35 Burst results for "Lymphoma"

"lymphoma" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

03:42 min | Last week

"lymphoma" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"What about a woman who comes in? She's treated one of the biggest hospitals in Connecticut. We have patients from all over the world. Coming here was the 57 year old woman. Just eight Children. She came with her friends. You've seen it. Two of the biggest hospitals in Connecticut and well they were treating him for lymphoma should have non Hodgkin's lymphoma, and they kept on doing surgery on her surgery, chemo and surgery and chemo and she was really fed up with surgery and chemo shoes having Surgeon or back and Ki mon, aggressive chemo chop chemo and she had multiple treatments, and then the cancer spread to her brain, and they wanted to open up her head. And she said enough enough with Connecticut. She's going to see Dr Liederman and sometimes people say, Oh, it's so far away if they live on whatever 72nd street and I say, Well, that's up to you, but we have very motivated people from All over the world coming here. This woman came from Connecticut with a Mass of lymphoma in her brain, and that the biggest hospital they want to open up her head like they opened up for spying twice and gave her all this chemo and really well, of course, it didn't work very well because the cancer spread to the brain, maybe even the cancer's hands. Cancer's spread, brother hands of the doctor. Anyway, She had a massive lymphoma nor brain, and they're going to open up her head again. And she decided, like many people who finally say, Hey, I'm not already enough with the chemo enough with the surgery. We know It's so expensive is expensive to be a patient, a person with cancer. We know that people with cancer have the number one highest category of bankruptcy. Because chemo and surgery especially the big hospitals, is so expensive, so expensive. That's another reason why people come Natalie because we're the first to New York with praying radio surgery and the first in America, the first in the Western Hemisphere with stereotype Actiq precise, noninvasive, invisible beams of radio surgery. Attack cancers most anywhere in the body. Well, that's why she came here. She heard about it through a friend of Friend of Predator on the shoulders of the Hey, you better go see Dr Liederman. Just calm at 212 choices, and she did. And she came. We saw She had a massive cancer in her head that we're gonna open up her head and give her chemo and she said enough. Enough. And she came here and here she had just a few treatments. Pinpoint treatment's not invasive treatments, invisible beams from thousands of angles to attack her cancer in her head. Was a lymphoma. And now that she came back this week from Connecticut In complete remission. No cancer seen with our treatment on Lee, no surgery, no cutting, no bleeding, no chemo. And that's the work that we do when the biggest doctors the biggest hospitals in Connecticut on all have Tager had opened up again, she said. No, I'm going to Dr Lieberman, and that's indeed what she did, and she's doing great. Her function is great if you didn't know that she had Cancer. You would have never known shit of mass in her head that cancer head treated with radiosurgery pinpoint non invasive treatment, No cutting, no bleeding. And so many people come. This is a story about one woman. My name is Dr Liederman will be right back. Many people with cancer comes to Dr Liederman when surgery didn't help and toxic chemo stopped working. Many come in pain..

chemo Cancer Dr Liederman Connecticut lymphoma Hodgkin Natalie Dr Lieberman Ki mon Tager New York Western Hemisphere Actiq America Lee
Los Angeles Dodgers' Justin Turner pulled mid-game during World Series win after positive Covid-19 test

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

05:22 min | Last month

Los Angeles Dodgers' Justin Turner pulled mid-game during World Series win after positive Covid-19 test

"Win three one, win the series and six, but being completely overshadowed one of the grandest franchises in sports winning the World Series Championship after three decade plus drought is being overshadowed by one player having to leave the game doing a positive corona virus tests and that is just turner but that is also so twenty twenty Jeff Passan is with us this morning Jeff have little more details on what went on that allowed Turner to be on the field for the post game celebration. Hasn't been nothing really allowed him to be on the field. He just chose to be field and nobody was going to drag off after he won the world series. He essentially said I'm going out there and nothing's GonNa stop me I want to pose with the trophy I wanna be with my teammates I want to choose celebrate like somebody WHO's won the world series for the first time and nothing was gonNA stop him and the fallout from that we're GONNA see over the next couple of days hopefully there. Are No other positive corona virus tests on the Los Angeles dodgers. But you know that all remains to be seen as does how they're going to get back to Los Angeles. When they're going to go back, there are a lot of questions still jeff. I don't put this on Justin Turner nor do I put this on the dodgers but how big of an indictment is this on the MLB? They're the ones that pulled him from the game in a there's the one that told him he needs to quarantine. When we see these Leagues Have Championship Games. There are people in the League office who were their security from league offices are there where where is the MLB and all this? Well I think the security tried to stop him from going on there but he you know this is a guy who's covert positive. So is security going to put their hands on him or are they GONNA to? Contract the virus themselves probably not, but they they didn't stop it from going out there and they did remove them and I. Think Rob Manfred got some questions answer about how that happened about what protocols were in place and why they weren't followed. Let me ask you this Jeff Obviously La in second biggest market for Major, League baseball outside of New York in the Yankees Major League Baseball don't want the headline story to be about covert the day after the second biggest market had just won the championship. Course not but I think regardless of weather. Justin Turner went onto the field or not it was going to be pretty interesting part of the story I. Think the fact that he did go back out there makes it a much bigger story now because there are questions, why did he go back out there? How did he go back out there? Who allowed him back out there? How did they not stop it? Jeff what are what are you hearing around the league this early morning about his teammates embracing the fact that he was able to join them for big celebration. GonNa go on up checks message here that I got from general manager. It's A super spreader event on live. TV. Welcome to twenty twenty. And I'M GONNA PULL UP A. Dm I got from an active player isn't here. Now it's nice, but essentially it's What the F. is going on. And that's kind of a thought around baseball and yet. You guys were players let let's put you in that same situation you gotten cut. Seven years ago, and this organization gave you a chance you blossom into an all-star to guy who gets MVP vote someone who's made fifty million dollars somebody who's a leader in the clubhouse and is seen as one of the voices and wants to celebrate this thing that he has worked so hard to celebrate. Would you have gone back out there As a teammate I'm okay with it I don't know if it was me dead had tested positive. I. Don't know because it would had to have happened in the moment and I would have probably responded reacted to my teammates, my coaches in people around me if they was embracing situation most likely I would have joined. But if Jay Wheel for instance is tested positive and he's my teammate I'm. Come on man we me. Yeah this is so subjective Jeff because I'm different I would have wanted to celebrate with my teammates. I just would've wore masks I would have done it differently but. turnage Justin Justin Turner did wear a mask out originally, but there were a couple of instances where cameras got him. He was talking to his wife taking pictures with her gave her a kiss mask was off and he was sitting down on the field for the team picture. To his left was the championship trophy to his right was Dave Roberts the dodgers manager who ten years ago was diagnosed with Hodgkin. Lymphoma. So He's a cancer survivor. He's the person who has a pre existing condition and Justin Turner daybreak spoke for mascots at that point now Dave Roberts told Fox later on I think it was something to the effect that I didn't touch him. but you know he was he was in the same vicinity wasn't for fifteen minutes wasn't close contact defined by CDC but the optics on it as Andrew Freedom and the president of baseball operations says not good.

Justin Justin Turner Jeff Passan Dodgers Baseball MLB Justin Turner Dave Roberts Los Angeles Twenty Twenty Cancer Rob Manfred Lymphoma General Manager Yankees MVP New York Jay Wheel Andrew Freedom FOX
Actor Jeff Bridges Tweets That He Has Been Diagnosed With Lymphoma

Mojo In The Morning

00:25 sec | Last month

Actor Jeff Bridges Tweets That He Has Been Diagnosed With Lymphoma

"Jeff Bridges took to twitter last night to reveal. He has been diagnosed with lymphoma and in a nod to his conical in the big Lebowski. But Dude, the Academy Award winning actor tweeted as the dude would say, new spit has come to lights I have been diagnosed with lymphoma although it is a serious disease i. feel fortunate that I have. A great team of doctors and the prognosis is good. He said he will keep all of his fans updated on his road to

Lymphoma Jeff Bridges Twitter Academy Award
Jeff Bridges says he's been diagnosed with lymphoma

KCBS Radio Morning News

00:47 sec | Last month

Jeff Bridges says he's been diagnosed with lymphoma

"The dude the dude in the Big in Lebowski, the Big Lebowski, one of one the memorable of the memorable ones in ones Hollywood in Hollywood history history and is and is the film itself the film itself might have said might the have dude said the abides dude abides bridges himself. bridges himself. I can't I say can't exactly say exactly what he said what on he said the radio, on the radio, but his but social his Media social Post Media says Post says As the dude As the would dude say, knew. would say, knew. Stuff Stuff has come has to come light. to light. He says He He's says been diagnosed He's been diagnosed with lymphoma with lymphoma and and reading reading from from Bridges. Bridges. Twitter Post, Twitter Post, Although it's Although a serious it's a serious disease, disease, I feel I fortunate feel fortunate that I have a that great I have team a great of doctors. team of doctors. And the prognosis And the prognosis is good is good about 30,000 about 30,000 retweets retweets of that of post, that post, and and one of them one came of them from came bridges from himself. bridges himself. A city's A profoundly city's profoundly grateful grateful for the love for and the support love and support from family from family and friends. and friends. Thank you Thank for your you prayers for your prayers and well and wishes. well wishes. And then And he said then that he while said I that have while you I please have you remember please to remember go vote to go vote because we're because all in we're this all together. in this together. Jeff Bridges Jeff Bridges says says he has he lymphoma has lymphoma but expressing but expressing optimism optimism Right now. Joan, don't agree

Bridges Jeff Bridges Lymphoma HE Twitter Hollywood Joan
Jeff Bridges says he's been diagnosed with lymphoma

KCBS Radio Morning News

00:45 sec | Last month

Jeff Bridges says he's been diagnosed with lymphoma

"The dude in the Big Lebowski, one of the memorable ones in Hollywood history and is the film itself might have said the dude abides bridges himself. I can't say exactly what he said on the radio, but his social Media Post says As the dude would say, knew. Stuff has come to light. He says He's been diagnosed with lymphoma and reading from Bridges. Twitter Post, Although it's a serious disease, I feel fortunate that I have a great team of doctors. And the prognosis is good about 30,000 retweets of that post, and one of them came from bridges himself. A city's profoundly grateful for the love and support from family and friends. Thank you for your prayers and well wishes. And then he said that while I have you please remember to go vote because we're all in this together. Jeff Bridges says he has lymphoma but expressing optimism

Jeff Bridges Lymphoma Twitter Hollywood
Jeff Bridges announces he's been diagnosed with lymphoma

WBBM Morning News

00:10 sec | Last month

Jeff Bridges announces he's been diagnosed with lymphoma

"Jeff Bridges has announced on social media is being treated for lymphoma. The 70 year old actor says his prognosis is good, and he promised to keep fans posted on his recovery.

Jeff Bridges Lymphoma
Jeff Bridges says he's been diagnosed with lymphoma

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:18 sec | Last month

Jeff Bridges says he's been diagnosed with lymphoma

"The actor Jeff Bridges has announced that he's been diagnosed with lymphoma in a Tweety references his role as the dude in the Big Lebowski knew it has come to light bridges writes it While it is a serious disease, he is fortunate to have a great team of doctors, and he says his prognosis is

Jeff Bridges Lymphoma
Jeff Bridges says he has lymphoma, cites good prognosis

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:22 sec | Last month

Jeff Bridges says he has lymphoma, cites good prognosis

"Is opening up about his latest health diagnosis. The actor got candid with his fans yesterday on social media revealing he's starting treatment for his cancer diagnosis. He took to Twitter, revealing that he has lymphoma and wrote, Although it is a serious disease. I feel fortunate that I have a great team of doctors and the prognosis is good. He added that he will keep his fans updated on his recovery.

Twitter Lymphoma
Jeff Bridges says he's been diagnosed with lymphoma

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | Last month

Jeff Bridges says he's been diagnosed with lymphoma

"Tonight from actor Jeff Bridges that he is battling lymphoma. The 70 year old Calls it a serious disease, but says his doctors have assured him that his prognosis is good. Bridges says he is starting treatment and is grateful for the support from family, friends and fans. The National Cancer Institute says non Hodgkin lymphoma has a five year survival rate of almost 73%.

Jeff Bridges Lymphoma National Cancer Institute
Jeff Bridges says he has lymphoma, cites good prognosis

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last month

Jeff Bridges says he has lymphoma, cites good prognosis

"The popular actor is fighting a form of cancer yeah well the data by Jeff bridges taking the same kind of attitude his character the dude in the big Lebowski he's being treated for lymphoma but says his prognosis is good the seventy year old actor says in a social media post he understands the disease a serious and express gratitude to his family friends and doctors but just as he will keep his fans posted on his recovery Regis has been nominated for seven Oscars during his career winning once for crazy heart in twenty ten Regis has deep Hollywood bloodlines he's the son of actors Lloyd and Dorothy bridges both of whom died in nineteen ninety eight I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Jeff Bridges Lymphoma Regis Hollywood Lloyd Dorothy Oscar Wells Gabriel
'Berlin patient', 1st person cured of HIV, dies of cancer

News, Traffic and Weather

00:22 sec | 2 months ago

'Berlin patient', 1st person cured of HIV, dies of cancer

"Ray Brown, the first person cured oven HIV infection has Reid. He was known around the world as the Berlin patient and was cured in 2008 after undergoing a stem cell transplant for lymphoma. His partner in a social media post says he died at home in Palm Springs, California Tuesday. The cause a return of cancer he had remained HIV free. Timothy

Hiv Infection Ray Brown Palm Springs Lymphoma Reid Berlin Timothy Partner California
Speeding the Delivery of CAR-T Therapies While Cutting the Cost

The Bio Report

04:25 min | 2 months ago

Speeding the Delivery of CAR-T Therapies While Cutting the Cost

"Greg. Thanks for joining US getting so much standing. My pleasure. We're GONNA talk about Cartesian therapies, exuma biotech, and your efforts to develop rapid point of care delivery of these therapies. Let's start with Cartesian therapies themselves out of these therapies work today. Well you know if we were to look at this technology today. And put it in the context of what we do in science and medicine even fifteen years ago. The the thought that we could truly have living medicine with genetically modified. LYMPHOCYTES in the body would have been unheard of it. And really I think the basic process of taking one cells from the body. In reprogramming genetically lymphocytes in returning them back into a patient to retrain those cells to see cancer antigens much in the same way we've done with monoclonal antibodies in the past, but wiring all that into itself is what is made Carta. Medicine which has been both exciting in is of course had. Equally that the number of challenges in in many different areas. Well. How are these therapies typically prepared and administered? Well it's a complicated process that has. A tremendous amount of technical skill required as well as logistics so typically. When a subject is entering into a trial or on therapy for approved medicines, their blood is drawn and separated into white blood cells and then shipped usually on a plane to a central manufacturing facility where those cells then are taken into a cleanroom, they are activated their genetically modified they're grown for about. Fifteen days, and then they are prepared just like you would with drug. And then ship back to the site. So there's a tremendous amount of time that can be lost for patients during this period and then once those cells. Are received. Back The patient receives Olympic depleting chemotherapy regimen to kind of make space. And then the cells are infused and at that point they take off and they're on their own. These cell therapies have been more successful in hematological answers than in solid tumors. What why is that? Well I. Think if you look at the history of the Field Dang, what you will find is that. One of the principal challenges in building cellular therapies has been it. They can be incredibly potent. So in the case of something, we know very well like CD nineteen, this isn't a liquid tumor setting those cells with CD nineteen will eliminate. All targets in the body that express CD nineteen, and this is found in many lymphomas. leukaemias. But the problem is in the case of CD nineteen, you're eliminating all of the normal cells make CD nineteen, which are called E. Cells, and this is tolerable in the case of liquid tumors. But when you think about the antigens targets that we go after in solid tumors, those are often expressed in tissues that. Not Be safe if the immune system were to attack it. So we've been forced to really take steps back on how well we can make a car for solid tumors to try and make them smarter to help recognize friend from foe. So the great efficacy I think that you've seen in relapse refractory ael l.. As well as in diffuse large B. Cell Lymphoma, and now also I think exciting we in places like multiple myeloma getting that stain level of efficacy in solid tumors has required that people really think about the precision inside of the problem to make sure can get a potent car but also one that is safe.

Solid Tumors United States Carta B. Cell Lymphoma Multiple Myeloma Field Dang Olympic Principal
Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

Living Healthy Podcast

09:05 min | 2 months ago

Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

"Please welcome to the show Dr Rick van how you doing. Thank you very much Andrew and Brittany I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be able to come and talk to your talk your listeners today. Yeah. Well, thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk to us. So we're GONNA be talking about obviously cancer and how you can prevent cancer do your best to prevent it. But as I mentioned in the Intro, most likely someone knows someone who's had cancer or they've had cancer themselves even it's pretty it seems like it's touches a lot of people but can you kind of tell me how many people does cancer impact on a yearly basis? Well. Thank you for the question Andrew. The lifetime risk of getting cancer is approaching thirty eight or thirty, nine percent. So more than one in three Americans will get cancer during their lifetime. So that explains what you said that basically almost everybody is either been personally. Involved with cancer knows a close family member or a loved one that's been stricken by cancer. So some of the statistics nationwide in the United States, there's about one point seven million people diagnosed each year with cancer. And they'll be about unfortunately six hundred thousand Americans will die every year of cancer. Here in Orange County it's interesting that cancer has overtaken cart diseases, the number one killer, and as soon gonNA happen nationwide. So a very very. Prevalent disease what kind of has led to what's led to that trajectory? Why is that happening? Well, actually the the the death rate from cancer has been falling and it's been falling significantly over the past fifteen or twenty years, which is a success basically for the research that's gone into it through the National Cancer Institute and other mechanisms. But the fact that cancer is now the number one killer has actually also reflected progress in cardiovascular disease. So doing which used to be the number one killer. So we're doing a better job at preventing. Heart disease through the things that you know about treatment of the risk factors like high lipids, blood pressure, diabetes et CETERA. Right? Interesting. Okay. All right. So we got some work to do on the cancer and Kinda catch up. And, that generally, like I mentioned usually happens through education funding, which we'll talk about in a little bit What types of cancers are the most prevalent today? I know that you specialize are a believe in like blood cancers by what are the most prevalent that people run into so we can talk both about incidents, which is the new diagnosis that we have each year and prevalence, which is the number of people living with the disease at any given time. But the top four in both categories are pretty similar. So there's breast cancer which obviously predominantly affects women but also can affect men. Then there's lung cancer there's prostate cancer which obviously is a male cancer and the last one is colorectal cancer. Those are the big four. Close on their heels are diseases like skin cancer and melanoma that's particularly relevant for Orange County where we have two hundred and eight, hundred, ninety days per year rate. And after that come some blood cancers that I specialize in, which is mainly things like leukemia lymphoma and Myeloma Okay. What kind of leads to these types of cancers occurring out of those top four that you mentioned, what? What's the biggest contributor to people getting? Is it? Is it just genetics you got bad genes or something in your lifestyle or in your the world around you I guess causing it. So they're. Probably, equal contributions both from genetics and from lifestyle. Okay. When I say genetics I mean the cancer is principally in the opinion of a lot of primarily a genetic disease in the cancer cells have acquired mutations that contribute to their malignant or cancerous phenotype, their ability to grow and attack the body. Most of those mutations are acquired in other words they happened just within the cancer cell and they're not inherited. So you don't get them from your mother or your father. Now there are exceptions there are well defined cancer susceptibility syndromes the most the one that may be most familiar to your listeners is the bracket jeans Brca which segregating families particularly people, of Ashkenazi, Jewish descent that are inherited either from your mother or your father, and greatly increase your risk for developing breast cancer or ovarian cancer so that the risk for women who doesn't ever bracken gene mutation is about one about eleven percent or one in nine during your lifetime. If you inherit one of these genes, it's virtually almost everybody will get breast cancer ninety percent risk over your lifetime. So, this cancer susceptibility syndromes are very important the need. For instance when there's a new cancer diagnosis, you need to take a careful family history and in some cases be referred to a genetic counselor to determine whether testing family members is indicated. Yeah. Well, that's interesting that you bring that up because my wife actually we went through that process, and so she was found her mother had breast cancer and through that process they found out, she had the bracket gene Brac to and then and so my wife decided because they kind of give you choice like do you want to get screened? Do you not like you kind of have? Do you want to know more or or like not and stay naive to it I guess and so what I've discovered, we went through it and is interesting out of the split my wife got it and her sister didn't so the fifty, fifty there and. It. Seems like. It's I think my opinion is it's good to know because now they're just more aggressively screening her and is that typically the case when you find out about something like that, you're more your screened even more regularly than the average person should be. That's right. A change basically changes the surveillance. In it not to make it more complicated. But there are some genes like the broncos where the penetrates which means that the chance of actually getting breast cancer. If you have the have, the mutation is very high I think there it's pretty straightforward to decide whether to get screened. Right. There are other mutations that can be inherited that don't increase the risk that much increase it above the background, but it's not nearly as high and there it's more complicated to try to decide what to do about that. But. My advice to your listeners is to seek the advice of a NCI cancer center in a a qualified genetic counselor. Those are the people best qualified to help guide you through that decision making process right? Right. When you're going through like you said they ramp up the screening process if you had the genetic mutation but how does how did we get to discovering these genetic mutations I? It sounds like you kind of have somewhat of a background like you discovered or help discover this protein that was causing leukemia right and. How does that process even work? How do we make these discoveries? How do you make these? Discovery I was involved in is one of these acquired mutations not inherited, but it came about from studies done many many years ago actually nineteen sixty that showed that patients with this particular type of leukemia had an abnormal chromosome in their blood cells. And when to make a very long story short when that was tracked down, it was shown that the chromosome was actually an a Barrett. That was acquired in these cancer cells that lead to the expression of this abnormal protein. And that protein. Hasn't is an enzyme which means that it has a ability to catalyze chemical reactions. Okay and that particular reaction stimulated the growth of those blood cancer cells. So. That led a drug company, which is today is no artis to develop us a drug a small molecule inhibited the action of that protein. And that That drug which has the trade name GLIVEC revolutionized the treatment of that leukemia so that in the past everybody died of this leukemia, unless you had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. Today everybody takes a drug likely. And most people go into remission and when they do, they have normal age adjusted life expectancy. That's example would that's Therapy likely that can do to cancer right? So does this all come from these discoveries? Does it come from just? Tons of data over decades like this one you're saying, it came from research started in the sixties and this didn't have until the early nineties. Is that right or wealth the the The structure of the protein was discovered. I'm saying Circa Nineteen, eighty-four which I got involved. The drug development efforts took place shortly thereafter I'm and the was FDA approved in two thousand one. So it's been on the market now for almost nineteen years I and there are many many other efforts in other cancers that are parallel parallel that. The thing that's happened today is because of our new technology and the genomics and the ability to determine, for instance, the genome sequence very quickly that's accelerated the progress that we can make. So what took forty years from sixty two to the drug being approved now can be done in a couple of years. Wow. Everything's happening much much faster. That's awesome. That's great news for those of US living right now.

Cancer Breast Cancer Lung Cancer National Cancer Institute Orange County Leukemia Andrew Dr Rick Van Heart Disease United States Broncos FDA Myeloma NCI Lymphoma
Metro Atlanta sterilization companies hit with wave of lawsuits over ethylene oxide

Clark Howard

00:36 sec | 3 months ago

Metro Atlanta sterilization companies hit with wave of lawsuits over ethylene oxide

"Sue to medical sterilization plants on behalf of the half dozen cancer patients they have lived. Did school in close proximity to either stare genetics or barn for a Pallone linked time years and each of these persons have been diagnosed with either lymphoma. Leukemia or breast cancer attorney Kill calmly says they'll be able to prove the company's ethylene oxide, a known carcinogen made their clients ill and some 200 others have been diagnosed. Sarah Gen X and barred insists their levels of E T O are safe. WSB news time is 11 03.

Pallone Sarah Gen WSB SUE Lymphoma Leukemia Attorney
The First Dog With COVID-19 Has Died, And There's A Lot We Still Don't Know

Short Wave

06:53 min | 4 months ago

The First Dog With COVID-19 Has Died, And There's A Lot We Still Don't Know

"April when buddies family I started to notice that something was a bright buddy started breathing really heavily, any hadn't mucus knows, and this was the first thing is family notice that you know the first sign that he was not himself. That's Natasha daily a wildlife reporter with National Geographic. Buddy was a German shepherd who Natasha says by his family's account was a very, very good boy. He loved running through sprinklers, Keitel's love like running and diving right into the lake. His family loved address them up for Halloween, is also photos of him in a bunny costume and you know he's just it looks like he's just grinning at the camera and so when buddies started getting sick this spring, just before his seventh birthday, his family, Robert Allison Mahoney and their daughter Juliana. While, they were worried I mean he'd be completely healthy, and then all of a sudden in the sprain he. started. Struggling to breathe and the first thing. I thought was he has the virus. Meaning the corona virus in the reason they thought that. They had also been sick. So specifically, Robert Mahoney, the husband had tested positive Alison Mahoney. Robert's wife had not been tested, but she was showing symptoms. So she had it to. The daughter Juliana who's thirteen tested negative. But when it came to getting buddy attest, that was a lot harder. But he's regular vet wasn't seeing patients. The Vet significantly said, there's no, he has like just you know there's no way and he prescribed the antibiotics over the phone. Another vets gave buddy ultrasound and x rays. But also didn't think he could have the krona virus remember no dog had yet tested positive in the US. And many vets didn't have the tests for animals anyway. But one day. Robert, Mahoney sister saw facebook post about a vet where they lived on. Staten. Island that had just gotten some test kits. Robert. was like great like let me call right now. Get down there, make an appointment, and so he was able to make an appointment for ten PM on a Friday. So it was a very strange time, but it was the clinic was really busy, and so it was the the first law they had available. That was Friday. May Fifteenth a full month after he started showing symptoms a few days later, but he finally got test that revealed. He was positive. This was a huge deal. Buddy was the first dog in the US known to have the virus and the USDA announced the news in a press release on June second. Buddy wasn't named in that press release. The government only identified his breed. In fact, we only know the details of his story because of Natasha's reporting. The USDA said in. June, that quote the dog is expected to make a full recovery. But Buddy didn't get better. He got more and more sick in June. It. All came to a head one weekend in July. And a warning that the details coming up are pretty tough to hear. So Allison. Came downstairs the morning of July eleventh and found buddy in the kitchen in a pool of modeled flood He was throwing up blood. It was coming from his nose. It was just horrific and devastating for the family, and at that point, they brought him into the vet and the decision was made to euthanize him which was obviously really really difficult on top of two and a half months of stress and confusion that the family had already been through thirteen dogs and eleven cats have tested positive in the US for cove nineteen according to public. Records and while those numbers sound small, they raise big questions about how virus can affect people and their pets. Today's episode. Natasha. Daily on why. Some of those questions are still so hard to answer. Allison Mooney said to me that you tell someone that your dog tested positive for Cova. Did they'd look at you like you had ten heads. You know there's no rubric for navigating covert in your pet. I'm Emily Quang and you're listening to shortwave the daily science podcast from NPR. First off the current CDC guidance that there is no evidence that pets can transmit the coronavirus to humans, and that's partially why testing for animals isn't more widespread. We do need to say to that test for animals are different than the test used to detect the virus in humans. All animal tests are processed in different labs are processed in veterinary labs. Not, there's no overlap between human testing and animal testing. So. While some of the mechanics of the tests may be the same. It's not at all taking resources away from humans. But because a covid positive animal isn't seen as a danger to humans, there's been very little scientific study of how the virus can affect those pets or even how it can interact with other diseases are pets may have. That's where we're going to pick up buddy story with an Tasha daily. Yes. So new blood work was taken on July tenth the day before a buddy died, and it was on July eleventh when the Mahoney's brought buddy in. To essentially be euthanized that they found the results of that blood work on and the blood work indicated that he very very likely had lymphoma, which is kind of cancer, right? Yes. Lymphoma is a type of cancer So I I asked a couple of veterinarians who were not involved in buddies case at all to review his full records and they said that, yes, every single one of the symptoms he had could be explained by lymphoma, you know A. A big open question is deity SARS Yovany to present clinically in buddies body, and what that means is did the virus cause any symptoms? For example, the trouble breathing was, and so I think it's it's tough and we'll never have an answer to this was every single. One of his symptoms are the lymph, Oma? Or was some of it, the COVID and the breakdown of fat isn't something that we have an answer to, and you also pose the question. Will. We won't know whether the cancer made them more susceptible to contracting the coronavirus exactly, and that's sort of a big takeaway from his case You know our dogs or cats with underlying conditions like cancer as it turns out. More likely to contract the virus because we know humans are humans It's thought that humans that have suppressed immune systems maybe more likely to contract the virus, but not only that maybe the virus may be more likely to present in ways that are more significant in their bodies if if they're already immuno-compromised. So the same question remains for animals and we just have so little data to investigate it.

Robert Allison Mahoney Buddy United States Natasha Alison Mahoney Usda Juliana Lymphoma Keitel Reporter Staten Covid National Geographic Allison Mooney Mahoney Facebook Island
Boston - Veteran Receiver Becomes Seventh Patriots Player To Opt Out

Glen Macnow and Ray Didinger

00:47 sec | 4 months ago

Boston - Veteran Receiver Becomes Seventh Patriots Player To Opt Out

"So far, Seven New England Patriots have opted out, including some pretty good players on that team, too. Just today, Marqise Lee, the wide receiver became number seven, right? Was it going to mean for Bill Belgian pretty significant losses and I, each guy explained why he was doing what he was doing. And you understand that I mean, Mark is cotton. The Right tackle who's a starting right tackle? That's a big loss for them. But there's a guy that had Hodgkin's lymphoma when he was before you. There was Before he got drafted Ah, and took treatment and beat it, but I mean, he's obviously ah, high risk sort of guy in these circumstances, he said. I can't do this. Ah, I understand that, um

AH New England Patriots Hodgkin Marqise Lee Bill Belgian
Coronavirus-infected German shepherd, first dog to test positive for COVID-19 in US, dies

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:51 sec | 4 months ago

Coronavirus-infected German shepherd, first dog to test positive for COVID-19 in US, dies

"Buddy, the German shepherd will go down in the medical history books as the first dog to apparently die from Cove it 19. But he was getting on in years and, like people with risk factors did have some other medical issues. But then came the Corona virus, which Buddy apparently caught from its owner makes it much worse of you. Conditions, and he may have had lymphoma on. Of course, when you have abnormal immune system, it's gonna really decrease your chances for getting over anything. Dr. John how is President of the American Veterinary Medical Association? Nobody is the 1st 1 that actually got sick enough to die. But being here I probably that cancer spread to his liver and spleen are never where else. There's just no way to survive that there have been no known cases anywhere in the world of humans getting covert 19 from their dogs or from any other pet for that matter,

Buddy American Veterinary Medical As Lymphoma Cancer President Trump Dr. John
First dog in the US to test positive for COVID-19 has died

TIME's Top Stories

01:15 min | 4 months ago

First dog in the US to test positive for COVID-19 has died

"A German shepherd in new. York. That had the first confirmed case of Covid nineteen and a dog in the US has died Robert and allison. Mahoney Staten. Island, told National Geographic that their seven year old shepherd buddy developed breathing problems in mid. April. After Robert had been sick with the corona virus for several weeks, a veterinarian tested buddy in May and found in positive for the virus. The US Department of Agriculture reported in June that a German shepherd in. New. York state was the first dog in the. The country to test positive for covid nineteen, but did not identify the owners buddies health declined steadily after he developed breathing problems and thick nasal mucus in. April. He was euthanized on July eleven after he started vomiting clotted blood, the Mahoney's told National Geographic. It's unknown if the corona virus played a role in his death blood tests indicated buddy likely had lymphoma. A cancer of the immune system veterinarians told the family a spokesman for the New York, City Department of Health. That arrangements were made to take the dog's body for a necropsy. But when the instructions were shared with the veterinarian, the body had already been cremated. A USDA database of confirmed cases of the coronavirus and animals in the united. States includes twelve dogs, ten cats, a tiger and a lion. The agency says there is currently no evidence that animals play a significant role in spreading the corona virus, but it appears the virus can spread from people to animals in some situations.

Us Department Of Agriculture National Geographic York Robert Covid United States Mahoney Staten New York Vomiting City Department Of Health Lymphoma Island Allison
Well in Brooklyn. We've still - Gal Test 5

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

08:22 min | 4 months ago

Well in Brooklyn. We've still - Gal Test 5

"The the world's world's biggest biggest companies companies are are joining joining forces forces to to cut cut carbon carbon emissions emissions and and a a double double punch punch of of the the movie movie industry industry from from the the Corona Corona virus. virus. Wednesdays Wednesdays one. one. Let's Let's get get a a check check of of traffic traffic in in transit transit on on the the ones ones now now from from Karen Karen Stewart. Stewart. Well Well in in Brooklyn. Brooklyn. We've We've still still got got a a full full closure closure of of the the Bhagwan Bhagwan is is Ram Ram to to the the Brooklyn Brooklyn Battery Battery Tunnel. Tunnel. We're We're dealing dealing with with the the debris debris spilled spilled that's that's been been out out there there since since before before five this morning. All lanes are blocked. They have reopened the H O V lane. The trouble of traffic squeaked by it is working very, very slowly. We are jammed in the guano is from back in the Verrazano Bridge. Bell Parkway is jammed onto the guan US from back of Bay Ridge Avenue on the Prospect Expressway delayed up to the go honest now starts back at Seely Street almost on Ocean Parkway. So in New Jersey. The good news is the North bound Turnpike Express lines are open and 71 The delays are easing out enormously. The delight of the inbound UW birds. Charles from the 80 95 Express is now only about 10 15 minutes. We are heavy across the spam into the city over the Alexander Hamilton on the eastbound cross Bronx will stay heavy until you get to Grand concourse. Upper East Side still bumper to bumper on the South Harlem River from 132nd Street Down East Harlem 114th. It stays heavy down the FDR but earlier problems in the seventies gone, and so things were starting to look up in the world. There is a need to know about the bridges and tunnels, 59th Street Bridge, absolutely packed from Queens Boulevard and Northern Boulevard. What? Throgs Throgs Neck Neck and and Whitestone Whitestone are are still still in in very very good good condition condition and and on on on Long Long Long Long Island, Island, Island, Island, Island, the the the the the westbound westbound westbound westbound westbound ally. ally. ally. ally. ally. He He He He He has has has has has delays delays delays delays delays now. now. now. now. now. Not Not Not Not Not too too too too too bad, bad, bad, bad, bad, though. though. though. though. though. Out Out Out Out Out into into into into into Asian Asian Asian Asian Asian 39 39 39 39 39 for for for for for Glen Glen Glen Glen Glen Cove Cove Cove Cove Cove Road. Road. Road. Road. Road. I'm I'm I'm I'm I'm Karen Karen Karen Karen Karen Stewart Stewart Stewart Stewart Stewart on on on on on 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 wins. wins. wins. wins. wins. No No No No No New New New New New York York York York York City City City City City is is is is now now now now officially officially officially officially in in in in a a a a heat heat heat heat wave. wave. wave. wave. But But But But on on on on the the the the upside, upside, upside, upside, it it it it should should should should be be be be a a a a relatively relatively relatively relatively short short short short heatwave. heatwave. heatwave. heatwave. Let's Let's Let's Let's get get get get specifics specifics specifics specifics from from from from digging digging digging digging divorce. divorce. divorce. divorce. Thank Thank Thank you you you Other Other Other Dane? Dane? Dane? Yeah, Yeah, Yeah, we we we hit hit hit 90 90 90 plus plus plus third day in a row yesterday. The brutal nous of that heat and humidity really evident the last couple of days. One thing you'll notice those you're out the door this morning is the dew point or the amount of humidity in the air is down a bit, so it'll still be hot today, not quite as human. We'll still get above 90 and real fields in the upper nineties with mostly sunny skies. Humanity searches back tonight and there could be a thunderstorm towards daybreak. We get close to 90 the next couple of days tomorrow Thursday, but the humidities backup so real fields will be in the low to mid nineties. So while we may ease out of the heat wave specifically, it's still going to be pretty rotten till we get towards the end of the week in terms of lesser humidity, arriving for the weekend itself will keep you up to date as we go through this He wait continuing today on New York's weather station 10 10 wins. Okay, 80 right now, now, with with a a real real feel feel of of 85. 85. Resident Resident trumps trumps been been sending sending in in federal federal agents agents to to deal deal with with unrest unrest in in Portland, Portland, Oregon, Oregon, has has been been threatening threatening to to do do so. so. Another Another city city is is run run by by Democrats Democrats of the local authority. Don't get the violence in those cities under control, but Merida, Blasio says it's not going to happen. Here is Glenn Shock reports from Midtown this morning, Glenn Federal police like Homeland Security agents are said to be going into Chicago unless legal action stops it Now. The president wants to go further blaming liberal Democrats for crime and unrest in other cities like Philadelphia, Detroit and New York. And that Federal help is needed here is well. New York won last night, the mayor, calling the president's threats all politics and rejects any federal cop plan. He's trying to send an outside presence. It's not because it's needed to protect those buildings again. The same way he's used ice. He uses ice as an extension of his reelection campaign, not protect people. In fact, the mayor says, they'll take legal action that the president does send in federal law enforcement. Every time we've seen the president do things that are illegal and unconstitutional. We've challenged him in court overwhelmingly beat him, and he's had to retreat. But on Monday, the president saying New York City's police are Restricted from doing anything and that federal help may be needed. One shot 10 10 wins here in Midtown rowing. Dan Hollander, the men's rights lawyer suspected of killing the son of federal judge Esther Solace and wounding her husband may also have been responsible for the murder of another men's rights attorney in California. Mark Angelucci was shot by somebody disguised as a FedEx delivery man, the same M O that was used in the killing of the judge's son, Daniel, and dairy and the wounding of her husband, Mark and dearie. Neighbor, Marion Costanza, says Daniel, who was 20 years old was a hero. I'm thinking making another kid would hide in the closet. I mean, you had gunshot. You get scared. You don't know what to do. This kid just ran to help his dad. I really can't believe that they were very close. Investigators say Roy Dan Hollander may have been hunting down enemies after being diagnosed with terminal cancer. He had once argued a case before Judge Solace he was found dead. From a self inflicted gunshot wound in his car in Liberty, New York yesterday. A deadly collision at a marina in the Bronx. Last night, two Jet skis collided, killing two men. The victims were rushed to Jacoby Medical Center but could not be saved. Officer is still working on identifying the men who were not carrying ID. New York City's and face for every opening, then supposed to be the final phase. But as you may have noticed, a lot of stuff still isn't open, notably bars and restaurants, at least for indoor purposes. The governor says the city is just not ready for that, even if many of the people who live in the city already As evidenced by crowds gathering outside restaurants and bars to the parties who come out. I understand the frustration. I understand you've been inside for a long time. I understand it's your young. I understand people like to socialize. I get that It's the summer I get that. Has to stop. He says. Cops need to enforce the law. The mayor and the governor are in a court of least on that one with the blonde CEO, saying troubling overcrowding at restaurants will not be tolerated. New Jersey governor, Murphy says parents will have the option to keep their kids out of school this fall. The Department of Education will be releasing guidance, allowing for parents to choose all remote learning. For their Children. The details will be coming out later this week, but we wanted everyone to know that we will allow for the step. Open a Murphy, adding It's just not possible for school to resume on a normal schedule this fall. Long Beach is now banning non residents not just from the beach on the weekends, but also banning everyone from the boardwalk residents to at night. This after lots of young people crowded onto the boardwalk last Saturday night. It was insanity there. There was no way they can put it under control Long Beach resident in favor of the nightly boardwalk shut down, which will begin nine PM Thursday. The move comes after Governor Cuomo said that revelers flouting his executive orders mandating social distancing. Are behaving in ways that could undo the state's progress against the pandemic. This gentleman, however, disagrees reaches for everybody, and they should all enjoy it. Long Beach Boardwalk will reopen at dawn. Sadie. Degrees mostly sunny. We're going up to 92 Yankee, whether real field 85 Alvez Geico, 15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance. Is a wedding coming up in a few weeks and you are invited. We're going to hold it right here on sense and wins. As John Montalbano is here to explain this morning, John. Theirs is a love in the time of Cove it Ashley Isaacs is a nurse at New York Presbyterian Israel Wretches played in a band. She liked them, but he was not the type of guy to commit. Until I met the girl. I met the girl and I felt I felt differently about it. Every time I spoke to her, I had butterflies. Every time he saw her. I had butterflies, Then two punches to the gut. He was diagnosed with stage four Hodgkin's lymphoma. And she was caring for Corona virus patients. I'm putting myself in danger. I'm goingto possibly put my fiance in danger and you kind of have this fight with yourself and it's hard. It's definitely hard at the end of the day. Takes a toll on you. Israel is in remission. But as to their big wedding plans crazy to say the

Karen Karen Karen Karen Karen New York City Glen Glen Glen Glen Glen Cove President Trump New York York York York York Brooklyn New Jersey Long Beach Asian Asian Asian Asian Asian Long Long Long Long Island Esther Solace Verrazano Bridge Midtown Bhagwan Bhagwan Dan Hollander New York Dane Throgs Throgs Neck Neck Long Beach Boardwalk
"lymphoma" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

03:02 min | 5 months ago

"lymphoma" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Was stated in the in the strip in other outlets they had internal conversations and they made the call here and I believe it's the right call I don't think that there's there are some people that are having issues and I'm not talking about just your local lymphoma across the country with taking names all four buildings tearing down statues and monuments name four people that were racist what what why do we have a problem with that it is there is there a particular reason why why we have a problem with it I mean if if if we're looking to improve and be a better country be a better nation I don't think anybody out there has a problem with that six five one ninety nine ninety two six I care about everybody I don't have any issues with any body out there based on race sexual preference religion I just I'm not wired that way I'm I'm I'm very she let you know we all have a way of life right I have a way of life I have certain things that I love that I enjoy people that I care about what I do and I care for everybody deeply what if somebody's lifestyle doesn't mess with my lifestyle you know what I do you know what I do I'll leave them alone yeah like what I don't understand what people just can't you know you know it's funny because you say stay in your lane right and I'm not saying you have to stay in your lane but if what you're doing as long as it's not negatively impacting my life I kind of just I will I leave it alone now now racism affects my life in a negative way some definitely I have a problem with that like what you do in your bedroom which god you pray to and all that stuff look man I'm not I'm not for that man I'm just not I'm not I'm not Muslim I got nothing against anybody that's Muslim it doesn't make any sense for me to have a problem with somebody that that is a part of another religion it doesn't make any sense for me to have a problem with anybody based on their skin color and it's it's so sad that is twenty twenty we still here with that but I just don't get that I really don't that's the problem.

lymphoma
"lymphoma" Discussed on Dermalogues

Dermalogues

14:55 min | 8 months ago

"lymphoma" Discussed on Dermalogues

"Danny Manser from U B C Dermatology. My question is about sensory syndrome if we suspect this diagnosis on call. What investigations should we order? And what should our inpatient management being? This would be very similar to what we talked about. At the beginning which is doing the ABC's multiple biopsies from different sides Running the baseline blood work With Flo psychometric and L. D. H. If on exam there Palpable lymph nodes. Then you WANNA do your On Your Index of suspicion is high is running up Imaging at the same time as well that would be from a diagnostic point of view. Managing the patient at the beginning until you get the diagnosis would be managing any patient similar to managing any patient with a Razor Dermot. So supportive care And topical therapies would be reasonable to start with if you want to use mitigation at the get go Until we get further information you could use metrics eight. It's a medication that works for it. Topic Dermatitis and sizes and can be helpful or at least not harmful for Mycosis fungoides syndrome. Yeah Yeah that's fair. That's a fair place to start. I guess until you get everything differentiated. Okay let's listen to another question from one of the dermatology residents high dermot logs. This is Naomi Labonte wrong at the University of Montreal. My question is how do you counsel patients on the possible progression of large plaque? Psoriasis TO CUTANEOUS T. Cell Lymphoma and I guess there's a pre question which is do you believe that. There is an entity called large plaque psoriasis. That's a fair point I think by making that comment. You're agreeing that this is disputed entity whether it really exists or not. I want to start by saying so. We have small plaque personalizes. I think most people agree at it does exist. And it's a separate entity. While the large flat personalizes there are two schools of thought. Is this standalone entity or is it part of Michael's fungoides. I find it much easier for myself and the patients is this is a type of my 'cause Goethe's the morphology you cannot distinguish also on that the pathology you cannot distinguish based on that and more importantly the treatment is the same so to me and this is so Akkerman. Pathology is one of those who was were believers in lumping them together. And this is the way I trained and I find it makes. It makes my life much easier doing it. That way thinking about that first disease categories so like you said you know differentiating out the to sort of mean diseases. So there's this the sick people with them and there's not sick people with them. How often do you see the not sick people with them athlete? The stage one a two to a type of thing. How often would you tend to see them? Is Question Part One and part two is? Do you follow those patients in perpetuity. Or do you ever refer them back to their primary care physician to keep an eye on and then you only see them. The things change SORTA remember. You're breaking the news to a patient that they have cancer and lymphoma so at the beginning I I like to see them Regular intervals Someone with a stayed one A. I might see them in about three or four months after the initial consultation just to make sure that the treatment is working for them that they're not Super Anxious. They don't have more questions the need to be answered and once we develop that Relation eventually it goes down to probably once a year I like to keep following those patients. that gives them that peace of mind but if a patient says it's difficulty to come back here for follow up more than happy to pass them along and say well. I'm more than happy in the future. If you have any concerns patients were. I'm really worried about their the bad. One B they have thick plaques I'm worried about disease progression. Those patients cl- I will continue to keep a very close and and like so close. I buy every three months every six months every week. Just getting not every week right Depends also on the treatment amusing something. The treatment itself would need more but on average every three to four months. I wouldn't go beyond every six months in that category. Okay good to know for four. We SORT OF SHIFT GEARS. A little bit to talk briefly about some of the other cutaneous lymphomas. Do you have any other? Do you think there's anything we didn't cover with respect to Emma that is really important for the residents to know. I think an important point to us as prognosis and it would be very helpful to us to know or to have a way of distinguishing between patients are more likely to progress versus patients. Who are very likely do very well on the long-term And they're different studies. That tried to identify prognostic factors One of the most useful tools is that clip tool the continuous lymphoma international agnostic index and this breaks patients into early stage and late state In the early stage five points That are taken into consideration. Male gender age over sixty presents of fully killer legions presence of plaques compared to patches and then palpable lymph node and we have low risk. Those patients were less than two points and then medium risk patients with two points and patients over two points are the high risk patients so anybody with Two or more. We need to keep a closer eye on them. Okay I learned something new see. I learned something new every time I do one of these and I have not heard of the clip tool so there we go new thing for me to read about before we completely move away from T. Cell Lymphomas. The residents had one other question. Either monologues this matthew and I'm the third year dermatology resident at the University of Calgary. My question is what factors on history and clinical damnation? Make you suspicious for subcutaneous. Nikolai dislike. Tesol THEM OMA. Another question Sorta remember those patients present with panicky lighters and the most common penny colitis a team or no does so. What are the things that make him on? Autism atypical number one persistence versus Recurrent episodes with complete clearing. Between when ever you see that It's important to consider alternative diagnoses and my practices. Anybody with suspected ventilators. I would perform a biopsy to start with In the case of Subcutaneous panicky lights lactates lymphoma. They tend to be on the lower extremities. Stimulatory team does on. But they are they on pathology. It has a lobster. Panicky lighters similar to Lupus Benny Collider's And then in further examination and pathology the patients will have atypical cells new plastic sales It becomes really challenging in distinguishing between Luke speculators and Subcutaneous panicky lightest liked lymphoma But some people even consider this Those are two entities in a spectrum about twenty percent of patients with With the teacher lymphoma actually are either a positive or have more features of lupus panic lighters. Okay okay so think about it as the main the main point there now just shifting gears a little bit. I mean the majority of what I think we said at the beginning. What we see is a cutaneous T. Cell Lymphoma mycosis fungoides. But from time to time we do see cell lymphomas and I guess I'm just thinking about what would be some clinical tips that you might use to think about a B. Cell Lymphoma like I always say you know firm Weird Look inaugurals always kinda get me suspicious away biopsy them think about lymphomas leukemia. But do you have any better ways than by way of wonky looking heard stuff? I don't think so. I like your way of thinking again. Now I'm feeling good to the most part the as you mentioned the Dayton to be plum coloured or Reddish Brown dome-shaped gnawed y'all's They in most cases they're a synthetic They could be individual lesions or few scattered lesions the low great be selling former typically are Either on the head and neck or upper trunk While the more aggressive lymphomas the large plastic Basil and former Tend to be on the lower extremity. Although there are exceptions to the rule but I think plum colored Nadia's or injury to plaques where the noise will change Especially if asymmetric biopsy. Yeah because I mean when I think about that the other thing on my differential in that scenario with some type of cutaneous metastasis so either way. You gotTA figure what it. I guess it would be difficult to talk about. All the different ways you would manage all the different B. Cell Lymphomas et Cetera. And I think in those cases you probably again do very similar. You know work up and involve hematology when necessary. Would that be fair to say? It's actually very easy because overall you have low grade LYMPHOMAS and you have aggressive lymphomas okay. The treatment for the low grade LYMPHOMAS is the same again. Prognosis is great So once you do your baseline workup. Which is the bloodwork To the most part and the imaging once you've confirmed this is a primary cutaneous low-grade beetle infomer- again. The options are to do nothing to inject with intelligent Kellogg To the most part this is what you need to do in very rare cases patients. Have one lesion and someone excise that Legion or radiation. If it's a very large legion I don't I don't I really would need to do anything beyond that while with the aggressive Lymphoma you really need to pass them onto the dodgers and A as early as possible and Despite that the prognosis. Not all that great right. Yeah Fair now. The resins had one other question and I have to admit. I've never actually heard of this so I don't know if you know the answer. Hydrogen logs this measure Vian. Ub Seizure metrology. My question is do breast implants. Increase the risk of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. How do you counsel patients around this risk? Yeah that's A. That's an important question. We we really get to ask the boat it in dermatology. This is a patient who typically would present to dermatology Those are first of all very very rare Number two they happen after breast implants Sometimes within a year so and sometimes after many many years and they present with a lump in the area so those patients were typically end up seeing a plastic surgeon or a brisk connect because there is suspicion about breast cancer That being said because of my interest and skill inform up we get asked Really about the bottom line. Is this what we know is there? Are there are a few case reports about that Number two it is a very rare complication And one epidemiological study from the Netherlands over. I think sixteen years they had only eleven cases of an plastic arts lymphoma On the breast and of those five patients had breast implants. They're rate itself. The absolute risk is very low although compared to if you have a breast implant and voluble inform on the breast it's very like to be an anaplastic large. Senate former compared to the other team former The other thing that they`ve. Da have reported on as that that takes care of the implants seems to play a role. The risk seems to be hired with the takes shirt compared to smooth Implants the content of the implant itself does not make any difference. Okay very interesting. I did not know that either so I've learned a number of different things this evening. I kind of asked if there's anything that you thought we hadn't covered in math but it's impossible to talk about all the subtypes of all the types of cutaneous lymphoma obviously but. Is there anything that you just say? Listen I have the audience of all the Canadian tall resumes? I just want them to know. But is there anything that we haven't covered? I think we covered the important things. There are always rare things that come here and there and That's where the going back to the six booker calling. You basically is what I would do that. I'll be more. That'd be to answer the phone. We'll put your phone number at the end of this. Podcast I'm just kidding. We're not GONNA do that but Well listen thank you so much for joining me. On this episode of Durham logs read. I learned a number of things. I think the residents are going to learn a lot as well so I really appreciate you taking the time to chat with me..

LYMPHOMAS Lymphoma large cell lymphoma T. Cell Lymphomas T. Cell Lymphoma plaque psoriasis ABC U B C Dermatology Danny Manser Akkerman University of Montreal L. D. H. Naomi Labonte cancer Michael University of Calgary Senate Emma Lupus Benny Collider
"lymphoma" Discussed on Dermalogues

Dermalogues

14:53 min | 8 months ago

"lymphoma" Discussed on Dermalogues

"Okay flicker is more like it could be a little bit more aggressive et. Cetera ET CETERA. So are there any pearls with respect to the clinical phenotype of math that you may have to impart on the residents right? I remember a few years back about seven years or so It was giving a talk to the risen intended. Wanted to impress them. So I M to name all types of mycosis fungoides. They know and once they're done showed the table with thirty two different types In reality though as you said the most common are the patches and plaques by far the most this is the most common type we see a lot of fully tropic enough f. And it's important from people. Think about from prognostic Side I think about it more from Treatment of choice. And then we see a lot of the hyper and Hypo committed various By four th by far those are the most common types in addition to the Dermatitis variant as well. Okay now Thinking about the Hypo pigmented. I guess that always in my mind. I have a picture of the kids. Have a method tends to be that. Hypo pigmented type or at least a two that I've ever seen. What makes you suspect in a child or an adolescent? Are Their clinical clues in that population? Or is it more? Just you know not responding to traditional treatments for you. Know a topic dermatitis right what apply to this is similar to what we talked about that. The beginning of actors that distribution of the lesions by far are important and the fact that the very well demarcated and the prisons were. Absence of those are still by far the most important Elements and and Suspecting Michael's fan gorgeous in those patients okay and I know it's not that common in children but it's one of those things that comes up and in particular usually at academic rounds etc but we see see. The HYPOC Mesa's Barrington adults as. Well they tend to be of darker skin as well. Okay so let's say now. You have a patient in a sixty year old male. You've proven that the biopsy is mycosis. Fungoides you're in the patch pox stage or maybe you know stage to. How do you discuss that with the patient? Like how do you what do you tell them? How do you prognosticate? Are you very specific? Do you just kind of give generalizations or like what are use I. I'm saying here but okay I was GONNA say instead like how. Do you break the news to the patient. Or how do you disclose the diagnosis? And what do you tell them about? Prognostic factors right. I start with that at the time off the initial consultation. If I suspect Michael von Goethe's and tell them this could be a common form Says but we are wondering whether this could be something else. Some of the rear entities that can evolve scanning luding. Sometimes skin cancer And they start by saying explaining how the immune system is involved in the skin right We talk about Usually use the example of The immune system is is like a car factory and the factory itself in the bone marrow and once the cars or the cells are made their stamp to go to different parts of the body so some will go to the lungs to protect against anything to breathe in and some of them are stabbed to go to the skin and once it is those cells that go to the skin once they understand skin they start multiplying out of control. The rest of your immune system is intact The process is only happening in the skin. And if someone is having stayed Aaron B. I am very comfortable telling them that. This is a disease that we do not expect to affect how long again a live right. There's cure for for it but the aim is to bring it under control with treatment the same way we would think about ECZEMA or psoriasis. And that in most cases the treatments we used for it are actually the same treatments. Used to treat eggs immortalizes. Whether it's the topical therapies or forty therapies or even some of systemic medication. We'd be using. I start with that and based on the How the patients take the news and the question they ask. I would go into more details. I like that way better because usually what I say is the type of lymphoma of your skin. It's not of the lymph nodes but it's lymph cells in your skin and they're always like would so I like your car factory better. What type of cars are being delivered to the skin will? At this time we're using as the Catania's lymphoma receptor for So that's the stamp that is used. The cells know that they need to go to the scam nicer than that. I was going to say like Mercedes. It is a KIA like. I'm just sorry. So you've given the patient the information you've you've you've told them about their prognosis. How do you approach treatment in early? Stage Mycosis fungoides. Because I think one of the things that I find confusing found confusing as a resident and I find sometimes patients find confusing is. The idea of there is no cure. Why are you clearing it? If it doesn't bother them on their skin like who cares. How aggressive are you in? Terms of initial management's part of that is reading the patient himself or herself how anxious they are the board about the diagnosis and with it. They're symptomatic or not so I would start with the fact That especially if someone had the disease for many years I'd say the fact you've had this disease for many years and without treatment and it did nothing is a very good indication has very low grade lymphoma. That's very unlike anything in the future. Right one option as we do nothing if this does not bother you. It's not causing. Any symptoms is not in a part of the body that you you care about having spots Say like the face for or exposed areas. One reasonable option is to do nothing if we are to treat a then go down the Options of treatment. I would discuss with them. The topical steroids is an option If someone has Involvement of Larger body surface area. I'll talk about the forty therapy. I will also tell them that if we are to use systemic medication in a low grade disease. I doubt that it'll be using any other medication. Other than systemic retinoids. Right and the choice of the Democrats and always read depends on on multiple factors. Okay when I was a resident we were still using nitrogen mustard and Karma Stein I to me. It's something that's we can't readily access here anymore to you at all use that in your practice I do remember Studying about how to mix the Niger mustard for the exam I'm glad to say that we don't have access to it hasn't used. I haven't used it in many years Although it made it back in the United States So there's actually. It's been formulated into a Gel It's very expensive though It's not available to my knowledge. It's not readily available encounter okay except for compounding pharmacies certain compounding pharmacies and even that is very challenging. I know even the compounding pharmacy. We used to access it from here in the East Coast. No longer makes it. If you use phototherapy what late modality do you think is most effective for Mycosis? Fungoides Kiva provea near band. Does it really matter? I typically would start with. You've never been BS available across In many centers? So it's much easier easier to administer and for patients who have access to We did a study with all the patients we treated at per appear in Toronto. And what we found as the response rate was very comparable between pouvoir and narrowband between fifty eight percent for narrowband to sixty five percent for pouvoir. It is really that Eurasian off the effect after stopping the treatment it lasts about nine to eleven months with narrowband compared to twenty one months with Puga So I would offer to patients who tend to have Thicker plaques just to get the deeper penetration or patients that have been treating with narrowband. You've be and They're not responding to treatment. Okay and then you did mention. Systemic retinoids is being an option for the milder cases. Do you have a retinoid of preference? I mean in theory I feel like Allah tretinoin would be a good choice but that can sometimes be challenging to access from the core can be cost prohibitive. So do you have a retinoid that you prefer to start with? I literally would be my first choice if the patient can access the treatment and the reason for that is it has Activity again against the written excerpt her which is very similar to big thirteen. Th Up on the approved medication in the states on Europe What I sometimes use ember that. Those patients have been digs over dermatitis before they might have had biopsy showing dermatitis so They in some cases they actually have a disease that alliterate is is approved to treat In other cases patients have private insurance. That would Would cover that medication. The advantage of alligator annoying compared to other retinoids is I find it very effective as monotherapy without the need to combine it with phototherapy wild for is it annoying nine or editor. They seem to only work win. Combined with photo therapy they don't seem to be that effective as one of therapy options. Okay yeah now. Do you think there's any utility in using topical retinoids ever for maybe we'll just have limited disease. I know some of my colleagues use it I used it in few patients. You could use it. In selected group patients patients with One or two thicker plaques or tumors that are not responding to your other medications that you're using I find that degree of retaliation Bothers patients that they tend to stop them indication in. I really would use although it's one of the Commonly used treatment options. Okay and then say you're moving into higher stage. Do you have some preferred Do you tend to use Systemic medications you tend to use a photo for recess are there. How do you decide where you're going to go in the more aggressive cases I guess I want to start by saying we need to make it very clear distinction between early stage? Michael is fun. Goethe's which is the patch black stage between one and and two. A and the advanced ages patients with tumors Or DERMIK or scissor syndrome. Were in the group that think the same disease Once you get to the point of having tumors and or thirty patients you really need to involve The hematologist in the process Because many of those medications that patients will need Usually are administered through the meteorology service but in general the Execution Oriel Foot of races or C. P. Works very well when there's a significant Burden of disease in the blood But if it's primarily the burden is probably in the skin Acp still effective. But it doesn't seem to be effective as patients were significant blood involvement if the the issue is having few isolated tumors here and there using radiation can be very effective or even inter-regional catalog for those humors But patients were multiple tumors or thermic Then we need to up our game and that the choices re depends on multiple factors. How healthy is the patient? Patient age where they will be able to read Certain Medications Interferon is one of the Very useful medications But because of the potential for side effects where their mood changes Flu like symptoms or hypnotic? -sity usually people over the age of sixty or seventy are less likely to to tolerate it. what we find very useful in that group of patients is using single agent monotherapy chemotherapy. Columbia Sell Doxorubicin We find those Patients tolerate and they're very gentle We also use H Dot can haters so Verina Stat Or Rama Depths and they mostly are useful for writers rather than helping these self. Although in a small subset of patients they benefit both the writers and the disease. Okay so do you run a combined clinic than with hematology for advanced cases we do so. We have a monthly combined connect with Hitachi..

Michael von Goethe lymphoma Barrington Hitachi Catania United States Toronto Flu Aaron B. East Coast Karma Stein Interferon Rama Depths Europe editor tretinoin ECZEMA
"lymphoma" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

AM 570 The Mission

06:54 min | 9 months ago

"lymphoma" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

"Leader men were back we are back when such a leader when I was there with a fifty three year old man the cement was diagnosed years ago actually decades ago with lymphoma yadda marginal zone lymphoma non-hodgkin's lymphoma he was diagnosed he had years chemo decades of chemo is that the biggest super duper places giving came on chemo and years of chemo over twenty years and went to the super duper place that kept on giving came on it didn't work in the ever more more chemo and more more chemo and number this is chemo nowadays about ten thousand dollars a month and a half years over a couple decades years probably spend million two million dollars it didn't work and the doctors this company giving him came over from Verizon to work and it wasn't working and I came we came to me a radio listener like you said Hey why don't you go see doctor leader when he came and we found this cancer we found this cancer we stage them up from the cancer than that kids multiple modules to three centimeter nod tools in the back and in the super curricular area on the left side is doctors never talked about all the options is given chemo chemo chemo for decades decades we talked a few minutes ago what's the benefit of having a doctor who is triple board certified what is one doctor around is trained in chemo and radiation Harvard trained working in New York taken most insurances thirteen eighty four Broadway this man came and they came years ago to me and we treated him with just a few treatments to the cancer with radiosurgery which we know works very well for most cancers works very well for lymphomas he was treated years of chemotherapy didn't work he came to us yet a few treatment she's now cancer free years later years later and I can tell you so happy to be cancer free with no more chemo after years of chemo which didn't work and why didn't they say that those big places ever tell them Hey you might want to see doctor Lieberman well you can guess why after millions of dollars of chemo they probably were hoping for more millions of dollars of chemo it wasn't working if something isn't working you know what you can do with you I'm gonna tell you what when you come and see me I'll tell you what you can do I would like about a seventy four year old woman who has the cancer of the China she has two children she came with her friend last spring she had difficulty urinating she couldn't urinate he saw urologist euro just as a surgeon operates on the urinary system and she noted the patient noted decreased five appearances such other faction she saw this doctor and he found a mass in the **** and she had a mass call the Carson sarcoma a big mass of the **** that was blocking or Europe and she went to one of the big hospitals in New York and she went to one of the bigger hospitals and yeah they did biopsies of this and that it like the other one a biopsy everything well it's great for the hospital biopsy everything but I can tell you that most people with cancer have one type of cancer is rare and we see it because we see so many patients because a woman with one cancer that went on bypassing the long of the giant of the lymph nodes and she started chemotherapy even though it's already known that stage four cancer carcinoma sarcoma it's already known the chemo doesn't work very well and with her she had the chemo at the super duper proper places and the cancer just kept on growing he came to me she had pain in the spine and pain in the leg her weight was honored fifty eight pounds she's five foot two and shed new scans of those super duper places to show that the cancer was growing the cancer before came it was six centimeters after chemo was twelve and I have centimeters it doubled it doubled in diameter which means invite him it went up about probably eight hundred percent and should the cancer along the lymph nodes of the **** the urethra examiner is a huge mass examined her abdomen showed about a fifteen centimeter mass is about the size of two men's fitness inner abdomen and we talked about all the options we talked about she's having chemo it's not work and we talk about treatments it's likely to work our treatment with a high success rate noninvasively this is the work that we do every day all non invasively I would have a seventy five year old woman born in Jamaica she has a cancer of the colon he was diagnosed last year showed the Nemea when there's a need via other means the blood cell the red blood cell count is low she had a hemoglobin of five normal hemoglobin is about fifteen so she lost two thirds of her blood he was you know one of the big hospitals in the New York area should dizziness shortness of breath bush's decision short of breath because she's a name make sure the colonoscopy it showed this cancer the transfers colon transfers colon is a part of the call the cross from the right side to the left side he was offered treatment she refuse refuse surgery she refused chemo through his blood transfusion she does not want those treatments she's lost weight or weight went from one eighty five to one fifty and I saw her and she has cancer in her colon we got the pathology we got a pet scan gutter stage stuff and this is the kind of work we do we do this work when people want to be treated refusing chemo refusing surgery don't want the usual therapy water chance to stop the cancer non invasively and that's what we do this is what we do every day here at thirteen eighty four Broadway Broadway thirty eight street in New York City I would have been Amanda came with prostate cancer came in with the police and seven PSA fifteen so a very high risk cancers a school teacher who sit in one of the biggest hospitals here in New York City and he said no treatment they wanted to do cryotherapy which is not the primary therapy for prostate cancer doesn't work very well it's toxic it's not considered the primary therapy he came with the Gleason seven PSA fifteen high risk cancer never treated him they wanted to them with all kinds of concoctions at this hospital by road HIFU and cryo and focused therapy for just trading part of the prostate which is proven therapy the purpose.

lymphoma
"lymphoma" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

08:18 min | 11 months ago

"lymphoma" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"He has it will come back and you only chemotherapy again to help him fight through this round of chemo is cost roughly in K. from start to finish my question is in regards to chemotherapy in the future we are unsure how long is remit remission will last how should I plan for future chemotherapy costs considering lymphoma is not curable we'll come back and I have quite a bit of debt left I should I create a sinking fund for chemotherapy or plan to cash flow his lymphoma if it comes back why did you guys give me this question you know I'm going to get so much hate mail our baby girl I love my dogs I cry when I bury them I've had a dog in my life as long as I can remember and sometimes more than one the chances I'm a multi millionaire and the chances of me spending twenty or thirty thousand dollars to keep the dog alive with chemotherapy Wallace suffering from myself version need to keep the dog alive for zero that's not fair to the dog is financially responsible sought human it's a dog the human we spend the money and you figure it out there is a differentiation between our pets and our family members even though they feel like family members and we love them deeply and we cry but you're not gonna like my answer I would not do another round of chemotherapy for ten thousand dollars I would send him to heaven and we know that all dogs go to heaven we're not sure about catch but all dogs go to heaven hi yeah you guys get so mad at me he doesn't understand what kind of a man we did **** listen it's a dog my dad should she gets a mile Apollon bringing coffee at five AM every morning and looks me in the face and not talk to it baby talk as if they can understand anything I'm saying because is dumber than a rock really but it's a sweet loving dog and I love that little dog and I will cry when that little dog is gone I will cry like a thirteen year old girl I will cry but I will not spend ten thousand dollars to keep Rufus alive he's a dog now all you folks that are thank god Madeline you just send me the hate mail and I'll burn it for canceling my god do the rest you idiots when you do that kind of stuff so you just have to have you know if you told me this was your child I would just say stop everything and power of money for your child but it's not it's not so and you cannot accuse me of not being an animal lover you cannot accuse me of not understanding the love that people have for their dogs because I am and I do that's not the point the point is it's a dog and I'm just not doing that plus the toxin it's not the dogs suffering mean you ever seen a person go through chemo it's hell it's hell it in you know it's awful but we're trying to keep a human being alive there and that is a different situation it really is different I know some people got confused about that in this culture but I'm I'm an old guy and I come from back in the old days when we had common sense about stuff open phones at triple eight eight two five five two two five David is with us and Georgia hi David how are you Hey Dave how you doing today better than I deserve what's up got a question for you for myself but you only text that contact with a charge phone she has shared with the R. S. some other happen also compromise please wait well I the results will no guarantees on the show is your take on sounds good to go straight with the IRS to assist us right and they were looking at a fairly large freighter team solomid set out by the support of a large number if they can get it done at the last close but so load board into the average compensation for them like like this your I would only use a tax attorney to do that I would not use a firm that specializes in it I would get an attorney that has a specialization in tax practice that does Aussies I think if you'll do some investigation and actually separate from the information this firm is giving you you're going to find that they almost never go through we have had customers clients that were counseling on finances that are in deep deep doo doo on all kinds of things or negotiate with all the different creditors with them for them and we work with the IRS on Lassies hundreds and hundreds of times the rules on I see an offer in compromise in order for the government to forgive and federal income tax that you you basically have to prove Popper shadows that you have no assets and no earning ability because I don't take your future running ability or they don't take all your assets before they talk about discounting your tax bill one dollar and so consequently very few people are in that situation that they have absolutely no assets ignoring ability there's a few times I've seen him do it but I would say you have less than a five percent chance of getting this tax bill reduced and if you have a substantial income or if you have assets if you have equity in your home forget it forget if they're not doing it are your being let down primrose path or get right take your money but there's this firm promising you something they cannot deliver on and for sure don't lie to the IRS that would be called fraud and that's go to jail do not pass go stuff right there so you tell the truth and if you have assets or you have earning abilities they're just not gonna do it on the statute is very clear on that show do a little bit a researcher self talk to Assad tax to to an attorney that has a specialization in tax work and see if they don't confirm what I just told you on and on no I would not give ten thousand dollars to affirm to try to get my one hundred thousand or tax bill reduced fifty thousand when you make a hundred thousand hours a year it's simply a waste of money they're not gonna do it I don't know if those are your numbers I just made those numbers up but that's I wouldn't do it William is with us in New Jersey hi William how are you all hi Dave pleasure to speak to you you too what's up hi I'm a first time caller and had recently signed listen to you so I'm calling you because I have a mess with my dad and I'm trying to figure out the best approach specifically I'd like to get out of my lease first because he was a very bad and expensive choice yeah and I I have about thirty seven Kate that I could get in the next three to four months good deal I'm wondering how can I leverage this to come out on the fringes get my dad in order right now who's the who's the fleece with it is with kia okay so you call kia and you ask them for the early buyout if you were going to buy the car and own it as like an early pay off on a loan and you compare that number to what the car which sell for some of the early buyout is thirty.

lymphoma
"lymphoma" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"lymphoma" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Lymphoma the plant now closed is less than a mile from the school Carol to fall another plaintiffs former guidance counselor I'm pretty mad about it I can't imagine anybody or any company putting poison in the air and taking that having money be more important in people's and Sterrett genic says they empathize with anyone battling cancer and the company is confident that is not responsible for causing the illness eighteen people are homeless after an apartment fire in the Lawndale neighborhood that took place early this morning no injuries were reported foot firefighters had to rescue several people from the windows of the three story building the cause remains under investigation Coast Guard searchers have found the helicopter reported missing in Hawaii A. B. C.'s Molly call McConnell reports the wreckage has been found in a mountainous area on the island of call white but there is no sign of the passengers that helicopter was on a tour that left just after five o'clock last night now there has been a search effort that's been ongoing we do know that the type of helicopter that was being used at the time was a Eurocopter AS three fifty and it was being flown by so fari helicopters into tour company on Kuwait there were six passengers on board plus the pilot a US special forces soldier who died in Afghanistan this week with season a Taliban weapons cache when he was killed a spokesperson for the US military says sergeant first class Michael gold was clearing out the weapons discovered in Kunduz province when the explosion happened the US is disputing Taliban claims the service members were in a convoy targeted by a roadside bomb some progress to report in Chicago with respect to gun violence this year police report fewer homicides then in two thousand eighteen police statistics show four hundred eighty four reported homicides in Chicago this year down frights hundred sixty one last year in a seven hundred seventy back in twenty sixteen at the head of the Joliet dioceses taking a medical leave bishop are Daniel Conlin's leave begins immediately a statement from the Joliet diocese did not provide any further information bishop Richard pates who serves as bishop emeritus of des Moines well service apostolic administrator in bishop Conlin's absence WGN sports more common season gone wrong for the bears they'll try to ended on the right note by beating the Minnesota Vikings in getting to aid and aid the bears will be playing without a key mix and Taylor Gabriel and Eddie Goldman as the Vikings are not playing for anything on Sunday the running back Dalvin cook will not go neither will line back there Kendricks and the quarterback Kirk cousins may sit out as well the Vikings the number six seed in the NFC college football going on right now they're in the fourth quarter the pinstripe bowl Michigan state leading Wake Forest twenty seven to twenty one should be a great one tomorrow in the college football semi final heiau state and Clemson Clemson is one twenty eight straight that's the nation's longest winning streak the Buckeyes are second at nineteen in a row before that number one Ellis you and number four Oklahoma will kick off around three o'clock and tonight it is the holiday bowl Iowa is in action in the big ten taking on the U. S. C. blackrock sake coming up seven o'clock a pre game seven thirty puck drop the New York Islanders at the United center a more common WGN sports your money on WGN Dow closing up today twenty three points nasdaq down fifteen points the S. and P. five hundred closing up just barely one tenth of a point and oil closing up four cents to close at sixty one dollars seventy two cents a barrel we have thirty four degrees now at o'hare I'm gauge one on Chicago's very own seven twenty WGN when.

Lymphoma
"lymphoma" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"lymphoma" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"So all we did the transplant put in the central line catheter. That was a little bit were deal. It was started bleeding too much like filler die whatever I do. But they just trudged through it. And then you know after about. Out. Four or five months everything successful transplant land. Well, my brother. Stop taking the anti rejection medication and his body rejected. The transplant. So. So he know of the change direction that you were heading down that. Yeah, we're talking about that time. Yeah. We did. We we mentioned that I told him I think I wanna do this and something that was he was aware of how how do you think of your brother and your job now? So every time I go into work. You know, it's funny because the the unit that we did the transplant a lot of the whole. Employees who work there though. Call me Benjamin, I'll call them Benjamin back like him walk out of the hey, Benjamin Benjamin that's not Benjamin e man out. We have something going on or say to like, one of the female, nurses, and they're like, no, that's that's that's not, you know, people there that then you end up working with them eat you remember that while a so like Toby, gene Dulcie those who's actually the educator. She's on she's on our team for the leukemia. Lymphoma society, she's educator for that department. Okay. Shoes actually a patient on the same unit with member. Other jury members story we're talking about. He was having a hard time with the treatment throwing a lot. And she offered to take them down to buy a slice of human eat pizza. Okay. So so while I've got you here ICU nurse. Stories. I mean, do you just have stories for days? Are you the one that you had a party? Somebody says tell me I see you stories. Yeah. There is a. People are different breed of people where the kind of people it's like the bodies are our career rights. We we see a lot of things. Yeah. I've seen lots lots of interesting things, we we. We're not judgmental. Of course. And and really at the end of the day. It's like you're here with me for this amount of time in my job is to deliver you healthy out of this situation. Regardless of what you make whatever you came in with whatever you did to yourself or to your body. That's not my role my role right now is to take all of them all that I've acquired over these years and get you healthy and deliver you with a heart rate and blood pressure in the day. I love that therapist saying so people come to be with their their things that they are going through and the, but with mine, it's a lot harder at times to try to sort through the reality. They're afraid of being judged. You know, how much am I going to let this person know in the ICU? It's there, you know. What's one? Yeah. Here stories that don't quite match up. But correct. Correct. And then and then, you know, you'll get the you'll give them that live from really really really is. That would happen is or my this is the one that like. It kind of gets me. The question marks. We're gonna give you drugs. We're gonna give you medication that actually can interfere with some of the drugs that you can't tell me that. Because if I don't know I give him something I can actually kill you. And I want to my mind my job or my career is trying to save you my I'm not gonna judge you taking this. We need to tell me what you've taken beforehand because if you if you've taken something that I don't know. And I come I mean, one of them that I'm just going to throw out the taboo, one is the blue Bill and a lot of people. Yes. But if you're if you are on something like that. We need to know a head of time..

Benjamin Benjamin Lymphoma leukemia Toby gene Dulcie five months
"lymphoma" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

06:18 min | 1 year ago

"lymphoma" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Make sure you like that page, and that page Kirk is dedicated to the charity portion of what you guys do. This is so cool because there is a registration fee for the course that you you teach and this fee goes toward charitable causes. Tell me more about that. So we started the foundation. It's gotta be four or five years ago. It used to be people would make they pay tuition to attend. The course since day one we donated those proceeds we would just take it into the business, and we would then turn around and and take it out. We found a national charity who wanted to support the education, they vetted. The course that we were teaching, and so they they sort of wanted to sponsor the course, and for us it made a lot of sense. And that's what the retirement education foundation. So we helped coordinate that with this national charity the charities United charitable in. What they allow us to do with the retirement education foundation is we can take in the tuition, and then we can redirect it to different charities that we want to direct it to show some local we support some local charities as well as some. National charities the national charities. There's there's some more personal reasons associated with the leukemia and lymphoma society, my father passed away a number of years ago from non Hodgkin's lymphoma in I credit, the leukemia and lymphoma society for keeping data live after diagnosis for for much longer than he should have been. He was able to participate in some studies some research studies and use some. That some treatment that wasn't available to the public yet. So because of the leukemia lymphoma society, and I got to. Two extra years with my dad that I wouldn't have been able to have so. After that. We we spent a lot of time. I developed a program for the leukemia lymphoma society, where I went around talking to some of their largest donors and talked about through retirement planning. There are so many charitable strategies that you could utilize that can benefit you in retirement financially in also impact national charities. And in fact, I would I would venture to say the numbers close to forty percent of our clients have some sort of charitable component to their retirement plan. There are so many strategies from a charitable perspective that are available. It's not just the vailable to the ultra wealthy. The challenge is always been that. If you weren't ultra-wealthy advisers could make enough money on you to help you to support those charity charities and use these these strategies, but these strategies are available for the middle class. You don't need to have a million dollar foundation. You can set up. A donor advised fund for twenty five thousand dollars, right? There are a lot of ways to support charity and also benefit with your own taxes in your own retirement plan. So you get to utilize great causes and to help yourself at the same time. So we support the leukemia lymphoma society, make a wish is a big one. My wife used to be a wish grant her. For those of you who do support make a wish and you're a wish granted. I can just I can't thank you enough. I know that my wife after I think the the tenth wish that she helped grant she couldn't do it emotionally any longer. It was really difficult to see these children often many of which are going to die. Get so involved in their life. And and help, you know, some of these these wishes come true, you it was just it took some of a toll on her that we now support it financially. She no longer can can do the help with making the wishes, but those of you who are donating your time in making those wishes. I can't thank you enough. Because that really is. Not an easy thing. So yes. So the twenty nine dollars that people pay to attend. Our course, we charge a fee, we charge the tuition. So that people recognize you're not going to be sold something this is purely an educational event. We're not going to solicit and in the only way we could convince people we felt was to to to charge tuition in in what it sort of taking a life of its own right now people are pretty engaged because it's supporting charity, they're getting an education. It's supporting charity. It's a win win. And everyone's enjoying it Meghan. It really is a win win Kirk. When you look at it, boy, you know, you're gonna come away with some valuable information for retirement planning. But also you've got that feel good component. You're giving back to some really worthy causes. I think that's that's great. And the buy in is there. So the people coming Kirk I would expect there pretty serious about learning. Aren't they were they they are right? They've made a financial commitment. They've made a pretty. Significant time commitment and for some people the idea of going to college is a bit intimidating. I hope it's not an if if that prevents you from tending or the time commitment prevents you from attending. I promise you will come away from. This course, I if you're a do it yourself for your really sophisticated. We have CPA's attorneys. I have many executives fortune five hundred CEO's CFO's coming to our courses. Right. Don't be intimidated. You're gonna come away much better prepared for retirement. No matter what level you're at. We're going to cover all the way through you can't help. But to be more confident in your decision making how to choose an adviser if you're going to get help or if you're going to try to do this yourself where to go, what's the most cost effective way? How do you reduce your cost and your fees and retirement all of these things are what we're going to discuss. So I want to make that offer. I'd like everyone to attend.

leukemia Kirk lymphoma CPA Meghan Hodgkin CEO CFO twenty five thousand dollars twenty nine dollars million dollar forty percent five years
"lymphoma" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"lymphoma" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"So. Gina grad New Year's. Had had a great break went to solving and fed the ostriches and who had an emergency cat scan by the way that was scary over at cedars. I'm fine. They thought I might have lymphoma. Don't I'm totally fine. All the coughing and the hacking, I wrote an apology to all Corolla show listeners. When once I got this figured out. I just got back cast member. You guys trust like I hadn't been able to control it. I I just I hadn't. So I went to pulmonologist because Dr yelled at me and asthma, and it's all on the men, and I feel much better. So got to walk every day three and a half miles, and I feel so much better. That's one of my resolutions every single day. I love it. I love my neighborhood. That was a big part of it and New Year's head of really Superfund dinner party with friends and just had a nice relaxing evening. But yeah, the resolutions I with the asthma and all the bullshit. And now I live so far from my gym. I think it's going to go back to walking. I'm not going to worry about you know, the steps and the soul cycle and all that shit right now I love walking outside. I love listening to my podcast. I love listening to stand up comedy. And that's a really good time for me to do that. So every day, I love it. I can't remember if we got into it in the news, or whatever it was of always said, classical music and walks walk walk walk. I've just known it. And then somebody tweeted me a whole article walk therapy. And how they're now using walk there being of course, that is very solid simple, basic, and extraordinarily helpful. But on unglamorous New Year's resolution, which is just walked just take a walk everyday, it feels so good. And I I'm a valley girl now, and I'm loving it. I really love the neighborhoods over there. And I love I'm not a big music person. I don't know why. But I like listening to stand up, and it's just I like to laugh, and I like to think and to come up with new ideas. Answered. So that's that's big fuck, you you fucking fucking them. The other one I've been working on our whole break, and I'm really excited about I'm going to try my best to start a new food blog, and I've come up with a bunch of different recipes and started setting that up with a couple of domain names. And having a lot of fun ordering all the right stuff. And would love suggestions from people who do that. Because that's something that I've realized I love it. I love cooking. I love coming up new recipes. I love you know, trying to figure out how to replace stuff and make it NS g I spent so much time during the break doing that. So my goals are simple this year. It's it's really continue to embrace the cooking and the healthy lifestyle that I've frankly fallen off with at the the second half of this year between the broken foot and all the bullshit and the as MMA and just being lazy and just just being an asshole. So it's time to kind of tighten all that up. And I feel really good about it. And I'm going to work on those Brian. Thank you same. Same as Gina. I'm an walk walk at any even sale loud. But I was thinking the whole time because walking all of yes last. We talked the day of our party the next very next day. A went to Lowery's with Christy for annual date. Third time into Lowery's this holiday season, wonderful prime rib, of course, a prime rib stuff dollars..

Lowery lymphoma Gina Dr Christy
"lymphoma" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"lymphoma" Discussed on KTRH

"And sign up and you'll be you'll be sent links to listen to these incredible interviews that are not just about the dangers of not just about how to get better but there's some profound evidence that terms on its head what we about health and he likes you and your opinion will monsanto settled these cases for a little quiet cash or take it all away you know i don't know i didn't ask that question to michael bound today who's with who's the head of the law firm and it's a question that i should've asked because i was as i was reading the study that the stories about it they're posing the same question there's obviously the advantage if there's a big win in this current case it should go about a month and if there's a huge win that that'll be a strong impetus for santo to settle because if the president comes and lee johnson i mean think about it it's absolutely perfect he got drenched soon after he got a disease it's extremely rare particular type of of lymphoma that are not usually found in african americans failed in high cuts in high amounts in associated roundup edible this is what i think's going to happen jeffrey they will probably try to settle even before this case is finalized because they do not want a guilty verdict on their record they don't want the suit to prove that they're wrong and it causes cancer so if they can settle let's say they give dwayne family five million dollars if they can settle under the agreement that nothing is released and there's no guilt put on this agreement they're going to do that with as many cases as they can i've seen that before by monsanto in fact they have these ways of keeping people quiet for example they'll see part of the part of the agreement they'll see a farmer claiming that the farmer bought and planted santos roundup pretty seats or canola illegally they'll find out that they actually made a mistake and so they may settle with the farmer the farmer can't describe thatcherite they always put that muzzle on them jeffrey we're gonna come back we'll talk more we'll take calls next hour to access the audio archives of coast to coast am log onto.

president lymphoma monsanto michael santo dwayne five million dollars
"lymphoma" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"lymphoma" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Now there are a lot of people out there that are going to say well okay great they're gonna find something wrong with me and then what i end up with a medication or i end up just knowing i have this extra disease that i'm going to have to get through the rest of my life and so those people be not afraid there are many programs and protocols that you have in place to turn people's lives around some of them just include eliminating certain food sensitivities that may trigger other problems others are more serious allergies and there other that are bona fide diseases such as silly ac and there's a lot of people that are walking around that don't even know that they have a single gene faciliate war i believe if you have to then you're confirmed that you silly ac can you talk to us about really what silly ac is because you know it's kinda just become oh it's gluten free in that cures everything talked to us about what a patient that comes to you with silly akwa silly symptoms would go through and what their life is about is like after diagnosis first of all to be fair having one or both of the genes whether it's h d q two or q eight does not make the person that's silly act it does make them susceptible or higher risk forgetting silly act disease the importance of knowing it wouldn't you said that someone will say oh great they gave me a new disease no we don't give anyone any disease we might give a name to what they've been complaining about but doing that gives you the opportunity to actually take care of it the nickname for silly i in the literature is that it's the mother of all auto immune disease and we're not into the popular to phrase statements going around these days everyone should be gluten free if you have any particular element you should be gluten free no you try to prove it but the mother of all auto immune the biggest complication potentially of it going on treated is lymphoma number two is where you started the show colon cancer that is not to say that everyone that has the gene and doesn't go gluten free gets lymphoma or colon cancer that would be fear mongering.

lymphoma
"lymphoma" Discussed on AdultSh1t

AdultSh1t

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"lymphoma" Discussed on AdultSh1t

"And he he hit my grandfather for her because he talked about it than the next day because his second he got japan i swear to guide he was up and he was talking while and he was like a whole different person and he had lymphoma no one was able to tell and it's just it's you've got to go dole where it's where it's in second opinions urges though fucking important i've seen should go down were people have just gone with the first thing the first dr the first test that and then their lives have been ruined and we've done sony videos about this where like doctors don't believe women of color women specifically and it's actually and say it's it's a huge problem like how how that is not talked about it it's as shitty things talking about because of course you never wanna like talks should about doctors because they're saving lives but there is fucking issues there they're big big issue gallagher is just a lot of like i went to a dermatologist ones i don't i don't want want to tell district you gotta i had escaped reasonable but look up it's is terrible scheme he's a bedbugs bedbugs don't burrow into your circadian leave is that was scheme is it's body lace yet can you just get it from dislike beat like a coat you have to have like hey like contact anyone that did not think to be embarrassed about right i just don't know how i got it like i don't know but even better but even still this is why it's so growth is that is bad enough because like you'll see like little signs league or whatever you go to the doctor it's gaby's and they give you medicine and you're done and you like wash your sheets and everything in your done judge or i went to you i was scared these studies dock and he was like.

lymphoma gallagher gaby japan sony
"lymphoma" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"lymphoma" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"For i think the 70s i don't turkey that was a good one you turkey oh my god and yet i immediately thought of our president i am mmediately thought of our president right now the word liar key i don't know why maybe he reminds me of a turkey but that to me i was like yeah he's not old mary i don't know i just reminded me of the price of a of a trump he feels like a holiday ham to me that's what he has to say when i was in the movies in there somebody who's overreacting onda man u's mullah pineapple someone spoken a holiday ham and then my friend goes that phrases working overtime i go now we're talking about the phrase now were not parent were not one way to madda give me fear i am afraid that i this is very real i'm afraid that i will die before i finish getting better greg has had stomach cancer i had stomach cancer which i ever again a gastrointestinal nonhodgkins bcell lymphoma which i have can't they short in that don't they know how inconvenient that is you know that's why it's a problem i think is that they haven't got one of those cute nicknamed him say like p diddy it or something i mean bob it's a nonhodgkin lymphoma i think that's like you now and then be saleh's that's lymphoma lymphoma but then people godkin zor nonhodgkins and then belly limp as l a belly limp belly limp he's rock and bellies lim man i granting of dated turn i got some and i am rock and some real bay sell lim abi lymph i got some be lymph in my up our have anymore so that is that is good but i above fortunately for me and also for new the listener i have just have my prostate biopsies so i'll find out in a week i that's gone i'm not really i'm i'm not i'm not afraid of and never have been super afraid of dying that is not my fear my fear is that i won't have a i won't.

president greg lymphoma bob saleh
"lymphoma" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"lymphoma" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Need give me an hour give me an hour of positively give me an hour of good stuff i'd been involved with a number of charities over time i i wanna do something fawn something good something that makes a difference i i wanna do that because if i don't i swear by here's was going to light on fire so in wanting to go about this mission i've been involved with in those people i work with who are involved with leukemia lymphoma and they have their like the night um they have a light the night event coming up tomorrow and money raised goes to leukemia lymphoma leukemia lymphoma foam of the reasons are coast to me and number of for is for a couple reasons leukemia lapalme society gets as gets more per dollar to research gets more per dollar to the labs than most charities do and k in a waste their money on marketing they don't waste their money on decorations or on overhead paying everybody billions of dollars just to be the ceo my cousin who i met once didn't make it till didn't make it to six years old because of childhood leukemia had he'd been diagnosed with that today he'd have a better chance of survival so what they do matters would they do has been working what used to be a death sentence back in the 80s now is is more than a chance so michael worker challenge me can you raised two thousand dollars an hour okay no one i'm going to try going to try to raise two thousand dollars in an hour seems like a low number unless you don't have to thousand dollars but i i need it i need something i need something and he.

lymphoma ceo leukemia two thousand dollars thousand dollars six years
"lymphoma" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"lymphoma" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"But it was not healthy so yeah so i think most people need someone to pointed out to them because really you feel like that's the person i at yes that's the finally my authentic self obsessively looking at tracts of land in portland is that what you do i went through a phase that talk to strangers through your vets that that sounds like the healthiest water as them a lot of questions i have my own little you know latenight show going on sale where you did he didn't do this did you do that snow what's that like yeah oh yeah so yeah i think most people need someone to pointed out to them look look to talk about the nonhodgkins lymphoma in by the way were you not able to save enough money for the hodgkins lymphoma you didn't listen your parents did you didn't listen to my parents now off yeah i parents cher cher with a listener what you shared with me off mike how about gas magnier and i feel like this is the only place where i could say that 'cause i feel like almost if i said as any other place that it would cause a arakis and i will say with the caveat of a habit had a very easy cancer as far as cancers go would you so you head of sexually cancer i had actually with the coal lease a cancer so the doctor is like you lease a cancer it's probably been in you for a long time and i didn't know if you monthly's ear the cancer so i did yeah i had a i had a lazy cancer but uh yeah i found physical illness and to this day so much easier than mental illness and maybe it's more diagnosed physical illness.

portland lymphoma mike cancer hodgkins
"lymphoma" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"lymphoma" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"To do its own research on these compounds was necessary that they could rely on the chemical manufacturers to do the research to hire the scientists to bring the data to the epa for analysis they also said well that's expensive undertaking for epa just to analyze it so they're going to pay fees to the epa to do that so that's why you get this thirty percent budget being taken up by the chemical producers writing checks to the epa the sat and what's interesting right now he's got some lawsuits that are out there and he's got farmers that have gotten nonhodgkin lymphoma and they are suing monsanto what's going on with this case what's the likelihood of how this might play out so the key fact there is that in in two thousand fifteen two years ago a very prominent cancer assessment agency that is associated with the world health organization so it's basically a un agency and it's based in france its acronym is our our founding that there was a likely carcinogenic effect from life assayed exposure they looked at all this data they confine themselves by the way to published in peerreviewed data because they're rule state they cannot take data directly from manufacturers or anyone environmentalists for that matter that hasn't been published in any way based on a study published in period you data i are determined there was an association between life assayed exposure in nonhogkin's lymphoma well you know what resulted from that everybody living on or near a farmer who applies decides for a living and has nonhodgkins lymphoma is suing monsanto and so they're probably thousands of these cases all over the country in state and federal court and in california in san francisco their consolidated some three hundred of those cases in a consolidated litigation out here in federal court house and that little gatien has undergo is going on well the judge there doesn't like sealed documents and very testing when monsanto tried to seal every document it exchanged and discovery in started unsealing secret confidential documents of monsanto and they tell us story and that's one of the elements of our story thank you so much thanks for having me this.

epa lymphoma monsanto france nonhogkin california san francisco two thousand fifteen two years thirty percent