35 Burst results for "Lyndon Johnson"

Blame Joe Biden for the Rapid Rise in Inflation

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:09 min | 4 months ago

Blame Joe Biden for the Rapid Rise in Inflation

"I really don't know wear inflation's going to be but brian is going to now. Brian what what we do ask that. I think we shot ourselves in the american foot collectively you. It is amazing. I i literally did not expect to see this for months and the the the games. I'm sure you've already talked about it. the games in Washington dc. i'm. I'm like in shock trying to catch up with nobody knows what's in this thing But the the games that are playing you know we thought that if they got the trillion they wouldn't go so fast for three and a half. that's yep but they took they said give us another trillion and they did. They took it. What's going to happen to the economy. Taxes are going up on everyone a lot and don't believe this millionaire's only crap. That's not true. The grill deals in there. S ones in there. It's a nightmare. Yeah so if you go back and his you know people are saying is this. Lbj lyndon johnson is. This fdr That you know is that the new deal is the great society you know. This is the build back better. Great reset plan And if we kind of look back in history you know. I'm not trying to be. I'm not trying to say this are be happy. Talk here but but we were able eventually able to absorb those increases in government spending. We we were now the seventies we had lots of inflation. We had lots more unemployment. We went through a lot of pain but then once we got to reagan and and he's been into clinton things got a lot better so today if you kind of think about the cloud blockchain five g. rolling out sixty probably after that the starling satellite system going up the new biotech inventions. I mean we have were very productive immensely wealthy country

Lbj Lyndon Johnson Washington Dc Brian Reagan Clinton
Democrat Presidents Have a History of Promoting Propaganda

Mark Levin

01:39 min | 4 months ago

Democrat Presidents Have a History of Promoting Propaganda

"I want to remind you of a few things. Those of you who listened over the years and have read some of these books I've written over the years. This is not the first administration. To try and take out their political enemies and criminalized Politan. Woodrow Wilson was the first they create a whole propaganda machine. And he used a man by the name of Bearnaise. You know, like the like the sauce anyway, His name was Bearnaise. He wrote a book called Propaganda. But before that, he spoke about it. He wrote about it and Propaganda wasn't a bad word back then. And so what? And so Wilson decided to use him and Some of the surrogates. Propaganda. For what he wanted to do in World War one, the League of Nations race and the rest of it because Wilson One of the founding fathers of the so called Progressive movement was a racist in the sensation ist who Resegregated, the military And he supported the Klan. A Democrat, A so called progressive Franklin Roosevelt used propaganda use the IRS. He used the FBI to intimidate, silence his opponents and send some of them to prison. One of the greatest presidents we've ever had just asked the Democrat Party. Lyndon Johnson. And I'm skipping over a few.

Politan Woodrow Wilson Wilson League Of Nations Franklin Roosevelt IRS FBI Democrat Party Lyndon Johnson
David Rice Atchison: President For A Day?

Everything Everywhere Daily

06:10 min | 9 months ago

David Rice Atchison: President For A Day?

"Rice was a democratic senator from the state of missouri. He served in the senate for twelve years from eighteen. Forty three to eighteen fifty five. He had a reputation for being extremely pro. Slavery he owned. Slaves supported all of the slave state issues in the run up to the civil war and when the war finally commenced he served in the confederate army as a brigadier general commanding missouri troops. So he's not the finest of people to sit in the upper chamber of congress. Quite frankly if it wasn't for the events that i'll be discussing this episode david. Rice atchison would probably be mostly forgotten to history i. I came across his name years ago and children's book of fun facts which said that he was the president of the united states for one day. This fact has been repeated on and off for over one hundred and fifty years in fact the words president of the united states for one day are on his tombstone in missouri as sort of a testament to his greatest achievement. So is this true. Was david rice. Atchison really the president of the united states for a single day to answer the question. We need to understand exactly what happened in the election of eighteen. Forty eight week party. Candidate zachary taylor comfortably. Defeated democrat lewis. Cass and free soil candidate. Martin van buren incoming president. James polka made a pledge to seek a single term in office and he honored that pledge by not. Running taylor was a career military man who had never expressed any political opinions prior to the election. And in fact he had never voted. He had a great deal of success as a general during the mexican american war which led to his popularity in calls for him to run for president. He wasn't fact recruited by both the whigs and the democrats. The two major political parties at the time to seek office prior to the passage of the twentieth amendment to the constitution the president and all members of congress would take office at noon on march fourth. This lengthy lame duck period made more sense when everyone had to travel by horseback. And that's why was eventually changed. Nonetheless march fourth was the date everyone took office in eighteen forty nine march fourth landed on a sunday. Zachary taylor being a devout man. Didn't want to have his inauguration ceremony. Take place on the sabbath so he postponed one day until monday. March fifth is vice. President millard fillmore also delayed his oath of office until march fifth according to the law at the time which was the presidential succession act of seventeen ninety to the next person in line to the presidency after the vice president was the president pro. Temporary of the united states senate. The vice president is technically the president of the senate. The president pro temporary is the person who presides over the senate when the vice president is not present. The president temporary was david rice. Atchison at the time the position was actually a competitive election today. The president pro temporary is just the senior ranking member of the majority party in the senate. So the argument is that because neither zachary taylor nor millard fillmore didn't take the oath of office on march fourth and waited until march fifth that they weren't president from noon on march fourth until noon on march fifth. That means that the next in line would have been the president pro. Temporary of the senate david rice. So is this true and does this argument. Hold water. The answer is pretty clear in the answer is no and there are a whole bunch of reasons. Why this is the case. I while the constitution does stipulate that the president and the vice president must take the oath of office it only says quote before he enters upon the execution of his office unquote. This is legal hair-splitting but it means before president can do anything presidential e- sign a law. Appoint officials signed a treaty etc. They must i take the oath of office however they can still be the president before taking the oath to illustrate the point. President kennedy was shot at twelve thirty pm on november. Twenty second nineteen sixty three. He was declared dead at one thirty three. Pm and lyndon johnson took the oath of office on air force one at two thirty eight pm. The moment president kennedy was dead. Or at least claire dead. Lyndon johnson became the president in the same way that someone becomes a king the moment the old king dead even if they haven't been coronated. The oath of office is just a way to legally unlock the powers of the presidency after becoming president. As i said this is legal hair-splitting and for all practical purposes it doesn't really matter but for the twenty four hour period before the oath of office zachary. Taylor was the president. If there was an emergency you could have quickly taken the oath of office in private and without a public ceremony and dealt with the crisis as president. The second argument as to why atkinson was never president is that he never took the oath of office. Either if taylor is in president. Because he didn't take the oath of office than atkinson also can't be president by the same logic. The third argument is that he officially wasn't the president pro. Tempore e of the senate. He was the president pro temporary during the previous session of congress. His term expired on march fourth at noon. Just like the presidential term. Did he needed to be reelected again. On march fifth which he was moreover. This wasn't the first time that this had happened in eighteen. Twenty one james monroe delay taking the oath by a day for the exact same reason yet known assumes that someone else was president for a day at johnson himself never claimed to be president at the time. No one seriously thought he was the president. And there's nothing in the congressional record to indicate that he was there are no constitutional scholars presidential historians or even atkinson's owned biographer. Who thinks that he was actually president at best. If you applied a very strict rule to the taking of the oath to become president then you could maybe say that there was a one day interregnum where there was no president but it doesn't follow that atkinson was president.

Senate David Rice Zachary Taylor Missouri Rice Atchison United States Atchison James Polka President Millard Fillmore Congress Martin Van Buren Majority Party Cass President Kennedy Lyndon Johnson Rice Taylor Millard Fillmore Army Lewis
Biden signs executive orders addressing the economy

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:38 min | 11 months ago

Biden signs executive orders addressing the economy

"Biden has turned to executive orders in his first days of office says he looks to address the economic crisis brought on by the pandemic. He's also pursuing a massive coronavirus aid bill Can Walsh White House and political analyst for U. S. News and World Report joined w. T. O. P S John Aaron to break down Biden's first few days in office and some of the past presidents he resembles well particular FDR going back a long way to 1933 when he first became president. He had a huge depression to deal with the worst economic calamity we've ever had, and his philosophy was similar to what Biden seems to be doing action action action. The country wanted the president to do something to act boldly. And you seeing that with President Biden again today with executive orders. They're going to continue indefinitely pushing this $1.9 trillion stimulus bill moving to try many different things to get the economy corrected, but mostly to get the coronavirus under control and to get the vaccines out. That's his first priority right now. And probably should be given how difficult that issue is for people to deal with very quickly on Lyndon Johnson. Of course, he took over after President Kennedy was assassinated. He also wanted to show action himself, particularly in areas of diversity and racial justice with writing is also doing so. I would say those two presidents come to mind and you see a lot of echoes in what Biden is doing when you compare them to Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson. The president, of course pitches himself is a compromise or experienced in the Senate. But we're hearing that some Republicans say there's no way they're gonna go for some of the elements and at one point trillion $1.9 trillion.8 bills. So where does this go? I think the thing we have to remember here, of course, is that this is vital opening bid in his attempt to get a lot of this legislation through. He's been around a long time. 36 years in the Senate years as vice president, he is known as a guy who knows how the Congress works. And so I think we have to realize that this is his the start of the neck. Negotiations started the deal making there are not good signs from the Republicans that they'll go along with him. There's a lot of pushback of the same time he's getting the sense from the left on his in his party to push further in government activism, and so on, So it is a difficult line. He's walking here, but I think That there's the potential particularly initially here that he will come to some kind of a compromise. It'll be difficult, but what he's got out there now is sort of the whistle ist. I think when he gets to the real bargaining, I think he's gonna have to borrow back off from a lot of that. But I think it's possible

Biden U. S. News And World Report T. O. P John Aaron President Biden Lyndon Johnson Walsh White House President Kennedy Depression Franklin Roosevelt Senate Congress
Bellwether no more? Ohio misses presidential pick for first time since 1960

Dave Fox Home Remodeling Show

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Bellwether no more? Ohio misses presidential pick for first time since 1960

"It's a bit of a history lists and when it comes to the presidential election in Ohio now that the media has declared Joe Biden, the presumptive winner of the presidential election, and if those numbers hold up, Ohio will have lost its status of being a bellwether state. 1960 election. The last election in which Ohio did not pick the winner of the Buckeye State going for Richard Nixon over John Kennedy that year, But starting in 1964, when Lyndon Johnson won, Ohio was picked a winner in every election since until now. I'm Tom Moore.

Ohio Joe Biden Richard Nixon John Kennedy Lyndon Johnson Tom Moore
Trump and Biden make final pitch to voters at last debate

Morning Edition

04:23 min | 1 year ago

Trump and Biden make final pitch to voters at last debate

"All right. We're going to turn now to our team of political strategist to get their take on what happened last night. We heard from Democratic political strategist Karen Finney and Republican strategist Scott Jennings yesterday ahead of the debate, and they are here again this morning. Good morning to you both. Good morning. Scott. I want to start with you. You said yesterday you thought the mute feature of the ability to mute the candidates. Different intervals could actually work in Trump's favor. You called it a medicine that would help him because it would let him make his economic argument. Did it work? Did that happen? Yeah, It's always fun being right and Donald Trump last night, you know whether it was the mute button or whether it was his own personal self control. Finally. He actually let Joe Biden talk, and I think it also let Donald Trump think about what he wanted to say next, which then caused them to actually have a choice. Sort of a debate over policy, which is the way trumps always needed this election to be framed up. Now it's late. A lot of folks have already voted or made up their minds. But finally, for one night, we actually had a debate over policy, and Donald Trump sounded pretty good. So can what do you make of that Because some Republicans are supporters of President Trump had reportedly said, You know, we just need here. Joe Biden speak that He'll essentially forgive him along enough piece of rope that he'll hang himself. We'll make some kind of Gaff. What did you make of having that the space that move between them and the ability to let them both talk didn't work, divided? Well, I think it actually worked to both of their favor. I'm willing to say that and congratulations, God, I thought of you, actually, not without being so disciplined. I thought it's Scott actually talk to him because you know, and it does matter. I mean, look, my other critique. Obviously, most importantly of President Trump's performance was that a lot of what he said was still untrue. But you know, one of the things as communicator we know is that the tone of the style of what you say matters and and I certainly think the space between them aloud for more of a conversation. I certainly thought that Vice President Biden also had an excellent night. In that, you know, he was ableto be clearly talking about substance as well. I think a number of the hits from President Trump really didn't seem tto land. Quite so well. And there were a couple of pretty cringe worthy moments like the conversation about Children who had been separated from their parents that despite his demeanor, I don't think worked well for Trump and I think Again. Gave Biden the space to actually have a comment about that. Instead of just, you know, the kind of behavior we saw in the first debate. So I want Oh, I wantto ask about one particular moment. The moderator Kristen Welker of NBC, asked President Trump what he would say to Americans. Who have not liked how how he has talked about race or seem to exacerbate racial divides in this country, and this is how he responded. Let's by the state. Nobody has done more for the black community and Donald Trump. And if you look with the exception of Abraham Lincoln, possible exception, but the exception of Abraham Lincoln. Nobody has done what I've done. I mean, Republicans believe that Scott it discounts the actions of several previous presidents. I mean, Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act in 1964, ending segregation. Yeah. I mean, I could do without the the bravado and the hyperbole about Abraham Lincoln. However, if you was that entire exchange, Donald Trump actually does have a story to tell When you talk about criminal justice reform and his support of the historically black colleges and universities, the economic numbers prick over it. He has a story to tell. And then he pivoted and said, What did you do while you were in office for the last eight years under Obama for for your 47 year career and actually take it take out the hyperbole about leaking, which, by the way, has always been patently ridiculous. The story. He could tell about what he did not too bad. So, aside from that I was happy with the case he brought on that.

President Trump Joe Biden Scott Jennings Abraham Lincoln Vice President Karen Finney Barack Obama Lyndon Johnson Kristen Welker NBC
Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:16 min | 1 year ago

Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia Britannica. Today's politicians but most of her life fighting for civil rights, she put her life at risk to change the course of American history, but she's often left out of history books. Let's talk about Constance Baker Motley. Constance Baker Motley was born on September fourteenth nineteen, forty one in new haven connecticut she was one of twelve children born to working class immigrant parents from the West indies. Constance. Was a bright child who grew up attending integrated schools and quickly fell in love with reading. She didn't learn much about black history in school. But what she did learn about civil rights leaders inspired her she decided she wanted to become a lawyer, but constance couldn't afford higher education. She took a job as a maid for a while before moving on to work for the National Youth Administration an organization focused on providing work an educational opportunities for young adults. Constance was giving a speech at a local community center one evening when her oratory skills impressed a wealthy white philanthropist. He, offered to pay for constants college tuition. So in nineteen, forty, one constance began attending college at Fisk University in Nashville. She later wrote that the train ride down to Tennessee was the first time she experienced overt racism and Jim Crow laws after being forced to ride in a broken down segregated train car, it was a perspective changing moment for constance two years into her attendance at Fisk Constance transferred to New York University and finished her bachelor's degree in economics. Then in nineteen, forty, four constance became the first black woman to be accepted to Columbia law school. After graduating from Columbia in nineteen, forty, six constants worked for the NWC peas legal staff under Thurgood. Marshall who later became a court justice over the course of her work at the N. double ACP constance assisted with almost sixty cases that ended up reaching the Supreme Court. She also personally argued ten supreme court cases and one nine. Constance is work integrated multiple southern state universities putting her toe-to-toe with racist governors determined to bar black students from schools. She also helped protect the right to peaceful protests and opened up parks for. Black. Americans. She did all that despite the sexism and racism personally experienced during her legal career. Some judges actually turned their backs on her and refused to hear her speak. But Constance didn't let others biopsies bar her from success. Her work made her a key player in the civil rights movement and she even occasionally represented Dr. Martin? Luther. King Junior. Constance was constantly in danger when she was working in the south racists threatened her life and the lives of other prominent figures in the black community constance was barred from staying in hotels. So she had to stay with local activists, but even that didn't make her feel completely safe her friend Mississippi civil rights leader Medgar. Evers. was murdered his own driveway. So in nineteen, sixty, five constance left her work in the south and moved back to New York City. Shortly thereafter, she became the first black woman to serve in the New York State Senate. She was also elected president of the borough of Manhattan which made her the first woman in that role. During her time as a politician constance focused on raising up under served communities in the city like Harlem and East Harlem in nineteen sixty, six president Lyndon Johnson appointed constance to the US. District Court in the southern district

Constance Baker Motley Fisk Constance Constance District Court Supreme Court Jenny Kaplan Wonder Media Network New York State Senate Fisk University Columbia Law School New York City West Indies New York University National Youth Administration Connecticut Nashville Mississippi Manhattan Lyndon Johnson
What Trump's Covid-19 diagnosis means for the country

Saturday Morning Update with Rick Fowler

10:08 min | 1 year ago

What Trump's Covid-19 diagnosis means for the country

"Were always joined on Saturday morning by John Gizzi. He is the White House correspondent and chief political columnist of newsmax dot com and Newsmax TV, John. Good morning. Good morning, Rick. And what a night it wass. Well, obviously, we're following the latest developments on President Trump and his diagnosis with covert 19. What is the latest you're hearing on the president. The president is resting comfortably at the Walter Reed Hospital where yesterday he left the White House. And arrived at the hospital. I might and he left the White House in his usual business suit looking as he always does. Uh, this is not someone who has been felled by the virus. But simply has symptoms of the Corona virus, and he will rest there until doctors say he can come out. Which effectively scotches the debate. Scheduled for October. 15th. But it doesn't mean he's going to be in the hospital through the rest of the campaign, and we may see a newer and better Donald Trump emerged from Walter Reed. For now, all signs are that he's resting and that this is not anything that Americans should be nervous about. John. We know the Corona virus hits each individual differently, assuming the best for the president, where he quarantines for the 14 days and gets through this What is the impact on the campaign for the impact on the campaign is that right now there's an absentee candidate that the president cannot have is make America great again Rallies. He cannot debate He cannot issue pronouncements, although one as the impression after covering Donald Trump for the past four years that no hospital and no confinement Ooh! Ah hospital bed is going to keep him away from his tweeting. Uh, hey, certainly can campaign that way. And another thing. We have a long history in America of candidates who are hospitalized or injured who actually do well as their supporters carry on for them. When he made his first center base in 1948 Congressman Lyndon B. Johnson was laid up for a period with very brutal, Cole. His wife, Lady Bird and others served is very effective Speakers and he went on to win hard fought race. I know of a case of another candidate, Arch war who was elected governor of West Virginia after surviving a helicopter crash. So just because it candidate is hospitalized or unhealthy doesn't mean it's a foregone conclusion. He'll lose well, John. Obviously, we know the polarization across the country and the polarization in the media. And there will be a lot of talk about the 25th amendment, and I just wanted to get sort of a factual look. At the 25th amendment. So when people hear the pundits talking about it, they understand it. Alright, 25th amendment was passed. In the late 19 sixties. It is known as the Presidential Succession Amendment. Its functions are twofold. One Puts into law what had been an informal agreement between presidents and their vice presidents. For a long time before them. And that means when the president is incapacitated, say is when he goes under the knife. For surgery, He turns over the powers. Of his office to his number two who effectively becomes acting President Richard Nixon served his acting president after a heart attack. President Dwight Eisenhower, and after a mild stroke, the president suffered Similarly, when Lyndon Johnson had surgery, Hubert Humphrey was the acting president and Dido for George H. W. Bush. Under Ronald Reagan when he had cancer surgery in his second term. The other part of the amendment is that if the vice president succeeds to the presidency, he or she can then designate Vice president that the Senate must give its advice and consent to I might add that when a president is declared unable to continue in his office for health reasons, the 25th amendment can be invoked. By the vice president and his succession to the top job can be insured. Post debate. Polls are now being released Thursday morning, NBC News National Polling had Biden up 7.9 points over President Trump Real clear politics showing Biden with a 6.6 lead over Trump Fivethirtyeight national polling tracker gave Biden the 7.6 advantage. President didn't seem to gain any ground whatsoever in the debates. Possibly lost some ground. What's your analysis is, we move forward. First of all, I do believe that the polls accurately reflect The post debate. Momentum is with Joe Biden, and it has very little to do with the debate itself. But with the media's interpretation of how candidates Trump and Biden acquitted themselves on national television, and of course, the opinion off the punditocracy is almost unanimous. The president was ruled. He interrupted. He had no consistent thought. And Joe Biden was a gentleman. That is their opinion. Which is being repeated by a lot of people. There's two factors that leaves this reporter to say that these numbers might have flaws in them. The first is the hidden vote. There's a lot of people, certainly, as was the case in 2016, who just won't admit they're voting for Donald Trump. Obviously they do so when they're in the voting booth. The other is that Joe Biden right now, by being cool, is holding on and appearing a front runner. Did. Donald Trump loses the debate? It all depends on who you ask. Chuck Booth, commentator and conservative activists from Nevada said the president decided to use this format to speak directly. To his base of supporters and try and rally them to the polls. He compared the president's performance and his refusal to abide by Time outs to the scene in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid when Butch is facing a much larger man and challenges him to a knife fight. And then says, but we have to go through the rules. The other man says there's no rules in a knife fight at which point which kicks him. And effectively weakens and subdues him. That's what the president's goal Wass with Joe Biden and to his base, he succeeded. So let's turn to the impact on the Senate and the Congress a lot of business to attend to, including the nomination of Amy Cockney Barrett to the Supreme Court. We take pause for well wishes from Democrats. But as we can see in the Chuck Schumer tweet, it is a one sentence pause. And then we're back into politics. Here's what he said Friday night. We now have two members of the Senate Judiciary Committee who have tested positive for covert and there may be more. I wish my colleagues well, so that's the nicety. And here's the politics. It is irresponsible and dangerous to move forward with the hearing, and there was absolutely no good reason to do so. Well, I would just say that the distinguished minority leader of the Senate, Senator Schumer should look a little bit more. At the rules of the Senate as wrong is there is a quorum of senators in the committee. They could move along, particularly if chairman gavels in now what he's referring to are Senator Mike Lee of Utah and Thom Tillis of North Carolina. Both Judiciary Committee members and both presently incapacitated by the Corona virus. Both could easily recover in a short time. Remember the Judiciary Committee hearings on drugs, Parrots nomination don't begin until the 14th of Oct over. So any judgments about Senator Tillis or Senator Lee? Not being in the job in two weeks is a bit premature. That's the Supreme Court debate. Let's talk about the stimulus deal. New York Times Reporting. Speaker Pelosi said that the president's positive Corona virus test could change the dynamic and produce a Nagre mint on additional pandemic relief. But a compromise remains elusive. The gist of it from Speaker Pelosi is that now the Republicans will take Corona virus more seriously. Well, where do we

President Trump Donald Trump Joe Biden Vice President President Dwight Eisenhower Acting President John Gizzi Senate White House Walter Reed Hospital Lyndon B. Johnson America White House Correspondent Senate Judiciary Committee Supreme Court Speaker Pelosi Rick Judiciary Committee Senator Tillis Chuck Schumer
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

08:27 min | 1 year ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"So the next time Lyndon Johnson ran for the Senate in 1948. He knew better. He never declared victory. He never said how many votes we had, and the other guy was ahead. The other guy was ahead. Coke Coke Stevenson. He was the former governor. Oh, what Lyndon Johnson do. He went to South Texas south of San Antonio. There was a very famous party boss down there who would deliver votes for you. And Johnson ends up winning by a couple 100 votes. Couple 100 votes out of hundreds of thousands of votes cast he won by a couple of 100 votes. There were weeks of litigation. They kept finding new votes all the time. All the time all the time. Finally, the last couple 100 votes that he got that put him over the top were all cast in one ballot box. In one precinct. South of San Antonio. The voters all voted. They had to sign the book, right? You're both signed they they voted in alphabetical order. Get Lord of all in the same hand, right? Yeah, but there's no there's no rampant abuse. There's no examples are rampant abuse in the election system, and our country has never have down for you. Thank you. I got to go. But you think, Curtis I was joining be coming up to the right. Thank you Still America. That's Curtis Ellis America. First policy. Hey, I'm gonna play for a little bit of audio that Steve has a conversation I had with diminished to Susan. I just called him out this week, saying what you think about the convention the taking for the Democrats? Just want to check his gut pick his brain check has got where where he thinks we're going And and, yes, share a little bit about this New Democrat party That is so in love unapologetically in love and married to socialism That's coming in just a second. Stick around. Look, it's Friday. This broadcast sent out on Friday. And If you're not aware of this, many movie theaters are open again. Cinna marks. Hey, emcees. Limited the capacity seating like 30%. They say I I went online to see what's open around here. My wife and I. That was a tradition. Every single fright was Send the kids over to like little Jim. It's like a little. It is what it is. It's a little gym or one of those floaty bouncing places. They run around like crazy dudes. And we'd leave for like 34 hours. Go see, Go get some dinner. And go see a movie Well. I'm not sure if we're quite there yet. I look over at Mama See where I'm at Deep South Texas, where one of the hot spots for covert 19 we got. Just to explain you how bad the situation is around here. We got FEMA refrigerator trucks like trailers like for tractor trailers, traders refrigerated trailers. That store the bodies of all the folks who died from covert 19. That's that's how bad it is here in deep South Texas, That's that's reality. So everybody walking, very careful staying away from each other. Washington's you know, covering her mouth. I don't know if if Mom is ready to see a movie, but I know I am. I don't care if they're showing like Jurassic Park back to the future of the Empire strikes back. It's that's all they're showing is like the big movies of all time for the past 30 40 years a big summer blockbusters. 15 cents. Take it at AMC movie theaters. Ghostbusters, Beauty and the Beast. And also check local Simpson in marketing. And I just put it out there just For you to think about it, Mike, would you Or are you on the campus of the I don't care anymore Mask. That's Ah, Master on American. Maybe that's what the that's the camp you're in right now. 844344 30 to 62. OK, So here's a little bit of all U. S. And over to Steve had a conversation with a friend Danish to Susan who? I'm pretty sure in the coming weeks. Dana will get a chance to speak with the Nationals. Tanesha has a new movie, a new book, new movie, just in Time for the election Trump card, right? We won't mention too much of that right next. I know Dana is going to be talking about him about that with him sometime in the near future. I called him and asked him about the ticket. This very left of Centre Piper Socialist ticket That is the Democrat Party ticket and why these guys were are married to socialism. Go ahead, Steve. I agree that a lot of the socialist indoctrination occurs in through the education system. I think what's bad about it? Is that it? It turns good people into thieves, and I'll explain it this way. In a sense, no young person is genuinely a socialist. If you went up to up to a kid A teenager, and he said, Listen, we your parents have been thinking about buying you a new car. But since you consider yourself a very privileged person, how about if we give the money to the government instead? To distribute to people who are less advantage than you are right. You could only imagine the response of young people across the country would be like no way I'll take the car. So they're not willing to give up. Anything in the name of this ideal is now if you tell them something else, let's take a car from some other guy who has let's just say five cars. On, then give it to you for free because you are quote entitled to a car there on board for that, so you can see what's really going on here. It's not a genuine application of a principle of egalitarianism. It's rather how can I get unearned benefit from someone else and feel good about it? So now that we're about roughly 2.5 months away from Election Day? What does your gut tell you? My God help the Democrats baloney here and by that, I mean they have named Ah, genuinely ridiculous man is their candidate. Kamala Harris is an interesting choice. But it's also a strange one. I mean, she basically got hardly any votes in the Democratic primary. And so the idea that she could somehow be magically resurrected and become, in a sense the stand in candidate for the Democrats. I think it's far fetched. Now. What has benefited the Democrats? More than anything else is Corona virus, And by that, I mean, also the economic locked down. The fact that the kind of good economy has been taken away from Trump. But the real question, I think, is who Khun bring the country back. Who can who can restore the economy restore the American spirit? I also think all this lawlessness and mayhem in major cities. I can't believe that even Democrats want to live like this people coming up to your house, smashing windows stealing stuff. This is not a formula for a decent society. So I think, with all that taken into account, despite all the media distortion I think the ordinary guy can see through the fog think that boat pretty well for Trump's remember so called silent Majority that better show up November 3rd. That's for sure. The national supplies a big hug to you and family. Thank you so much. On the final night of the Democratic National Convention. Hey, guess who's now a fan of walls. Security walls. Yes, sory security walls set up barricades, supporters and voters into a specific outside area to watch. Democrat presidential candidate Joe Biden in his speech. So this DNC set up those security walls keep keeping supporters and protesters barricaded into an area outside the Chase Center s o that anybody In the dinosaur media left this Democrat Party water carrying meeting anybody ask Hey, y'all! So this barricade these ones so Two walls work Yes or no? What do you say Joe Biden. 10 minutes to the hour. You're listening to the Dana show from her Southern command in South Texas. A conservative judges confirmed today. That's awesome. I never get sick of winning. I'm with you, though I am worried about this Favored nation idea, the one where our country installs socialist price controls directly from countries with socialized medicine. Their policies will mean fewer new cures less access to treatments and lost jobs for Americans..

Democrats Dana South Texas Steve Lyndon Johnson Democrat Party San Antonio Joe Biden Curtis Ellis America Senate Curtis I AMC America Kamala Harris DNC Jurassic Park FEMA
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"First they passed laws that destabilized families. That's the war on poverty that was done in the mid sixties with the best of intentions. I have never believed that some of my friends believe that Lyndon Johnson, Democrats did it to destroy families. I think they were just naive. They were done with what incentivize families to marry the government on allowed men to abandon their financial more responsibility. Then what happened? Crime, of course, goes up because there's a relationship between not having a father in the home and crime. Even Obama said that then what happened? The majority of the law body people in the community want safer laws, stronger laws to stop them from minority of criminals. The Democrats passed the laws and then what happened? A disappointment at number of blacks go to prison and what happened to Democrats Blame you got institutional racism, which didn't with Republicans are either guilty off or don't care about and we on the other hand, Democrats want to do something about it. That's how the Con world works, and they do it all the time. No. Obama got elected with a higher percentage of the white vote. Then John Kerry would tell you about institutional racism. And even though when Obama walked into office his very first day Trish he was at 67%. How does that happen when you only get 52%? Because 15% who didn't even vote for him still prop for him because they knew that he was Making a statement about America. Yeah, No, he had such an opportunity, Larry. I mean, listen, I was pretty proud that America had a black president, and I thought, you know what it kind of it helps put aside some of those those biases about us as a country and it shows that we have Really, you know, transcended some of our history. But now it feels like we're going right back to some of these very dark days. Because you know of these identity politics. I've got Larry Elder here. Everyone don't go anywhere. Larry. He's coming back with me. Next. We're going to talk a little bit about Uncle Tom. His new movie. This is Dennis Prager. The longer I live, the more I realize that many people a lot of people really over 40 or 50 have aches and pains that Khun Start affecting the way they live the way they sleep or get around. You know what I'm talking about? Pizza Chef Talbot, The owners of relief actor created this 100% drug free supplement to help people like me, My wife and just about everybody I know with low back pain my wife with her knee pain. To see if a 1995 investment $19.95 investment for their three week quick start can help.

Obama Larry Elder Lyndon Johnson Dennis Prager America John Kerry knee pain Khun Chef Talbot president Trish
'Better America': Biden's Campaign Launches New National Ad

All In with Chris Hayes

04:30 min | 1 year ago

'Better America': Biden's Campaign Launches New National Ad

"In one thousand, nine, sixty, four Lyndon Johnson ran a now iconic campaign ad against Barry Goldwater where a little girl counts daisy pedals until her counting becomes the countdown to nuclear explosion idea being present goldwater has become elected and started a nuclear war because he's a madman. said. It. there. Is, are, the stakes. You'll make a world in which all of God's children can live. Aren't to go into the dark room, we must either love each other. Or we must die. Vote for President Johnson on November third, the stakes are too high for you to stay home. The stakes are that you're adorable daughter gets nuked. Now. Even though we're not living through a nuclear winter, we are living through a version of disaster. I mean a a national disaster resulting in thousands and thousands of deaths day after day after day and a new Joe Biden goes against the grain in many ways the opposite of the grand life and death scale the daisy at. The new the biden relates what a bummer. This current disastrous doesn't focus deaths, evictions, closed schools. It says, this virus is ruining the little things like seeing your grandkids. have been gifted with two beautiful grandchildren. We try to see them as often as possible and it's been six months. And it's way too long. And while I don't blame Donald Trump for the virus, I blame him for his lack of action and because of that, we're sitting here zooming or facetime ing with our grandchildren instead of hugging and kissing them. And that's hard. Joe Biden knows every moment is precious I trust you Biden to get this virus under control? I'm Joe Biden and I approve this message. Seems like a really real smart relatable ad for a portion of the population that Joe Biden is trying to focus on. This is for all the people who were sold on idea that there was some normal around the Ben. During the trump years because there is no normal during trump that was false join me. Now for more on the different approaches, the two campaigns are taking is Adrian Shropshire. She's a veteran democratic strategist and executive director of black pack had a lot of experience in politics community organizing and ads as well and I just I was so struck by this ad agent because it's so understood in. So many ways given how terrible things are and given the kind of micro targeted median voter. He's trying to reach you know elderly couple or senior citizen couple in Florida. Yeah I mean the reality is that. Voters understand where we are. They understand the crisis that we're in. They do not. WanNa see campaign after campaign ad reminding them of our national. Right. I've said he focused move after folks. And what? The message that voters say that they want to hear is one of national unity. They WanNa hear message about a path forward how this mess is going to get fixed and I think the brilliant thing about that ad is that. while. It appears to be targeted at one segment of the electorate. The reality is that that is all of us, right? That is my entire family every Sunday night sitting zoom call, right so it is it is. There is a moment where the multipronged crisis that are facing the country are literally touching every single one of us and what's brilliant about the ad is that. You know it's it leads toward that unifying message right? It is it in every message quite frankly every ad I would hope to see that comes out of the campaign on is a way to unify to tell a message to tell a story that connects people about the moment that we're in. It's really if you think about it in this in this way having a national unity being a campaign strategy all by itself.

Joe Biden Donald Trump Barry Goldwater President Johnson Adrian Shropshire Executive Director Florida
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Of Lyndon Johnson at two years now between sixty five the trouble and what's which everybody agreed with a catastrophe and the trouble in Newark did Johnson not respond in any fashion well you know Johnson did worked his heart out getting the civil rights law and then the voting rights law of sixty five along with the billion dollar poverty bill and many other efforts so it yes he was deeply disappointed at the watch right where's the gratitude right that yeah I mean it's a little bit of a a little bit selfish if you went into in a serious pout we know this because his aide Joe Califano who later became a cabinet member trying to find Johnson and swaps went up in flames and on the characteristically for Johnson he couldn't find Johnson Johnson one telephones you know it's called everyone all the time a red button on but Johnson was a wall because Johnson was effectively pouting and digesting the horrible news of watch and it was horrible the numbers turned out to be even higher and then the numbers initially cited that you quoted by the time you get to sixty seven Johnson is disillusioned he sad he's struggling with Vietnam all the time and he cannot understand why his big hearted efforts were working and the rights of the sixty seven contributed to Johnson's decision not to run again in sixty eight Detroit is swept by riding in fires New York times Monday July twenty fourth nineteen sixty seven Romney calls in guard seven hundred arrested at the same time in New York disorders erupt in East Harlem mobs disperse the thousand police rushed in to end me lie eight shots fired on a hundred eleven street we're looking at a catastrophe in the summer of nineteen sixty seven you say that Johnson was in retreat let's leave it there where was Sargent Shriver where was the where was the economic opportunity act while he was in battle and you know Johnson and thank him threatened him prayed over him to get Sargent Shriver take the job the courtship by Johnson was one amazing thing he was a charm offensive that it you know if you you know exponential charm offensive driver in taking the job in and of course Johnson began to blame them for the failures so Shriver was angry too what's sad about for example Detroit is the police violence was still there the jobs were not there the people were arrested and there was terrible destruction in that city today we wonder why destroy it was Detroit was so wrapped one reason was that Ryan people moved out because they didn't want to be around for another ride another reason though once all of the big three automakers were beginning to realize they were facing international competition and you know in the years that followed foreign automakers would begin to easy to choice lunch so the jobs were not there for the people of Detroit the people in the machine tool centers of Missouri or Ohio the people around Michigan and the big automakers I would say out of state liberalism and progressivism said we're going to make this all about high wages for our workers the unions want us to do that we're going to do it and again who was conned out less skilled workers often blacks and they knew it so they were demonstrating at this time there were some very angry black led unions in sixty seven sixty eight the the leader of the United auto workers who would actually contributed to Martin Luther king stale in Birmingham jail once absolutely disheartened because he felt he'd done a lot for black civil rights in unions and yet it black unions were now turning against him and his union are they called in the red hat it should be had the red head very violent talk as of today so those who are liberals and progressives and tried to help didn't supply the the right help and we're headed for that fifty six years later Johnson thought assigned August twentieth nineteen sixty four the SEC eight K. poverty building known as the economic opportunity act Sargent Shriver I believe died in twenty eleven did a Sargent Shriver did the people who work for him regard the poverty build economic opportunity act of failure I think so or much of it a failure Daniel Patrick Moynihan at once and I'm paraphrasing said on the texture but when I called me we who picks up but some snippy miss college girls what he meant was this is a limousine liberal programs are run by people a jobs program for people's daughters at the headquarters and run by people with scant scan understanding what's going on the street morning hand who later became a senator also said our programs are wrong because they are feeding the horses he disparaged eating the horses to be disparaged by which he meant the horses were the social workers right really poor people people really need many of the minorities are not the main beneficiaries the social worker's status meant are the beneficiaries and that brings us to today and the question one might have about the new emphasis on community work we have thirty seconds of your measure of the great society today is it is it understood is that much talked about your book is very careful about it is it right is the memory there we have thirty seconds the memories not there and that's perhaps why we're summoning the old remedy a failed at that time nothing is new it's just forgotten yes the only thing that's new in your life is the.

Lyndon Johnson Newark
How did America get to its current state?

Between The Lines

05:06 min | 1 year ago

How did America get to its current state?

"The scenes across the US in the past week or so, they have been profoundly disturbing heavenly. The protests are in response to the horrifying image of George. Floyd an African American man and Minneapolis. Police officer who killed him by kneeling on his nick for close to nine minutes to spot. He's pleased that he could not brave. Those demonstrations as we all know turned into, want him violence and destruction, not only in the twin cities, but all across American CDs. Today's are quiet and peaceful, but it's really the evenings in the night, so usually bring that fury. Those frustrations attend to boil over in the results or these fiery clashes that we've seen across the country, and of course here in New York. We've already seen dozens of people injured. Hundreds of people arrested in tonight. The expectation is that we could see more of these demonstrations. How did America get to this point? And who precisely are Antioch, the militant left wing political protest movement that part of these rights. Face because Nazis, thank. and. That is a very bad thing because harass people Lemay Organiz they kill. People hurt people. They fight people. And we're the ones who fighting back there. The second coming of Hitler for several decades America has I deeply divided nation. Just go back to the mid to late nineteen sixties when America experienced those long hot summers, protests and riots, Vietnam Rice and Martin. Luther King's assassination. The American people are deeply disturbed. They're baffled and dismayed by the wholesale looting and violence. That has occurred both in small towns and then great metropolitan centres. No society can tolerate massive violence. Anymore than a body can tolerate massive disease to me that black people are in the streets. Has Do the lives air force lead in this country? And unfortunately lead these lives by the indifference and the apathy. And a certain kind of ignorance, willful ignorance on the part of their citizens. According to British historian Max Hastings Pass guest on this show in those days quote. It seemed that rice the election and the Vietnam. War would tearing asunder the greatest country on earth. And to think is deep divisions in America have clearly grown since the sixties especially in the trump era, just think of that toxic polarization, hyper partisanship in Washington and elsewhere not to mention the crisis engulfing American cities. So. How did America get to this point? Robert DALIC is arguably America's most distinguished living presidential historian. He's author of fourteen books including on Presidents FDR JFK, LBJ, Richard, Nixon, and Ronald Reagan. The latest book is called. How did we get? He from Theodore Roosevelt? To Donald Trump it's published by harpercollins. Robert Delic joins me from Washington DC hi Bob. Hi Tom Lovely to hear from you. Great to have you on the show now they adopt is in Washington and across other use CDs, but America as I mentioned, before has experienced similar protests in violence. What do you think distinguishes this crosses? The widespread unrest in nineteen sixty I'd. Well, Tom. One of the things that distinguish did was the fact that Lyndon Johnson of course was. President then, and was presiding over the Vietnam War, which was at the center of what? Disturbed so many people in the United States and triggered so many of these. Demonstrations but Johnson had the good sense. To? Give up running for president. He was very skillful politician. Now we have a president who will not give up who would not resign and the only way we're going to get him out of office is by feeding him in the election. Night comes up and five months from now it's very disquieting situation and the demonstrations across this country. I believe on not. Simply a response to the tragic killing of that black man in Minneapolis, but it's also a protest against Donald Trump's presidency. You Know Tom. He's never reached fifty percent approval. And the going on for years he's been office. And this is unprecedented. No President in terms since we've had polling in the Mid Nineteen Thirties. Has Gone through a whole first term without ever reaching fifty percent approval.

America President Trump Lyndon Johnson Tom Lovely Donald Trump Floyd Robert Dalic Minneapolis United States Mid Nineteen Thirties Washington Vietnam George Luther King Officer Max Hastings Lemay Organiz New York Ronald Reagan
Washington - White House butler who served 11 presidents died of coronavirus

The Opening Bell

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Washington - White House butler who served 11 presidents died of coronavirus

"Wanted to mention so today passed away but a remarkable person you may have heard of Wilson German in the past he was a Butler at the White House who served eleven presidents history was sort of cold in the the movie the bottler with forest Whitaker in Oprah and not so many other big names pretty good movie from a few years back but this gentleman Wilson German started working in the White House as a cleaner in nineteen fifty seven under Dwight D. Eisenhower and then worked for John F. Kennedy was promoted to Butler under JFK but also worked for Lyndon Johnson Lyndon Johnson liked him so much that when Mister Germans wife was very ill he sent that President Johnson sent his personal positions to treat her to to take care of her and then the worked for president Nixon and president Ford and I mean the the the list goes on and on Jimmy Carter George W. bush said that he was a lovely man he was the first person that we saw in the in the white house every morning the last person we saw when we returned at night he worked for president Obama and of course took a great deal of pride in working for president Obama being African American himself that the there was an African American president but a a rather remarkable man who served as a cleaner A. and and elevator operator at the White House apparently they haven't put in the automatic elevators at the White House for at the time at least did not and then ultimately bottler which is you know I I guess quite a prestigious position there he died of coronavirus sadly age ninety is

Wilson German Butler White House Oprah Dwight D. Eisenhower John F. Kennedy Lyndon Johnson Lyndon Johnson President Nixon Ford Jimmy Carter George W. Bush Barack Obama President Trump Mister Germans
Robert Caro on How He Does It

The Book Review

09:47 min | 1 year ago

Robert Caro on How He Does It

"Robert Carroll joins us now he is the Pulitzer Prize. Winning author of many books. New Book is called working researching interviewing and writing. He's also the author of the years of Lyndon Johnson four volumes of them thus far and the powerbroker Robert Moses and the fall of New York Bob. Thanks so much for being here. Pleasure to be here all right so everyone has been greatly anticipating a volume five of the years of Johnson. But instead you have written this other book working researching interviewing writing. Why did you decide to do this? Ever since the powerbroker I kept myself out of the book. I don't think the word I appears in there many times. If soon as the book came out people started asking me. What was it like ten of you Robert Moses and I realized that I should have put in something to tell people what that was like so for like forty five years. I've been hearing that question and people ask me what it's like to work in presidential libraries were. Can you find out from interviews? This isn't the adviced anybody but it's sort of. I said we'll I WANNA give people some glimpses into how I work so. I took time out to do this book now. I'm back doing the volume. I mean it's an interesting question about interviewing Robert Moses because you had read five sessions which women seven sessions with him. Which was very different from the Johnson. Biography where he was dead already for several years. Before you could get started and I'm curious you write about it a bit in working what the difference was like for you. Writing the book writing a biography of a person who was still alive versus writing a biography of someone who was already gone in one sense. It's great to write about someone who's still alive because you get to meet Moses. Didn't talk to me for the first couple of years of the book. Then we had seven interviews. Soon as I started asking questions. Pamela the interviews were over but they will long sessions and I really got to look at him with Johnson. You felt okay. I came along just too late. He had died just three years before was great about him was that he died so young he would have been only sixty seven when I started. He darted sixty four that everyone was still alive. He had I think twelve people in Johnson City High School. When he was there they were all there to be viewed. But you can't make up for not meeting and talking to the person writing about you just can't do feel that absence and working on the Johnson. Yes you do everything you can to overcome that you know you interview the people closest to him over and over and over again constantly asking them what was he like. If I was standing next to you what would I see him doing? So you try to get a feeling of him now. We have these telephone transcripts where you hear him talking hundreds and hundreds of hours you can listen to him talking and see how he deals with people and how he gets what he wants from people. That's always amazing to me. Has that changed the way that you've been doing your research having access to those types a change the writing of history in general like on the Gulf of Tonkin incident which has been sort of mystery. What really happened there. How many attacks were there? On our destroyers. You know that led Johnson to launch these launch bombing attacks on North Vietnam. Now you actually hear the communications between Robert McNamara. The Secretary of Defense Cincpac the admiral at Honolulu and the commander of the fleet. That's an in Viet Nam. You hear this and what was really going on in real time the other aspect of your interviewing that. I thought was so interesting that you write about in this new book working is the delicacy of interviews and especially when you get to touchy subjects. And they'll you didn't interview Johnson for the book did Interview Lady Bird and tell the story about how you and when you approached the subject of Johnson's longtime affair with Alice Marsh. Well when Johnson is in the Pacific during World War. Two year allowed easing Australia. You're allowed one telephone. Call the senator from Texas. Just Johnson has to decide whether to run again for the House of Representatives or to run for senator. I'm going through all the correspondents and suddenly in the middle of it. There is a telegram from someone sewing. Alice I've never heard of Alice. She appears in no book and it says Lyndon everyone else that happened to me in the White House. Everyone else thinks you should run for the Senate. I think you should run for the house. Please try to cool love Alice. I said WHO is Alice. Who was the person that he makes the only one telephone call? And who's giving political advice which he follows shortly after that? So that's you know. An example of going through the papers by luck her sister and best friend show up at the Johnson Library and ask to see me and I go down to see them and they say you know we wanna tell you about a woman named Alice Marsh. We don't want to portray to some Bimbo. She was really very important in Johnson's life. And they told me the whole story of this Lauren and significant relationship and his life. So how do you then? Ask Lady Bird. You know panel. That's the only interview I ever had in my life where I couldn't bring myself to look at the person I was interviewing. Alice was a small town girl. She turned herself into the brilliant Washington. Hostess Brilliant Brilliant Salons and she came from a little town called Morlin. Now no one would go to the mall. And unless they were looking for inflammation analysis a little town in the middle of nowhere and I never know I went up there and we learned about her. And how remarkable she was but all of a sudden we have a mutual friend. Who lived in Morlin? Who calls me in a panic and says the bird in Texas? Everybody Calls Lady Bird Bird. Bird and always. You've been in Marlin. So she knows you know about Al. Assad said well that had to be if it doesn't concern me but her secretary then shows up at my desk in the reading room says Mrs Johnson would like to see you out at the ranch this weekend. We had been meeting in her office so we sit down at the dining table. She's at the head of the table. I might her right. Hand my stenographer's notebook like like the one you use is is down on my right hand taking notes and without preamble. She starts to talk about Alice Quiz. How elegance she was how sophisticated she was how she taught. Linden things and everything that she taught him. He followed the rest of his life. You don't hear these lawn when she met him. He was this new congressman very awkward with Lorne Gang Leo Arms. She said turn them into an asset. Always wear shirts with French. Cuffs and very nice cufflinks. So when people's attention is cool to them it's called in in a in a good way. She told him. We're kind of Necktie to favor. Countess Myers Tie. But most of all at crucial elements in life. It was her advice that he followed an in a number of cases one in particular. It's not exaggerating. Very much to say she saved. His career is takes a moment to tell. But it's it's interesting his early careers financed by a very fierce huge Texas contractor. Herman Brown Brown and Root and Herman was prepared to keep financing his Roy and in return Johnson was getting huge contracts for Brown and root when all of a sudden they had a falling out Lyndon Johnson was getting them authorization to build a dam which they wanted but Linden wandered low. Rent Housing Project built in Boston in what was a very poor Mexican American neighborhood. The houses in that neighborhood were owned by Herman Brown. The tenants were paying rent to him. They were very profitable and he was enraged at Linden wanted to condemn them for his housing project and his chief lobbyist and his chief lawyer talked. Instead you know Herman was about to turn on Linden and when Herman turned on you he never turned back when Alice here is about this and invites them both down to Greatest Stadium Virginia. She sits down at her table. And says why don't you just compromise give Herman the damaging winds and the land and all of a sudden everything was okay. So Lady Bird starts talking not only about her elegance. She says the quotes are in the book. She was so sophisticated so beautiful. I remember her neck succession of wonderful beautiful dresses and me in well not so wonderful. And and then she said you know Lyndon Basically Linden always followed Alice's vice during that whole interview I have to say my head. Just stay down and I took notes. I couldn't look at her so that was done. The next week we went back to ordinary interview she just launched into it without you. Even though I you know I sometimes think I know something about politics. I'm really glad I don't have to write about. Women never understood why she did

Lyndon Johnson Alice Marsh Lady Bird Robert Moses Texas Johnson City High School Herman Brown Brown Johnson Library Pulitzer Prize Robert Carroll Robert Mcnamara Secretary Brilliant Brilliant Salons Gulf Of Tonkin Australia Linden New York Viet Nam
Trump’s presentation of changes in black voting is largely ridiculous — but not entirely

1A

05:32 min | 1 year ago

Trump’s presentation of changes in black voting is largely ridiculous — but not entirely

"Instance how did African Americans com so it becomes so closely identified with the Democratic Party pointed back to Lyndon Johnson fifty six years ago what's the what's the origin of what I'll call the synergy between black folks in Democrats I now right you know it's been a process I mean black people have not always voted Democrat there was a time when we voted and our own best interests and coming out of the civil war Democrats I mean blacks are recognizing that it was the Abraham Lincoln a message that they we're the party of the abolitionist they were Republican SO we align very closely to the Republican Party and then as we began to move into the Great Depression you began to see now you have Franklin D. Roosevelt black people at that particular time they would have been but need that the bottom rung of the economic ladder in here you have a Democrat president FDR's same will listen let's start social programs I ask you about some food and things like that welfare job programs SO black people began to pay attention to the Democrat party not in mass yet but they started looking at it and then you have the civil rights movement with Lyndon B. Johnson in nineteen sixty four Civil Rights bill that passed and although it was a Republican Party that made sure the bill could pass into law because Democrats wanted nothing to do with it it was of a democratic president that was that was leading the charge of the party the parties were not nearly as polarized at the time right southern I think southern southern racist Democrats were were very much oppose they were northern Democrats who were with Johnson and northern Republicans in western Republic yeah if you are a black person coming from the Emancipation Proclamation in eighteen sixty three down to nineteen sixty four of the of the civil rights bill that's a hundred a hundred plus years of Democrats being very enthusiastic in their desire to impede the the movement of black people so whether so whether it was some that was nice and some that maybe wasn't so much it didn't matter the fact is a hundred years between emancipation and the civil rights movement it with the Democrat party that was with great gusto impeding the life of black people so we asked our listeners who are conservatives of color to share why they joined the GOP here's what one person had to say hi there my name is Brian I'm not a black conservative but I am a conservative of color I used to be a Democrat it was a liberal but college I had sort of change of heart and what sort of sports my change with the Facebook group that said minorities that though the public could make me cry and it made me think no wonder the person feel that way and it made me also think you know why do I vote Democrat and so it kind of got me questioning my values and yeah and then you start thinking maybe I should start shopping around for parties and the lead now today fundamental conservative and had to be there and that is encouraged people other people of color to think yourselves if democratic card doesn't own your vote Kathy any part of Brian's story sound familiar to you I love it I love all of it and that's exactly what happened to me I've been I've been voting Republican primarily for over twenty years so this is a brand new I know we have a lot of black folks who are coming out now where at all their Medicare and I'm so excited to welcome them to the other side of the aisle we'll talk in a second about whether it's actually a lot when we look across the country but I had I'm excited about it I'm excited about it nonetheless but what but what the caller said exactly where I found myself when I was in college in my junior year I had the Pitney I wanted to get involved in politics so where did I go Hey I'm black I'm a Democrat so I went to the to the to the first Democrat office I saw sat down the white Democrats man who was running started talking to me and and the piston me a bubble popped up in my mind what what exactly does he believe what he believed doesn't align with what you believe and for the very first time I started thinking through what what do I believe and does his policies align with my policies and that was the seed that was planted that many years later has turned into me being very adamant about rescuing black people off the Democrat plantation and helping them to see what is in their own best interests but I get why black people vote Democrat I mean I was born into the Democrat party just like I was born into brown skin there was no point of separation I never remember a conversation it's just what you do here black we built this way and to step out of that essay why I'm no longer going to vote Democrat many black people like in it to me rejecting the color of my skin so it's very difficult for black people to have that appear Finney and then to have the boldness to say excuse me I'm going to think for myself that is a big deal for people to react and say it's like you rejecting the color of your skin have you ever heard that pushback from all my goodness I had that a lot I have been called every name under the bus Hey do you get all kinds you know I mean it's rhetoric right but everything in an instant and its rejection I lost all of my black friends except for two during the two thousand sixteen election when I came out saying I'm voting for president trump I mean it is literally a ten to rejecting your race and so it's very difficult we're live at the conservative political action conference on Todd's

Democratic Party Lyndon Johnson
White House or Fight House? Tevi Troy’s new book looks at tiffs and turf wars among White House staffers

THINK! America

08:20 min | 1 year ago

White House or Fight House? Tevi Troy’s new book looks at tiffs and turf wars among White House staffers

"With us and we're gonna talk about that you know the fussing and fighting vet says going on in the White House and don't think for a second that that's exclusive to Donald trump's administration you know it's kind of interesting anytime it's its whatever you're closest to write in history and other things they have to be the worst you know and so Donald Trump his administration's wise it just has to be the worst all the fussing and fighting in in fighting that's going on like no other president before well before you really jump that shark and think that that is the case then you start believing you're hyperbole I once you get your hands on this new book called White House from doctor Tevye Troy bestselling author and former White House adviser okay he's been on the inside he's known as and researched and studied this and he's right about now with his book White House rivalries in the White House from Truman J. trump Dr Troy welcome to the show good to have you with us thanks bill Bradley on talk about played out hello this is this is it this is exciting you know that you know to put this out because you know this conversation has come up from time to time and you always hear from you know the hyperbolic that downhole trump is the worst ever and then you you start bringing back some of the the stories and histories and now here it is you've documented it I imagine if you wanted to go back even before Truman we we have to do episodes inch you know volumes of all the fussing happening in the White House right no absolutely and and we know that they were fighting before experiment where we are perfect I mean you look at the administration of Washington and Hamilton and Jefferson murder each other's throats but the difference is they were cabinet members and when I try to get that in my house how the dynamic change once we had the creation of a White House staff there was no real White House staff before Roosevelt and Truman the first person to enter the White House staff and make change the dynamic in that certainly you have the people who are close to the president meaning in the same building advising him on foreign policy and economic policy and then you might have a treasury secretary or spectators biggest ticked off that somebody else is inviting in his area that was one thing that changed in that that meant that I wasn't quite interesting to note that that the dynamic in the entrance of more humanity just because the more issues right yeah look and government was growing mistake became higher and then also you have this right the best celebrity White House aide the whole idea of a White House staff was supposed to be people with a passion for anonymity but that went away pretty quickly especially in the Kennedy administration when he hired people who are already famous like orcas lessons or to work in the White House is suddenly how celebrity White House they had its own reputation has long ties to the craft and they they could get their word out there if the policies were not going their way and to suddenly you have this idea of leaks and counter leaks you can make you look good in the press and that also at the White House right now make that I talk about the book in the course that is continued and become almost like a to the degree of a tender green black belt when you talk about all this and leaking and stuff going on you know but bad enough that it happens in DC but now of course with the most recent refill we understand that even ambassadors in our state department is running rampant with it as well yeah well you talk about ten degree black belt and that that was Henry Kissinger I'll tell you one great story that's been quite how's that Kissinger was dating Jill St John a very attractive bond girl actress Mandy comes out in the papers that Kissinger's dating this woman and Kissinger ghost and extending complains that his rival Christy William Rogers leaked the information about your retaining but the truth is that your lease it because a he wanted everyone to know he was dating that the truck the bond girl would be he wanted to hurt Rogers any internal wars and bribery deposit so what happened what was it what was the conclusion that well well written exam would rail about all the leaking that happened at the state department and constant complained about it but just not your fat it but at least some of the time we know the kiss your will the guy doing the leaking and then blaming the state department and of course everybody knows because your date of birth second longer up there with a win win corrective measure like you would can degrade black belt in Plato's exactly so he gets the he gets the reward and the award let's talk about president Truman we touched a little bit on that I mean he he he was I guess the modern era of the expanding the staff and and really kind of bringing this into play and of course it's just been kind of kind of a a monolith that like the blob is just been growing unto itself right yes Sir but instrument you have the right there were just unbelievable I don't I'm a presidential historian I've been putting this stuff for decades and the story behind in spite house were were things I'd never even heard of and one breaks during the ministration is that the secretary of state George Marshall as opposed to the recognition of the state of Israel which is flabbergasting to update the business interest on July especially right there at that critical time because it was true and that led the battle for inferred knowledge meant of Israel that would that would be very fight with marshals on the wrong side of it Clark Clifford a junior White House beat it on the right side of it make an argument in front of Clifford Clifford and Truman and Marshall are all arguing out in the White House Clifford wins the argument Truman recognized Israel Marshall is still mad that he never again the clippers or mentions his name for the rest of life right yeah right because so it's pretty petty but yeah such as such as you can't be the government the illusion of the Kennedy Camelot regime you said was not devoid of conflict as well of course in Kennedy do you have this notion of Camelot music wonderful people sitting around a table can you never even heard the term Camelot elections administration that comes from our interview that took place after the administration after he was dead yes but even in the administration there was fighting taking place especially between Lyndon Johnson and Robert F. Kennedy canteen was the product any would be turned general and the president brother Lynn Johnson vice president that you hated each other going back to their time in the Senate together when we can't even the lowly staffer and Johnson with the Senate Majority Leader and they had these nasty nicknames for him brought Robert if they reported Johnson is ruthless corded phone and get a canny referred to by Johnson as bunny boy really didn't like each other and they're always trying well anyway and we've known that that that tension what is it was pretty extreme there between them what else within the Kennedy at Camelot compound anything else that you discovered yeah there was a a a a rivalry between artists less intervention before they collect their prize winning historian who came to the White House when the first intellectual ever worked in the White House and then there was Ted Sorensen it was not as well known but he was closer to Kennedy and there was tension between them that continued even after the administration because the two of them we're kind of bracing to get their books out first hand stories then asked her to stop and stop writing his books but it's different in different book out first plus you're obviously would not agree and there were and the race was on and it it colored their relationship there's tension between them that went on for a long time and I got to imagine especially after the assassination these rivalries it would increase all the more would they not yeah and if there is one great story that dean Rusk with the sector state did not like that Slazenger called him brutalized in silence in meetings during the Kennedy administration implying that he wouldn't say anything that's a rough put it out there the only reason he was silent in meetings this lessons are within the facilities are respected leaker and we would talk about everything that he heard needing three wins Mr this is this is great fun Dr Chevy try I'd say it's good fun because you know the politics is just right for comedy it's it's when we take it too seriously like at times we're doing right now in this current environment then we deprive ourselves of of the little bit of humor in thank you Dr drive for presenting

White House Donald Trump
New York: Longest-serving federal judge, named by LBJ, retires at 98

The Takeaway

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

New York: Longest-serving federal judge, named by LBJ, retires at 98

"And a federal judge in New York City was nominated by president Lyndon Johnson is retiring at age ninety eight the New York Daily News reported at U. S. district judge Jack Weinstein was the longest serving incumbent federal judge he was known for favoring lenient sentences in favor of rehabilitation after law school once you work for Thurgood Marshall at the end of a Lacy peak contributing research briefs to the landmark case brown versus board of education which struck down racial segregation in the

New York City Lyndon Johnson New York Daily News Jack Weinstein Thurgood Marshall Lacy Peak President Trump U. S.
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Scrutinized to this day to detect any risk of ideological deviation Gorsuch was among those who came there in the seal of approval of the federalist society the conservative legal group that it made itself the central actor in this court shaping exercise it was plain even more outsize role in the new administration trump took pains to sing single out one man who is not in the rose garden that day Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell for all he did to make this a she meant possible courting trump indeed everyone present knew the McConnell had been the indispensable man leading to that moment at it not been for McConnell president Obama would fill the vacancy created by Justin at justice Antonin Scalia sudden death in February twenty sixteen and just as Merrick garland would be sitting on the High Court anchoring a newly fortified liberal majority McConnell with his audacious announcement of the opening would not be filled no matter that Obama had eleven months remaining in his term and avoided that fateful outcome is intervention mentor Gorsuch not now occupied Scully is see a conservative for conservative swap the next vacancy was almost certain to be far at the far more critical one shift in the court's balance instead of a for a minute on that score all eyes were on the eighty year old Kennedy than serving his third thirtieth year on the High Court and by dint of age years of service and political allegiance the most likely to depart the swing justice center already conservative court Kennedy was pleased about Gorsuch but yet another former law clerk in mind as he ushered as he was ushered into trump's private dining room for an unusual session with the president and White House counsel don McGann justices are routinely invited to the White House for social events state dinners and holiday parties but at least until trump took office such one on one meetings were rare in the modern era it's finicky notions about preserving the appearance of juror and judicial independence unlike the relaxed days when justices did double duty as private counselors to presidents such as Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson in the chronically leaky trump White House aides took pains to keep the trump Kennedy meeting in secret there were no public reports about the session and only a few senior officials ever learned what Kennedy said to trump that day the justices message to the president was is consequential as it was straight forward and it was a remarkable insertion by a sitting justice into the distinctly presidential act of judge picking as a candidate trump up ended tradition by issuing a list of judges it alternately grew to twenty one including Gorsuch from which he pledged to pitch his his Supreme Court nominees now Kennedy had a recommendation for trump's list you named one of my former clerks Kennedy told trump you should think about another one right Cavanaugh Anthony Kennedy spoke the trump White House listened with good reason during the campaign when trump against all expectations emerged as the Republican nominee and ultimate Victor over Hillary Clinton issue judicial selection had been a utilitarian means to electoral and the socially conservative and evangelical voters trump needed to win were deeply understandably suspicious of the thrice married once democratic New Yorker they were particularly dubious about how trump would approach the critical task of shaping the federal judiciary especially the Supreme Court the list of High Court candidates the trump produced with the help of the federalist society up ending convention with typical Trumpy in bravado was explicitly aimed at calming their concerns and is succeeded beyond the wildest expectations of its creators final action day more than a quarter of trump voters identified the Supreme Court as the critical factor in determining their vote white evangelical born again Christians broke eighty one percent for trump to sixteen percent for Hillary Clinton meaning the trump outperform previous Republican nominees Mitt Romney John McCain and George W. bush among such voters in office trying Donnelly keenly understood the politics of judicial selection and its importance for his reelection he also gained a new appreciation for what the Supreme Court meant to a president's legacy thanks to McConnell's ruthlessness trump had inherited.

What exactly are 'war powers' and why is Congress voting on them?

Weekend Edition Sunday

05:05 min | 2 years ago

What exactly are 'war powers' and why is Congress voting on them?

"The United States moves with me to translate into action the United Nations call to arms against the aggressor American occupation troops in Japan are hurried to the defense of the Korean Republic combat units of the United States Marine Corps arrive in Vietnam joining other marines already there the peak in the pattern was Lyndon Johnson's Gulf of Tonkin resolution in nineteen sixty four that led to the escalation of the Vietnam War last year act of aggression directly around persons okay brings home to all of us in the United States once a restaurant of the peace and security in Southeast Asia nearly a decade later as that conflict had stretched into another president's second term Congress rallied to reassert its constitutional role good evening the Congress of the United States in a historic action today made effective a limitation on the powers of the president to make war in nineteen seventy three democratic majorities in both chambers past the war powers resolution requiring the president to notify Congress within forty eight hours when troops were sent into harm's way that legislation also required president to end any foreign military action after sixty days unless Congress had declared war or passed an authorization for the use of military force a phrase that's come to be known as in a U. M. F. since then however the law has fallen short of its author's intent in part because presidents found ways to work around it and also because Congress has shown itself willing to follow the president's lead in matters of foreign conflict there's a new war this morning in the Persian Gulf a rock turns to blood shed to settle its oil price dispute with quite a different level of difficulty arose after Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein invaded his neighbor country of Kuwait in nineteen ninety this is the seventh week of operation desert shield and now they're about a hundred fifty thousand American military in the region and the number is growing every day president George H. W. bush deployed hundreds of thousands of US troops to the Persian Gulf region before Congress had taken a vote to authorize I know what it's like to have fallen comrades and see young kids die in battle and it's only the president it should be asked to make the decision Congress did authorize that use of force by relatively narrow margins in January of nineteen ninety one and the first Persian Gulf War began just days later since then we have seen presidents outmaneuver Congress again and again president Bill Clinton in the Balkans and later president Obama battling ISIS in Iraq and Syria president George W. bush called for two authorizations for the use of military force the first just days after the terror attacks of September eleventh two thousand one I was immediately approved military action against terrorists wherever they might be and bush soon send forces to Afghanistan good afternoon on my orders the United States military has begun strikes against al Qaeda terrorist training camps and military installations of the Taliban regime in Afghanistan the following year Congress debated and approved another authorization this one focusing on a rock the debate was emotional but in the end the vote empowering President Bush to go to war with Iraq was larger than the vote eleven years ago authorizing his father to take on Saddam Hussein one or both of these measures has been cited to justify it literally thousands of drone strikes and other military actions against those the US has labeled terrorists ever since it appears the US military has launched a missile strike in a rock including the one that killed Iranian commander customs money this month a revered Ronnie in general and one of the country's most powerful military leaders is considered by the you asked to be a terrorist president trump has often describe bush's two thousand three invasion and occupation of Iraq as quote the worst single mistake on quote in the history of US foreign policy but President Bush can at least argue he submitted his request to Congress before his invasion of Iraq began trump has yet to seek congressional approval for any of his actions in the Middle East very very nearly three thousand additional American troops have been ordered to the Middle East tonight at midnight and in the latest instance in the did not even inform congressional leaders of his plans other than via Twitter he said some of his opponents among the leaders in Congress could not be trusted with the information in that atmosphere of mutual distrust it is hard to see how the founding fathers ideal of shared powers could succeed in war making or any other aspect of national

United States
The Biggest Tech Flops of the Past Decade

The Tech Guy

05:20 min | 2 years ago

The Biggest Tech Flops of the Past Decade

"Here's the verges article. The eighty four biggest flops fails and dead dreams of the decade. INTECH think the biggest disappointment in tech doc really is Big Tech and the disappointment of you know twitter and facebook not really living living up to the promise the Internet in general not living up to the promise it offered at the beginning of the decade. We could safely say or reasonably say. Oh it's going to bring thus all together it's going to be the ultimate democratizing medium. Everybody will have a voice will be heard from and that turned. Got To be the big problem. Because everybody's being heard from the Internet's being used to Polarize us to some some degree right. Sometimes by outside forces I mean you can it be. Don't facebook just clobbered a bunch of accounts twitter to from you you know outside groups from China and Russia trying to influence our our internal discussions in the United States but also sometimes from inside forces you know out in a way. This is exactly what we thought would happen. That there are many different voices in the United States and some uh many of them are jarring to many of the other people. Right it's You didn't know your neighbors thought these crazy things right and And who's to say who's right or wrong. I mean I don't WanNa make a value judgment. You know the people right who agree with me. Obviously we all say I think if that's if you're going to pick a disappointment maybe this isn't such a disappointment. Maybe the Internet is a disappointment in one regard. Another regard. We're we are learning what our neighbors think it's not it's not a it's not the unified sought. We saw it. It was only because we lived in a bubble we. You know before the free flow of information I I would argue. There's this there's this whole notion Called the filter bubble got an ally pariser even wrote a book called the filter bubble and his premise. was that the Internet fosters kind of these bubbles of thought where you just read stuff that you agree with. I think it's kind of the opposite. I think that's what it was before the Internet before the Internet you made the magazines and newspapers. TV channels and and they kind of fostered a uniformity of sought. And there are some moments is very famous moment when Walter cronkite. The most trusted voice in news in But wins oops probably Late sixties now. I Guess Johnson was still president so it was So it must have been sixty seven or sixty six Walter cronkite finally on the CBS. Evening News said we can't win the war in Vietnam and the nation pivoted people. When Walter said it everybody in fact Lyndon Johnson very famously said well we've lost now off if we if we've lost Walter? We've lost everybody but that those are those are remarkable moments because they're so few so far between are they. At least they were in those days there was a uniformity of thought. And if Walter said something well the nation kind of pretty much went along now now. We're very fractious. Because every voice is heard he's had a bad thing well it's certainly not comfortable in the way that nineteen fifties America America was. It was very comfortable right. We all kind of well thought we thought we thought the same thing we didn't know it was all the stuff on the rocks. It was going on. It's never stopped going on. It's always go there. And now thanks the Internet's not under the rocks anymore. It's out there in the open. I suspect that's a good thing in the long run. There's no mysteries and secrets. And we don't have the illusion that we all agree on everything and you know what I th. I predict. I'm getting optimistic here. A hope you'll forgive. Let me but I keep seeing these stories the biggest flops. The end of the decade is just disappointing with the Internet. I I I held up this magazine and holding up a magazine radio silly. I hold this magazine up from the New York Times last month. That said so. The Internet didn't turn out the way we hoped that was that was the cover and then The whole supplement this week the flops and failures of the twenty tens. Maybe it isn't such a flop. Maybe in time we'll adjust and we'll understand yes. There are many kinds. There's your neighbors think differently than you do. Maybe be Certainly people in your state your county your city and certainly in the country they all have. There's many varying opinions of. Maybe we'll find a way to embrace that. It's just that we used to. We have this illusion that we all kind of agreed on stuff not anymore. They'll we'll have that illusion anymore. Do

Walter Cronkite Facebook Twitter Lyndon Johnson United States Intech Big Tech New York Times Vietnam CBS America President Trump China Russia
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"Of the impeachment process with a fox news alert the debate is under way and there are votes expected tonight on the impeachment of the forty fifth president of the United States we have all the details for you all and lots of perspectives here on the guy Benson show today I look up at my screen right now and I see representative John Lewis a Democrat from Georgia has just taken to the lectern let's dip in and listen live this is the impeachment debate happening right now we decided president Lyndon Johnson but today this day we didn't ask for this this it is not a day drawing you shouldn't is founded on the person who we do not have a chance we have president's Lewis is clearly vote in favor of impeachment not a surprise and echoing what we've heard from the speaker when she is trying to tone down the the temperature a little bit and saying okay let's let's style it back this is a sad day that is what they're trying to convey to voters and some of them are doing a better job of conveying that than others I wanted to use coming up in the next segment any McCarthy is going to be here our friend former federal prosecutor he's written a book on impeachment he did so during the Obama years we have course will asking about impeachment bought I also want to ask him about this bill Barr the Attorney General sitting down for an exclusive interview with our own Martha McCallum on the story tonight fox news channel we have some sound bites from that story firing back at James Comey will play you audio get reaction that's coming up on the guidance and shall he's an evening with progressive it took a bit of a risk singing that song but of course.

president United States John Lewis Georgia Lyndon Johnson McCarthy Martha McCallum James Comey Benson representative Obama bill Barr Attorney
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Lyndon Johnson was sworn in immediately the plane right after he was a Kennedy was declared dead was because there has to be a president yeah and worse so it was for a brief moment there was from from Kennedy stuff until the swearing in there was no president and I mean if if this whole thing has gotten to the point of thirty in terms of facts and Kelly and prediction about their alternative facts well currently there are alternate back but not in a court of law right now in a court of law and less and less and it thank heavens for our court because they have really made clear that they are standing up to the facts and the law and they're not ignoring it two would you like a historical fun facts regarding Lyndon Johnson before we go yes what is that he played a little bit of grab **** with my mom on the dance floor it is not two hands he will hand the LBJ my goodness gracious that wonderful well yeah no no me two times up back then well we'd about that in Watergate girl I know yes there are plenty of me to the way they had one on the radio that I I was on a show with a new defense lawyer for Donald Trump and just like you can name right no I mean and she she was very defense for like but she was also very fox news like folk over the host and didn't answer questions she said what she needed to say and wanted to say and then I was on with someone named Bobby on he who is the former New Jersey prosecutor and we were talking about the case for impeachment and he said well you know I I I actually know her and she's a nice girl and I I I never interrupt another gas but I did and I said I can't believe you just that they are they said what what should I have called her I said you should have called her a defense lawyer she is I said well she's a nice woman that's why I still have to step up from nice girl but it's not a step to where we need to be exact that's why he deals with shock that's what Joe's because ironically named Watergate girl after the seventies my foot it should not capture today thank you thank you happen to think of it like last week Dan Abrams so I was like stone Jill we're out of time I we always go too long because we love you so much wonder if you are perfect for every year that every era that girl reference you are timeless okay all right great talking to you too honey thanks Joe by she's warm this lady Lassie's lady she giggled at your little story there that was hysterical well it was one degree of Stephanie Miller separation well it's always.

Lyndon Johnson Kennedy one degree two hands
The Mission Act looks to give more healthcare options to veterans

All Things Considered

05:24 min | 2 years ago

The Mission Act looks to give more healthcare options to veterans

"We're going to spend the next few minutes talking about something that we don't often see in washington these days a bill that passed congress with overwhelming bipartisan support it's called the mission act and starting this week it will bring big changes to the department of veterans affairs particularly when it comes to health care the law expands the number of veterans who qualify for private care that is reimbursed by v._a. today i spoke with the secretary of veterans affairs robert wilkie and he told me the number of veterans seeking healthcare outside the v._a. has actually gone down recently so i asked the secretary if that's the case how many people does he expect to take advantage of this expansion i don't see that large arise the way the system is set up is that the veteran will come to us we will tell him that we cannot provide a service and because he lives outside a certain number of minutes from v._a. facility and we're telling him that the wait time is greater than twenty days then he has the option of going into the private sector as you know critics are afraid that this is a move towards privatising v._a. healthcare explain why you disagree with view well just presented a two hundred twenty billion dollar budget a budget that also calls for an employee base of three hundred ninety thousand ten years ago the budget was ninety eight billion and we had two hundred eighty thousand employees so if we're going about privatizing this we're going about it in very strange way but on its surface doesn't expanding eligibility for private care constitute a shift away from government provided health care whether or not this is part of as critics would accuse some kind of trojan horse larger project well no not if you read the mission act my goal is to provide the best possible healthcare because it's not only the right thing to do but the congress said it right there in the legislation and because of the nature of our patient base people like my father suffered terrible combat wounds cambodia there's nothing in the private sector that is going to understand or take care of someone who has suffered that kind of trauma in battle there's just no other place like i'd like to talk about another important topic which is expanding efforts to prevent veteran suicide the v._a. has had this is the highest clinical priority something like twenty veterans die each day by suicide and this number has for the most part been pretty consistent why after years of making this a priority hasn't the v._a. been able to make a real improvement in this area well i don't think the country has made it a priority i've said that we need a national conversation on mental health homelessness in addiction you're in charge of the v._a. so let's talk about what the v._a.'s doing yeah well the v._a. has got very specific programs every veteran who comes to us gets a mental health screening every veteran who comes to us has same day mental health services so why haven't the numbers improved here's the problem all of these cases are not related give you an example fourteen of the twenty take their lives are veterans that we have no contact with a couple are on active duty several are on guard and reserve duty and never deployed and the bulk are from the vietnam era lyndon johnson left washington d._c. fifty years ago in january and many of these problems have been brewing ever since that time so we're not going to be able to get these numbers erased but we have to change the culture that we start training troops from the time they get into boot camp to the time they leave not only on their own mental health but to see signs in their buddies and also say veterans crisis line get seventeen hundred calls a day of those seventeen hundred we act on two to three hundred calls where we send people out and we get those veterans help does the have enough mental health providers right now well we are in the same position the united states is in we were able to hire thirty nine hundred mental health professionals last year i think n._p._r.'s covered the fact that most of our medical schools are sending their students into the most expensive specialties out there and v._a. i just as the rest of america sucks secretary wilkie the last thing i would like to ask you about is surprising moment that happened on the campaign trail recently where congressman seth monta massachusetts he's a veteran running for the democratic nomination did four combat tours in iraq and at a campaign event last week he spoke very frankly and openly about his experience with this is what he told n._p._r. about that moment now applying to leave the country and i think it'd be different anyways not to lead by example and share my own story about my own struggle with the issues what's your reaction to seeing this kind of an honest conversation happening in a form as prominent as a presidential campaign well it is about time it is about time we are seeing a generational shift in the armed forces of the united states where we finally talk about these things we don't hide them the military is a conservative institutions for many reasons and one of them is it takes a long time to change but the more we hear voices like this the more we talk about it i think will be in a much better

Washington Three Hundred Ninety Thousand Two Hundred Twenty Billion Dol Fifty Years Twenty Days
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

14:02 min | 2 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"President has always accused of using power abusing power as abused power to use the IRS like Obama or Kennedy or Lyndon Johnson, her FDR. No did he use the FBI like Lyndon Johnson and Kennedy and FDR. No. How about those files that wound up in the Clinton White House? Remember that Hillary? That problem at the Trump White House now, no problem there. How many reporters Trump locked up? None by last count. How many newspapers is he shut none by last count. How many did FDR shut down? How many people that he locked up? We can go on and on. But I want to touch on this subject and on freedom of the press page one ninety two those of you who are going to get it. Newsrooms editorial pages insists that President Trump is frequently and relentlessly abusing power in more ways than one can count. A categorize by way of news reports news analysis. News interpretation, news tables, expert, commentary and clear-cut propaganda. The public is served by the Democratic Party press. A daily dose of President Trump's alleged criminal violations legal violations ethics violations, norm violations and president at actions, bullying threatening, etc. Suggesting or asserting that Trump is a tyrant would be tyrant. Typical example, Huffington Post contributor, Phillip Ratner. Good name their pal. Phillip Rottner proclaimed on July twenty seven twenty seventeen only six months into the Trump presidency. They quote, Donald Trump is using the bully pulpit of the presidency to politicize the criminal Justice system. Punish politicians who won't lie and humiliate private citizens who dare to speak out against him. Whether Trump's abuse of power is criminal or only dangerously unethical probably depends on whether he is crossed the line into criminal. Obstruction of Justice that judgment will be made by special counsel, Robert Muller, assuming that Muller will be allowed to complete his investigation. Hall. Psychos course Muller did finish investigation. And there was no criminal obstruction of Justice rotten or later declared that neither criminal accountability nor the prospect of impeachment takes the full measure Trump's abuse of power more important is the damage. Trump is inflicting upon the rule of law separation of powers, and the checks and balances that protect our democracy the hell with this fool know about any of that. And as I write in on freedom of the press rotten is widely absurd and hysterical assertions are not uncommon among those who work in America's newsrooms, the mass media coverage at Donald Trump treats has given that he's power hungry lawbreaker. But to what end is he supposedly so inclined? He is not financially enriched himself as president on the contrary. He left the lucrative business career to run and then serving public office and donates his presidential salary to government and charities. He's not an ideologue who seeks to fundamentally transform America. And to something it is not and against the public's will as Barack Obama openly proclaimed are like Senator Bernie Sanders and other democratic candidates seeking the presidency of declared. He's not assumed our exercise presidential powers and some extraordinary way. Despite for example, efforts to falsely characterizes use the national emergencies act of nineteen seventy six and the funding of physical barriers on the southern border, as such by the way, whatever happened to the manufactured crisis on the southern border. Looks like a real crisis to me. What's manufactured is the BS that comes from the Democrats? An examination of news reporting immediate commentary over a score of months demonstrates that many of the president's statements decisions and actions are met with a predictable and knee jerk course, immediate excavations at allegations. However seemed at one point the President Trump's firing a former FBI director James Comey whose resignation or removal of democratic officials and the Democratic Party press. Head earlier demanded turned out to be an specially traumatizing event for the mass media or more accurately and opportunity for them to crystallize their loathing for the president around a set of accusations such as constitutional crisis, obstruction of Justice and cover up which they hoped would lead to political and legal undoing. Now, our friends at the Washington free beacon observe that combs dismissal drachmas, Asians that Trump was trying to cover up the federal investigation into collusion between his presidential campaign and the Russians in two thousand sixteen CNN legal analyst, he's more of a legal aid A-List, I would say, Mr. producer. Jeffrey Toobin said the firing was a grotesque abuse of power by Trump was the sort of thing that happens non democracies fellow CNN analyst, and this guy failed that meet the press David Gregory said Trump's actions in the subsequent White House been demonstrated disdain for the presidency. The free beacon also reported that MSNBC host Chris Matthews called it. The Tuesday night massacre a reference to the Saturday night massacre. When Richard Nixon ordered the firing of Watergate special prosecutor Archibald Cox in nineteen Seventy-three. He later at Trump's actions had the whiff of fascism to them, one of the reporters who broke the Watergate scandal the bloated dummy. Carl Bernstein said on CNN that the dismissal. Mark a terribly dangerous moment in American history. And then there's ABC's Cokie Roberts. She said, the Watergate comparisons were understandable, and I mess NBC's. Loathsome host Joe Scarborough said that the echoes award gate, we're filling Washington DC that question. This morning is whether the centuries old system of checks and balances well swing into action. What was missing from? Most of these reports was accuracy and context the remaining good and legitimate reasons for combs firing many Democrats have been on record denouncing him for example in November two twenty sixteen. Bloomberg news reported, quote, Senator Charles Schumer is joining a growing chorus of criticism over FBI director James Comey's decision to alert lawmakers to new emails but tensions linked to the bureau's investigation of the Hillary Clinton's private server. I do not have confidence in him. Any longer Schumer said, by the way, Chuck that corn row that's stuff that you planted into your head. It's not taking hold must be climate change on January thirteen twenty seventeen in a story headlined tensions between Democrats and director CBS news reported that Democrats stormed out of a briefing on Russian hacking furious. But one of the briefers Komi the FBI director. Has no credibility said Representative that detestable, Maxine Waters, California, my confidence and the director's ability to lead. This agency has been shaken said Representative Hank Johnson of Georgia. Now, of course on may nine twenty seventeen. The deputy attorney general of the United States rod Rosenstein, set forth in detailed memo, titled restoring public confidence in the FBI. The reasons he and the department of Justice had lost faith in Komi and the basis for his firing among other things he wrote, although the president has the powdery movie FBI director, the decision should not be taken lightly. I agree with the nearly unanimous opinions of former FBI officials the way the director handled the conclusion of the Hilary Clinton Email investigation was wrong. And as a result, the the is unlikely to gain public and congressional trust until it has a director who understands that gravity the mistakes and pledges never to repeat them having refused to admit his errors, the director cannot be expected to implement the necessary corrective actions. In fact, shortly after it's fine Comey stated in a letter from himself to all quote, unquote. That quote, I have long believed that a president can fire FBI director for any reason. Or no reason at all. I'm not going to spend time on the decision or the way was executed. Now, of course, disgruntled Komi has never stopped criticizing the president for his removal. But at the time, he understood to be perfectly legitimate and legal presidential election. Notwithstanding that the Russia investigation was never hampered in any way during our after combs firing the president did nothing to limit its reach or it's funding. The Trump's abuse of power narrative persists in the media. The fact is that the Trump administration's use of executive power has hardly been abusive. Indeed, it has been unexceptional even tame and those of you who preordered the book what you'll find is. Then give actual examples. Stunning shocking examples that I that I dug up the course of months. Of Franklin Roosevelt Roosevelt for that matter. You'd be shocked to learn. John kennedy. Of Lyndon Johnson. And yes, some of Nixon. But Nixon was a choirboy compared to Johnson, and Kenny that's the truth. That's the truth. I mean Johnson is I've told you before he literally wiretapped Hubert Humphrey's phones, his own vice president because he wanted to know what Humphry was going to say about the Vietnam war. He was running for president of the United States against Richard Nixon. He had Hoover Senden FBI agents into his own convention. The democrat convention Atlantic City to keep an eye on those who would oppose him cluding, the Kennedy clan and had Martin Luther King's hotel phones bugged. But he was just doing that from which he learned from the Kennedy brothers. Robert kennedy. Agreed. That Hoover should go ahead and bug Martin Luther King's phones, they knew everything king was doing everywhere. He was going. Robert Kennedy advised. Hoover. Just be careful. This is very delicate matter. All those kids over there at the Washington compost. They just love their man. Ben bradlee main after I brought down Nixon published the Pentagon papers. What a man what an icon of journalism. No, he wasn't. He was in John Kennedy's back pocket. You see before Bradley worked at the post. He worked at Newsweek on by the same company. He helped cover it up. Some of Kennedy's activities. And even worse. Kennedy through one of Pierre. Salinger shared FBI files with Ben bradlee. How about that? Shared tax information about Getty and others. Ben bradlee. Here's your Washington compost. Questions have been raised about the way that Bob Woodward. Forget about the the slob Bernstein. He was along for the ride. He's too stupid to do anything. But Woodward's a little bit more conniving. Of course. I don't know these men I'm nothing personal against them. Just call him as I seem. Been some questions about the reporting stuff hidden flowerpots? Nobody believes that. They just headed kind of dress it up. Ben bradlee didn't believe that. They're getting most of their information from the deputy director of the FBI now as a side point as I say, all this is an unfrequented the press as a side point. This is kind of how I knew that these leaks two years ago, we're coming out of the senior level up among other places because they've done it before that was Mark felt the former deputy director he was deep throat. Because all these investigations, the roads all lead to the senior level the FBI. You've got disparate investigations going on for right of individual, but they all funnel in they all funnel through. That's how I knew it had to be coming from the top literally be I when I saw the Faisal leak, and I reported to you two years ago. What I read what I saw that had to come from the FBI the MVP is instigating and involved in the initial aspects of Feis application. So you had to know that that's where it was coming from Brian Stelter? He's not hard to notice. He's tall as wide as a little, you know. Marshmallow. But anyway. He got an argument. How do you know about Faisal who told you maybe you're not reading the media? But you can't independently verify that this is what I'm dealing with an absolute certify a moron. He had no curiosity whatsoever. And still doesn't. He stood up. You can lead a liberal to water, but you can't force them to drink. Not being able to make it.

President Trump President FBI director John kennedy Trump White House Ben bradlee Trump Representative Hank Johnson Richard Nixon Donald Trump Washington combs Hillary Clinton Democrats Trump administration James Comey Barack Obama
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

11:28 min | 2 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on KPCC

"This is one eight I'm Todd's willington Washington just rejection is on assignment in the Senate chamber on Capitol Hill here in Washington in the gallery. Overlooking the Senate floor there's a place just for journalists who report on the Senate every day. It's where they go to watch the big history-making moments. The votes that send us to war or enact a healthcare law on a desk above where the Senator stand. There's a book that sits like a fixture. It's a permanent reference for understanding what's really going on below. It's a biography. It's the story of Lyndon Johnson. And how he used power to bend. The Senate to his will and become the greatest majority leader in history. Master of the Senate one poet's surprise in two thousand three for its author. Robert Caro in eleven hundred pages Carro uses president Johnson to explore how power Crete's how it's used and the impact of that power on the everyday lives of Americans. It's one installment in the series. The years of Lyndon Johnson Carro was already a Pulitzer prize winner for his thirteen hundred page nineteen seventy four biography about New York infrastructure mogul, Robert Moses, it's called the powerbroker cowers fans. Now eagerly await the last installment of the Johnson books all about the presidential years, the sixties civil rights and Vietnam. In the meantime, Robert carrot is out with the new much shorter book, it's called working, and it's all about the interviews the discipline, and the method that have helped Robert Caro in thrall his fans for decades Robert Carroll joins me now from NPR in New York mister car. Welcome to one A. Nice to be here. Very nice to have you, sir. I know that people constantly ask you when the final LBJ book is going to be finished. And and I promise you're going to be spared that here, I'm not going to ask you that give you a break from that perennial question. Even though you never give your sources of break from your perennial questions. That's okay. The years of Lyndon Johnson have been a forty year plus project for you in Robert Moses, many years before that when you were a young reporter there. There are lots of people with real power in this society. What drew you to these two powerful men? Well, I was a young journalist that was a political reporter. And I got interested in Robert Moses, I started to realize we live in a democracy. So we think that power comes from being elected for votes at the ballot box. But here was ago. I Robert Moses who had never been elected to anything, and he had more power than anyone who was elected more power than any mayor more than any governor more. More than any mayor in governor put together and he had held this power for forty four years. And with it. He shaped New York all the highways the modern bridges, the porks. And I said, I don't understand I'm supposed to be writing about political power. But I have no idea where he got this power. And I realized that that anybody else, and I realized that have to write a book to try to find out what it was that. I didn't understand what it was. And to explain a similar impulse for Lyndon Johnson. Well, by in a way, similar. So the power broker you could say is about urban power power and cities, then I wanted to do national power. And I learned I hoped with the powerbroker that if you pick the right man, you could show a lot about political power through his life. And I knew I wanted to do national power next. And I knew I wanted to do it through Lyndon Johnson because I felt his life. He understood national power. I felt I could do a lot through his life of you mentioned those early days as a young reporter a young political reporter when you looked up from your daily deadlines in your daily stories and realized wait power is important. And and why does this unelected man have so much of it? You got your start as a beat reporter at Newsday on Long Island to take me. Take me back. If you can how do you remember those days in the clattering teletype in the grumpy editors in the newsroom, you know? I. I love being reporter, then as you say the newsroom was full of shouting back and forth. I work nights for awhile. I think by hours seven thirty at night to three thirty in the morning. And if you look around the room about three o'clock, you sort everybody with the headsets on and you knew they were making dates for when they got off at three thirty. You could tell who is dating who by who is torturing the headset, and who who is listening, but I had an editor who is like an old out of the front page days in Chicago, tough old guy named Alan halfway. I had never done any kind of investigative work in through a real accident. The meaning everyone else who's on the Newsday picnic on fire island one could get them on the telephone. Because this was guess about nineteen sixty six sixty seven no one had cell phones. And a tip came in a very important story. We're working on they couldn't get any of the regular investigative reporter. So finally, the editor said to me you'll have to go down and do it. It was looking through files secret files that was suddenly being made available to us at the Federal Aviation agency at Idyllwild airport late at Kennedy airport, and I went down. I just loved the. But I didn't know that. I knew what I was doing. I wrote a long memo for so that the real reporters who came in later could write the story and the next day. The this old guy secretary he was managing editor calls and says Allen wants to season Allen halfway she says island wants to see right away. I said to my wife, I I'm glad we didn't move about to be fired. And I went in there, and he was reading my memo, and he looks up at me. And he says, I didn't know someone from Princeton could do digging like this from now on you do investigative work. Todd with my usual southwe fair times. Like, I said, but I don't know anything about investigative work. And I remember he looked up at me for a very long time. And he said just remember one thing turn every page. Never assume anything turn regard them page. And I think I've carried that advice in my head of since you get a byline on that story on the. You ask the right question. No, I didn't. You remember who did? No. Well, I. The two reporters who were covering most of this will Bob green in on Brophy. But I don't know who's lying on. They probably oh, you a bigger than maybe even they would acknowledge their later years. I wonder since they were at the company picnic, and and you for the first time turned every page that was advice. And you you write about this in the book that that was advice that has stuck with you throughout your entire career. Turn every page assume nothing always get the next interview read, the next document. That's a moment. It's pretty clear that has that has never left you. No, I I wish I could recount all the times that that advice has proven just right? I mean, I could tell you one incident. Diana, the Johnson library. Your course, you can't turn every page. They're they're there. They say they have forty five million pieces of paper there. And I believe that I believe that if they go on endlessly. But I decided to look in the boxes of papers that related to his first three years in congress because I wanted to paint the picture of what are what the life of the young new congressman was Johnson came to congress at the age of twenty nine without any power. So I'm I said, okay. That's what ever was I think Levin twelve boxes I can handle that it's going to take time. And I'm looking I and you look through these papers, these letters, and memos and all and you see oh, something happened. And it happened in October nineteen forty before October nineteen forty this young congressman is writing letters to committee chairmen and senior congressman basically saying can I have five minutes of Utah after election day nineteen. Thousand forty November fifth nineteen forty all of a sudden a lot of the letters from these more powerful congressman to this young congressman saying can I have five minutes of your time. And I said what changed things around at that time. I was a talking a lot interviewing a lot to an old Washington fixer sort of a legend in his time. Thomas corcoran. They call them. Tommy, the cork the greatest fundraiser in history, they call them. And I said to him what happened in October nineteen forty and I remember he called me kid, and he said money could money, but he said you're never going to be able to write about that kid. I said why not he said because Lyndon Johnson never put anything in writing. And I really believed that at the time. But I said I'm gonna look through, you know, turn every page in this ten or eleven boxes. And I'm sitting there turning one letter innocuous letter after another thinking, you know, I'm just wasting another three or four weeks in my life. And all of a sudden he did put something in writing there. It is. It's a Western Union. Telegraph form from Tova thirteenth nineteen forty. It's from George Brown, Brown and root this huge Texas contracting firm that was really financing his early rise. And it said Linden. The checks are on the way and Linden had written in hand on the bottom. I'm not acknowledging their letters were said telling anyone about this. So thank them yourselves. But the names of the six people were in there. It will Brown root subcontractors, and I was able to cross reference into their files and find out that they were all sending this money to Johnson. And what was he doing with the money? I kept turning pages. And there was a list type by one of his secretaries fascinating list, it with to type columns in the left tank, which one of the most amazing documents taught I've ever seen in the left hand type column was the name of the congressman who were asking Lyndon Johnson for money in the central column was what they were at how much they were asking. And what they were asking it for him outs. They were asking with sociable. Today's terms Linden need four hundred fifty dollars for last minute advertising Linden. They're going to steal at the polls. I need seven hundred dollars for poll watch and Linden deciding who gets largest and who does not. Yes. In the way. He did it Mr. let's, let's take a brief breath. And we'll come right back to this story. More with Robert Caro right after this on Robert Caro's career of doing.

Lyndon Johnson Robert Caro Robert Moses reporter congressman national power Lyndon Johnson Carro Senate Linden Johnson New York Washington Todd investigative reporter Pulitzer prize Senator Robert carrot Vietnam fire island
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Software controls hydraulic pumps and Motors similar to those used when Lyndon Johnson was president Wall Street Journal reporter, Dan, Michael says the plane I designed in the nineteen sixties and modernized three times is caked with successive generations of technology superimposed on each other. He's with us from his post in Brussels, Dan, explain to one of the issues that investigators are focused on with the max crashes. Is this? Stops the plan from stall I accidentally. And it was introduced in the most recent version of the plane that was developed four five years ago. The planet selfish. I evolved in the nineteen sixties. It's been modernized three times. Each time. A new layer of more advanced technology would introduced. And one thing that that these crashes appear to show it's not conclusive is the unexpected consequences when you introduce. Digital control software automation to a piece of equipment that previously was mechanical or much simpler, especially if the operators in the case pilot are unaware of this system or aren't clear how the system works or there's some unexpected interaction between the new software and the older physical equipment. You said to even before the internet of things becomes a pervasive. Reality tech experts in public safety pros are fretting over the intersection of virtual and real in what they call cyber physical security. So so that's ex- on a more broad meaning here, obviously. Exactly, I did all familiar with cybercrime hacking, malware. But so far most of it has focused on the virtual world of the internet. We have a Bank account. Annette and our money is indeed materialized, intricate stolen, it's stolen. But it's it's in this virtual world. The internet and most of the connected world. So far. Addington been virtual, but it's starting to get physical because digital technology is allowing tensor on all sorts of things, and and the ability to transmit data is growing exponentially. People talk about the internet of things where you're a reader, your and even smart home devices are step toward that everything is connected to the internet and five G technology. He's gonna push that. And so the all these problems that have existed in the virtual world of the internet will. Already do or starting to and will very much more pose a threat to the world that we live in right? So. In what realm are hackers, for example, rubbing their hands together in excitement. It really runs the gamut from. Kind of malicious activity just to mess with things. But what really scares people is. Physical equivalent of the malware attacks. So like about. Random. Taking up Phillipi hostage day. If you want your factory back you have to pay us or even beyond that taking control of some kind of silly to cause actual physical damage. Most of the damage has been caused by hackers and malware so far has been either financial or emotional or reputational, but very little of it. It's been actual direct. Physical harm. By now. It is increasingly possible. I mean there have been attacks. So far. Ukraine has been a testing ground for Russian attacked on things like the power grid. But we had an article recently in the Wall Street Journal about how Russian hackers got into the US power grid didn't do harm but had the potential to so retrofitting, then kind of circling back to the seven thirty seven max is retrofitting. The most dangerous of all it's more dangerous in many ways, if you're going to develop new technology that digitally controlled like, an electric car or Doronin or an advanced medical device. It's a piece of equipment with twist software and a computer controls. Software is developed at the same time if the hardware the two are integrated from the outset, and it may not be done. Well, but chances are there is a thought paid to security safety. And what happens if this thing gets hacked? But if you've got something like a petrochemical plant that it existed for decades, maybe even had computer controls, but those computer controls whenever never network to anything and you start adding internet connection remote connections. Maybe you open the facility to the potential for innocent software, bugs, just bad software or malware hacking completely unforeseen interaction. Thanks, dan. Dan Michaels Wall Street Journal reporter in Brussels. It's thirteen minutes now after the hour.

Wall Street Journal Dan Michaels reporter Brussels Lyndon Johnson Michael president Addington Annette Ukraine Phillipi US Doronin thirteen minutes four five years five G
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Software controls hydraulic pumps and Motors similar to those used when Lyndon Johnson was president Wall Street Journal reporter, Dan Michaels says the plane I designed in the sixties and modernized three times is caked with successive generations of technology superimposed on each other is with us from his post in Brussels, Dan, explain to one of the issues that investigators are focused on with the max crashes is this a system that stops the plan from stall I accidentally, and it was introduced in the most recent version of the plane that was developed four or five years ago. The plane itself as I developed in the nineteen sixties it's been modernized three times each time. A new layer of a more advanced technology would introduced and one thing that that these crashes appear to show it's not conclusive is that you can get some unexpected consequences when you introduce. Digital control software automation to a piece of equipment that previously with mechanical or much simpler. Especially if the operators in this case pilot are unaware of this system or aren't clear how the system works or there's some unexpected interaction between the new software and the older physical equipment to even before the internet of things becomes a pervasive. Reality tech experts in public safety pros are fretting over the intersection of virtual real- in what they call cyber physical security. So so that's on a more broad meaning here, obviously. Exactly. We're all familiar with cybercrime hacking, malware. But so far most of it has focused on the virtual world of the internet. We have a Bank account on the internet, and our money is indeed materialized to get stolen, it's stolen. But it's it's in the virtual world. The internet and most of this. Connected world so far. It's been virtual. But it's starting to get because digital technology is allowing sensors on all sorts of things and and ability to transmit data is growing exponentially. People talk about the internet of things where you're frigerator your ad, even smart home devices are step towards that. Everything is getting connected to the internet and a five G technology is going to push that. And so the all these problems that existed in the virtual world of the internet will. Already do or starting to and will very much more. Pose a threat to the physical one. Old that we live in. All right. So in what realm are hackers, for example, rubbing their hands together in excitement. It really runs the gamut from. Kind of malicious activity just to mess with things. But what really scares people is. Physical equivalent of of the malware attacks. So like. About. Random. Facility hostage day. You want your factory back. You have to pay us or even beyond that taking control of some kind of silly to cause actual physical damage. Most of the damage that's been caused by hackers and malware so far has been either financial or emotional or reputational, but has been actual direct. Physical harm. But now. It is increasingly possible. I mean there have been attacks. So far. Ukraine has been a testing ground for Russian attacks on things like the power grid. But we had an article recently in the Wall Street Journal about how Russian hackers got into the US power grid didn't do harm but had the potential to dance Wall Street Journal reporter, Dan Michaels. Meanwhile, the journal says officials have reached a preliminary conclusion that a flight control feature automatically activated before the Ethiopian Airlines plane nosedived into the ground earlier this month. It's the strongest indication yet that the caste system misfired and both the airlines flight and a lion air flight in Indonesia which crashed in late October, fourteen minutes now after the hour on.

Wall Street Journal Dan Michaels reporter Lyndon Johnson Ethiopian Airlines Brussels Indonesia Ukraine president US fourteen minutes five years five G
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Software controls hydraulic pumps and Motors similar to those used when Lyndon Johnson was president Wall Street Journal reporter, Dan Michaels says the plane I designed in the sixties and modernized three times is caked with successive generations of technology superimposed on each other. He's with us from his post in Brussels, Dan, explain to one of the issues that investigators are focused on with the max crashes is this system this stops the plan from stalling accidentally. And it was introduced in the most recent version of the plane that was developed four or five years ago. The planet. I evolved in the nineteen sixties. It's been modernized three times each time. A new layer of more advanced technology was introduced. And one thing that that these crashes appear to show it's not conclusive is the unexpected consequences when you introduce. Digital control software automation to a piece of equipment that previously was mechanical or much simpler, especially if he operators in the case pilot unaware of the system or aren't clear how the system works or there's some unexpected interaction between the new software and the older equipment use it to even before the internet of things becomes a pervasive. Reality tech experts in public safety pros or fretting over the intersection of virtual and real in what they call cyber physical security. So so that takes on a more broad meaning here, obviously exactly I mean, we're all familiar with cybercrime hacking, malware. But so far most of it has focused on the virtual world of the internet. Bank accounts on the internet, and our money is being materialized to get stolen. It's stolen, but it's virtual world. The internet and most of this. Connected world so far. Haven't been to the college virtual, but it's starting to get physical because digital technology is allowing us on all sorts of pain. And and ability to transmit data is growing exponentially. People talk about the internet of things where your refrigerator, you're getting even smart home devices are step towards that. Everything is getting connected to the internet and five G technology is going to push that. And so all these problems in the virtual world of the internet will already do or starting to very much more pose a threat to the physical world that we live in art. So in what realm are hackers, for example, rubbing their hands together in excitement. It really runs the gamut from. Malicious activity just to mess with things. But what really scares people is. Of of malware attacks. So like a. Random. Taking hostage and you want your back. You have to pay us or even beyond that taking control of some kind of silly to cause actual physical damage most damaged it's been caused by hackers and malware so far has been either financial or emotional or reputational. But. Has been actual direct. Physical harm. By now. It is increasingly possible. I mean there have been attacks. So far. Ukraine has been a testing ground for Russian attacked on things like the power grid. But we had an article recently in the Wall Street Journal about how Russian hackers got into the US power grid didn't do harm, but have the potential to Wall Street Journal reporter, Dan Michaels. Meanwhile, the journal says officials have reached a preliminary conclusion that a flight control feature automatically activated before the airlines plane nosedived into the ground earlier this month. It's the strongest indication yet that the M caste system misfired and both the airlines flight and a lion air flight in Indonesia which crashed in late October, fourteen minutes now after the hour.

Dan Michaels Wall Street Journal reporter Lyndon Johnson Brussels Indonesia president Ukraine US fourteen minutes five years five G
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:08 min | 3 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Talks in your presentation about what it was like with Lyndon Johnson back during this sixty eight riots. And so the president said, well, look, I want to see how much damage the riders have done in the city of Washington. And the best place from the air range for him to fly on general Westmoreland Djelic after over the city, I was on the helicopter with him. And it was. Quite a sight to behold usage was unbelievable. Major portion of city it actually burned. Never forget. This happened after Martin Luther King was assassinated did did this work in any way that rioting and the looting. Well, one of the things that, you know, tell people often when riots occur people say why would they do this to their own neighborhood? And I always tell people it's not their own neighborhood. They don't have any ownership of it because they've an unprecedented. Situation. You know, it's like I'm not justifying the burning or looting or anything like that. But I understand the frustration. It's like, you're working. And you look at a point at at that time where there were stores that, you know, people couldn't go in or if they could go in they couldn't try on clothes, and they were being charged higher prices and certain neighborhoods for certain goods and things of that nature and frustration built up, and it's I tell people they did not feel ownership because they were being displaced, even then and there. You know, I I don't know that it worked in terms of, you know, if you're looking at in that sense, except that it brought attention to the plight of the inner cities. And you've got the reports that came out and showed just how unequal the school systems were just how severe the housing crisis. Would you know, what kind of conditions people were living at it? Brought attention to just how impoverished in both. Physical and emotional levels that people were living in. So what are the different organizations that you work for you said you worked for the Baltimore evening sun. I then worked for Gannett newspapers up in Westchester county, New York, and I worked for Newsday on Long Island. So before I came to the post, how did you get your job at the post is interesting. I was at Newsday in the Washington bureau by this point, and they were consolidating the Washington office. And I figured you know, I'll have a job back in New York. But I knew that there wasn't going to be a role for me in Washington. And I was my father had passed away by then my mother was getting older. And I was like I'm not sure I want to go back to New York at the stage. And I truly thought I I might lead journalism because I wasn't sure that there was going to be a role here. And everyone in my office was calling the post except me. And I got a call from them. And they said, you know, what you come in for an interview. And I said sure, you know, and I was actually kind of surprised by and. It was one of the one of those things where I was sort of at a crossroads in my life. I just come up with the two thousand four election, and I was kind of burned out, and I thought I really want to do this. But it's like, it's the Washington Post. You don't say no to them. And so it's been it's been a great ride vaca James Baldwin a little bit. Is another clip from his Press Club appearance. We've us a lot of that. But that's the latest thing that we have because I was in one thousand nine hundred six and he died the for one year later, December the first one thousand nine hundred seven here, he is talking about the myths. That white people have about themselves. It just about this country is buried in the midst the white people have about themselves. They had these miss to be excavated excavated by white people. In other words, I mean this history has this country better than. The teacher is trying to teach my child..

Washington Lyndon Johnson New York Newsday Washington Post James Baldwin Martin Luther King president Westmoreland Djelic Baltimore Gannett Press Club Long Island Westchester county one year
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

05:59 min | 3 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on KGO 810

"Doppler still seeing a lot of rain across the bay area with snow in lower elevations. I'm Nikki medoro. Doctor Dr drew on K D L. Eight hundred two two two five two teachers phone number. We're talking about the governor of Virginia and whether or not he should step down as well as whether or not it is ever, okay. To change your skin tone to portray another character or personnel. Less helped me out with this way. How you doing? I was a little bit amount of experience different things in my life. Basically, you know, nurse manager. And I was over. Three hundred fifty women. I was the boss. You don't say women. Jake's you don't degrade before. I got to be a manager. Also, I'm the one thing that happened. Well, being a manager at back you said all remark about another racial group. But I had to correct him on that say, we don't do that around here. The whole thing. Daddy issues that this good news. Black people tragedy. Honored him die giving them Bill. The black community was his corners. Imagine. If you wake up and you see a man in black face. Pretty. You know, what that means a dental slap in the face of the black community. We're in your. Went there because they're never going that we're in. Yeah. In the military, sure. In. Anywhere. I can't understand. Why even was a Jew was funny? That was my medical school do it. Yeah. I know. That's exactly my take. Like what what were you think? But but let's say let's say he's a racist. Let's just say he didn't understand he was a racist. And he's corrected himself is corrected. Course. Is there any way guy like that redeems himself? Mostly break into Lyndon Johnson. Lyndon Johnson said begging we know his history by people from Texas. Lyndon johnson. You so big and say that you have the kings. Lyndon Johnson, right? Baddie ways. He said, hey big here. Born in big legislature. Okay. So you're telling. Okay. So it's possible. But you gotta really you gotta make it a priority of your life to tell them properly. Would you say and Lyndon Johnson didn't have to do it? All right, man. Thanks less. I appreciate it. Bye. Bye. Bye. Let's talk to Francis. What do you say resign? Not resign. I think he needs to resign and the answer to your question botchy three ever dress up in someone else's skin color. Yeah. That you're not representing yourself. You're representing their color. So no, you should never do that. And yes, he shift me side. It's like a cancer lake is in America. You logan. Well, you want to get it out early. And if you didn't catch it, and it was. Then you take it out. It's finish recognize it. And that's what this guy is. He's a cancer. He's the race. It is there is there anything he could say or do. Yeah. So there's no there's no redemption for you. If you think cancer is one's body. Is there any way you could lead state often you'll do chemo you'll do radio? You do other things operations. Don't do very much most of the time because it's already spread. That's the. It's a cancer. He is a cancer. Can't just in. You make good with you know, we're not gonna make good with him. I I know I get that. I just curious if in this day and age when we're we're we're chopping off heads. I just heard from less who said that Lyndon Johnson who was able to spearhead civil rights movement in five have been a serious racist. He redeemed himself is there. Doctor. How can you? Redeem your cancer when you oughta gets even trust this man, I believe he did some wrong thing a doctor. I wouldn't trust him with my kid. I wouldn't trust him in eighty four. This is a hidden races. He knows that. He is he got over. So why would you want to give you? No, I'm not giving a dog stop. I'm not giving him another chance. I'm just trying to understand what we do these days. And we would not have had a Lyndon Johnson. Have we done the same thing to him? This is my point. We would not have had the civil rights movement. And I'm just wondering just want us all to calm down. I think he needs to resign to I'm with you Francis. I thank you can resign and rehabilitate and get a job somewhere else. Show that you didn't have to stay in office. I don't really I wonder what the hell that picture was all about and hilly explains that to me, I he's got. He keeps changing a store. They need to be honest. Stay on this day in this day and time people are still getting people are still getting murdered by the pay cops. Okay. That's my feeling. So for you to say this time why you keep saying. Just as as we gotta get I agree with you. It's gotta go. There's no doubt. I'm just being thoughtful about what we are doing. That's all I'm saying, I'm not siding with anybody trying to create conversation. Let's take a break. Eight hundred two two two five two two two midday live. Dr drew.

Lyndon Johnson cancer Francis black community Doctor Dr Nikki medoro Virginia Jake America chemo logan Texas
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on AM Joy

AM Joy

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on AM Joy

"Politicians race is the is the original sin to quote, Condoleeza Rice of this country born in slavery. So how do voters process all of that if north? What his case he's trying to make a good governor that he's a progressive governor. And he should be allowed to hang on. Because the history of the countries that have been a lot of raises politicians in both parties. Joy, it goes back to a word I've used over and over and over again, and that's moral authority there. I mean, sure you try to do the right thing and push through good policies. But if people don't feel you have the Marla authority to even hold the office that you have how much good works. Will you be able to do the Democratic Party of president Lyndon Johnson is completely different than the Democratic Party of today and the Democratic Party of Lyndon Johnson? As Republicans are always, you know, they love pointing out the fact that it was Democrats who were the ones who were standing in the way of civil rights legislation and were the racist segregationists of time. But that was fifty years ago. The party has changed the cu-. Country has changed and governor north them is the governor of state that figures prominently figured prominently in the confederacy and slavery. He's a party that has the most diverse. The most diverse candidates running for the presidential nomination problem in this country's history. He ran a campaign for governor against Republican Republican challenger who was once believed to be a mainstream traditional Republican who instead ran a Trumpian racial dog whistle campaign..

Democratic Party Condoleeza Rice Lyndon Johnson Trumpian president fifty years
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on WJR 760

"From Covington would be heroes today only leftist running around claiming solidarity with Martin Luther King. That poor man has had his legacy hijacked. And redirected into something that it never was. I'm dead serious about that what these people have done to the legacy of Martin Luther King about claiming it themselves. You have all these people out there running around trying to convince African Americans that they? Should continue to support the democrat party because we respect you and your heroes and so forth. And meanwhile, their lives never improve their lives. Never substantively improve. Unless somebody like Donald Trump comes along. Just crazy Bernie at the Martin Luther King day rally in Columbia, South Carolina today, we talk about today we talked about races. But I must tell you it gives me. No pleasure. Telling you that we have a president of the United States. Dam you crazy Mirny because that is an out and out lie. It is character assassination. It's insulting. There is no modern American president who has done more to lift up African Americans and Hispanics than Donald J Trump. In fact, did you see the polling data over the weekend Trump's approval rating among Hispanics during the government shutdown is up nineteen points. His approval rating among Hispanics is up nineteen points. Black unemployment all time record, low Hispanic unemployment all time record low not during Bill Clinton. Not during Lyndon Johnson. Not during JFK not during Barack Hussein. Oh, no ninety even get close to record low, Hispanic or African American unemployment but records have now been set under the presidency of Donald J Trump who I have no pleasure in telling you that we have a president of the United States who is a racist. The racism in this country. I. Firmly believe is the exclusive possession and providence of the American left. After all, they openly advocate identity politics. If that's not racism. I don't know what it is. You are who you are based on your skin color. You are who you all are based on what bathroom you wanna use? You are who you are because of your sexual orientation. You are who you are because you wear a vagina hat or not. You are who you are. Because you support open borders and let the country be flooded with people who are not interested in becoming American somehow use you claim to hold the moral high ground. Sorry, not here. All right. Here is ladies and gentlemen. The president's proposal. Nobody makes.

Donald J Trump Martin Luther King president United States democrat party Lyndon Johnson Bill Clinton Covington Barack Hussein South Carolina JFK Columbia Bernie
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:52 min | 3 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Showers along with a slight chance of thunderstorms today. We'll f is from the mid fifty s to the low sixties the time at six forty six. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm David Greene. President Trump's nominee for attorney general William bar face some sharp questioning this week from senators who wanted to know just how independent of President Trump. He would be the relationship between the chief executive and the nation's most influential lawyer is sometimes cosy, although sometimes tense as was the case between president Lyndon Johnson. And his attorney general Robert Kennedy, nNcholas Katzenbach, succeeded Kennedy as attorney general, and here's how he viewed the relationship between president Johnson and Robert Kennedy. They didn't like each other. They had the work together politically, and they did, but it was not easy for either of them. We want to bring in commentator Cokie Roberts for our ask Cokie segment where she takes your questions about how politics and the government work and go figure many of you had questions about this relation. And we'll get right to them either Cokie. Hi, david. All right. So actually one of the questions we got gets right at that. Kennedy Johnson relationship with the question, California. This is Lee Williams and Santa Barbara cookie. Wasn't there a mega mass between Bobby Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson? How did they get resolved a mega mega mega mega Madison? Resolve by Kennedy resigning in September of nineteen sixty four to run for the Senate, and he was elected in November. But the two men really did dislike each other, and they distrusted each other Johnson was always sure Kennedy was out to get him. And keeping the flame of his brother Jack alive to overshadow the new president, you listen to the Johnson tapes, David and the conversations between the two or just they just painful to listen to but their problems personal not on policy matters and took Kennedy became an opponent of the war in Vietnam. Well, several listeners actually pointed out that Kennedy's appointment as AG was controversial in part because of nepotism, right? I mean, he was John F Kennedy's brother right and campaign manager. And not appointment was highly controversial at the time. When Eisenhower appointed his campaign operative and former Republican National Committee, chairman Herbert Brownell to the job. There were outcries, but Brownell turned out to be a very tough attorney general supporting civil rights recommending progressive southern judges and then chief Justice Warren, but it goes back to the beginning. David George Washington appointed his revolutionary ward aide-de-camp, Edmund Randolph is the very first attorney general but Randolph also had a distinguished career in government after the war. Well, here's a question that came to us about the relationship between the president and AG non on a personal level. But in terms of of what the law says it comes from Ruth Compton. And she wrote doesn't the taken oath to defend the constitution. And she went on to say that maybe conflict exists because the president isn't always protecting and defending the constitution. She wrote. I don't see this must have misunderstood the constitution piece. Well, obviously, the most famous case of insurance general defending. Constitution over the president's wishes was the so-called Saturday night massacre. When Nixon ordered his attorney general Elliot Richardson to fire the special counsel investigating Watergate, which it's an refused and resigned. The deputy attorney general refused and was fired. But more recently, there's the case of John Ashcroft refusing to certify the legality of George W Bush's domestic surveillance program. And that's a dramatic story featuring names that are in today's headlines the president's lawyer and chief of staff went to the hospital where Ashcroft was in the ICU to get a signature, MRs Ashcroft alerted the Justice department, and the acting attorney General James Comey got to the hospital. I with FBI chief Robert Muller telling agents victim Ashcroft refused to sign and Bush changed the problem. Yes. Right. One of the most dramatic moments at least in my memory of involving an attorney general that was incredible. Thanks cokie. Could you talk to you? David always great to talk to commentator Cokie Roberts, and you can ask Cokie.

Robert Kennedy president attorney Kennedy Johnson President Trump Lyndon Johnson Cokie Roberts david deputy attorney general Cokie Ruth Compton David Greene Steve Inskeep John F Kennedy John Ashcroft acting attorney General NPR AG Herbert Brownell Johnson
"lyndon johnson" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"lyndon johnson" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"This is my point to you. This is why I get concerned. When you don't receive the information, you should it's almost like the liberal media. If the president triggers this. And all this talk about centralization. And I've written about it more than anybody. It would pale in comparison. To the executive power is exercised by John Adams. Andrew jackson. James polk. Abraham lincoln. Ulysses s grant Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Franklin Roosevelt. Dwight Eisenhower Lyndon Johnson, Barack Obama just the name a few not even close. Not even close. And nothing compares to the power grab of the court as an institution nothing. Our constitution would never ever. Have been adopted in Philadelphia. First of all never would have been written to empower the courts like this. But it never would have been adopted by the delegates in Philadelphia. It's certainly never would have been adopted by the by the delegates at the various constitutional conventions in the various states never ever. And yet there it is. Upholding almost all of the Obama agenda and wherever possible striking down the Trump agenda as it continues to do. Now, some might say ho what aboutism now this is called history history matters, unless you're a leftist, and you believe history begins today. Ethics begin today. Morality begins today Madeira needy. No, it doesn't begin today. And it didn't begin today. So one might are this doesn't excuse Trump triggering the act. Who said it did? It's not an excuse. It's an explanation. Now. Of course, the irony is that some court is likely to strike down not the law per se, but Trump's use of it. And that's my problem with these so-called conservative commentators, many of them are never Trumpers or have been never-trumpers. That's why in the past. They've never addressed the statute. But today it concerned about centralized government. Real. Well, and you cherry pick like this when you leave out history and context when you're unexplained there is in fact, a check and balance on this president or any president who exercise the national -mergency? You're not doing anybody a favor it more anti Trump anti-trump, and it is not we who are wearing the uniform that is of that team. It is. Who wear the uniform and yet they pretend to be objective, which is throwing a illegal analysis. This writing about the history of the national baron. She's no, you're not just doing anything. Now. I.

Trump president Barack Obama Philadelphia Dwight Eisenhower Lyndon Johns Abraham lincoln James polk Franklin Roosevelt Theodore Roosevelt Andrew jackson Madeira John Adams executive Woodrow Wilson Ulysses Trumpers