35 Burst results for "Luther King"

Chauvin's Lawyer Seeks New Trial, Impeachment of Verdict

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | Last week

Chauvin's Lawyer Seeks New Trial, Impeachment of Verdict

"Hi Mike Crossey a reporting Derek Sheldon's lawyer seeks a new trial and an impeachment of the verdicts the attorney for former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin has requested a new trial saying the judge abused the discretion of the court and the verdict should be impeached due to jury misconduct Chauvin was convicted last month of second degree unintentional murder third degree murder and second degree manslaughter in the may twenty fifth death of George Floyd attorney Eric Nelson says judge Peter Cahill violated children's right to a fair trial when he denied Nelson's request for a change of venue due to pre trial publicity Nelson also cites Cahill's refusal to sequester the jury for the trial or instruct jurors to avoid all media Nelson's brief does not refer to reports that one of the jurors participated in an August twenty eighth March in Washington DC to honor Martin Luther king junior Floyd's brother and sister addressed the crowd at that March hi Mike Rossio

Mike Crossey Derek Sheldon Derek Chauvin Chauvin George Floyd Peter Cahill Nelson Minneapolis Eric Nelson Cahill Martin Luther King Junior Floy Washington Dc Mike Rossio
Maine Man Arrested for Setting Fire to Black Church

Jesse Kelly

00:41 sec | Last month

Maine Man Arrested for Setting Fire to Black Church

"Is the Fox News. Run down, Listen and subscribe now by going up fox news podcasts dot com. A man from main faces federal hate crimes charges accused of setting fire to a predominantly black church in Massachusetts extensive damage and Martin Luther King Jr Community Presbyterian Church in Springfield, Massachusetts, from a fire set December 28th. There were three smaller fires set on two separate days there earlier that month and some tires slashed in the area. Federal prosecutors say disco vulture I've 44 years old from Houlton, Maine, is responsible for all of it. They say investigators found on his phone, several messages using racist language about black people and location data linking him to the scene of the crimes. He was already in state custody, pleading not guilty of

King Jr Community Presbyterian Massachusetts Fox News FOX Martin Luther Springfield Houlton Maine
Georgia's new GOP election law draws criticism, lawsuits

Mornings on Maine Street

01:20 min | Last month

Georgia's new GOP election law draws criticism, lawsuits

"Street with Bill Main Bizarre is adjourned Sonny down. And with that House Speaker David Ralston, calling the 2021 legislator legislative session to a close Georgia lawmakers agreeing to a budget for the new year that does restore money to K 12 education increases. The mental health funding also pays nursing home operators more Now even know with that there has been more fuss about the state sweeping new election law, which has already been signed into law. The chief executives of Delta Airlines and Coca Cola, now calling the law unacceptable. Also Tyler Perry, who owns the giant Tyler Perry Studios in Atlanta. Is speaking out about the new lawyer. Perry is joining other metro Atlanta business leaders, including Delta's CEO and criticism of Georgia's new voting law, He told the Hollywood reporter the law is unconstitutional and called on the U. S. Department of Justice to investigate its validity. Ford versus Ferrari Director James Mangold tweeted that he would not direct a feature film in Georgia due to the new law. While some agree with Perry and others in the production industry about the boycott. Others see the danger and blocking business in the state. Bernice King, daughter of the late Reverend Martin Luther King Jr tweeted that boycotting the state would disproportionately affect middle

Bill Main Bizarre House Speaker David Ralston Tyler Perry Studios Georgia Delta Airlines Sonny Atlanta U. S. Department Of Justice Tyler Perry Coca Cola Perry James Mangold Hollywood Ferrari Ford Bernice King Reverend Martin Luther King Jr
Women Share Why They Fight For Reproductive Justice

Ordinary Equality

05:40 min | Last month

Women Share Why They Fight For Reproductive Justice

"Welcome back to ordinary equality. I'm jimmy wilson a writer editor and feminist activist. And i'm kate. Kelly human rights attorney and feminist activist. Today we're talking about an issue that has been undercurrent of a lot of what we've covered so far reproductive justice it's a framework created by black women to center our needs in the midst of a movement that has ignored us for far too long. This episode we're going to discuss some of the reproductive injustice. That continued post emancipation. And how it spurred the founding of a movement bill to address the inequity and the mistrust caused by centuries of reproductive oppression at the end of the episode will learn white folks myself included can do to better center marginalized and underrepresented voices in this conversation. And what organizations are doing on the ground to ensure reproductive justice the slave breeding industry we discussed in episode three left a painful and persistent legacy in this country. Professor jennifer morgan talked about how the historic commodification of black bodies set the stage for ongoing mistreatment of folks embedding generational trauma that persists today that shamas sits beneath much more recent oppression of reproductive rights throughout most of the twentieth century. Eugenics campaigns flourished in the united states quickly becoming the dominant scientific view. The goal was to exterminate all so-called undesirable qualities in society through often-forced selective breeding and sterilization mental illnesses criminal records unwanted racial traits low intelligence levels and even poverty were considered undesirable indicators leading scientists. Believed that all these traits could and should be selectively bred out of the human population by any means necessary as we now know all of these ideas have since been proven to be as false as they are immoral. Time and time again. In the heyday of eugenics thirty-three states allowed involuntary sterilization on groups lawmakers claimed were unfit have children in california mental institutions. Alone about twenty thousand for sterilizations between nineteen o nine and nineteen seventy-nine unsurprisingly. People of color in immigrants were far more likely to be selected as an undesirable group worthy for sterilization mainstream. Scientists pushed these views. As fact margaret sanger the founder of planned. Parenthood got involved in the eugenics movement as she tried to promote reproductive rights. On october sixteenth. Nine hundred sixteen sanger opened the first birth control clinic in the united states. In order to push the idea of birth control rights forward. She consorted with leaders in the ever growing eugenics movement. She even personally advocated for selective breeding herself in one thousand nine hundred ninety one article. She wrote quote. The most urgent problem. Today is how to limit and discourage the over fertility of the mentally and physically defective as damning as that is. There's more to the story. Here's loretta ross. A professor at smith college and former national coordinator of sister song women of color reproductive justice collective on sanger's legacy her involvement in movement. But i also contextualized wbz devos was vaulted with the jenex movement. And so because it was a popular pseudoscience at that time a lot of people were involved in it. And so to single out margaret sanger as the demon is trying to eliminate the black race is just bad historical research because in fact. She was far ahead of her time. Even i called in a sectional list one day because in nineteen teams retired nineteen sixteen. She about poverty. She wrote about racism she wrote about all the inner sexual issues. We're talking about now. One hundred years later she was so ahead of her time and so she was an accident. Early intersection analyst. Who made some mistakes. But then everybody i know. Who's a human being makes. Mistakes if i wanted to do an analysis of everything dr martin luther king junior it wrong. It's an attention. But maybe they demonize him as they do margaret sanger. Many anti-choice advocates claim. That singer sought to eliminate black people from america altogether. That couldn't be less true. She focused the spread of birth control on poor communities many of which were largely populated with people of color. But it's because they were more likely to be susceptible to unwanted pregnancies and she wrote in one thousand nine fourteen enforced. Motherhood is the most complete denial of women's right to life and liberty. It's definitely disturbing to read about many of sanger's eugenic spaced beliefs. Today though she later repudiated everything. About the idea of selective breeding we still have to contend with the damage her involvement in the movement when a well known figure participates in such a harmful ideology it may provide others the justification to do the same. Her language may also have sowed increased wariness and communities of color after atrocities committed by nazi germany on earth. The terror born from the disgusting ideology of eugenics the vocal public support for the movement fizzled and most sleep died in the united states. But for sterilization continued behind the scenes for decades and still takes place today as we'll discuss later in the

Jimmy Wilson Jennifer Morgan Shamas Margaret Sanger Sanger Loretta Ross America Sister Song Women Of Color Rep Wbz Devos Kate Kelly Dr Martin Luther King Smith College California Germany
Heather McGhee - “The Sum Of Us” And The True Cost Of Racism

Democracy Now! Audio

04:20 min | 2 months ago

Heather McGhee - “The Sum Of Us” And The True Cost Of Racism

"Joe biden and vice president khama harris head to atlanta today where they plan to address tuesday's mass shootings at three spa. That killed eight people including seven women. Six of whom were of asian descent. The trip to atlanta was originally scheduled as part of biden's campaign promoting nearly two trillion dollar american rescue plan democrats hailed. The deal has the largest anti poverty law in a generation. One study projects. It will lift. Almost fourteen million americans out of poverty including five point seven million children while the relief plan has broad public support. Not a single republican supported the legislation. We spend the rest of the hour with heather. Mickey author of the new book. The some of us what. Racism costs everyone. And how we can prosper together. Have there is the board chair of color of change and former president of the think tank. Demos thanks so much for joining us. Heather congratulations on your new book. Thank you congratulations on twenty five years. Thank you so much. The whole team at democracy now is celebrating. Hopefully soon we can celebrate together. Well you just sat there and watched once again. The reverend warnock you tweeted while he was speaking and said everyone should do themselves a favor and watched the speech. Can you talk about the significance of what happened in georgia for this whole country. Reverend warnock the first black democrat to be elected from the former confederacy. It was so moving. I mean i really think of the crucible of the twenty four hours between january fifth and january sixth as american promise in american paralyzed nutshell. I we saw a multi-racial coalition a multi-racial anti-racist coalition that was standing up to four years of division pain and suffering and putting the man who is the successor to reverend dr martin luther king marching through the pews of that story to church and putting him in office. Along with reverend with jon ossoff. That was an historic moment. So many of the political class had counted georgia out and yet a coalition that went from black folks who had been organizing for years with stacey abrams and the touch brown Two white women in the suburbs who turned away from the republican party for the first time and generations young people really overcoming a number of barriers to the ballot in the middle of a pandemic. Did the impossible with the promise of relief from this pandemic. it's self disease that has retaliated disproportionately on people of color. But that has shown that our fates are inextricably linked and then not twenty four hours later the dark spirit of american white supremacy. Fueled by a big lie that has as its core logic racism. The idea the common sense that of course a man who was rejected by the majority of people of color could not possibly have lost the presidency. That of course when people of color vote it is somehow suspect and criminal. This is the tension and explore this tension in my book because fundamentally racism has been the most powerful tool wielded against the best of america against american democracy against cross racial solidarity against the american dream itself. I talk about how it's brought us. The inequality era and figures like reverend warnock who put into perspective who in their own lives have so much of the course of american history on display are whom we need to look to right now to remind us that that tool always robs this country. It's best

Khama Harris Atlanta Reverend Warnock Joe Biden Reverend Dr Martin Luther King Jon Ossoff Biden Stacey Abrams Warnock Georgia Mickey Heather Republican Party America
2 teens charged with carjacking 58-year-old woman in Chicago's Clearing neighborhood

Sunday Standards

00:33 sec | 2 months ago

2 teens charged with carjacking 58-year-old woman in Chicago's Clearing neighborhood

"Boys 15 of 17 have been charged with Carjacking and allegedly threatening to shoot a woman yesterday and on the southwest side. A teen's allegedly pulled a 58 year old woman out of her SUV just before 10 a.m. in the 5400 lack of West 64 Street and threatened to shooter before taking your vehicle. The vehicle was reportedly located Lesson two hours later, in the 60 100 block of South Martin Luther King Drive. One teen was placed in custody. The other team took off in the stolen SUV. But he was arrested later in the evening and the SUV was recovered.

Biden to sign voting-rights executive order Sunday

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:53 sec | 2 months ago

Biden to sign voting-rights executive order Sunday

"Of the executive order on election reforms during a video message. It came of the anniversary of a major event in the civil rights movement. Today marks 56 years since the marches and bloody Sunday when more than 500 demonstrators gathered on March 7th 1965, demanding the right for black people to vote and cross Selma's Edmund Pettus Bridge as protesters were met by dozens of states. Troopers and violence that was broadcast for all to see a national television, becoming a symbol of racism across the deep South that later led Martin Luther King Jr to March from Selma to the state Capitol in Montgomery and eventually led Congress to pass the Voting Rights Act of 1965. This year's Selma Bridge crossing Jubilee, largely virtual this year because of the Corona virus pandemic

Edmund Pettus Bridge Selma Martin Luther King Jr Selma Bridge Crossing Jubilee Montgomery Congress
Biden to sign voting-rights executive order Sunday

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:33 sec | 2 months ago

Biden to sign voting-rights executive order Sunday

"President biden is expected to sign an executive order today designed to promote voting access this as civil rights activists mark fifty six years since bloody sunday. When hundreds of people marched for voting rights in selma alabama. Some of them were brutally beaten by state troopers. As they crossed the edmund pettus bridge becoming a symbol of racism across the deep south that later led martin luther king junior to march from selma to the state capital in montgomery and eventually led congress to pass the voting rights act of nineteen sixty

President Biden Edmund Pettus Selma Alabama Martin Luther King Montgomery Congress
Bloody Sunday memorial to honor late civil rights giants

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

Bloody Sunday memorial to honor late civil rights giants

"Event in the civil rights movement. Today marks 56 years since the marches and bloody Sunday when more than 500 demonstrators gathered on March 7th 1965, demanding the right for black people to vote and cross Selma's Edmund Pettus Bridge as protesters were met by dozens of state troopers and violence that was broadcast for all to see a national television. Becoming a symbol of racism across the deep south that later led Martin Luther King Jr to March from Selma to the state Capitol in Montgomery and eventually led Congress to pass the Voting Rights Act of 1965. This year's Selma Bridge crossing Jubilee, largely virtual this year because of the Corona virus pandemic That was Fox's Jeff

Edmund Pettus Bridge Selma Martin Luther King Jr Selma Bridge Crossing Jubilee Montgomery Congress FOX Jeff
LAPD officer dies days after being hit by car in South Los Angeles

Tim Conway Jr.

00:21 sec | 2 months ago

LAPD officer dies days after being hit by car in South Los Angeles

"Last week in south L. A has died at the hospital. Newton division Officer Jose and Zohra was during traffic control after a car crash last Friday night when a car turned the corner of Martin Luther King Boulevard in Wall Street and hit him. He had been with the LAPD since 2011. A procession from the hospital to the coroner's office went through the streets of South L A Tonight Ah California Congressman says he wants to put the

South L. Newton Division Zohra Jose Lapd California
LAPD Officer Struck While Conducting Traffic Control In South Los Angeles Dies

Tim Conway Jr.

00:16 sec | 2 months ago

LAPD Officer Struck While Conducting Traffic Control In South Los Angeles Dies

"South L. A last week has died. The officer was from the Newton division was directing traffic near Martin Luther King Boulevard in Wall Street when a car turned a corner and hit him. Officer Jose and Zara had been with the LAPD since 2011. California congressman says he wants to put the brakes on the

Newton Division Officer Jose Zara Lapd California
Interview With Roy Kinsey, The Rapbrarian

Good Life Project

06:48 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Roy Kinsey, The Rapbrarian

"Tell me if this is true. Your parents met in a way that kind of foreshadowed your future in a little bit like they didn't mean a bar that didn't mean party is actually true that they met at a library. Of course it's a. I've had my own moments with that story. But it's the absolute truth. My mother was going to interview at. What was the large libraries in sta cultural center and my father was working at a desk. Saugus he Slip some gaming but yet that's that's where they met and then my mother was working actually on the the floor where the music was where all the film were. The vinyls that was this is not harold washington library This is before perr washes number and They met their first date was purple. Rain of the movie yet differs date was to go see preparation. The movie that is not suspicious. I eight yeah yeah. My dad loved france and it was really interesting. Because when i was putting out kinsey a memoir that is very reminiscent to me in a lot of ways of the story of purple rain Imprint the first place that i was asked to come pretty much to drop. The album actually was to first avenue for sold out show. And that's where my father lives now. My father has lived in minnesota for longer than twenty years. Twenty five thirty years probably which is why. This album is a purple winds wire at the vinyl herbal. But it was the first show that i was asked to come in do at prince's club where my father would walk at c be reforming in his hometown. Right before the shutdown so was the first and last show that i got to perform before we before the pandemic times matt. What what was it like for you. It was magical. It was so so amazing. I felt like it's called me. They're a felt like prince called me. You know called me to be there not knowing that things would shut down in a couple of weeks after that. But i think that it's sustained me in a way. I really miss performing and to be sold out show. I was called by desa so Of doom tree who lives in minnesota's a artist and author our own. Right of course asked me to come an open for her. So i do the sold out show and it was just one of the most magical experiences that i've had as far The reception was so so incredible and You know the people of minnesota really made me feel like a star that day in so it was just a lot of moments that were more magical more synchronised than even you know just the forty minutes i was on stage. It was just a whole magical experience that it's sort of like everything was leading up to that moment. Have you talked to your dad about that. His show yeah. It was so funny. My dad is very mysterious guy so when he came i didn't see him. He called me till we. It was a great show. And all that but i think just the way my mind works in the art. That was moving through in the art. That i was making and where i was in that space. I can't lie that i was like. I don't even know if he came. I don't even know if he was even actually here and van but me and my dad had this really interesting connection. I mean you have that connection with your parents. You have the connection with people that brought you into the world doesn't have to be so literal or on the phone or shortly proof or whatever life. I have that tie with my parents. My parents no when. I'm going through something whether i talked to them or not. Like they'll feel it from across town or prostate or cross country in so Randomly two or three weeks later. He sends me a video of me like on my last song. You know rocking the stage of okay. Right he was legit there. that's awesome. yeah. I mean as bad i think You know amazon. There's that connection. There's that sort of thing which. I'm fairly practical person. But there's also certain things like that that i just believe in you just feel something doesn't matter where you are I know you're also really close with grandma coming up as well right. Oh yeah my best details. Tell me more better ellen thompson. She was born in nineteen forty three in mississippi. And i love to speak her name. She was one of the first people that clap from me in made a really big deal out of me knowing how to read on my seventh birthday. She made me de. Protagonist of this book was a story of dr martin luther king junior. It should be around here somewhere. But it's right there so in this in this book that my grandmother gave me my tribute to martin luther king. Junior i am the protagonists of this book. And i'm writing a paper on martin luther king junior at tell the story of his life. But i'm you know in the beginning saying oh telling my cousins rookie creek turtle i have to write this paper on martin luther king junior Go into the story by the end of the story. I've told this whole thing. I turned it in. I get a on the paper. That is the book right. So not only. Did my grandmother clap for me. When she sees me reading. And saying that. I you know had a love. For words you should go to market a garden classes with me and sit in a walk me home and then when i began talking she would call me radio or lawnmower. She said because. I've talked so much if you call me that. And that was a foreshadowing in itself. Right i mean of me getting a on the paper. Maybe the paper was the black album. Right me. Being able to use my words for the upliftment of myself in marginalized communities in it was really just kind of like thinking about this is a power device and words in education literature a are powered by

Sta Cultural Center Prince's Club Minnesota Harold Washington Saugus Kinsey Desa Ellen Thompson France Prince Matt Martin Luther King Dr Martin Luther Amazon Mississippi
Alabama: The Newest Amazon Union Battleground

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:03 min | 2 months ago

Alabama: The Newest Amazon Union Battleground

"Okay lena to understand. What is happening at this alabama warehouse. I'm guessing we should start by looking at some history. Yes and i spoke to just the person for that. Monday is gym specially and i'm a voca auditor for mercedes benz. Us international. We do audits on vehicles. After they're built jim as a very unique perspective on the union voted amazon because his mercedes plant. That was the epicenter of the last time. A super high profile labor battle played out in the state of alabama. And it makes sense that we'd be talking about auto plants because of course. A lot of foreign automakers have been opening factories in the south for decades. Now alex since the nineties yes they brought a lot of new jobs and jim you know he loves his job but he has a pretty glum view of why these foreign car companies came to the south in the first place the coming here because of the fact that there is not a fear of unions. You know they're saying we're just not educated. You know country bumpkins and whatnot. They don't know nothing about unions and don't care a lot of this stems from to work laws and all this other states which say that each worker can choose not to pay union dues still. The auto industry is historically pretty unionized. So the big auto union. The united auto workers decided to go after these new southern factories prompting intense anti union campaigns all labor experts. I talked to about unionization in alabama. Brought up this period of time. Like michael innes jimenez from the university of alabama the board that i'll never forget. Do you want tuscaloosa to be the next detroit. Let's throw race in there too. Obviously but seeing this post industrial city in a lot of pain and blaming the unions and then something incredible happened. workers at volkswagen in. Tennessee voted against the union and vw was the one company that actually wanted a union. It was the governor and republican lawmakers who fought against it from the air things just unraveled nissan workers in mississippi also rejected. The union at jim spits lease mercedes. Plant in alabama. Uaw didn't even petition for a vote. What it all comes down to is getting that vote and we haven't got that in twenty five years on three attempts so this sets the stage for where we are. Now this is. Why alina been asking you. How alabama became the first state to potentially have a unionized amazon warehouse. Right that's why so many people find it surprising. But i actually think that could be one of the three main reasons why this warehouse got to a union votes. So quickly we know amazon has stamped out union attempts and other places perhaps. The company also wasn't expecting such aggressive organizing in alabama compared to more traditionally Activist places. That's factor number. One are the other two to others are about the time and the place. Then let's start with a time. This is one of the things. I heard from the union. That's helping organize amazon workers in bessemer. The unions called the retail wholesale and department store union. And it's president. Stuart applebaum pointed out that this warehouse is only about a year old so it opened right as the pandemic started. I believe that the pandemic opened a lot of people is they understand now that they need a collective voice to stand up for themselves and to protect themselves. I also think that people had expectations when they came in that were not being realized. Amazon has been raking in profits during the pandemic which workers often bring up and also amazon went on a massive hiring spree and this by the way is often when workers ended up gaining some more power which is when they know that the employer needs more workers. The retail union folks say the best. My warehouse workers reached out to them quietly in the summer. They were describing grueling productivity quotas. They wanted to have more say in how they work. How they get disciplined. How they get fired. The union then mobilized support system of other folks from the region who are already unionized particularly workers from poultry plants. Okay and that brings us to your third factor alina. Which is the place right exactly. Professor michael innes jimenez pointed out something notable about alabama on that few people might realize if you follow the border and the coastline between california and maryland. alabama has the highest unionization rate for every state between california maryland. and then throw in tennessee. Also it's a pretty low rate. Only about eight percent of alabama workers are union members which is lower than the national average. But it is higher than all other southern states. And then you've got the specific location of the amazon warehouse which has bessemer. It's a working class. Suburb of birmingham. It's got early roots. In steel and mining and unionized labor. And another thing about bessemer is that it's a community that's predominantly black and the amazon unionization campaign is evoking social justice themes focusing a lot on respect in the workplace and of course this is all happening on the heels of the black lives matter protests. Yes exactly but the union also presented as part of its history. Its members marched with martin luther king junior in the sixties the union president talks about how in the south labor and civil rights battles have always been intertwined and so alina people think that all of these things at the time the place the context will end up making a difference and give alabama. The nation's first unionized amazon warehouse. the union. certainly hope so folks there told me more than half of the workers at the bessemer warehouse signed petitions for union shop. So they think this could be it of course amazon for its part has led a big anti-union campaign. They've got required meetings where workers were told. How union dues our waste of money. How great these jobs are already with all the benefits and the starting wage of fifteen dollars an hour and for context. The minimum wage in alabama is also the federal minimum wage which is seven dollars. Twenty five cents an hour which makes amazon starting wage of fifteen dollars an hour. More than double the alabama minimum. That is actually a big point four. Jim spits lee over the mercedes benz plant as he's watching this big amazon union. Vote play out it'll send a nami ripple but it's going to send one. It's going to let people know that. Hey even people fifteen dollars an hour. Seventeen dollars an hour can have union in their workplace. Bessemer warehouse workers will be voting by mail through the end of march. If this votes exceeds at an anti union place like amazon in alabama. This could turn a whole new page for both the

Alabama Amazon United Auto Workers Michael Innes Jimenez Jim Spits Lease Alina Volkswagen JIM Stuart Applebaum Lena University Of Alabama Tuscaloosa Professor Michael Innes Jimene Alex Bessemer Nissan Detroit Tennessee Mississippi
Ibram X. Kendi And Keisha N. Blain On The 400-year story Of Black people In America

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

04:54 min | 3 months ago

Ibram X. Kendi And Keisha N. Blain On The 400-year story Of Black people In America

"Professor planes. You've got the top box. I'm going to start with you. This is a different kind of history book right. It's a history book where some of the ninety writers aren't even historians collectively who are the writers. And why are their voices so important so we asked an array of writers to contribute to the volume. And as you point out so many of them are not professional Journalists to contribute we asked philosophers to contribute We asked creative writers to contribute as well as poets end. What we wanted to do was really grapple with four hundred years of history. And not you know. We really didn't want it to feel like a typical a history book. I and of course asking ninety historians Would have i think a taken away from the the sort of you know tone that we were trying to set which was bringing together a diverse community which met people coming to the history writing about the history from their own experiences but also from their unique trainings whether in the field of journalism are in the field of law and so it was important for us to create something new something special something original and that meant bringing in writers from a wide array of backgrounds. Professor professor blaine just talked about the fact that you have poets in the book and you write quote sometimes. History is best captured by poets out. Some more there's anything. I've learned in my time writing history. That is that it's deeply complex. Variegated story that in many ways. We have to imagine things that we don't have a speculate on on on decisions that we don't have a specific for that we have to stretch archive especially when writing on on people's particularly working class. Americans certainly working cost black folks who haven't left an archive who haven't left on speeches and and necessarily written records and so you know. Poets have the capacity to really show the depth and complexity and the imagination and creativity of humanity. And and so when we when that comes to bear on history. And i think they were really able at the end of each section to really flush out and contextualized. You know forty years. When i was in school. Professor blaine We're going way back like the nineteen seventies nineteen eighties black history The way we're talking about today just wasn't taught. Slavery was a chapter and not exactly told honestly the accomplishments of black americans were diminished if they were even acknowledged so has anything changed since the seventies in the eighty s. What needs to change. So i think some things have changed You know when you look at how history textbooks written. We're certainly at a place where the textbooks that are produced today or even in the last ten years i think are better than the ones that were a public. Maybe twenty years ago does not mean that we still don't have work to do. In fact we have a lot of work to do. Especially i think in the last two or three years. We've been talking about textbooks in places states like texas for example where they're still a debate about how you talk about the civil war and how you talk about slavery and like you. I certainly encounter textbooks. That didn't really flesh out are the nuances. You know an even the trauma of of the the experience of slavery in often times a glossed over eight or or perhaps had a little box to focus on martin luther king junior but other than that not really center a historical figures i and so a lot has changed in part of that. Change is directly tied. I think to the work of a professional historians. We've been working very hard odd to excavate the history in in in order to help people better write about the history. I in a way that reflects the richness than the complexity and diversity of the black experience but particularly in a way that centers black agency which is key that black voices appear. That black ideas appear in. These textbooks are still some work to do. But i think we're making progress. I think four hundred souls is certainly the kind of texts that would help us move forward in that direction.

Blaine Just Professor Blaine Martin Luther King Texas
How the San Francisco Comunity Music Center is thriving in the pandemic

Voices of the Community

07:16 min | 3 months ago

How the San Francisco Comunity Music Center is thriving in the pandemic

"Of our counters died from complications due to hiv and aids. I'm the remaining survivor. There are many who supported a stirring that time but having navigated losing dancers choreographers audience members weekly similar to what we're seeing now and yet the differences so many people were unaware and didn't care you can tell. The pain still sits with me the trauma and i think that we are in that now. We will be in that period of time. I would say decades of time where we will be sitting with. What wasn't done. What was left unsaid. What was not attempted for the safety of people over profit. This is the co founder and executive director of dancers group wayne hazard. The dancer group was born in the middle of the aids crisis and has over the decades into a service organization providing wrap around fiscal sponsorship programs and services to incubate and support artists and the dance community as well as their historical roots at presenting unique grassroots base. Dance to the san francisco bay area. I'm joined remotely via zoom by wayne hazard the executive director of dancers group. Thanks for being here win. Thanks george it's my pleasure on martin luther king junior day twenty twenty one yes quite a solemn day and quite a powerful day so segue to our first question. Which is i think. The audience probably doesn't know dance group which is an interesting can of service group model. So if you could give us a little background on the dancers group and some of the really unique the of eighteen programs while it's my favorite topic obviously vance's group has been around since nineteen eighty two and we were founded in san francisco's mission district. We really started out. As a collective of choreographers of dance makers looking to have support space and camaraderie and ways to be in relationship to one. Another and really. That hasn't changed thirty nine years later. I like to call us now. Hybrid organization. Because i think it kind of clicks with people one and two. It's kind of what we do in terms of providing direct services to dance makers dancers those interested in dance and we also present dance at timmy's and i say that in that way because we do commissioning of work but we also have large programs of the your leg bay area dance week where pretty The pandemic we had twenty two thousand people in the spring. Take free dance. Classes all over the bay area from hip hop to who led to back to tap to beginning movement classes. Were children to adults. Dance for people with parkinson's you name it. We probably haven't morale-booster over the years so the services we do really are about you know supporting people where they are classes. Discounts performance information discounts on those and. Then we provide direct services to dance makers through our fiscal sponsorship program. We have over one hundred and twenty five dance companies dance projects that fundraise under us so each year close to one point. Five million raised less than we redistribute through expenses back to those entities where over generally pandemic times of three hundred thousand people attend those company and artists activities classes and performances though this last going on ten months with covid nineteen and so much of obviously performing arts and dance especially is a personal experience. How has the dance group dealt with the covid nineteen and economic meltdown. And then how do you feel like. It's impacted all of the dozens of dance. Performance groups that you incubate and work with big question. I'll start by saying that. Dancers groups founders along with myself win through the aids pandemic in the early eighties. All the way into the nineties and still continuing today as a worldwide pandemic beget really not seeing that way. Because of i think broadly and it's changed a bit but seeing as a gay male disease. Two of our founders died from complications hiv and aids. I'm the remaining survivor. There are many who supported a stirring that time but having navigated losing dancers choreographers audience members weekly similar to what we're seeing now and yet the differences so many people were unaware and didn't care you can tell. The pain still sits with me the trauma and i think that we are in that now. We will be in that period of time. I would say decades of time where we will be sitting with what was done what was left unsaid. What was not attempted for the safety of people over prophet so specifically to your question. I think one of the first things we did as an organization is aboard said. Are you okay and we. We talked a lot. We said to staff your job is there. We like many organizations applied for support both private foundations and others to help us navigate this time. We are very fortunate in the bay area to have major foundations. Like the hewlett some rain ins and haase's and fly checkers Really step forward and then we just looked at getting information out early on also. Many organizations were creating cove relief funds and the area had going. i and i was approached by a donor. Saying here's a large took money. Let's get this out to dancers. And i said well what if we join forces with theatre bay area would if we not created just one more fun but just was able to get more money to one fund and so the funder liked that the donor like that theatre bay area. Love that inter music. Sf joined as well and so there's a performing arts workers relief fund on theatre bay area dot org site it's also on dancers

Wayne Hazard Aids Dancers Group Parkinson's HIV San Francisco Bay Martin Luther King Vance Timmy George San Francisco Haase Hewlett
A Safety Net for America

Important, Not Important

08:20 min | 3 months ago

A Safety Net for America

"There's a popular martin. Luther king junior quote that lays bare the false promise of the american dream. He said it's all right to tell a man to lift himself up by his bootstraps. But it is cruel just to say to a bootlace man the oughta lift himself up by his own bootstraps now because it was martin luther king junior's birthday recently because we the people seem to have finally elected policymakers who care that are growing inequality is quite literally killing. Many of us thought it prudent to talk about safety nets for boot lewis americans. A safety net traditionally provides a margin of protection against the fluctuations of everyday life the highs and lows it allows for room for error. It helps you endure and designed purposely. It lets you succeed. Safety nets come in a variety of literal and figurative flavors artist. We're talking about actual rope. You can fly higher knowing you won't die if you slip. If you're an investor. A percentage of capital that remains fluid in cash or bonds. So you can make other bets on crazy biotech companies. Or i guess game stop is what we're doing this week if you're doomsday prepar. Who's pretty convinced. It's the end times but safety net might be an underground bunker in your backyard packed with ken. Paris and dynamite. They'll safety nets are complicated. Systemic concept but the first principles are easy to understand if millions of americans are hungry without water without health insurance and healthcare without childcare without wages. Whatever we're doing is working and because we live in a interconnected society not a spaceship made for one. The unequal distribution of safety nets actually affects everyone as america continues along in a quote unquote k shaped recovery or enormous wealth gap continues to grow. Thus many americans haven't had to think about a proper. Can i buy food this week. Safety net for some time now while others are further away from one than ever before white people are for the most part born with a safety net. The color of their skin. This simple unearned. Genetic inheritance provides a set of boots enabling most white people to simultaneously feel protected from sudden life changes and to take risks and embrace opportunities all relative but why people like me and stuff away a bunch of cash and then take advantage of opportunities like nonexistent interest rates and skyrocketing market values to remortgage houses and by tesla or bitcoin because the goal is growth through compounding interest. Not figuring out how to pick up free school lunches during your twelve hour onsite during a pandemic in a world that is more volatile than ever with list of externalities that includes invisible novel viruses in your living room and workplace and actual oceans. Making their way into your kitchen. It's more important than ever that we think through what it means for everyone to have a safety net as morgan hausa. We'll tell you a functionable. Reliable margin of safety means not having to sell your stocks and interrupt compounding interest when shit hits the fan and compound interest is incredible. It's everywhere for example. The ice age didn't happen because it suddenly got super cold outside. It happened because the summers were gradually and consistently more tepid. And the ice just eventually didn't melt but compound interest goes both ways. I mean look at the climate crisis or the continued state of black housing landownership food. College debt and education positive compound interest means not having to choose between food and rent. You don't even have to think about that when you don't have to worry about and food you can do so much more. It means building an infrastructure and culture of wellness and prevention. Not just going to the emergency room with no idea why your chest hurts because and this is vital to understand. It's not usually the suddenly sick person paying that bill. Ambulance rides and emergency room. Visits that are unable to be paid for by. The patient are often paid for by the hospital with something called charity. Care and that's subsidized by state grants basically your tax dollars of course sixty percent of the time. That sick person isn't white and this is the system. We've designed person doesn't have a safety net. A safety net means paying wages that allow for less congested three generation living conditions that viruses can't thrive in that allow for healthy plant based foods and building a strong microbiome that allow for not living next to fucking fossil fuel facilities and uncapped wells. So kids can grow and learn and breathe and you'd be amazed at what kids can do when they can grow and learn and breathe. I means paid sick. Leave for the days. You just can't do it whether you're suffering physically or mentally so you can do your best work on the other days. A safety net is paid parental leave for welcoming child into your family. It's childcare once you go back to work in preschool. After that for your mental health for your performance at work for your child's future it means giving every american child a few thousand bucks every year starting at birth to be spent indoor invested however. The parents see fit for food now and for turning on that fiscal compound interest for the rest of their lives. We can do better. We can make sure people land on their feet and that the entire society benefits society that decides that safety net's of every kind should be universal. We'll find her citizens able to reach further and faster and will suffer for less when faced with a pandemic. your challenge is to consider the safety nets available to you today and to manifest ways. You can extend those to your business in your community to lift all boats a bunch of guys longtime ago said the life liberty and the pursuit of happiness are unalienable. But i'll tell you this. Hungry person has no liberty no freedom no safety net to millions of americans have no liberty to speak of martin. Luther king talked about that in washington to paraphrase here. He said ever since the founding fathers of our nation dreamed this dream. America has been something of a schizophrenic personality on the one hand we have proudly professed the noble principles of democracy life liberty and the pursuit of happiness. But on the other hand. We have sadly practiced the very antithesis of those principles. Now more than ever before. America is challenged to realize it's noble dream for the sheep of the world. Today does not permit us the luxury of an anemic democracy. Our hours late and the clock of destiny is ticking out. We can't expect people to solve existential crises like climate change and they can keep their water turned on. So i asked today look to your own safety nets and find ways to extend them to your neighbors

Luther King Morgan Hausa Bitcoin Martin Tesla KEN Paris America Washington
Amanda Gorman's books jump to bestsellers after inaugural poem

The Book Review

04:38 min | 4 months ago

Amanda Gorman's books jump to bestsellers after inaugural poem

"The dawn is hours before we knew it. Somehow we do it. Somehow we've weathered in witnessed a nation that isn't broken but simply unfinished we the successors of a country and the time were a skinny black girl. Descended from slaves and raised by a single mother can dream of becoming president only to find herself reciting for one that was amanda gorman the inaugural youth poet lawyer it reading from her poem. At the hill we climb which she read at joe biden's inauguration alexandra alter profiled gorman and interviewed her joining us now to talk a little bit more about that hey alexandra hey pamela so this was a really exciting week in washington but i most loved about the news events. This week was that a poet was the breakout star of the inauguration ceremony on wednesday. Amanda gorman was the youngest inaugural poet and us history. She joins a very elite class of poets. Only been a handful of poets who have performed it including robert frost my ngelo elizabeth richard blanco. So she really brought a lot to this performance. And when i spoke to her what was really interesting to me was. She felt enormous pressure. Not just because of the size of the audience she was going to be addressing. Tens of millions of people potentially watching the events at home but because of the state of the country she felt real responsibility to present a poem that reflected joe biden's inaugural theme of america united and. She said they didn't give her any specific guidelines but they said that's the three million inauguration but she also really wanted to address. What has happened recently in the country. Particularly the partisan divisions that we've seen the political violence the effects of the pandemic. It's a really dark moment. And so she was kind of trying to counter johnston to forces the potential for unity. But also these deep divisions that we're seeing in the country now so interestingly. She was really struggling with the poem. The inaugural committee reached out to her late december. She had a few weeks to work on it and was kind of she said it's like it felt like climbing a mountain would do a few versus a day and then on january six. We all watched across the country as the unfolded at the capital. There was the insurrection. There and rioters stormed the capital. And amanda gorman at that point had written about half of her poem and she stayed up late into the night and finished it because she just felt this urgency. And so you're there are verses in the poem that reflect what we saw that day the other thing that she said that was interesting about how she prepared to write it was. She said she always starts with historical research so she studied speeches from leaders who really brought their countries together. In times of crisis she looked at speeches by winston. Churchill abraham lincoln martin luther king junior and she listened to music that inspired her including the musical hamilton. There are a couple of hamilton references within the poem. That some people caught including lin-manuel miranda who was very appreciative of her poetry. So it's been incredible to see their response to her work after she gave this really kind of inspiring performance her books. She has two books coming out this year. Actually three because they're releasing the poem she wrote as a standalone and she has now the number one and number two books on amazon and this is a poet who is twenty two years old and she's preparing to publish her debut collection. This fall so she's gone incredibly quickly from somebody who had following and was pretty well known in the poetry world to kind of national literary star and one other thing that i loved about her performance and her approach to it which she talked about how she felt like she was representing not just her own words but representing poetry itself representing american poetry and y you know it was important to have poetry part of the ceremony. She said when. I spoke to her now more than ever. The united states needs an inaugural poem. Poetry is typically the touchstone that we go back to when we have to remind ourselves of the history that we stand on the future that we stand for so i thought it was lovely that she felt that she was standing up in front of the capital. Two weeks after the insurrection took place kind of representing poetry as a form that can unite the country.

Amanda Gorman Joe Biden Alexandra Elizabeth Richard Blanco Gorman Robert Frost Pamela Churchill Abraham Lincoln Mart Manuel Miranda Johnston Washington Hamilton America United Winston LIN Amazon
22-year-old poet Amanda Gorman delivers stirring inauguration performance

the NewsWorthy

00:36 sec | 4 months ago

22-year-old poet Amanda Gorman delivers stirring inauguration performance

"Have heard about it by now. The words of the youngest inaugural poet in recent. Us history quickly spread around social media after she spoke on stage twenty two year old. Amanda gorman delivered her original poem the hill we climb. During yesterday's inauguration ceremony it was about overcoming obstacles coming together as a nation and taking part in positive change. Gorman told cbs news. She researched speeches. From abraham lincoln. And dr martin luther king as she began writing she told npr. She struggled to finalize the poem until the capital riots. Then she completed it that night. A variety of celebrities including oprah winfrey praised her performance online.

Amanda Gorman Dr Martin Luther King Gorman Cbs News Abraham Lincoln United States NPR Oprah Winfrey
"luther king" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

Kottke Ride Home

03:39 min | 4 months ago

"luther king" Discussed on Kottke Ride Home

"A new documentary out today called. Mlk fbi which traces the ways in which the fbi was surveilling. Martin luther king junior towards the end of his life as well as other black activists in an attempt to tamp down the civil rights movements directed by legendary filmmaker sam pollard. This documentary is based on a nineteen eighty one book by historian david garrow as well as documents released by the national archives in two thousand seventeen and two thousand eighteen quoting the atlantic. Mlk fbi arrows attempts to stifle the civil rights movement through coordinated efforts to spy on king with the hope of discrediting his righteous public image with king as with many black activists since the beginning of the twentieth century. The fbi surveillance wasn't an isolated obsession. It was part of a long running effort to keep black americans from acquiring institutional power. Pohlad told me the film traces. Exactly how the surveillance of king started how it was conducted and the effects it had on his life end quote using tons of archival footage and interviews with firsthand witnesses. The film illustrates how. Fbi's surveillance of black americans began as part of fbi director. Jaeger hoover's obsession with rooting out. Communism <unk> believing black people to be more susceptible to political manipulation as their efforts became more focused specifically on martin luther king junior and his growing influence. The fbi sought to expose his extramarital affairs as a way of discrediting him to the public and his followers but director sample are noted to npr's fresh air quote would hoover didn't bank on was back in the sixties. The press did not take the bait. They didn't reveal the personal lives of these public figures. They didn't do with john kennedy. They didn't do with others and they didn't do it. With dr king and quotes and while this documentary serves as a needed reminder. That martin luther king junior was not universally revered in his time there could be wearing that paints too negative a picture of him by including personal details like the affairs he had producer. Benjamin heddon said a our approach however quote he wouldn't be d- mythology someone he would simply be portraying him with responsibility and sympathy the way he would subject in his documentaries who was not known to the wider public and quotes and hannah georgia's said in the atlantic quote. Mlk fbi offers an important corrective to prevailing myths about king and his principles of nonviolent resistance. Which were not in fact. Widely embraced as my colleague. Van newkirk wrote in two thousand eighteen hostility toward the civil rights. Movement turned into a cherry. Pick celebration of the revolutions victories over segregation in over easily caricatured gap toothed bigots in the south and quotes and continuing georgia's. The reality was that opposition to king into the racial progress. He symbolized was restricted by region or by political affiliation diplomats and republicans alike had turned against king by his later years especially after he voiced objection to the vietnam war. It's impossible to separate the fbi's decades long commitment to tracking black activists from its relative failure to address the credible threats posed by white nationalists including those that surfaced with last week's deadly attack on the capital the fbi surveilling king and using dubious reasoning to do so isn't altogether shocking for much of the country's history sabotaging black rebellion by any means necessary has been integral to preserving white political power. The new and still contested development is finally accepting black people as active participants in american democracy and quotes.

south africa monday anne frank today Today friday corey nbc January eighteenth twenty twen Nbc Luther ninety two both This week dr martin luther king First martin this month martin luther king junior Bernice king
"luther king" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"luther king" Discussed on Amanpour

"It is local eighteen thousand police departments. This is failed leadership at local level. It's a lot of speeches and not not a whole lot of courage, so I think that the demand now for them to do what they know. Know, they can do to exercise the power that they have to do it into. Just do it. I don't think that we need to talk around. We don't need to talk about a boycott I. Don't need you know we don't. We don't need that right now. They're like what we need. Is People already in the streets? In the reason? You're talking to me right now because they're in the streets. So because we are in the street because people all across the world on the street and has gotten people's attention and mayor. City! Council people they need to respond to that and do something that is meaningful. Because they had the power to do it today, they can't punt in the more they punt. The more people are just going to stay in the street. So raise you correctly said you are in the streets, and that's why we're talking about talking to you and I've been doing that my whole career around the world watching as I say, uprisings for freedom and democracy and dignity and justice so what I want to ask you. Is this the family of George Floyd? Just as we speak, came out and said end, the violence bought. You've gotTA. GotTa keep out on the streets key protesting MP's but lock those guys up in other words. They're saying all the rest of the others. The police the three others need to be held accountable like show van was. Is that what you're saying also needs to happen now is that the I guess the purpose of being in the street until that actually happens as floyd family was saying. So. You know you already know how I feel about. Telling pro-death is not to be violent. The violence isn't coming from the The protests is coming from the police, but we think about that solution it is. It is about making sure there's justice and Accountability Accountability that people confuse the terms, but they are similar, but not the same. Accountability is what happens after the trauma justice, the idea that there should be no trauma in the first place, so arresting me officers is good that is that is accountability. But Justice is what you see people in the street for two. They are saying that this has to stop the. There can't be another case in any city at anytime, and until we figure out a plan to get there, I don't know how the unrest ends. Well. I'm very pleased that you took time to talk to us. During mckesson of black lives, matter and Martin Luther King the third. Thank you both for your really important contributions. We expect a lot from our homes..

George Floyd Martin Luther King mckesson
"luther king" Discussed on Personology

Personology

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"luther king" Discussed on Personology

"Do you have thoughts as a historian had he not been assassinated the ways in which he might have changed things further? Were there things on the horizon that it looked like he might impact had he lived longer life. Oh of course yeah. I think that he just started as like when you compare him to someone. Light Dandy at the age of thirty nine damned done. Nothing early in India. You had achieved some change in South Africa that all the things that we re thinking of in terms of Ghandi's accomplishments. They were still in the future when he was thirty. Nine from Martin Luther King to be fascinated at what is really an early age. What I would say is that yeah you had lot. He would like to accomplish. One of the ironies is that because his visionary goals were so visited there would be no Martin Luther King Holiday if Martin Luther King Live because he would have been seen as someone trying to achieve things that were unachievable. Eliminating poverty has eliminating war. Do you think he could really on his own. Stop the war in Vietnam and stopped all the wars since then he was trying to do something very radical. You know just think of of the poor people's campaign I described it to my students terms. They would understand that bachelor occupy movement. Some of them remember the occupied though pence of ten years ago. Badger that a leader. Today that I'm GonNa go occupy the National Mall States until Congress passes anti-poverty legislation just think of how radical that would be how Daesh us that would be. So I think that Martin Luther King if he had lived he would have been seen as this radical leader and you don't make radical leaders into national holidays so I think what happened was because he was assassinated before that. Follow the into of weddings doing terms of report people's campaign than it was then possible to honor or this person because he was associated with this great civil rights and that is the place that he he made impact and the that is the place where we saw incredible change following his time to the Rights Act of nineteen sixty four civil rights act of nineteen sixty five or rule. Minutes changes in the history of states perhaps important as the fourteen fifteen th amendment to the constitution so we make Martin Luther King National Holiday because he is the person most associated with that civil rights revolution. You know you can't choose a better person for that for him. That was simply part of his vision. Part of what he wanted to accomplish with his life but our national psyche. I guess what you're saying is the combination of his success in this in this particular arena and his sudden death which essentially martyred him made us see him in a certain light. Yes I noticed it. On Martin Luther King Holiday there's a tendency to replay. The I have a dream speech but not his speech attacking the war in Vietnam because that's still controversial. What else in that speech? We have destroyed bath to most terrorist institution. Family and the village is our national psychology that has essentially in some ways. Immortalised him further. Well that wraps things up for this episode a huge thanks to Dr Clayborn Carson for more on. Mlk's life and work check out. His edited volumes of the papers of Martin Luther King Junior. Also if you're interested in more information about the people we discuss in the series you can check out my book the power of different and make sure to follow me on twitter at Dr Gail Saltz or at personality. Md to follow along with all the latest news about the show. Personality is a production of iheartradio. The executive producers are Dr Gail Saltz and Tyler Clang. The supervising producer is dylan. Fagin the associate producer is Lowell Berlanti editing. Music and mixing by Lowbrow Berlanti for more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts..

Martin Luther King National Ho Martin Luther King Martin Luther King Junior Dr Gail Saltz Vietnam Ghandi Dr Clayborn Carson India Lowbrow Berlanti supervising producer Congress Md South Africa Fagin producer Mlk apple Daesh dylan
"luther king" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"luther king" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"Dr Martin Luther King Junior wearing a gold chain promoting a party called freedom to work. It was supposed to take place at this club but it's been cancelled. The owner says he's disgusted and they'll we know torquing year there will be no tw- working here. Sound like Gandalf in Tyler Perry movie that will be no all the strips flow. Also how you going to photoshop Dr King with gold chains to try I make them look cool he was already cool. Look at look at these pictures of Dr King from back in the day. Look at playing pool in a suit. The civil rights march shot so cool. It doesn't matter if he misses and here. He is making the laboratory cool standing in front of book. Stacks of money. But there's this favor Martin Luther King wearing sunglasses inside trevor. He could've taken that call in private but he left the door open for the hate us but maybe maybe the most popular activity on. Mlk Day a is using his legacy to push your own agenda and no one has done in a more interesting fashion than this guy. I believe that God Appreciation Day Honors Honors the Legacy of Dr King. And the truth is I think Martin Luther King would agree with me if he were alive. Today that if African Americans had been given given.

Martin Luther King Tyler Perry
"luther king" Discussed on RUMBLE with MICHAEL MOORE

RUMBLE with MICHAEL MOORE

10:39 min | 1 year ago

"luther king" Discussed on RUMBLE with MICHAEL MOORE

"My friends. The role ahead will not always be smooth. I will still be rocket pieces of frustration. Meandering during points of the Wilderness and that would be inevitable setbacks here and there will be those moments when the billions of hope you will be transformed into the fatigue of the spam dreams sometime be shattered an hour. The`real hopes best we may again with KIA drenched is have to stand before the beard of some courageous civil liberal rights worker. whose life would be snuffed out my the best? The act obsession mom difficult and painful as it did. We must walk on in the days ahead with an a basis faith in the future as we continue our shot of course we may gain consolation insulation. Where so nobly left by that great black BOP was also a great freedom fighter yesterday? James Weldon Donald Johnson Stony the road withdraw litter the chessmen rod felt in the days when hope on bone on had died yet with a steady beat. Have not our weary feet come to the place. For which are Paul the side we have come over. overweigh that with tears has been watered. We have come treading pass through the blood of the Slavic out from the gloom pass Till now we stand it lands where the bride gleam of our bright start is cast lead this affirmation beyond ringing cry. It will give us the courage to face the uncertainties of the future. It will give are tired feet new strength as we continue our forward stride toward the city of freedom when I days become dreary with low hovering clouds of dispatch. We're on nights. Become doc on a thousand midnights. Let us remember. That is a creative force in this universe working pin to pull down the gigantic mountings of evil. How that is able to make our way out of no way transform? Yesterday's into bright tomorrow let us realize that talk of the Mario Universe is long but it bins to justice notice realized that William Cullen Bryant is Right Truth Creston arise again that US go out realizing that the Bible is right right to see God is not mom whatsoever. The man saw that also also in this is our hope for the future. With this faith we will be able to sing in some not too distant Amara with a cosmic pash can and we have overcome. We have overcome deep in my heart. I did billy we Overcome three evils of our society that have to be eliminated. Racism militarism and this unjust economic system. That is called capitalism. This is the Martin Luther King that You will not hear from today. But it is what he spoke about his entire careers entire life Of the injustice of this economic system that is Not Democratic not agreed upon by the majority of the people most people don't have say in what's happening with their economy selected in the hands of the few and he saw that the things were never really really really change unless we changed that unless as we had a more democratic economy is very powerful stuff I WANNA I wanNA play for you a Clip that's not from speech. But from an appearance on the tonight show with Johnny Carson in February of Nineteen. Sixty Eight on this particular night Johnny Ah the night off and I believe in this case if I remember correctly the week off and he invited Harry Belafonte One of the great a singers actors activists political icons and heroes so the Twentieth an twenty-first-century The Great Harry Belafonte subbing for Johnny Carson as the host that night they gotta think about this rebel finds a black man guest hosting the tonight show in nineteen sixty eight. I mean that You know I have a kind of a memory of that but you gotta believe that. That was a kind of a radical legal thing to do and maybe we have him on. He's he's agreed to come on The podcast here on onto rumble Sometime in the near future. We'll ask him about about about hit the guest hosting for Johnny Carson amongst many many other things said I'd love to talk to him about enough for you to hear what he has to say now in his ninety indecent and still as a spry and as great as ever but that night he must obviously had something to do with booking The guests that at ninety he has on Martin. Luther King Junior and king comes out onto onto the tonight show stage With a sketch and that sketch Henderson the band playing them out Dad I'm dumped died and now here's Martin Luther King and It was a guy like APP just like remembering that SORTA anyways So king sits down and You can you can I think the I think the full on youtube somewhere full clip of his appearance that night. But I just want you to hear these two minutes. Thirty five seconds as a king tells Harry Belafonte what he's up to in this year of nineteen sixty eight. What he's planning to do in the spring and and and the this key injustice about the way our economy is And how that needs to change this is on February eighth. Nineteen sixty eight less than eight weeks to months before he's assassinated Martin Luther King Junior. When you're on the tonight show I guess I could use some of the time? Get into pleasantries and you talk about too many experiences. I've had unity here in Europe and other places. What do you have in store for us this summer? Good question I don't know about the summer I guess I should begin with what we have in store for. The rain not feel that we are in the midst of the most critical period in our nation and the economic problem is probably the most serious problems confronting the Negro community and I might say the most serious here's from Problem Confronting People Jenner. And I don't WanNa be now or about this talking about the black for our country because I must be concerned about Puerto Ricans will Mexican narrow. I'm American Indians and Appalachian Whites and we are. Oh confronting a major depression In the poor community times come to brains bath the power of direct action the Nonviolent Direct Action Movement on the basic economic conditions. We've face all over the country. Nonviolence is Denison Menderes Force and grappling with a social problem of legal legal segregation and descend from of deprivation surrounding that system. And of course it has been a major force in grappling with political problem with the denial of the right to vote but in winning. Victor is like the civil rights of sixty four and the voting rights burst of nineteen sixty five around the issue of segregation and voting rights. We discover that these as Legislative Strides did very little to improve the lot of the millions of Negroes in the ghetto. How's the north and in the nation generally in other words a good little penetrate the lower depths of Negro deprivation in communities all over the final clip? I'm playing for you today here on rumble. is From a speech that Martin Luther King Junior Dr gave on August thirty first nineteen sixty seven at a conference in Chicago The speeches called the three evils of society sort of build. Somebody said a few weeks earlier in the speech you just heard from about the inner twining of these these three evils of racism and war and our economic system and And he decries the idea that that what we have actually is socialism for the rich and capitalism for the poor and the irony of this and the hypocrisy of it is was I think too much for him to bear and he just he's in the final weeks of his life now and he's speaking out against this again. This this will be played on the evening news tonight. This will not be played at most tributes to him But it Here in this clip here where he says that the The fact is is that capitalism was built on the exploitation and the suffering of black slaves this myth of how we built this country in the early days. You know we. We didn't want.

Martin Luther King Harry Belafonte Johnny Carson Martin Luther King Junior Luther King Junior Martin Luther William Cullen Bryant James Weldon Donald Johnson Johnny Ah Europe Denison Menderes Force Puerto Ricans Amara Paul youtube Chicago billy People Jenner Nonviolent Direct Action Movem
"luther king" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"luther king" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"That they are ordinary human beings in American citizens have these rights and the courts told them so. Now it's up to them. AM to move out. Got To grow up with guns and bombs on being honest but they've got to go with the determination courage steadfastness like this man. Luther King's them and say here am I and I stand on my rights lights and it's it's got vail and it can't be beaten if we have enough of them. Who instead I enough when they began to compromise mayes and sell out on principle? Then they're going to matter of strategy is to keep a complete solid front there may be tax takes too early. WILL YOU WANNA make bus cases I or school kisses railroad cases or things of that kind rose nine Mina details but the strategy is you'll must never surrender any of their right show game and you must look forward to the team and a full equality. I know that your strategy. What about future tactics? Where do you go from here? Well that's a pretty difficult. Recall question to answer this point since in. Montgomery we have not worked out in if future plans that is in any chronological order and we are suddenly committed to work and press on until segregation is non-existent in Montgomery and all over the south. We are committed to fool equality equality and Doing Away with injustice wherever we find it but as to the next move on. I don't have the answer for that because we have not done work that out at this point we have been so involved then the bus situation until we have not had an had the real time to sit down and think about next move but in a general sense We we are committed to achieving first class citizenship in every area of life in Montgomery and throughout the southern commute to what extent that this is a question that has occurred to me I wonder to what extent the judicial decision may nineteen fifty four stimulated a great it feeling of self respect amongst grows intensified. Him them a willingness to assert they demand I think it had a tremendous indus impact and influence on On the Negro and bring about this new self respect I think it certainly is one. One of the major factors not on several other forces and historical circumstances must be brought into the picture The fact that circumstances made it necessary for the Negro to travel so that his rural plantation background rose was granulation relations planet by more urban industrial life illiteracy was gradually passing away and with the growth of. Aw the cultural life of the Negro that brought about new self respect and economic growth and also the tremendous impact of the world zero situation with people all over the world seeking freedom from colonial powers and imperialism. These things all came together and then with the decision of May seventy nine thousand nine hundred fifty four we gain the culminating point that it seems to me was a final. AWW which came into bring all of these things together and that gave this new Negro a new self respect aspect which we see all over the south and all over the nation today. If this was a final point in a sense a culminating point all why do you ask now for another act on a national level and act. Let's put him the president for a speech in the south. Why is this so as Hasn't happened enough. Steps been made up to this point to enable you to carry the ball from here on well. I think it's necessary for all of the forces as possible to be working to implement and enforce force The decisions that handed down by the courts and so often in the area of civil rights it seems that the Judicial branch of the government is fighting the battle alone and we feel that the executive and legislative branches of the government have of a basic responsibility and these branches have got to silent.

Montgomery Luther King mayes Mina president executive
"luther king" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"luther king" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"I'm Shane Morris sitting in for Johnston Street today as the nation marks. Dr Martin Luther King Day I want to share with you. Chuck Colson thoughts on one of Dr King's most powerful legacies days for the Colson Center. This is break point in their eloquent defensive life marriage and Religious Liberty Chuck Colson. The authors of the Manhattan Declaration made this bold statement treatment. There is no more eloquent defense of the rights and duties of religious conscience than the one offered by Martin Luther King Junior in his letter from Birmingham Jail Today Day on Martin Luther King Day we wanNA share with you. breakpoint commentary Chuck Colson aired back in the year. Two thousand about letter from Birmingham jail. Although recent revelations point linked to Dr King's moral failings the issues Dr King raised about the nature of law what constitutes an unjust law and how we should respond to unjust. Laws are as true true today as ever. So here's chuck. Colson from January of two thousand adjust law is a manmade code that squares with the moral law or the law of God an an unjust law is out of harmony with the moral law. Do you know who wrote those words. It was with these very words in his memorable letter from Birmingham jail. That Martin Luther King Junior threw down the gauntlet in his great civil rights. Crusade King refused to obey what he regarded as an immoral law that did not square with the law of God all across America. Millions of the people are celebrating the birthday of this courageous man and deservedly so he was a fearless battle for truth and all of us are in his debt because he remedied past wrongs and brought millions millions of Americans into the full riches of citizenship in schools and on courthouse steps. People will be quoting his. I have a dream speech. It's an elegant powerful classic sick. But I would suggest that Dr King's greatest accomplishments one which will be little mentioned today because it has suddenly become politically incorrect is his advocacy of the true true. moral foundations of law king defended the transcendent source of laws authority and in doing so. He took a conservative Christian view of law in fact he was the most eloquent advocate of this viewpoint in his time as interestingly enough Justice Clarence Thomas is today writing from a jail. King declared that the code of Justice is not man's law. It is God's law. Imagine a politician saying that today. We all remember the controversy that in just a few weeks ago when George W Bush even made reference to his Christian faith in a televised was national debate but king built his whole case on the argument that an unjust law is no law. At all exactly as argued by Saint Augustine and Thomas Aquinas us to be just king argued. Our laws must always reflect God's law and this is the greatest you today in the Public Square is the law rooted in truth is it transcended immutable and morally binding or is it as liberal. Interpreters suggest simply whatever the court says. It is ever since Dr King's Day the. US Supreme Court has been moving moving a step by step away from the positions. This great civil rights leader espoused to continue in this direction. As I've written can only lead to the loss of self-governing democracy so so I would challenge each of us today to use this occasion to reflect not just on his great crusade for civil rights but also on Martin Luther King's wisdom in bringing law back to its moral foundations nations. Many think of king some kind of liberal firebrand but when it comes to the law he was a great conservative who stood on the shoulders of Thomas Aquinas and Saint Augustine striving without apology to restore our heritage of justice. This is a story. I tell my new book. How now should we live a great moment history when a courageous man applied the law of God to to the unjust laws of our time and made a difference? And that's the lesson. We should be teaching our kids on this holiday. This isn't just another day off from school or a day to go to the mall. In fact I have a suggestion. Take this data. Sit Down with your kids and read them. King's letter from Birmingham jail. It may be the most important civics lesson they'll ever get for breakpoint. This is Chuck Colson in Washington..

Martin Luther King Chuck Colson Dr Martin Luther Birmingham Colson Center Thomas Aquinas Saint Augustine Shane Morris Public Square Manhattan Justice Clarence Thomas US Supreme Court George W Bush America Washington
"luther king" Discussed on On Purpose with Jay Shetty

On Purpose with Jay Shetty

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"luther king" Discussed on On Purpose with Jay Shetty

"His famous woods. We must keep going if you can't fly run if you can't run walk if you you can't walk but by all means keep moving so the question I would of Austin onto his. What's what's in your lives blueprint? A Martin. Luther King was the youngest person to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in nineteen sixty four. And I'm so grateful. Oh we got to sit down and have this conversation to unearth some of the gems and priceless wisdom and insight and his words. I hope this has been a really fulfilling podcast for you. It's it's been a huge experience for me like I feel like this. I genuinely feel like this. Incredible experience reading his words because they're so powerful so powerful. They're not just so powerful. And just this process you're sitting with your for just over thirty minutes and leading to his work and feeling like on asking these questions. This such a powerful experience is there and I really hope that it resonated in connect to each and every one of you as well and I just like to thank you all really hope you enjoyed this episode. Please please please Sherry. Please please please recommended to as many people as you can. I think it's going to help a lot of people understand what's happening in the world and gain perspective and for us to realized that we can be the change. I'm I'm just so grateful that I get a share these messages with you. Thank you so much for being a subscriber and listening to on purpose and makes you to come back next week. I'm genuinely so deeply grateful to each and every single one of you thank you so so so much..

Luther King Austin Sherry
"luther king" Discussed on On Purpose with Jay Shetty

On Purpose with Jay Shetty

15:15 min | 1 year ago

"luther king" Discussed on On Purpose with Jay Shetty

"Ever want to get to a point where we stop questioning our beliefs our habits our values because then we get on the dangerous ranger aside of rationalizing. Something that can be very painful to our own selves. So when you think about it what are you rationalizing in your life. A behavior just one behavior. You know you wanted to change about yourself get really close to it because I want you to start thinking about how to reframe and thinking about how to change it and all you have to do is once you're aware of it. You can amended mended right. Once you become aware of something you can amend it and then act on the amendment so if I say one of the things that I've rationalize is being judgmental like I think that everyone should just get on with their lives and stop complaining or let's say that okay. How am I going to mend? I'm not going to be more empathetic compassionate when that door arises because actually I'm realizing realize what I'm doing is rationalizing something. That went wrong like he talked about how slavery was justified. Morally biologically theoretically scientifically and he says human beings cannot continue to run without eventually rationalizing which is crazy. That's such a powerful statement that we can keep doing wrong but we have to rationalized at one point because we don't want to feel we're doing something wrong. It's a while is this. It's so powerful. Because it shows that humans are innately. Good we are good people report but when you're doing something wrong you make yourself feel that it's good to do that. Oh that is so powerful so powerful. Thank you so much to Martin Luther King Junior for making us aware of that such a powerful point. Now Okay Sir I would also ask him this Martin Luther King. I'd love to ask you what people really want in your opinion like what we really looking for. I want to know that from you. From an existential point of view they want equality period. We want to be persons judged on the basis of the color of our skin but on the basis of the content of our character. And I think this is something that we all have to strive for for ourselves else. I if we want to be liked for our external if we want to be liked for what we have what we own or how we think Robin rather than who we are. Then we are attracting that judgment right if we if we all just who we are. And we're happy that we shared that the move. Find People like us who we are but if we always try and gain the validation of others based on what we own you know how well we think and who know and that kind of stuff then we almost inviting the judgement so we always have to reflect the other way around. How are we judging those around us? Are we unfairly judging someone because of their skin color because they clothing because of their accent because of their background how many judgments do we have in our lives that external it may not be someone's color that may not be it but we you all have more subtle judgments in us that stop us from giving people equality that's giving ourselves equality the movie judge on this is for these externals the more we're going to judge ourselves for our extensive. You'll judging someone for what they post on instagram. You're now going to think you're doing something right. Beulah judge yourself on a deep level. C judgment is a trait. If you judge you judge yourself more if you judge yourself more judge this when we become empathetic and kind and honest with ourselves we become empathetic kind and honest with others. It's a it's a muscle that you don't just switch between how you treat yourself and how you treat others We seem to have a similar pattern like if always being mean gene to others. We often think that person. Is You know confident or arrogant but actually that person often is treating themselves badly as well and I think we forget that that a lot the people end up treating themselves badly to there was something I I it on instagram. I'm just trying to find it because I think it was really really important whereas originally where is it. So there's this that are shared people who put you down ignore you and make you feel bad and not confident. They have their own self esteem issues. Don't make it about you. Who does that? And it's also one more. Yeah if someone is not good to you this this is lane if someone is not good to you that probably really bad themselves. Remember that relic. It's it's interesting. How one of our behaviors come together in that way? So I think that's a really really powerful reflection in point now I'd go unto US Montiel I'd say won't can you share with us about your famous. I have a dream speech. I think it'd be an amazing thing to ask him. Because it's such gotcha powerful speech for something said in words without music without you know it wasn't said in a in a in a challenging time name and it remains so powerful and and still to this day. Everyone's had a speech like that does such powerful words there and we already know that Martin taking one is speaking prize when he was eleven years old is I said so. I think it's I think it's good question. Also I must confess it that dream that I had that day has at many points turned into a nightmare now. I'm not one to lose. Hope I keep on hoping I still have faith in the future but have had to analyzed many things over the last few years and I would say over the last few months. I've gone through a lot of soul searching and guiding moments and I've come to see that that we have many more difficult days ahead and some of the old optimism was a little superficial and now it must be tempered with a solid realism and I think the realistic the fact is that we still have a long long way to go. While those are his words I did not make that up. Martin Luther King Said those words in this embassy entity how incredible. It's amazing that someone like him is able to say that about. Oh probably if not definitely the most powerful public speech of all time in terms of global notoriety. Amazing he's here. He's able to pose check and reflect. It's okay to change your mind and admit that something was optimistic optimistic. And now you're trying to figure it out and think long and hard about what worked. What didn't and how you can move forward in this effective way? A and what I love most about this is he knew how much work with needed. He was aware of how much work was needed. And he wasn't losing hope on it and he was still committed to it and at the same time. I don't think I don't think the speech was false promises I think the speech was a emblem of aspiration of who we want to become and who should be and I think we need. I don't think he shouldn't have said those things. I think that speech is needed. But I think what's lovely family here. This is another state by him. That those who love peace need to learn to organize themselves as well as those who love war and that's why this statement eight men of old optimism was a little superficial and now it must be tempered with a solid realism. I love that because I think that's often where we miss out is is that we have these beautiful ideas. We have these beautiful goals and desires. But we don't turn them into a solid realism. And this is something that I really press fee in your own life at twenty twenty. You may have these lofty goals. You have this amazing idea turned into solid realism right. Don't become an armchair philosopher. Don't just become a couch. Pundit or somebody just sitting there talking about these things get into action trying things out going to build that community going. Start that venture. Don't settle for toll about these things. So I love that transition he's recommending for all of us to go from a superficial understanding is solid realism. Okay so the next question I would ask him. which which I think's a really important one for right now and I think it's a fascinating for for us to think about his? What are your thoughts on wall? When a nation becomes obsessed with guns of war it loses its social perspective? It's much more more difficult to really arouse a conscious conscience or a during a time of war. I've noticed the other day and weeks ago. A person that he you were shut down in Chicago and he was a clear case of police brutality. That was unpaid steady of the paper. But on page run at the top was seven. The no eight Viet Cong killed. That is something about a war like this that makes people insensitive. It does the conscience. It strengthens the forces of reaction and brings into being bitterness and hatred and violence and it strengthens the military industrial complex of that country. So this is something that's really really the important and powerful that we get distracted from. What's waiting important when this happens in I'm I'm not a political or social commentator toils a And I don't WanNA claim to be but I but I think it is important. That war doesn't really bring us together as people when we've never that really come out of a war and felt good about it like you know. I didn't think that that exists. especially if if you're starting it yourself responding to what's happening happening and at and said towards that was maybe unavoidable but now this is just something that really needs to be carefully assessed when we look at the impact of this on our society as a whole now the next few segments that I'm going to Martin Luther King from the BBC face to face face interview from nineteen sixty one so my question would be. What are some of the best advice you've ever received from your mother? She always said to me. You must never feel that you are less than anybody else. You must always feel somebody and you must feel that you are as good as anybody else. And of course. This came. Uh Up with me. In spite of the fact that I still confronted the system of segregation every day on the one hand. My mother told me that I should feel a sense of somebody. Somebody on the other hand I had to go out and face a system. Which stabbed me in the face every day saying you're less than you're not equal to so this was a real tension within and what I love about this is that's what we get strengthened right like when you build your resolve in your mind and then you still go against whatever it is and this is all of us right? This doesn't just apply to please do not just apply this to two challenges with race and color applies to any interview life where you feel you making resolve. This is the difference. It's it's all about. It's the strength of your resolve against the strength of someone's once criticism right. That's that's really what it is. If you've made a commitment to to have a resolution right what is your self tool that allows you to persist list when your environment isn't supportive. We all feel bad work. We all without communities we feel that maybe in the workplace probably what we know what we want to do and who we want to be people who wish shutting down and at that point is not about the the. It's not about how loud you raise your voice. It's not about how how. How big you build your muscles? It's not about how much you shout. It's about the strength of resolve.

Martin Luther King us Robin Montiel twenty twenty Chicago BBC
"luther king" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

10:37 min | 1 year ago

"luther king" Discussed on In Black America

"Dr Martin Luther. The King Junior is considered by many as the father of the civil rights movement. Born on Tuesday January Fifteenth Nineteen Twenty nine at the family home in Atlanta Atlanta Georgia. He was christened. Michael Luther King but in one thousand nine hundred ninety four daddy came changes name at the young Martin experienced racial prejudice in nineteen forty four at the age of fifteen he graduated high. School ended Morehouse College in Atlanta with the intention of becoming a medical doctor but changed his mine in his junior year in April nineteen forty eight. Cain received his bachelor's degree in sociology and quotas theological seminary in Chester Pennsylvania. Wayne in May nineteen fifty. One graduated with a bachelor of Vinegar. Degree Anas Valedictorian and student body and I team fifty five. I burned his doctorate in systematic theology from Boston University in Spring. Nineteen sixty three kings. Nine violent tactics were put to the most severe test asked in Birmingham Alabama doing a mass protests for fair hiring practices and the desegregation of department stores police. Brutality used against the march dramatize the plight of African Americans to the nation at large with enormous IMPAC king and others were arrested but his voice was not silenced. Wallet Is Jail Cell. He read a public statement by eight Alabama clergyman that criticizes activities as untimely and unwise on the margins. Other newspaper. He can pause. It's classic Pie Letter from Birmingham. J. Up to refute his critics. And your statement. You assert that I- actions even though peaceful must be condemned because they precipitate violence. But there is this a logical assertion. Isn't this like condemning robbed man because his possession of money precipitated. Evil Act of robbery isn't this condemning socrates because his unswerving and commitment to truth and his philosophical inquiries precipitated the act by the misguided populists in which they made him drink. Hemlock isn't this like condemning Jesus because his unique out consciousness and never ceasing devotion. To God's will precipitated the evil act of Crucifixion. More and more. I feel that the people of ill will have used time much. Lloyd Oy effectively then have the people of goodwill we would have to repent in this generation not merely for the hateful words and actions of the bad people but for the appalling silence of the good people now is the time to make real the promise of democracy and transform our pending national allergy into a creative SOMMA brotherhood. Now is the time to live on national policy from the quicksand of racial injustice to the solid rock of of human dignity. I have no fear about the outcome of our struggle in Birmingham. Even if I'm motives at present misunderstood we he will reach the goal of freedom in Birmingham all over the nation because our goal of America is freedom abused down SCON- or we may be Destiny is tied up with America's destiny before the pilgrims landed at Plymouth. We were here before the pen of Jefferson Edson majestic words of the declaration of independence across the pages of history red. We were here. More than two centuries off Obama's labored in this country without wages they made competent king. They built a home Salaam masters. While suffering gross injustice in shameful humiliation and yet out of a bottomless vitality they continue tended to thrive and develop if the inexpressible crew is our slave raid. Could not stop us the opposition. We we now face will surely fail. We will win Freedom because sacred heritage of our nation and the tunnel final will of the Almighty God bought it and Echoing demands never before have I written so long Maleta. I'm afraid that much too long to take your precious time. I can assure you that it would have been much shorter if I had. I've been writing from a comfortable desk. But what else can one do when he is alone in our jails sale of than write long letters think think long Forbes and pray long prized via said anything in this letter that overstates the truth and indicates an unreasonable impatience nations. I beg you to forgive me if I said anything that understates the truth and indicates my having patience that allows me to settle for anything less than brotherhood. I beg God to forgive me. I hope this letter finds you strong into fade. I also hope that circumstances will soon make it possible for me to meet each of you not as an integrationist as a civil rights leader leader but as a fellow clergyman and the Christian brother as all hope that the dog clouds of racial prejudice will soon pass pass away and the deep fog. Misunderstanding will be lifted from our fears drenched communities and then some not too distant Tamara. Ara the radio. Stars of love and brotherhood will shine over our great nation. With all the scintillating beauty yours for the cause of peace and brotherhood Martin Luther King Junior and nineteen fifty seven in New Orleans seeking to build upon the success of the Montgomery bus boycott with the hope of greatness status of southern blacks and America's poor king summit together number of black leaders to lay the foundation for the organization Tation now known as the southern Christian leadership conference at C. L. C. King was elected its first president and he soon began helping other communities. Organize is their own protests against discrimination the envelope Andrew Young former mayor of Atlanta and. US Ambassador was one of King's most trusted advisers looking back on it. We think of those as the best days of our lives. Actually at the time it was We really didn't know what we were doing. We knew things were wrong and somebody had to do something about it and we just stumbled along from one thing to the other two. We found a way to make it work and in Fortunately most of us had read a lot about India and we understood some of the nonviolent methods of Gandhi. And we just I experimented until we find out how to organize people nobody was trained as an organizer. We knew the black community. We knew the cities that we working in fairly well and We learned gradually over a period of time. How to get things done? What type of impact at the late? Dr Martin Luther King King have on you at that time. Well Martin was an amazing young man. He had been sort of thrust in the leadership. He never really really wanted it. And yet he couldn't get away from it and he was essentially trying to do something for other people that kind of dedication and the sort of things that he said matter of factly. If a person hadn't found something that they're willing to die for they probably not fit to live anyway. You know. Somebody's dropped that on you in a joking kind of friendly conversation it makes you think you know what is it that I'm willing to die for and you begin to to the thing about your life and think about other people in a new way. I mean he was amazing that all of the things that he did and he never lived before two years old and yet in the midst of it all he was still privately of very easy going. friendly joking. O'Kane clowning lovable guy in nineteen fifty three king completely. His doctorate and was granted. The degree two years later upon completion of his dissertation Asian married at the time he returned to the south to become pastor Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery Alabama there. He made his first smart on. The civil rights movement came fight for justice and equal rights began on December fifth nineteen fifty five five days after the late Rosa Park with foods obeyed. The city rules mandating segregation on buses and nineteen fifty six at the boycott continue Kane gang national prominence as a result of the sectional speaking skills and personal courage although increasingly portrayed as supremely black spokesperson King did not mobilize mass protests activities during the first five years at the Montgomery Bus Boycott had ended on August twenty eighth nineteen sixty. Three King led a massive march on Washington. DC lead and deliver it one of the most passionate addresses of his career. Even the state of Mississippi state sweltering with the heat Toko injustice sweltering with the heat oppression be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. I have a dream my four. Little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content that character. I have a dream today. Have a dream that one day and in Alabama with its vicious racists.

Dr Martin Luther King King Michael Luther King Birmingham Atlanta Alabama Martin Luther King Junior Dr Martin Luther Martin America Montgomery Alabama Morehouse College Wayne Cain Boston University Obama Chester Pennsylvania robbery DC
"luther king" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"luther king" Discussed on In Black America

"From the University of Texas at Austin K. U. T. radio this is in black. America came to be known as the blood. It is possible that the pre spend leave. I looked over that man on the ground and one of the robbers were still around as possible that they felt that the man on the ground was merely faking acting like he had been robbed and in ought to seize them over their love and bath quick and he's deceased so the first question that the priests ad the first question that the lead by squalls. If I stopped the help this man what will happen to me. But then the Good Samaritan and came out and he reversed a question. If I do not stop to help this man. What will happen to him? That's the question before you tonight. Not at past stuff to help the sanitation worker. What will happen to my job? Mount Stopping the help the sanitation workers. What will happen to all of Iowa's spending my office every day and every week as a pathway jeff question is not if I stuff to help this man and need what will happen to me? The question miss if I do not stop to help. The sanitation work of will happen to them. That's the question reverend. Dr Martin Luther. The King Junior would have been ninety one this year. Had He lived out a dream for racial equality in this country. He was a man walking down the oppressed and for a man who question unfair laws and went to jail rather than submit to them. King was passionate fighting for civil rights and although he died by violence his life and teachings were dedicated Kennedy to a deep disrespectful violence and its consequence he won a Nobel Prize for peace. His lectures and dialogues stirred the conscience of the nation. Doc in November one thousand nine hundred eighty three legislation was signed creating Martin Luther King Junior day making it only the third National Holiday born in the twentieth century in Fall Nineteen ninety-one National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis Tennessee. Sasser made it was dedicated to his remembers on October sixteenth. Twenty eleven the MLK memorial dedicated on the National Mall. I'm John Leo. Hanson junior and welcome to another edition of in Black America on this week's program a tribute to the late reverend. Dr Martin Luther King Junior in Black America..

Martin Luther King Dr Martin Luther America National Civil Rights Museum University of Texas Mount Stopping John Leo Austin K. U. T. MLK memorial Kennedy Nobel Prize Hanson Sasser National Mall Iowa Memphis Tennessee
"luther king" Discussed on Rantin' and Ravin'

Rantin' and Ravin'

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"luther king" Discussed on Rantin' and Ravin'

"Right. Right. Right. Right. Right. Right. Yeah. Like, she was she her mind, you know, she had. Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. So tell her to go Walker for the caps. You wanna go? You wanna do your part of the million man March to see you can leave there with a million men? Twenty nine start a podcast series. I guess once a month ago try at one time to see how it goes. But I think it will be a fun environment corn rows. In conversations. I think I think the thing that our hope that comes out of this is that it'll be. I would like it to be an environment where styling is being done. You know, people come in. We still styling getting somebody getting their nails done Kerr. Whatever we talking with. And we really need men to come to this. You understand we need very few women. I need a lot of men to come to this. And maybe one other woman. But it'll be about us talking about relationships, and, you know, self esteem, and, you know, just following your dreams, right? I think you're great example of that. You've you've made moves and done the things that you want and put yourself in the environments that you wanna be in. And I think I've done that as well. I think we we we all could come from a place where we have to build and create. But it doesn't mean that we can't. Redefine and create other avenues that people didn't even know or make connections away. People didn't think were possible and people are constantly like, oh, how did you do that? Why did you get here? How did you? I'm like, you know, number one, the Lord, you know, that's number one and number two. I'm also just open. I don't restrict myself. I don't say I can't go here. I can't do this. I can't be here. I can't hang with people, blah. I'm like, you know, there's something that opens up say, yes, try, let me see, you know, all the things that come my way as best been from me being open and connecting with people got on the tonight show doing, you know, the monologues with Jimmy Fallon. You know, it's like that happened. And you know, I got my first time in Montreal comedy festival, which I thought would be a certain, you know, I wanted to be on new faces that was my big thing. And I didn't get new faces. And then. I want my first time ever going. There was part of the biggest show, which is nasty show and I recorded for Showtime. So it's like, you never know what's going to happen. You know, try not to sometimes people are trying to follow a path and sometimes path limits. What the possibility is on if you just trying to go out and be a teacher. Knowing that you love hair, you won't be a teacher. But you could also have been a teacher and opened up a path to then do hair and become a celebrity hairstylist and on your own salon have your dogs travel all over the world, right? Never limit yourself. One of the things I wanna talk about first of all it's Martin Luther King birthday. Yes. Happy birthday to Martin Luther King. Remember when they were saying happy birthday to happy birthday to your happy. Like only black people know how to make a song. That's what maybe a minute have long into a theatrical guys will number every piece for five minutes for five minutes. And then other people joining in and like, you know, why why does everybody why is it like a Jackson Five reunion to sing happy birthday. You know, when would Stevie Wonder added on lines to it, we come to you today owners like they did a special thing. Right. Because we always gotta add salt and milk to whatever. The fuck y'all doing. And that's just what it is. Even the national anthem. We gotta ask salt milk to that. We gotta Pepe data. Put it back on the stove bullet it up because you know, there's a presentation that has to happen. A lot of times people like to call it ghetto, but I like to call it grandeur. Okay. Yeah. So happy Martin Luther King day. Got a little note on you about model of the king..

Martin Luther King Jimmy Fallon Montreal Stevie Wonder Walker Kerr five minutes milk
"luther king" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"luther king" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"We've talked a lot about professional football here in a minute. And our next guest is certainly heading in that direction. The great linebacker from the university of Alabama MAC Wilson who announced the other day that he will move on after distinguished career at the university. Mac. Thank you, very very much for joining us. Good afternoon to you and congratulations on your time at Alabama. Noon. He was well, thank you for having math before we talk about Alabama. I wanna ask you because we just got through playing a clip in commemoration of this holiday honoring Dr Martin Luther King, and I know young people don't have the kind of recollection as some of us who were alive during Dr king's life. But but as a young person growing up in Montgomery, Alabama place that was very integral in Dr king's rise. As a minister, the he pastored a church there. What does this day mean to you? A lot of you know, mom, McCain was wasn't man whose bear quarter in and around Gherman, basically, you know, well from his fight facilities equalize Islam able to play football the grade school like Alabama, you know, he was a hero. And he soon America will occur lead. Like, and he also, you know, he died for freedom as well. Well, what an what an incredible and very poignant answer for someone who who grew up many years after Dr king had left Montgomery, but that's that's that's really very memorable answer. Well, MAC let me move on to your career at Alabama. Now that it's over. I'm sure a lot of memories are passing three your your mind. What stands out? There's out. I mean for my career is is being able to play, you know, with a lot of great group of guys, you know, even from freshman year until this point, you know, how at great team made caring team as he will always love each other like brothers. And you know, there's just experienced the play on the great coaches and also on great coaches in the world co saving, you know. It was a Hughes unin that's something that I cherish forever. You know, you can't get back in time. I enjoy my years here. But no, you got to move on to the next step in life. And not to rush you to the NFL, but certainly projection this is projection season. And there's there's still plenty for you to do in terms of of working out and being examined. But how do you feel right now? What are you hearing? Great, you know out here. A lot of things I have little chance to go first around they go out there, or whatever the case may be, but you know, not paying his anything like that. Because at the end of the day, you know, the worst has to be put in I still have to fill case, you know, my ability to to beat a player to everybody thinks I am I still have to. So you know, NFL teams that have great care some great person. You know, I love football. And I'm not just playing football just to be playing. So, you know, there's a lot of things that you know, I have to work on these lakes past six weeks before the combined and to continue to be a better person than a player. Now, not not to Russia told him in two weeks since your last game. But what what are you doing right now? Because this isn't something you can just take vacation. I mean, you gotta get ready. What what are you doing right now to to get ready for the combine? You know, obviously we lost. You know, we got back took the the Sunday off the Monday off. And I went to work at Tuesday, you know, because there's no there's no time to waste. I can't be sitting around everybody else working hard and preparing themselves to you know, for the next chapter..

Alabama Dr Martin Luther King football Montgomery Mac university of Alabama NFL Wilson America McCain Gherman Hughes Russia six weeks two weeks
"luther king" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"luther king" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Our guest charles mckinney said dr martin luther king junior's legacy has become distorted over time and listeners we are hearing from you how is dr king's life addressed in schools today penatta stephen elementary school music teacher from nyack new york mice didn't have the impression that dr king was powerful speaker close friend of the president and widely accepted more leader i emphasized to them that he was arrested for protesting around twenty times vilified by the press and threatened with physical violence regularly i also talked to them at length about the poor people campaign emphasizing the fact that much of dr king hoped to achieve particularly economic quality for all races has still not yet been accomplished my name is peggy and i'm calling from england new jersey and i am actually a middle school art teacher the decision about who does what to celebrate it is usually left up to me and they might have a little bit of discussion but unfortunately it's not taking us seriously as i like i am a black woman and it is serious and important to me so i make a point of trying to incorporate some project around that time however is just not enough devotion put to this and it's sad because i teach an urban school district and our kids really should learn more by name is gin yell and i'm calling from hollywood florida i have a son in fourth grade and they do a little bit about martin luther king and a little bit about rosa parks but they don't really go into it it's incumbent upon the parents to teach the children because this will only going touch the circus.

charles mckinney president florida martin luther king dr martin luther penatta stephen elementary sch new york peggy hollywood
"luther king" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"luther king" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Now think that's why people like jfk mlk an rfk were killed okay so i'll with that now i don't want to go worked up over an assassination theories credible is maybe i just want you to know about it the real focus episode is definitely kings incredible life think about his legacy with the civil rights act with nineteen sixty four have been passed without his tireless work maybe not now what obama if ever become president maybe not the martin luther king junior research and education institute at stanford university at is home to the king papers project a comprehensive collection of all king speeches correspondence and other writings institute is also involved with a liberation curriculum initiative in the gandhi king community both of which used king's life and ideas to connect social activists around the world working to promote human rights who knows how much good that alone is done how many other social activists of it inspired directly by his work other than his autobiography i learned about the the i leaned gives me on the stanford website for research and his times of great information on that on dr king on that some so much it basically everything about the guy at stanford website in a speech held in london 1954 marlon king repeatedly hit repeated his call for economic sanctions against south africa who knows how much his words you know led to ending apartheid in that country is teaching tolerance are are taught to kids across the world and we'll be for decades i'm sure his speech is still touch the lives of new generations of people every day you know how many african americans have found strength the persevered to intolerance in martin luther king's words how many are still comforted by his voice reminded that they're not alone reminded they're just as good as anybody powerful shit.

civil rights obama president stanford university human rights marlon king south africa african americans martin luther king martin luther king stanford london
"luther king" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

02:13 min | 4 years ago

"luther king" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"And then there's the innocent idiocy of user sammarai jackie who's who says i'm a filipino i truly respect martin luther king for reuniting the black and white peoples now they realize how the black people are famous in the other country just like lebron james you get it san jack jackie you can't speak english well you can but who cares you you get you will you understand his message would mlk really wanted was for more african american people to be famous that's that's what it's about fame you get it the dream was always about famed the whole time and it was mostly about lebron james lebron james is the culmination of king's vision none of aama becoming president not the end of segregation no playing basketball really well and being recognised internationally for this athletic skill that's what mlk was talking about finally to job sammarai jackie and then there is a silly words slip up the just kinda made me laugh frederick be h one said was i the only one getting goosebumps yup you probably william when getting goosebumps because those aren't real things goosebumps that sounds like a horrific version of goosebumps when instead of muscles contracting inhere follicles tied in cousin here to stand up your muscles literally shoot your fucking body hair completely ah your body with explosive bomblike forced to take ira as it goose bomb going off there are too many white racist idiots account in his speeches comments section hundreds not thousands of and bombs dropped really disgraceful really despicable budget trolling disgusting racial slurs dared type slim all over the place by scared ignorant sometimes evil people i saw known tell us behind any of them nothing creative but then there's also a lot of races commerce left users who are not white and after spending this past week in the king timesuck i feel like those comments actually would have maybe heard him more like he refused to lower himself to the level of the white oppressor and he expects his followers do the same the most ridiculous commentator i've found or commentary commenter was a guy going by true goaldenboy champ and i know for sure he's african american because he posts selfie videos you know records himself in addition just leaving comments and other videos and his his videos are.

martin luther king aama president basketball mlk jackie ira james lebron william
"luther king" Discussed on Giants of History

Giants of History

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"luther king" Discussed on Giants of History

"Last thing to mention here's this the fbi file on martin luther king junior is to this day sealed the file contains approximately seventeen thousand pages and materials all related to king and his daytoday activities from 1958 up until his death among the contents of the sealed file are the alleged sex tapes as well as a sub file titled merkin which he shorthand for murder king the official designation of the martin luther king junior assassination vested gatien now there have been numerous attempts by current and former members of congress including john kerry and hillary clinton to pass legislation that would mandate king's fbi file be opened and released for immediate review but none of these attempts have been successful to date and as a result king's file is scheduled to remain sealed until the year twenty twenty seven when we left off last episode martin luther king junior had focused his fight for equal rights on a variety of cities and events including montgomery and little rock albany the freedom rides themselves and then of course there was birmingham alabama where the fighting was so vicious and the protests so massive that president john f kennedy had to send three thousand troops into the city to alleviate racial tensions and put an end to the monthlong violence it was the events in birmingham though that would prompt kennedy to start initiating legislation that would eventually become the civil rights act of nineteen 64 but at the time we pick backup our story we're in the middle of 1963 thus the civil rights act was still about a year off and much was to happen between now and that time and some of it was glorious and some of it was absolutely tragic.

merkin congress john kerry hillary clinton king montgomery alabama john f kennedy birmingham civil rights fbi daytoday official martin luther president