congress because I wanted to paint the picture of what are what the life of the young new congressman was Johnson came to congress at the age of twenty nine without any power. So I'm I said, okay. That's what ever was I think Levin twelve boxes I can handle that it's going to take time. And I'm looking I and you look through these papers, these letters, and memos and all and you see oh, something happened. And it happened in October nineteen forty before October nineteen forty this young congressman is writing letters to committee chairmen and senior congressman basically saying can I have five minutes of Utah after election day nineteen. Thousand forty November fifth nineteen forty all of a sudden a lot of the letters from these more powerful congressman to this young congressman saying can I have five minutes of your time. And I said what changed things around at that time. I was a talking a lot interviewing a lot to an old Washington fixer sort of a legend in his time. Thomas corcoran. They call them. Tommy, the cork the greatest fundraiser in history, they call them. And I said to him what happened in October nineteen forty and I remember he called me kid, and he said money could money, but he said you're never going to be able to write about that kid. I said why not he said because Lyndon Johnson never put anything in writing. And I really believed that at the time. But I said I'm gonna look through, you know, turn every page in this ten or eleven boxes. And I'm sitting there turning one letter innocuous letter after another thinking, you know, I'm just wasting another three or four weeks in my life. And all of a sudden he did put something in writing there. It is. It's a Western Union. Telegraph form from Tova thirteenth nineteen forty. It's from George Brown, Brown and root this huge Texas contracting firm that was really financing his early rise. And it said Linden. The checks are on the way and Linden had written in hand on the bottom. I'm not acknowledging their letters were said telling anyone about this. So thank them yourselves. But the names of the six people were in there. It will Brown root subcontractors, and I was able to cross reference into their files and find out that they were all sending this money to Johnson. And what was he doing with the money? I kept turning pages. And there was a list type by one of his secretaries fascinating list, it with to type columns in the left tank, which one of the most amazing documents taught I've ever seen in the left hand type column was the name of the congressman who were asking Lyndon Johnson for money in the central column was what they were at how much they were asking. And what they were asking it for him outs. They were asking with sociable. Today's terms Linden need four hundred fifty dollars for last minute advertising Linden. They're going to steal at the polls. I need seven hundred dollars for poll watch and Linden deciding who gets largest and who does not. Yes. In the way. He did it Mr. let's, let's take a brief breath. And we'll come right back to this story. More with Robert Caro right after this on Robert Caro's career of doing.

Lyndon Johnson Robert Caro Robert Moses reporter congressman national power Lyndon Johnson Carro Senate Linden Johnson New York Washington Todd investigative reporter Pulitzer prize Senator Robert carrot Vietnam fire island
Washington's Inslee puts climate change at center of presidential bid

Science Friday

11:40 min | 1 year ago

Washington's Inslee puts climate change at center of presidential bid

"It's been said that nothing is stronger than an idea whose time has come and for my next guest. Washington state governor Jay Inslee that idea is climate change. And that idea is time has come he staked his run for the White House in twenty twenty on what he calls America's climate mission. And his campaign platform says that quote, defeating climate change is the defining challenge of our time. And that it must be the foremost priority for the next president. That's a bold statement considering that climate change was practically a non issue in the last presidential election. There were no specific questions about climate policy in the debates, and according to the environmental new site, grist only, five minutes and twenty seven seconds were spent talking about climate change across all three presidential debates. That's two percent of the total talking time. So has the tide turned. Is the American public ready for a candidate who embraces this issue? That's what we're going to be talking about on our question to you listeners. How important is climate change compared to other national issues when it comes to winning your vote in the next presidential election on eight four four seven two four eight two five five eight four four scientific you can tweet us at scifi governor Jay Inslee as governor of Washington state. He's jumped into the pool of democratic presidential candidates for twenty twenty welcome to sign Friday governor, you bet it's the best day of the week. Thank you. Happy Friday because of you. Complimentary. Get you everywhere you've been called a single issue candidate. Would you disagree with that name? Yes. Because climate change is not a single issue. It's all issues. It's a matter of saving our economic assets where we had one point six billion dollars in lost because of leading west on the downside. The upside it's the number one job creator in United States in the next several decades clean energy jobs today are going twice as fast as the rest of the economy. The number one job fastest growing jealous. Today's solar installer. Never to wind turbine technician. So it is as much an economic promise as it is an environmental peril. It's a health issue. Look, it's with the thousands of our kids are suffering from from fossil fuel pollution, increasing the range of infectious diseases because of insect vectors loss of life during during hurricanes and heat waves. It's a national security issue. We know that the Trump is trying. To ignore the clear warnings from the Pentagon, and our intelligence services that this is a national security threat because we know that increasing droughts have potential to drive mass migrations with consequent political instability in violence. So it's not just a single issue is all of the issues, and is one that we have no more opportunities. This is our last chance. And when I've learned when he was governor as I've been for six years in the most successful economy in the United States you need to make priority decisions. It's one of the first functions leadership, and what I am saying is defeating climate change has to be the first foremost and term on duty of the next semester. Ration- because it is our last chance if you look at the clearest science fi report, it is becoming quite obvious that we've gotta move right now. Someone so much of the impacts of climate change that you were taking off there also seem to be included in the the green new deal that is working its way debating through congress, would you if you were still serving in congress, would you have your name among its co-sponsors? I think this has been a welcome development. I wrote a book accosted a book in two thousand seven that basically set out a vision for economic growth round clean energy. So I really welcome a wet. This is done to light up interest in this as as you indicated it's really important to get climate change on people's radar stope, and this has been very successful getting into the national conversation. It's also been very successful raising the scope of people's ambition. This cannot be just a check the box kind of issue. It has to be dominant organizing principle, the United States and insert. It's it's engaged. More communities in this discussion marginalize means frontline community just color in poverty that was the first victims of climate change. And so it's made clear something I believe that. As we go through this transition to decarbonised economy and a clean energy economy. We have to make this not. Just the transition. It has to be just transitioned so everyone can participate. So now, we start the heavy work at hard work of developing the policies that hopefully will follow what we've done in Washington right now, we're of beating the efforts in Washington state. And I hope we keep that that ball rolling. So how do you answer people who say addressing climate change is is too expensive? Or they want to take your hamburgers away from you. Well, I just say baloney. You know, I was having a discussion with big McCain of you a couple of weeks ago, and she was seeing exactly that. But, you know, Democrats take away your planes and your your railroads in your car. And I said, well, that's interesting Megan because as of this moment, I had a shiny blue General Motors all electric bowl. It was made by the American workers and Oreo on Michigan. And that's the type of destiny that we have. Usually, we'll have a president to unite the edgy nations in the innate can-do optimistic spirit of the American people to grow our economy around clean energy. We know we are capable of doing this. Because we've done we've done it so many times before whenever there has been a technological transformation. United States has been able to lead if we have leadership to get us going in. If I'm giving us Highlander I would intend to provide that that spark of leadership just to like John F Kennedy did when. When I was, you know, ten or eleven years of anything, and I believe with the spark of creativity ambition America can do that kind of thing again. But do you think that you know, I remember the Kennedy years? I remember the challenge they go to the moon. I remember Lyndon Johnson taking it over. I remember landing on the moon during the Nixon administration. This was a generational and decade long effort. Do we have that kind of political muscle now to see something through that we could change a whole society? Yes. Not only do we. But we have to have that. You know, what I think victory is the only option here Churchill in World War Two. So sure victory. You said it's really simple. It's only option because without victory. There's no survival. And that is the situation that we have to realize today if we follow science, and we we are scientifically literate nation. We deserve a scientifically literate president. And we have a scientifically illiterate person in that office right now who couple of days ago said that wind turbines cause cancer for goodness sakes. And that if we wind turbines, you won't be able to run your television here, we are going to Konami in my state. We've developed the best economy in the United States in part because we focused on clean energy. We have focused on science in. When you do those two things. Good things happen. Not only to your health. To prevent your force from burning down. And by the way, this is very personal to me 'cause I've met the victims of climate change. I was in paradise California a few months ago, and you know, this town of twenty five thousand people that was burned to the ground looks like a post apocalypse movie in Hollywood, I remember meeting a woman named Marsha. Moss in in seminal springs community about one hundred mobile homes burned. She lost everything. She wanted us to to do something about climate change to produce these forest. Fires. And I think we need a president that will do just that. So yes, I do believe we we the company's ready. And I and I believe that park is pulling in shooting Iowa one of our democratic voters. So I'm happy to the just in time at the right moment. He yet carbon pricing ballot initiative failed in your own state in the last election for the second time another pricing initiative failed in two thousand sixteen. What do these failures mean to you are, you know, are people still not getting it? I think what they show is that we have to be willing to use the most powerful Newell fuel in the country, and that's perseverance, and we have to use perseverance, and we have to use a multiple tools in the toolbox carbon pricing system is one of them with. Fortunately, there are dozens of others. And so we are we are now addressing I'm promoting five bills in my legislature, all of which are moving forward one of which would would guarantee Washingtonians of one hundred percent, clean electrical grid, another that would provide us with clean fuel standards. So we have cleaner transportation fuels and other that would require net of euro commercial building. So we don't waste energy another that will have an incentive program. So more people not just you know, wealthier people, but more people have access to the cars and the like, so we know there's a. Multiple ways to go forward on this. And we're doing this in my state, and I think we have to have the same attitude inner nation, we can do that. If we have a president who's both knowledge of what these things and has had a multi decay. Oh commitment as I've had I've been at this year over twenty years now into some of the first legislation in two thousand three I started the US climate alliance with governor Jerry Brown, we know twenty three states or moving forward. I think this is a good sign, by the way for those. Who question our ability to move forward? This organization that I helped start now twenty three states that are committed to defeating climate change. So and we did this in part because we wanted to world to know they're still intelligent life in the United States. And we've demonstrated that it's one of the reasons that the rest of the world is continuing to move forward. So there is reason for optimism because we know there's there's many ways to to build the clean energy. And we're doing that right here in my state. Let's go to the phones. Eight four four seven two four two five five. Let's go to Ames Iowa. Joe? I welcome to science Friday. Hi, thank you. You know, I think it's really points out of a real flaw. We have in our election system every four years. I see all of these politicians come to Iowa, and they speak at these forums put on by our agriculture powerhouses, all of them speak in favour of everything. That has to do with, you know, animal agriculture ethanol all of these things that really cause global warming and all of them are scared to death to speak out against anything to do with animal agriculture because they know that the farm bureau is other powerful egg this will sink in that even goes, I mean, it's it's completely true for the Republican party.

United States President Trump Iowa America Washington State Jay Inslee White House Washington Twenty Twenty John F Kennedy Lyndon Johnson Nixon Administration Congress Michigan
The climate change lawsuit that could stop the US government from supporting fossil fuels

60 Minutes

04:21 min | 1 year ago

The climate change lawsuit that could stop the US government from supporting fossil fuels

"Than Juliana versus the United States to quote, one federal judge. This is no ordinary lawsuit. It was filed back in two thousand fifteen on behalf of a group of kids who were trying to get the courts to block the US government from continuing the use of fossil fuels they say it's causing climate change endangering their future in violating their constitutional rights to life liberty and property when the lawsuit began hardly anyone took it seriously, including the government's lawyers who have sensed watched the supreme court rejected two of their motions to delay or dismissed the case for years in it is still very much alive in part because the plaintiff. So the master body of evidence that will surprise even the skeptics in a force the governor. To admit that the crisis is real. The case was born here in Eugene, Oregon, a tree huggers paradise and one of the cradles of environmental activism in the United States. The lead plaintiff university of Oregon student. Kelsey Juliana was only five weeks old winter parents took her to her first rally to protect spotted owls today. Her main concern is climate change drought and the growing threat of wildfires in the surrounding cascade mountains there has wildfire season. That was so intense. We advised not to go outside that particular matter in the smoke was literally off the charts. I mean, it was so bad. It was it was passed severe in terms of danger health in new that's because of plummet change. That's what scientists tell me. It's not just scientists even the federal government. Now knowledge is in its response to the lawsuit that the effects of. Climate change are already happening and likely to get worse, especially for young people who will have to deal with them for the long term important as this case to you. This case is everything this is the climate case, we have everything to lose if we don't act on climate change right now my generation and all the generations to come. Okay. She was keen when the lawsuit was filed and the oldest of Twenty-one plaintiffs. They come from ten different states all claim to be affected or threatened by the consequences of climate change. The youngest Levi dre Heim is in sixth grade here eleven years old and you're suing the United States government. That's not what most eleven year olds do, right. He's lived most of his life on the beaches of a barrier island in Florida. That's a mile wide in barely above sea limb. What's your biggest fear about this aisle? I fear that I won't have a home here in the future that the island will be going. Yeah. That the island will be underwater because of change. So you feel like you've got a stake in this. Yes. That department of Justice will were recruited from environmental groups across the country by Julia Olsen, an Oregon lawyer and the executive director of a nonprofit legal organization called our children's trust. She began constructing the case eight years ago out of the Spartan space now dominated by this paper diorama that winds its way through the office to what is this. This is a time line that we put together documents what in win past US administration's knew about the connection between. Clean fossil fuels and climate change. The time line goes back fifty years beginning with the presidency of Lyndon Johnson during president Johnson's administration. They issued a report nineteen sixty five that talked about climate change being a catastrophic threat, whether it was a democrat or a Republican office Olsen says there was an awareness of the potential dangers of carbon dioxide emissions. Every president knew that burning fossil fuels was causing climate change. Fifty years of evidence has been a mass by Olson enter team thirty six thousand pages

Kelsey Juliana United States Oregon University Of Oregon Levi Dre Heim Lyndon Johnson Eugene Julia Olsen President Trump Department Of Justice Olson Florida Executive Director Eleven Years Fifty Years Eight Years Eleven Year
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on AM Joy

AM Joy

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on AM Joy

"Politicians race is the is the original sin to quote, Condoleeza Rice of this country born in slavery. So how do voters process all of that if north? What his case he's trying to make a good governor that he's a progressive governor. And he should be allowed to hang on. Because the history of the countries that have been a lot of raises politicians in both parties. Joy, it goes back to a word I've used over and over and over again, and that's moral authority there. I mean, sure you try to do the right thing and push through good policies. But if people don't feel you have the Marla authority to even hold the office that you have how much good works. Will you be able to do the Democratic Party of president Lyndon Johnson is completely different than the Democratic Party of today and the Democratic Party of Lyndon Johnson? As Republicans are always, you know, they love pointing out the fact that it was Democrats who were the ones who were standing in the way of civil rights legislation and were the racist segregationists of time. But that was fifty years ago. The party has changed the cu-. Country has changed and governor north them is the governor of state that figures prominently figured prominently in the confederacy and slavery. He's a party that has the most diverse. The most diverse candidates running for the presidential nomination problem in this country's history. He ran a campaign for governor against Republican Republican challenger who was once believed to be a mainstream traditional Republican who instead ran a Trumpian racial dog whistle campaign..

Democratic Party Condoleeza Rice Lyndon Johnson Trumpian president fifty years
A look at the Trump presidency

The Economist Radio

07:22 min | 1 year ago

A look at the Trump presidency

"Is the pow that Donald Trump tests. I think what Donald Trump is testing. Now is that he's been able to get the Republicans in congress to do the things that they wanted to do, and perhaps he is well, the tax cut the deregulation, the supreme court appointments, but he's testing a power. That the public themselves in the end are the ones that are the big biggest check on the congress and on the courts and on the presidency and right now the approval rating of Donald Trump is is the lowest any president has been. And I think it's in part not because he hasn't accomplished many of the things that a lot of people feel are good. But because there has been a toxic culture created people feel anxious people feel the moorings are being undone that traditions norms are being violated and after a while the people will speak. I mean, they spoke pretty strongly in the midterm elections. I'm even though he kept the Senate which most people assumed he would given the structural balance. The Senate had he lost pretty big in the house. And and he hasn't accepted the loss really in some ways. Which is a problem. If he did he might say, how can I change now? So that I can reach out to the other side. And maybe he will maybe we'll get infrastructure. Maybe we'll get something for the dreamers. Maybe we'll get this criminal Justice reform. And I'm hoping that I'm hoping that that will will make the two sides come together in a better way. I wonder if if you don't reading the midterms wrong, I'm just going to make you flat-out challenge on that won't turn out was high. You could argue his reinvigorates is the electricity. We had happen to democratic stress just into lake on his show not long ago saying yes, Democrats took back the house. But if you look across the races, it doesn't look like the Trump machine is coming to a standstill in any way. Indeed. The take way might be Donald Trump is now definitely gonna go on all things behavioral and run again in twenty twenty rather than this being a great mid Tom's or you show, you're not trading too, much to woods wishful thinking possibly possibly. I might be. I mean, it's hard to predict anything when you know. I like everybody else never assumed that Hillary Clinton wasn't going to win. So it makes you much more vulnerable to making predictions. I think that the most important thing that happened in the midterms, and this has nothing to do with party necessarily is that the fact so many people came out. I mean young people voting five hundred percent more than in the previous midterms more. Women running for election from all sorts of parts of the lives that had never been in politics before. That's that's a really hopeful sign is that thanks to Donald Trump at possibly could be. I mean, I think the interest in politics has been increased because of Donald Trump, and that's a very good thing. Whether or not it produces him again or whether it produces somebody against him when the citizens get awakened. That's when things happen in the country. I mean when I look back at the times when change happened. It was the anti slavery movement that did it all Lincoln said not his leadership alone. It was the progressive movement in the cities and states long before FDR an and teddy Roosevelt became president that allowed that some of the regulations that could deal with the industrial revolution. And of course, it was the civil rights movement that allowed LBJ to do the civil rights Bill in the voting rights Bill. So we need a political revolution in our country. Something's not working well with the system. The congressional lines are being drawn gerrymandering this too much money in politics. There's a sense that as. Teddy Roosevelt said the rock of democracy will break when people in different regions and different parties and different races begin to feel themselves as the other. So somehow that's been happening long before trunk the polarization in the country people in the rural areas feeling cut off from the city's people who are working class people feeling that the elites haven't handled them. Well, they don't have the right educational system. They haven't had mobility those are deep cultural problems that he hasn't created that were there. And so the question the question will be will leader rise that can heal those divisions. And so far, he hasn't healed them. The question will be where does the country go and twenty twenty if such a leader arises, we don't know who that later will be I must ask you about impeachment who spectra of postal impeachment hanging over the presidency. Not least because you have a sort of strong personal echo. Here. Think is a young stone for you route two piece in the new Republic and Johnson entitled how to dump Lyndon Johnson. I understand it. Career impeaching president the autumn of put you off impeaching another will. Well, no what I meant by. That was that. I was hoping this was written in nineteen sixty seven when I became a White House fellow and I'd written an article for the new Republic with a friend of mine, and we were simply saying how to remove Lyndon Johnson. From office was to create a party that would run against him in nineteen sixty eight rather wishful thinking, it would be made up of women minorities poor people and. Opposable strategy fool the Democrats on the left. Do you recognize that I do indeed? But I think that in some ways I think it would be a big mistake for impeachment to start. I mean, the Democrats have to know that whatever Muller comes up with the Senate will not go along with the impeachment. And I think it's much better to just educate the people, let them feel and change their mind about him suppose Muller comes up with obstruction of Justice or even collusion. Then you just let the people absorb that information. It would be a big mistake for them to move in an impeachment direction. It'll just fire the base of Trump, and then he will be able to say this is a witch hunt. So that I think they should just keep their heads down. They should do their investigations, but they should try and get as much done as they can even if it contributes to the benefit of the Republicans to get some of these things pass it'll be good for the country. So that's changing your thinking of fifty years. I think you become a little bit more practical. But no, even then I was wanting them to re unelected him not necessarily impeach him. Fair point just a closing from you what kind of presidency regardless of who runs. Oh gets elected. But what cut presence, you do you think will result from Donald Trump having been in the White House while the question will be does the next president have to have that kind of celebrity entertainment value. So that he becomes a figure who's part of your lives. I mean in some ways if I thought about who could come back now that could most challenge President Trump. It would be teddy Roosevelt because he was a person who people would follow him when he was on stage as he was in center stage. I mean, they said about him. He wanted to be the baby at the baptism and the bride at the wedding and the corpse at the funeral. He hungered for that stage as Trump does. And there's something charismatic about that people are drawn to that. It's like a kid drawn to a circus. And the question will be doing need that person today in our social media entertainment world, or could it be Oprah presidency? That's. Wrecked. How you feel about it? Well, I think not only Oprah. But now, there's also it's a sports stars and movie stars think, oh, I can become president. If this person became president without political experience. I think it's a problem to get into public life without political experience, or at least leadership experience. I mean, I can see a big businessman whose really led hundreds of thousands of people in a company overseas coming in and having had the experience of building a team and all those human qualities, but to just pop in from some other field where you haven't been a leader. But you've simply been a celebrity. I think would be a problem if that's the lesson taken from this doors. Thank you very much. Joining us. Thank

President Trump Donald Trump Teddy Roosevelt Senate Lyndon Johnson Congress Hillary Clinton FDR Muller White House White House Fellow Lincoln Twenty Twenty Woods TOM
New immunotherapy drug showing promise for aggressive type of breast cancer

Weekend Edition Sunday

13:29 min | 2 years ago

New immunotherapy drug showing promise for aggressive type of breast cancer

"To many almost a symbol of the corruption and patronage that has held Afghanistan back, and it was really interesting to see election observers at the polls there were four hundred thousand of them many of them there to support their own candidates to make sure that they're candidates got a fair shake in these elections. The fact that so many young people and non-politicians we're willing to put themselves out there. I think shows that there's a new generation of Afghans trying to change things. And just briefly what does it signify that the vote was held after so very long. It's always important to remind people. This is a country in conflict a conflict that the United States is involved in it is and there was a lot of controversy about whether this vote should be held at all. But Afghan officials were adamant and international officials were adamant that they were going forward with this vote. And I think today they might be happy with their decision. More than three million of eight point eight million registered voters coming out there. Trying to show that the that Afghantistan is making progress as it battles insurgents around the country. The Taliban are resurgent Islamic state was against the vote and yet still Afghans came out to exercise their civil rights that is Jennifer gloss in Kabul. Thank you so much great to talk to you. Thousands of Central American migrants are at Mexico's southern border with water Malla that's some fifteen hundred miles from Mexico's border with the United States. But President Trump says he'll end regional US aid, send troops and cancel appending trade agreement with Mexico if the migrants reached the United States, this isn't the first time Trump is used aid is a political lever targeting Central America. But how effective are those threats? And will they have unintended consequences? Joining us now is Andrew Natsios. He was a former administrator for the United States agency for international development or USA ID under President, George W Bush, welcome to the program. Good morning. So the US says it's working with Central American countries and Mexico to help them address issues such as governance and rule of law, democracy and food security, it provides a lot of aid to these troubled countries. What happens if the United States cut off that aid? It's interesting their programs to grow their economies. So that people won't have a motivation to leave there. Countries that the principal reason. People migrate particularly in Central America is for better jobs and a better life for economic reasons and the trigger that usually sets them off in terms of their journey. To the United States to the border is gang violence in. So if you can reduce gang violence and increase economic growth in these countries than the motivation to leave their countries toward the United States will diminish and took to cancel those programs means they're putting the American people at risk. When you look at how US aid has been deployed in the past. You know, often presidents see it as a two prong strategy. Right. You on the one hand, you might use enforcement, you might use other sort of more direct methods of trying to influence other nations. But on the other hand, they also use aid. They use aid usually in a more positive way. In other words, if we ever an ally of ours, it's unstable or it's under attack by terrorists groups or by neighboring power, that's hostile the United States. Then we will try to strengthen them. There are instances historically in the last seventy years in both Republican and democratic administrations where presidents have threatened to cut off aid. President Trump is not the first one to do that Lyndon Johnson cancel food aid to India in the middle of a food emergency in the nineteen sixties because they were neutral in the Cold War, and he was annoyed with him. So we cancelled the shipments. But I don't recall President Bush or. Clinton or President Obama actually threatened to cut off aid. If countries didn't do it because negative incentives don't tend to work that. Well, full disclosure, you sit on the advisory board for an aide contractor in Central America. What do you say to critics who say US aid has been ineffective that despite all this money? People are still fleeing to the United States an aid program is not going to stop political forces that are dysfunctional or trying to destabilise countries in Central America. That's not the purpose of the program. That's for the defense department and the CIA and the White House to deal with in State Department. This president has been pretty open though about operating in a transactional manner. He recently said at the United Nations in New York few give anything to us. And that is why we are taking a hard look at US foreign assistance. He's made it clear that he doesn't really believe in aid is a tool of American interests. Well, actually, if he didn't I think he just propose abolishing. Or the State Department's programs is he transactional. Yes. He is. And I think these threats don't look at the actual reality of what's going on. That was Andrew Natsios. He is now executive professor at the Bush school of government and public service at Texas. Am university. Thank you so much. Thank you very much.

United States President Trump Central America President Bush Andrew Natsios Mexico United Nations Afghanistan Taliban State Department Kabul Water Malla Texas Principal CIA Am University Jennifer Gloss White House
Who Gets Credit For The Booming US Economy?

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

03:24 min | 2 years ago

Who Gets Credit For The Booming US Economy?

"As you may have heard here on KOMO President Trump was laughed at during his speech at the UN general assembly yesterday, he claimed that over two years his administration accomplished more than almost any administration in the history of the country, prompting chuckles from the audience of world leaders examining the accuracy of the president's claims in front. Of the UN general assembly is Glenn Kessler affect checker for the Washington Post and glides with me on the KOMO news on hey, Glenn. How are you? All right, you right. That this claim that America's economy is booming. Like never before is highly dubious to say, the least y. Well, he is often said that that the. This is the greatest economy in US history. And we had looked at this weeks ago. I should note he said this. He said this more than fifty times. And certainly the economy is. In a very good state. But just about every measure, you can look at economic growth unemployment that sort of thing the economy is not doing as well as it did under president. Dwight Eisenhower Lyndon Johnson Bill Clinton. Economists. I spoke to historical contests also said that you listen GRANDE presided over economy that would be better than the one that we currently have. Okay. As an offshoot. He's said that he has passed the biggest tax cuts and reforms in American history. How accurate is that? It's completely false. He doesn't even rank in the way essentially that tax cuts would measure the size of the economy. Ranks eight in in recent history. He said he says in American history, but we went back to the last hundred years and it ranks in size as number eight. We're talking with Glenn Kessler from Washington Post. A fact checker for the post reviewing some of the president's recent claims and comments he has also blamed OPEC for higher domestic gas prices. What's the real story there? Well, actually, the biggest factor right now in the rise of oil prices is the president's decision to terminate the nuclear agreement with Iran and imposed new sanctions on that country. Iran is one of the world's biggest oil producers under the sanctions that the president is pushing many countries would not be able to purchase oil from Iran. And so that it has started a spike in the price of oil, and many experts have say it could be one hundred dollars a barrel. When the sanctions are imposed currently it's about seventy dollars a barrel stick with Iran for a minute. He says they grew their military budget by nearly forty percent after the nuclear deal was signed. Yeah. That's not quite right either. It did increase a almost thirty percent since the nuclear deal resigned. But just looking at a raw number is not always, particularly helpful. All of its spending went up. Military spending increased alongside overall government spending. And so as as old role share of government spending. There was barely any increase in Iran's military expenditures, Jeff or Glenn great job were reporting. Very interesting reading Glenn Kessler. The fact checker for the Washington Post. You can read his stuff fact checking President Trump's speech, the UN general assembly in Washington, Post dot com.

Glenn Kessler President Trump Washington Post Iran UN Grande Donald Trump Komo Dwight Eisenhower Lyndon Johns America United States Washington Bill Clinton Opec Jeff One Hundred Dollars Seventy Dollars
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The pursuit of better healthcare starts here we're trying to get through health insurance over these next you know several weeks frankly because it takes way longer than that but let's do some background here i did not know this medicare started just to be in the sixties correct yeah medicare was actually signed in nineteen sixty five by lyndon johnson you know the social security act was started in nineteen thirty five by fdr but it was right in the middle of depression he didn't feel that putting healthcare in that was a great idea at the time and the burden to the finances of the country would have been devastating and then determined said hammond to bring this back up and in his state of the union he talked about his fair deal which included healthcare but unfortunately at that time he didn't have enough support in congress and it to get that covered and then finally lyndon johnson did it in nineteen sixty five so people think oh it's been here for ever no it really hasn't set almost since see still there's a there's part b we can give you a little brief history on that when we come back we'll take you about the difference to medicare medicaid and some commercial insurance issues to get into as well in traditional insurance but having said all that before we get back with all of that what does the state of medicare right now it's still in good shape you know we still pay into it as us working bees you'll looking you'll see in your paycheck you know that there's a line there for medicare so it's not as sound as we'd like it to be probably much more sound than social security and some of the changes that they're going to try to make it medicare are ones that are going to try to contain some costs which will help to make sure that it continues to go on compensation for hospitals and compensation for doctors obviously is very flat if not declining so it's probably i would say sound right now and in regards to the doctors getting paid that becomes less and less each year doesn't it does you know there's increases but the increases don't coincide with the cost of living increases or any other increases that go on so they're very very minimal same with the hospitals hospitals are getting get paid by sunday call the dr g a diagnosis related group so we get a set amount of money to take care of an individual for their care here hospital regardless of how much money the hospital spends on that individual more dr kevin most on.

lyndon johnson hammond congress kevin
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on Big Ideas with Ben Weingarten

Big Ideas with Ben Weingarten

05:29 min | 2 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on Big Ideas with Ben Weingarten

"So I learned a lot about politics from him, and he was somebody who had a worldview it evolve and he compromised. You've also written extensively about Richard Nixon, who I think is another figure that you can learn just a lifetime of political lessons from studying and he's much maligned based upon how his presidency ended. But there's so much to his career from the fact that he was down and out of politics and kicked to the curb side and then ended up rising to the presidency in a miraculously sort of fashion. What are the great lessons of Nixon's career? Well, look, Nixon was a brilliant political analyst. Not a particularly good candidate, but having lost nine. Nine hundred sixty two for governor of California after losing to John f. Kennedy in nineteen sixty. He was pronounced dead. He was reelected in sixty eight running with effectively a plan to end the war in Vietnam and notion that he would pursue a different set of policies than Lyndon Johnson and the great society. In fact, he institutionalized much of the great society all the while campaigning as a cultural and economic conservative. But at the same time, there was more school integration under Richard Nixon than any. What else? We started the Opportunity Commission, black chapel ISM, the Clean Air Act. So there were bold, bold. Initiatives and accomplishments in domestic policy. But between detente with the Russians, the first successful approach to the Chinese arms control agreements, the Nixon administration was preeminent and foreign policy. He also created a backlash against his moderation at the same time was a model for what Bill Clinton ultimately did later all of which is a quick way to say Nixon shaped politics in a way that led me to write that he was probably the preeminent political actor of the second half of the twentieth century. Since you mention Nixon, going to China, a pivotal move in a world history. Obviously, everyone recognizes the material benefits that that relationship has provided to us. And there have been some benefits to the America and the west interacting with an integrating with China. On the other hand, there's a downside as well, which is that China has, of course stolen billions of dollars and intellectual property from us. And we've essentially recapitalized a formerly basket case communist run economy. Maybe we can't pine as to who won in this bargain overtime, but how do you see the net benefit versus cost of the opening with China? Well, there's a third thing that I would say, which is that the expansionist nature of the Chinese policies, both in the South China Sea in Asia, more generally, and indeed, and in particularly African Latin America means that they have been. Expansionist in a way that we have not been able, at least in my judgment to successfully challenge them. There's one other thing then which is to be profoundly troubling. We've given up on human rights. I mean, China is one of the worst offenders. And we sort of ignored it not sort of we have and to my way of thinking, they probably been winners these AVI us. But since it's not as Eero some game and it's not a question of who wins and who loses we have maintained the peace. We have avoid conflict with them, but at substantial cost. What do you think China ultimately wants to? They want to be the world hegemony. Do they wanna be able to act with complete impunity and not be afraid that the US will counter them? I think they do want to be the world. Hedge Amman certainly in their realm they do in in as. South China Sea. I think they are increasingly confrontational. They, I've been working as I said, one of my books with the Russians successfully, and I think that the Chinese are looking to institutionalize and evolve the communist party for another fifty years. I think they're looking to deal with their own economic problems, their own environmental problems and their own social problems without jeopardizing basic societal organization. Since you mentioned the Russian Chinese relationship, you and I share the view that Russia is a major adversary regardless of the ending of the Cold War. Unlike after World War Two, it wasn't as if Russia purged its ranks of all the people who were involved in the mass maters and the intelligence dictatorship that they..

Richard Nixon Russia China South China Sea Nixon administration Kennedy political analyst Lyndon Johnson California Bill Clinton Vietnam Hedge Amman US communist party John f America
Republicans sign letter saying Trump should win Nobel Peace Prize

24 Hour News

01:44 min | 2 years ago

Republicans sign letter saying Trump should win Nobel Peace Prize

"Plan late night debates on the budget package and the hope is for passage late tonight i'm tim mcguire a group of house republicans is pushing president trump for the nobel peace prize because of his work to ease nuclear tensions with north korea ap washington correspondent saga megani reports from the white house eighteen republicans have signed a letter to the norwegian nobel committee saying the president's peace through strength policies are working and bringing the regime to the negotiating table a meeting between the president and kim jong and could be announced this week south korea's leader had earlier mentioned the peace prize as a possibility saying trump could have the prize if the korea's could have the piece president moon was very nice one as suggested i wanna i wanna get peace indiana congressman luke messer unveiled the letter on twitter he's running for a senate seat while several others who signed it are running to become senators or governors saga megani at the white house the obama foundation says it's partnering with the city of chicago to include a public library branch at the yet to be built obama presidential center chicago public library board of directors president lyndon johnson says it's a big deal the first time in our nation's history a public library will be included in a presidential center johnson says the libraries more than a place to put books there are shared spaces and community gathering places there are theaters and art museums are job training and citizenship centers the facility must be approved by the chicago city council along with funding for everything from staffing and books technology.

Chicago Barack Obama Senate Congressman Indiana South Korea Kim Jong Chicago City Council Lyndon Johnson Tim Mcguire Obama Foundation Luke Messer Korea Donald Trump President Trump Norwegian Nobel Committee White House
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"The streets and that was what brought down lyndon johnson it's not true there was the united states senator his name was eugene mccarthy and yes all of this was organized was organized by peop in the democratic party who rejected lyndon johnson and his leadership and they organized a race against him and ultimately will drove johnson out of office was not people in the streets because one of the things that happened and you learned this from the '60s and by the way people in the left please pay attention because it was one hundred percent the record in the '60s you can go back and look it up i lived through some of this and every time they had some died of major demonstration support for the war went up people don't like the idea of people marching around with signs and with puppets and chanting and singing and sometimes breaking windows and sometimes trashing of places demonstrations don't work it's stupid and by the way you may remain ember that i'm consistent on this i've been saying this for a long time if you want to make a difference you want to change the direction of the country you don't change minds by marching around or cursing or saying he's the worst he you persuade people that there is a better way now is president trump doing that by the way if somebody thinks that you you will applaud the way the chuck schumer speaking and you think he is speaking the truth and we got a win win win win win and the way to do that is resist resist resist and all sorts of activism in the streets as chuck schumer says if you think that's the way to go give me a call one eight hundred nine five.

lyndon johnson united states senator democratic party chuck schumer eugene mccarthy president one hundred percent
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on WJR 760

"Mm the news welcome back el rushbo that cutting edge i wanna go back and listen to just for the fun of it here this is lyndon johnson nineteen sixty four president of the time this is a portion of a phone call that lyndon johnson made in the owner of they hager clothing company eggers sued sager slacks h a g g a r and it was about some pence that lbj wanted a order now to hang with crack down or not time it always low who cried gave me about it promotes the separation and rounder undermined by coban oh that was a belt of you heard mirrored it was lbj on the fallen ordering pan and source slacks from hager want to hear that one more time does okay here here you go in its simplest by how onward none of hang with crack down orient tying at all as low who pied she became about finance from farther separate and rounder undermine our back from among oh longhaul you mean like is that like the the the things trump was talking about is that what that is okay nineteen 64 of course not nobody nobody does that we've picked the dogs of the beagles whether years not nobody knew this at the time because nobody leaked that so that the hey reputed this is our way of the president of belts to ever china say this is unique in fact barack hussein obama this is the audio book version of then senator obama's dreams from my father when my by your own them for us now you know that guy sorry i've got nothing on me right nothing their white folks in the mirror ignorant mother like you rack hussein obama reading his own text in his own book dreams from my father it just saying here is.

lyndon johnson lbj hager president barack hussein obama eggers china
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on Kickass News

"It was terrible oh it was always terrible uh you know lyndon johnson was a power in the senate majority leader in the senate when senator jack kennedy from massachusetts was a relatively junior senator junior member of the senate and even more junior than that was younger brother bobby kennedy who was one of the staff lawyers working in the senate in various jobs and i'll lyndon johnson didn't like anything about bobby kennedy even at at the staff level in the senate a he thought jackie kennedy was okay and he he respected how jackie kennedy had earned his position in the senate through votes but he had absolutely no respect for bobby kennedy getting his position uh to work in washington basically through his brother and his father and an and so it started off very badly end men got much much worse and so you know as lyndon johnson uh is uh you know a force to be reckoned with in in democratic party politics and jackie kennedy when he is thinking about it he he's got the not presidential nomination walked up he has to think about a vice presidential nominee yes think about geographic advantages the different of vice presidential candidates can bring him he thinks about the southeast thinks about texas he thinks about lyndon johnson and he offers it to lyndon johnson this horrifies bobby kennedy just horrifies and after jack kennedy has offered the vice presidency to lyndon johnson lyndon johnson is is smart enough in cagey enough not to say yes instantaneously uh and and thinks about it says that he's going to think about it but comes really close to saying yes to jackie kennedy in the first scottish note bobby gets wind of this in goes down to linden johnson's hotel suite in the conventional tell an tries to talk johnson.

lyndon johnson majority leader senate senator jack kennedy massachusetts bobby kennedy jackie kennedy presidential nomination washington texas lyndon johnson lyndon johnson linden johnson
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on Super Station 101

"The johnson administration let's lyndon johnson was at kennedy i can't remember there's an senators wandering around there never know where they are our this are suffering from our late onset dementia and they're still and their god knows what their grabbing onto to think it's a railing it's a woman behind you know they they don't know what they're doing malivai nets that's a that's on what you recall it from mississippi bad cochran who they had to usher he was heading the wrong way going up to a he's going to the house they said no sir you're in the senate and the they ushered him toward the senate thousand points to contact oh i miss my can you adjust my wheelchair because my angles a little high angle push it down here we go how he sunny barbara look the other way joining us now is klay travis you have to just laugh through the just unamerican sports journalist writer television journalists and analysts who has had to listen to this how you doing my friend i'm doing well i i once you got up at a wedding reception uh to tell the story of how a guy in a girl met at uh uh uh uh and i told the story and i said before i finish this i want you to think about this this could have either been a marriage and by the way their mary they have kids they're very happy so far as i know doing well but i said when he you hear all this story it could either read the white somebody being a record purselle stalking or it could be a marital relationship that ends gloriously like the next like go to a wedding with into the coach and disclosure eyes and imagine that it's written in a police report it's like this guy would not take no for an answer he shakespeare all over the place e wouter for months and months he showed up in her house on it out like all these things are technically things that could be written in a up police report of a gawker right you're differing did really a good in a positive way.

lyndon johnson cochran the house senate klay travis johnson administration mississippi writer stalking
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Movie lbj over the weekend and and uh it it really illustrates this this moment in nineteen 64 when when the democratic party and lyndon johnson decided to fundamentally change the message of the democratic party the democratic party that had been founded by thomas jefferson and had basically been the party of slavery up through the civil war the democratic party that that had been the party of the south the party of white supremacy in the part party awake prestige arguably fdr started taking that apart harry harry truman took a took a big hammer to it but the big one was the civil rights act in the voting rights act since six sixty four and sixty five and and uh you know the republicans looked said okay the democrats are given up on the white racists we'll take him and whether you call that the southern strategy or not i mean the fact of the matter is that the first speech the ronald reagan gave after he got the republican nomination at the convention the first speech he gave was in at the novo shikaki uh fair in uh philadelphia mississippi or great just down the road from philadelphia mississippi where uh schwimmer cheney and goodman the three civil rights workers were brutally murdered uh back in the '60s and his whole speech was about states' rights and donald trump jr did the exact same thing his for speech a was about states' rights at the notion of calories state fair near philadelphia mississippi you know a whole bunch of white people showed up you can google it there's pictures and everything um these guys are only barely uh hiding exactly what they're doing so it it you know i don't you don't need a lot of numbers to a bunk this albert all unita's philosophy call judith in chandler arizona judith what's up hi there um uh i want to bring a perspective of evolution of seoul's to what's going on in this country and globally at something that a kind of came to through reading dr michael newton's two books journey of seoul's at and destiny of seoul so we have about forty seconds jude's can you summarize roof where her work where where each year due to learn lessons incomplete tasks and.

dr michael newton chandler arizona google donald trump jr goodman philadelphia civil rights harry harry truman lyndon johnson jude democratic party seoul judith unita schwimmer cheney mississippi ronald reagan voting rights act civil war thomas jefferson forty seconds
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

03:15 min | 3 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on WCHS

"Knew oh that in passing this writes he was going to lose the south he was going to lose the democrats on the south and that's a very heavy political price to pay and he said i'm going to lose the democrats for a decade to turned out to be more than five oh the get do on what he did medicare and medicaid and headstart in all the did he did uh he knew that uh this was not just something done on a win this was something that was in his uh dna in his bones and was part of what he wanted to accomplish america speaking of lbj jason theaters across the country awesome as president lyndon johnson on they've done a lot of linking conspiracy theories that lob uh jim rutledge kennedy assassination mle rep historian ever read said that's not the case did did you ever find anything approaching a connection in your research uh for this moving no i didn't but what i did wind uh and this is not a great revelation is that was oswald because it could oswald uh we'll just connect uh castro like he was pro castro ist communist uh he's pro you know communist cruise jeff yao russian communist gene johnson was worried that if it looked like that there was any nibs conspiracy with uh the communists where is the russians joe trying to get back of them for bay of pigs neighbor in fact that would create a second right so he didn't want any but you know he if anything he had a role to play in key investigation uh limited so that red paint oswald as a single lunatic not too who have nothing else to do with anything else jeff that right so i i do think played a role in uh deflecting the investigation that igf should have gone and i said reading in rubber karaoz most recent dogged sees lbj biography that he uh to tempt dashon any parallel congressional investigations into the assassination and consolidate kgb worn that that came out and it was really more about it political expediency and geopolitical stability then then a really tried to get an accurate report of went on he would he would yield the country was devastated by the wbc of beloved president and the last thing lyndon johnson was to have a a world nuclear war on his hand and there was a reason why he.

lyndon johnson castro gene johnson igf political expediency president medicare america lbj jim rutledge oswald red paint jeff
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on Trumpcast

Trumpcast

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on Trumpcast

"Major threat to lyndon johnson mccarthy had won forty percent of the ballot in the new hampshire primary and johnson at one forty six percent so it was a great surprise that eugene mccarthy this largely unknown candidate got forty percent of the vote simply by having an anti vietnam war stance but the fact is that linden johnson's name was not on that ballot in new hampshire it had to be written in so it it mccarthy's name was on the ballot and still lyndon johnson one i think he would have won the presidency that year richard nixon of course we know one and had pretty much the same vietnam war policy the johnson had but the johnson didn't want to run for two reasons one is that he had a bad heart his father and grandfather had died it just into their 60s he had had a heart condition that was nearlyfatal we had a heart attack in it when he was forty seven years old and nearly died and felt his heart every day this this heavyhearted he had and didn't want it put the american people through a health crisis that was one reason the other reason was that he wanted to get hold she men to the peace table and he thought that overture of not running would get poaching men to agree to talk peace in fact the overture worked but the the peace talks never came to fruition throughout the balance of johnson's presency partly because nixon helped to sabotage them in the fall 1968 so that's what happened in it with lyndon johnson in answer your question about trump josh i think that there is a a a battle afoot currently for the soul of the republican party you've seen the establishment republicanism republicans rather in in jeff flake and others realized that there is really no clear path forward for them so i think the the.

new hampshire linden johnson richard nixon lyndon johnson republican party jeff flake lyndon johnson mccarthy eugene mccarthy vietnam war mccarthy forty percent one forty six percent forty seven years
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"President had an interesting relationship with senator paul of course to sit down with them and get him on board here yeah you know the one thing that piece of advice that i would recommend for the pro the united states is key start doing a little bit of lbj on the congress the lyndon johnson's great talent was relationship sometimes friendly sometimes coercive with actual members of congress obama was really bad at this point the way he didn't really know people from the republican party or even people from the democratic party he kept to himself but up huge lost opportunity if i were president trump i would start having people from the senate for the house over in twos and threes for dinner with me and my family i get to know a little bit better and there are times what i would go over to an individual center you know better i really really need you on this one that was a secret to lbj doing this stuff you did it was absolutely and in when it comes to influencing people that way and it also influencing the public what's the most important thing to keep in mind about the third of these big issues the tax cuts that the president is going to be fighting for how do you persuade people that this will actually change their lives you know tax cuts have always been a really hard thing ever since republicans shot but boy of i'm going to lower your tax and to the extent that that fifty percent of a population at this point approximately fifty percent having no federal tax liability it's a much harder argument to make but basically they're going to have to.

President senator paul united states lbj congress lyndon johnson obama republican party democratic party senate the house fifty percent
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on WEEI

"That guy gap who quoted detectable fox but that's okay when the end if what he was saying was true then uh con cap in asia it's protesting the wrong thing at the wrong time so because the national anthem it's thoughts on this issue specific it's not a up opting but that's not why qualify call because you're talking about who the units that were calling quake in my as i've been working on my drive long drive home from work i noticed the biggest city it that you had clog was the guy with the japs he's still fighting world war two that that's just not the other the other one the guy who quaint that lyndon johnson ended the vietnam war when he escalated the vietnam war and but might that the reason why equality and in the third idiot but the ones that claim that i don't have a right to protest calling capping it because his protest trump's mine no pun intended but i have a question for key oh i love question at you keep asking the same question everybody does someone who beats his wife oh kill the animals does europe play indiana fell i'll ask you that what do you think yeah i think if they're not in prison they they should be allowed to be in the nfl of if a team of an owner to gm feel like they can be on the team then then yeah that's that's their right to to have them on their yeah because actually that's a that's a different matter that guy that chemical made a mistake and believe me i don't think anybody we should have a quiet in the nfl of but i guess they have that right if they show pen that they that they were having forward that you know yeah it's up to that team at that point to feel like if this guy is really this guy's really changed or or whatever i mean i'm not saying you're not going to have fifty three choirboys on your team but you're you're just you're not going to you would sorry like that'd be great if you did but but you don't so those guys that yeah they should they should be allowed to play i believe yep but caller cabinet had a belief that some of us don't believe and we have the right to disagree with him and you know and that that that.

fox asia world war lyndon johnson vietnam war indiana nfl gm
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on KOIL

"Health savings accounts and i'm like you people have you don't offer any thing ever do not in now i remember i go back all the way to the medicare battle one there was a good republican andrea cold curb mills and republicans really didn't and lyndon johnson ram to medicare thing through per 20 uh senator mccain and we all wish him well in this current crisis identifies the public good is what he and the democrats can agree on rather than what what is party agree what we have different concepts of truth be told in the the mighty if you welfare state neosocialist welfare state move on and acura sometimes there's a flight pull back but gradually move on and on because every time the democrats past one of these social security or medicare medicaid and build dan the growth of the entitlements the republican retreat to a new defence line i gotta any roll back sad near right and this is the opportunity of a generation and it could be squandered that's sad pat buchanan tell a lot of truth here holding them accountable the sean hannity show thank you sir you're take it easy my all right when we come back finally we've got some breaking news on the effort to pursue some truth about the corruption the felonies the scandals the double standard as it relates to democrats and election fraud in collusion and hillary clinton's crimes that she committed we'll get to that and don't forget when your grilling this summer keep in mind there are so many that have fought to defend our liberty and our freedom and that includes our second amendment rights but you also have to remember the bad guys only are not just the people you see overseas you know like terrorists you also have home invasions and robberies burglaries and the uscca they know when this unpredictable world itself defenses more of a necessity than ever before now you're not alone they are the first the largest organization that are dedicated to protecting those of us that are responsible gun owners if god forbid during any self defense incident afterwards they're going to be there to help you and they'll have your pack offer but it ever.

senator mccain social security pat buchanan fraud hillary clinton second amendment rights medicare lyndon johnson acura sean hannity
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on 1A

"While he was certainly a defeated soundly and roundly by lyndon johnson in the 64 race to some extent that concept has has risen to the for for many other reasons that the jonathan's article in atlantic which is superb points out silvan a wonder jonathan does that mean that it's our butts who need to get kicked and not just congress lose i mean we get the congress we elected and if we didn't elect extreme lawmakers they wouldn't be there maybe it's our fault at some level of course of democracy it's always our fault and if you ask people who say they don't like congress if they like thorough member of congress they usually say yes and then they usually return him to office so you can't have it both ways but i believe that the solution to this this riddle is not trying to get turnout boosted way up in primary elections because the structure primaries is such that the special interests will always be more motivated and better funded i think that the answer is to return more power over who gets nominated to the parties and the elected officials which is how it was done in this country until very very recently the idea that a few people in a few key areas would decide the nominee over the heads of the party leaders the elected officials the people who have to do the work show up to govern every day that is new and it's not working so you need to have more input from the the governor's and the elected officials the party chairman state and local you need to get some more sign off sin peer review to screen out some of the bad actors you know a were were up against the break shortly but dr perry i believe what jonathan saying would rub some people wrong because of a kind of sounds like oh you want to let the the political class run things again but there is some historical precedent for these decisions being made more centrally even the idea of the electoral college this idea that sober my headed thoughtful people would be choosing our chief executive.

lyndon johnson jonathan congress electoral college chief executive chairman dr perry