5 Burst results for "Lyle Thompson Lyle"

"lyle thompson lyle" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"lyle thompson lyle" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"Networks, no contracts. Welcome back to the sporting life. We're joined now in this segment by someone who can be called plausibly with implausibly the greatest ever in his sport. He is by many measures, the greatest lacrosse player, ever, we're pleased to welcome to the sporting life. Lyle Thompson Lyle, thank you for joining us. Thanks for having me. Lyle Desportivo crisis grown so much in the last couple of decades. But there was a period of time when its popularity was essentially limited to a few geographic areas, primarily the area around Baltimore, Maryland, Long Island, New York in upstate New York. Your from upstate New York. Can you tell us about your first exposure to the game? Yeah. For me. I grew up on a reservation, just south of Syracuse, central New York. And and for for me, and for a lot of a lot of people growing up on the Onondaga reservation. It's it's really. It's really a tradition. It's the game has passed down. So right from what I was born. I was given a traditional one at stake from my father, and you know, all through all my family lines. We we've all played the game lacrosse, so I've had a stick in my hands. Since the day. I was born and you were twice honored when you were at Albany in college as the national player of the year the winner of the trophy. Your brother one the trophy at Albany as well you scored at least one hundred points in your final three seasons at Albany. You were the first overall selection in the dress of both of the major lacrosse leagues. Your your credentials are impeccable. But what observers of the game same or anything else is how much you and your brothers and your cousin changed the game. How did you guys changed the game? I'm looking at it from my point of view. Honestly, I think we're just bra brought him aspect to the game where we're kind kinda brought some fun back into the game. It's a it's a creative game. And that's what we were always taught us kids. And I think that was a point in time. Where the game was was became really structured in in your cokes away where you were supposed to play the game, certainly and me and my brothers. And we've we've always played the game in a lot of Americans. We've always played the game, whether it really free style and it allowed for more creativity. But also outside of the game. It just brought a lot more awareness to who we are. And where this game has worst game was originated because at one point it was known as the rich, white preppy sport. When when you know, we've been playing this game for for hundreds of years, and I think when when me miles at tie started to blow up at Albany. That's what people were seeing in in. Our story was was starting to be told. And that story was about native American people in where I'm from. So it was it was important for us. We're speaking with Lyle Thompson. Are you bleed the greatest lacrosse player ever and still very much in the prime of his career number one overall pick in both major lacrosse leagues in two thousand fifteen he now plays for the Chesapeake Bay hawks in major league lacrosse in Georgia swarm in the national lacrosse league. Why is it important for you? For there to be greater recognition of the legacy of native Americans in lacrosse and their ownership of the origins of the game. Yeah. I mean, I think I think what I'm what I'm beginning to realize as I continue to grow as a person. And and that's across player is. I wanna I wanna I want native Americans to be recognized even more than just lacrosse because then lacrosse, you know, it's again, it's it's growing in that area. But it's just important to me because that's why I come from. I see a lot of the struggles. I see a lot of our our our community struggles in lacrosse has been a vehicle for for a lot of us. And I know it's been a huge huge part of my brothers lives, and we want we want the same for the next generation. So that's why it's important to us. We're speaking with Lyle Thompson, the legendary all-time great lacrosse tack men who now plays professionally. Here in the US wild there. There was an ugly incidents in the last several days involving you in Philadelphia as you were playing and the arena announcer for the home team in Philadelphia. A guy named shawnee hill said something he said the words talking about you in you, wear your hair long braid as a way of honoring your heritage. He said to the whole crowd. Let's nip the ponytail way going after you. What were you thinking in the moment when you heard him say, those things could be honest. I didn't hear him say the words I was I was carrying the ball down. And you know, usually when you're on the floor. You don't hear them? Once you step off the floor decks when you hear my whole team heard. They I wouldn't say they reacted to it. But they they definitely within the team they reacted to. But there were some other incidents during the game that you know, similar answer. Honestly worse than that from the fans from the fans, and that's testified that kinda got to me, which I wish I hadn't. But but yeah, that that that's happened begins Philadelphia. It's been about five days now days since the incident. We're speaking here on a Friday was the previous Saturday. How are you processing it? What is it like for you to endure that kind of racism, honestly, you know, the only way I can gossip. The only way I can handle it is in a positive way. That sounds sports is Tommy. Itself across really has taught me, and I do think there's there's good some the incident. It's it's kinda it's really opened my eyes up about all educated. People are about my people about every American people. But also in in I opened up for me to be able to to look at the next generation to be able to have control and making sure that, you know, incidents like this don't happen to them. And and to be honest at the youth level, they're happening a lot on. And that's what I want to be a part of that sort of wanna be able to take part in and. Like, I said, I think I think there is good. It's gotta come from this. And and those are the things, you know, I wanna focus on. Well, it's been a pleasure Lyle having you here on the sporting life. Thank you for taking the time to speak with us, and congratulations on other outstanding season Lyle Thompson is widely regarded as one of the best players ever in the ancient sport of the cross Lyle. Thanks so much again for being here on the shelves. Thanks for having me on.

lacrosse Lyle Thompson Lyle Lyle Thompson Albany New York Lyle Desportivo national lacrosse league Philadelphia US Long Island Onondaga reservation Baltimore Maryland Syracuse shawnee hill Chesapeake Bay hawks Georgia five days
"lyle thompson lyle" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

06:49 min | 1 year ago

"lyle thompson lyle" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"This is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Here's Jeremy chef we're joined now in this segment by someone who can be called plausibly more than plausibly the greatest ever in his sport. He is by many measures, the greatest lacrosse player, ever, we're pleased to welcome to the sporting life. Lyle Thompson Lyle, thank you for joining us. Lyle? You know, the sport of lacrosse grown so much in the last couple of decades. But there was a period of time when its popularity was essentially limited to a few geographic areas, primarily the area around Baltimore, Maryland, Long Island, New York and upstate New York. Your from upstate New York. Can you tell us about your first exposure to the game? Yeah. For me. I grew up on reservation just self a surface, central New York, and and for for men, and for a lot of a lot of people going up on the dog or vacation. It's a it's it's really tradition. It's the game has passed out. So right from what I was born. I was giving a traditional one stake from my father in in all through all my family lines. We we've all played the game lacrosse, so I've had a stick in my hands of the Dell was born and you were twice honored when you were at Albany college. Jr. As the national player of the year. The winner of the two art and trophy your brother won the two art and trophy Albany is well. You scored at least one hundred points in your final three seasons at Albany. You were the first overall selection in the dress of both of the major lacrosse leagues. Your your credentials are impeccable. But what observers of the game same where they anything else is how much you and your brothers and your cousin changed the game. How did you guys change the game on and look at it from my my point of view. Honestly, I would just brought mass to the game where where kind of brought some fun back into the game. It's a it's a creative game. And that's what we were always taught us kids. And I think that was a point in time where the game was was became really structured in in your colts away where you were supposed to play the game away and me and my brothers. And we've we've always played a game in a lot of Americans. We've always played the game. Whether really. Free style in allowed for more creativity. But also outside of the game. They just raw a lot more awareness to who we are. And where this game has wear game was originated because at one point. It was you know, known as the rich white preppy sport. When when you know, we've been playing this game for for hundreds of years, and I think when when me miles and tie started to blow up at Albany. That's what people were seeing in in. Our story was was starting to be told in that story was about native American people in in where the game come from. So it was it was important for us. We're speaking with Lyle Thompson, are you bleed the greatest lacrosse player ever and still very much in the prime of his career number one overall pick in both major lacrosse leagues in twenty fifteen now plays for the Chesapeake Bay hawks in major league lacrosse in Georgia swarm in the national lacrosse league. Why is it? Important for you for there to be greater recognition of the legacy of native Americans in lacrosse and their ownership of the origins of the game. I mean, I think I think what I'm what I'm beginning to realize as I continue to grow as a person and lacrosse player is I wanna I wanna big I want native Americans to be recognized even more than just lacrosse because then lacrosse, you know, it's again, it's it's growing in that area. But it's just important to me because that's why I come from. I see a lot of the struggles. I see a lot of our our inter-community struggles and lacrosse has been a vehicle for for a lot of us. And I know it's been a huge huge part of me and my brothers lives, and we want we wanted to same for the next generation. So that's why it's important to us playing. The game is professional now in playing in two leagues seasons overlap. There's indoor there's out. Outdoor. How do you manage your schedule? How do you prioritize your roles with two different teams in two different leagues? Yeah. I mean almost professional cost. That's the way I see it. And and I trained you're on the cross whether it's it indoor or out there. I'm constantly playing the game. And you know, it's it's a matter of I think college prepared me really really well for just managing my time. Because a lot of a lot of players you have you have players that have they jobs to nine to five. And I think the way I best way I can look at it is just almost professional lacrosse player. And I have to prepare my body, my stick people sticking my hands. And and that's where I try to do every day. You have been called. Not by just anybody. But by people who know the game you've been called unguardable. When you have the stick in your hand and the ball in the stick. What is the thought process? How are you thinking about attacking the opposing goal? I mean, honestly throat years, you form habits, and and a level playing which is because at a professional level. There's there's a lot to it. There's there's not a simple answer to that. Because every time every time I play and every time I died a lot of times it's against a different opponent different defender. And what I always try to do is just prepare for each individual. Because I always have a MAC someone's usually assigned to cover me, and I always liked to prepare for that person in expect to who I'm gonna be who's gonna who who I'm going to be going up against that game. So preparation is a huge thing. But you know, what I always tell the kids in the most important part of the game. If you really want to hone your your craft his you gotta keep your lacrosse stick in your hand. And you know practice whether whether you are. Really with or just grabbing every day sleep with it. Yup. That's exactly

lacrosse Lyle Thompson Lyle national lacrosse league New York Albany ESPN Jeremy chef Albany college Long Island Baltimore Lyle Thompson Maryland Dell Chesapeake Bay hawks Georgia two leagues
"lyle thompson lyle" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

06:49 min | 1 year ago

"lyle thompson lyle" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"This is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Here's Jeremy chef we're joined now in this segment by someone who can be called plausibly more than plausibly the greatest ever in his sport. He is by many measures, the greatest lacrosse player, ever, we're pleased to welcome to the sporting life. Lyle Thompson Lyle, thank you for joining us. Lisle the sport of crisis grown so much in the last couple of decades. But there was a period of time when its popularity was essentially limited to a few geographic areas, primarily the area around Baltimore, Maryland, Long Island, New York and upstate New York. Your from upstate New York. Can you tell us about your first exposure to the game? Yeah. For me. I grew up on reservation just self a surf you central New York, and and for for men, and for a lot of a lot of people going up on the dog or vacation. It's a it's it's really tradition. It's the game has passed out. So right from what I was born. I was given a traditional one stake from my father in in all through all my family lines. We we've all played the game lacrosse, so I've had a stick in my hands of the Dell was born and you were twice honored when you were at Albany college. Jr. As the national player of the year. The winner of the art in trophy, your brother won the two art and trophy Albany is well. You scored at least one hundred points in your final three seasons at Albany. You were the first overall selection in the dress of both of the major lacrosse leagues. Your your credentials are impeccable. But what observers of the game same where they anything else is how much you and your brothers and your cousin change the game. How did you guys change the game? I'm look at it from my my point of view. Honestly, I would just bra brought mass to the game where where kind of brought some fun back into the game. It's a it's a creative game. And that's what we were always taught us kids. And I think that was a point in time where the game was was became really structured in in your colts away where you were supposed to play the game away and me and my brothers and we've always played a game. And a lot of we've always played the game. Whether really. Free style in allowed for more creativity. But also outside of the game. They just brought a lot more awareness to who we are. And where this game has wear game was originated because at one point. It was you know, known as the rich white preppy sport. When when you know, we've been playing this game for for hundreds of years, and I think when when me miles and tie started to blow up at Albany. That's what people were seeing in in. Our story was was starting to be told in that story was about native American people in in where the game come from. So it was it was important for us. We're speaking with Lyle Thompson, are you bleed the greatest lacrosse player ever and still very much in the prime of his career number one overall pick in both major lacrosse leagues in twenty fifteen now plays for the Chesapeake Bay hawks in major league lacrosse in Georgia swarm in the national lacrosse league. Why is it? Important for you for there to be greater recognition of the legacy of native Americans lacrosse and their ownership of the origins of the game. I mean, I think I think what I'm what I'm beginning to realize as I continue to grow as a person and lacrosse player is I wanna I wanna big I want native Americans to be recognized even more than just lacrosse because then lacrosse, you know, it's again, it's it's growing in that area. But it's just important to me because that's why I come from. I see a lot of struggles. I see a lot of our our our community struggles and lacrosse has been a vehicle for for a lot of us. And I know it's been a huge huge part of me and my brothers lives, and we want we wanted to same for the next generation. So that's why it's important to us playing. The game is professional now in playing in two leagues seasons overlap. There's indoor there's out. Outdoor. How do you manage your schedule? How do you prioritize your roles with two different teams into different leagues? Yeah. I mean almost professional across the way, I see it. And and I trained you're on the cross whether it's it indoor or there, I'm constantly playing the game. And you know, it's it's a matter of I think college prepared me really really well for just managing my time. Because a lot of a lot of players you have you have players that have they jobs to a nine to five. And I think the way I best way I can look at it is just almost professional lacrosse player. And I have to prepare my body, my stick people sticking my hands. And and that's where I try to every day. You have been called. Not by just anybody. But by people who know the game you've been called unguardable when you have the stick in your hand and the ball in the stick. What is the thought process? How are you thinking about attacking the opposing goal? I mean, honestly throat years, you form habits, and and a level playing which is because at a professional level. There's there's a lot to it. There's there's not a simple answer to that. Because every time every time I play and every time I dodge a lot of times it's against a different opponent different defender. And what I always try to do is just prepare for each individual. Because I always have a MAC someone's usually assigned to cover me, and I always liked to prepare for that person in expect to who I'm going to be who's gonna who who I'm going to be going up against that game. So preparation is a huge thing. But you know, what I always tell the kids in the most important part of the game. If you really want to hone your your craft is you gotta keep your across in your hands, and you know practice, whether whether you are. Drilling with or just grabbing every day sleep with it. Yup. That's exactly

lacrosse New York Albany Lyle Thompson Lyle national lacrosse league ESPN Jeremy chef Albany college Lisle Long Island Baltimore Maryland Lyle Thompson Dell Chesapeake Bay hawks Georgia two leagues
"lyle thompson lyle" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"lyle thompson lyle" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Best networks, no contracts. Welcome back to the sporting life. We're joined now in this segment by someone who can be called plausibly with implausibly the greatest ever in his sport used by many measures, the greatest lacrosse player ever, replace to welcome to the sporting life. Lyle Thompson Lyle, thank you for joining us. Thanks for having me Lyle. The sport of lacrosse has grown so much in the last couple of decades. But there was a period of time when its popularity was essentially limited to a few geographic areas, primarily the area around Baltimore, Maryland, Long Island, New York in upstate New York. Your from upstate New York. Can you tell us about your first exposure to the game? Yeah. For me. I grew up on a reservation just south of the surface. New York, and and for for men and for a lot of a lot of people growing up on the Onondaga reservation. It's it's really it's really a tradition. It's the game has passed down. So I was born I was given a traditional one at stake from my father and all through all my family lines. We we've all played the game lacrosse, so I've had a stick in my have been Fidel was born, and you were twice honored when you were at Albany in college as the national player of the year. The winner of the trophy your brother one word in trophy Albany's. Well, you scored at least one hundred points in your final three seasons at Albany. You were the first overall selection in the dress of both of the major lacrosse leagues. Your your credentials are impeccable, but observers of the game same with anything else is how much you and your brothers and your cousin. Changed the game. How did you guys change the game? I'm looking at it from from my point of view of honestly, I think we just brought to the game where we're kind of brought some fun back into the game. It's a it's a creative game. And that's what we were always taught us kids. And I think that was a point in time where the game was was became really structured in in your colts away where you were supposed to play the game, certainly and me and my brothers and we've we've always played the game. And a lot of Americans we've always played the game, really free style and it allowed for more creativity. But also outside of the game. It just brought a lot more awareness to who we are. And where this game has where skin was originated because at one point. It was. Known as rich white referee sport. When when you know, we've been playing this game for for hundreds of years, and I think when when the miles of tie started to blow up at Albany. That's what people were seeing. And our story was was starting to be told. And that story was about native American people in where they came from. So it was it was important for us. We're speaking with Lyle Thompson, arguably the greatest lacrosse player ever and still very much in the prime of his career number one overall pick in both major lacrosse leagues in two thousand fifteen he now plays for the Chesapeake Bay hawks in major league lacrosse in the Georgia swarm in the national lacrosse league. Why is it important for you for there to be greater recognition of the legacy of native Americans in lacrosse and their ownership of the origins of the game. Yeah. I mean, I think I think. What I'm what I'm beginning to realize as I continue to grow as a person. And and after lacrosse player is I wanna I wanna I want native Americans to be recognized. Even more than just cross because then lacrosse, it's again, it's it's growing in that area. But it's just important to me because that's where I come from. I see a lot of the struggles. I feel a lot of our our our community struggles in lacrosse has been a vehicle for for a lot of us. And I know it's been a huge huge part of my brothers lives, and we want we want the same for the next generation. So that's why it's important to us speaking with Lyle Thompson, the legendary all-time great across tack men who now plays professionally here in the US ploughed there. There was an ugly incidents in the last several days involving you in Philadelphia as you were playing and the arena announcer for the home team in Philadelphia guy, named shawnee hill said something he said the words talking about you in you, wear your hair long braid. As a way of honoring your heritage. He said to the whole crowd. Let's nip the pony tail way going after you thinking in the moment when you heard him say, those things to be honest. I didn't hear them say the words, I was I was carrying the ball down. Usually when you're on the floor. You don't hear them? So once you step off the floor decks when you hear my whole team day. We I wouldn't say they reacted to it. But they they definitely within the team they reacted to it. But there were some other incidents during the game that you know, somewhere honestly worse than that from the fans. Yep. From the fans, and that's kinda got to me, which I wish I did. That that's what happened begins Philadelphia. It's been about five days. Now six days since the incident were speaking here on a Friday was the previous Saturday. How are you processing it? What is it like for you to kind of endure that kind of racism, honestly, you know, the only way I can gossip. The only way I can handle it is in a positive way. That's something sports is Tommy across really has taught me, and I do think there's there's good some from the incidence. It's kinda it's really opened my eyes up. All educated people are about my people about every American people. But also I opened up for me to be able to look at the X generation and to be able to have control and make sure that incidents like this don't happen to them. And and to be honest at the youth level there have happening a lot or and that's what I want to be a part of. That's what I want to be able to take part in and. Like, I said, I think I think there is good just gonna come from this. And and those are the things I want to focus. Well, it's been a pleasure Lyle having you here on the sporting life. Thank you for taking the time to speak with us. And congratulations on another outstanding season Lyle Thompson is widely regarded as one of the best players ever in the ancient sport of cross Lyle. Thanks so much again for being here on the show. Thanks for having me on.

Lyle Thompson Lyle lacrosse Lyle Thompson Albany New York national lacrosse league Philadelphia Long Island Baltimore US Maryland Onondaga reservation Fidel Chesapeake Bay hawks shawnee hill Georgia five days six days
"lyle thompson lyle" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"lyle thompson lyle" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"Of Super Bowl ticket brokering can burn regular fats. And as you report in the story. There's nothing per se illegal going on here. There's nothing no illegal about this market. And there's nothing illegal alternately not about not being able to deliver the tickets that are promised as long as you pay him. Back. Right. Well, I mean, there's two schools of thought out there. They're in the business and says this is a free market. And if that's what the price of tickets are going for then you, you know, you should be able to make the money you can make right? But there is a school of thought of wait a second it works until fans. Don't get what they were promised. What his what they thought? You know, they pay over thousands of dollars for tickets. And then maybe they don't get tickets. Right. And what we what we really wrap their heads around the articles this act this concept called tickets speculation. And the Super Bowl is in like any major sporting event, you're gonna run into something called ticket speculation essentially what it is brokers and people who are trying to sell tickets at a prophet. He's leader sporting events are gambling six months in advance. Based on where the game is going to be for what kind of prices, they think they can get for the tickets. So to us. Is the year that we really focus in on which is twenty fifteen which was the Seattle Seahawks versus the New England Patriots in Arizona. The game was in Arizona, so broker six months before that game before they knew who was actually going to play in that game thought based on previous Super Bowls where the location is irresolvable that was a warm place. People could golf they really do other things that just Huber they thought, well, we can get our hands on those tickets probably for fifteen hundred dollars for people like, you know, players sponsors. Because folks that we could flip them for about three thousand dollars bake, you know, fifteen hundred dollars profit double their money. Well once the Seahawks won that game. And they realized that they were going to the Super Bowl. There was the man it was a perfect storm. It was a whisker of venue with a fanatic west coast team. That was so so that would be there and a lot of could just drive machine. So people were just driving down. They're hoping to get their hands on tickets. Well, anyone who had bought tickets for three thousand dollars? Well. Those tickets were worth three thousand dollars. Now, they were upwards of ten thousand dollars because the band was so high so brokers who had promised three thousand dollars seven thousand dollars in the hole. Right. So when a two scenarios happened brokers either very quickly said to their clients. I'm sorry. We can't deliver these tickets. Here's a full refund. Some brokers either through like five hundred dollars or a thousand bucks say apologize for you know, basically, you're not gonna get to Super Bowl. But they at least were affront about it. And they were honest about it. There are other brokers to stroke people along who kept saying over you get your tickets to get your tickets and get your tickets. Those people didn't came down to Cemex and for anyone. He's under the new Super Bowl. It is incredibly expensive experience hotels that are not one hundred fifty dollars or a thousand bucks at night lights are like two or three hundred dollars or thousand bucks just to get to the town. You know, and then the food is ridiculous of the taxes. Are it's just. Very very expensive. If you can get an Uber. I mean, I guess the lesson ultimately tissue from your from your story your reporting here of last year and a half is that in less. You've got the tickets in hand. Don't know. You've got nothing is guaranteed. What Bill eating? That's typically funny that they don't have the tickets in their hands yet because they can't get reception or rowers seat. So that's my biggest piece of advice much tougher on just a general area. Like, it's in the stadium. Yeah, that's three hundred somewhere of you know, thirty year if you see that, but it doesn't necessarily mean a speculative. It's just me. I would want to know at least a section at this point to shoot. Thompson a terrific story and very important to anyone who happens to be considering at this point going to the game next week. The story can be seen as I said Sunday morning on E sixty. I think we're on at nine eastern time on ESPN two this week and also tissue story. Free SPN dot com is online tissue. Thank you so much as always for joining us. Thanks for having me. This is the sporting life on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. We're joined now in this segment by someone who can be called plausibly with implausibly the greatest ever in his sport. He is by many measures, the greatest lacrosse player, ever, we're pleased to welcome to the sporting life. Lyle Thompson Lyle, thank you for joining us. Actually, I haven't been Lyle. The sport of lacrosse has grown so much in the last couple of decades. But there was a period of time when its popularity was essentially limited to a few geographic areas, primarily the area around Baltimore, Maryland, Long Island, New York and upstate New York. Your from upstate New York. Can you tell us about your first exposure to the game? Yeah. For me. I grew up on the reservation, just south a surface, central New York, and and for for men and for a lot of a lot of people going up on the dog or exhibition. It's it's really it's really tradition. It's the game has passed down. So right from what I was born. I was giving a traditional one at stake from my father in, you know, all through so all my family lines. We we've all played the game lacrosse, so I've had a stick in my hand with the Dell was born and you

Lyle Thompson Lyle Seattle Seahawks lacrosse New York ESPN Arizona Cemex Huber New England Patriots Bill Long Island Baltimore Dell Maryland three thousand dollars fifteen hundred dollars six months