35 Burst results for "Lush"

"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

Lush Life

05:29 min | 3 weeks ago

"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

"Podcast. I still wasn't sure of that would work. I really had to start everything from the beginning. All my social media all of that A whole new website. So i was really starting from ground zero again but it was really really exciting. When later on that year i was chosen as a finalist for the two thousand eighteen. Four blog awards for best drinks blog out of more than twenty thousand entries now since launching my podcast for nine years ago and the the website two years ago and starting my lush life cocktail tours and speaking at at events like also festival i have to say. I've met some of the best people i have ever known. I am constantly inspired and in all of the taste makers the writers the artist. Pr's everyone i made in the industry. Everyone who's been on my program their generosity of spirit and time has allowed me to really keep doing what i'm doing and i love them for that in this terrible year. My heart aches for what we've lost Not only milk and honey from my lush life cocktail tour but any bar or restaurant around the world that's been affected by this. I hope that even in my small way by continuing what i'm doing i can help the world out there understand that a bar is not just a place to quench your thirst but a home for so many of us so in a nutshell this is who i am and this is why i bring lush life too you every tuesday and this is why i remain. You're drinking companion. And i'm inspired to live life one cocktail.

Choosing and Decorating your Christmas Tree

Home Space and Reason

05:18 min | Last month

Choosing and Decorating your Christmas Tree

"Don't know about you. But i used to be caught in the traditional decorations verses pretty designer ish tree quagmire and once had a condo as a single gal and i got a metallic green intentionally. Not real looking. Dr seuss looking skinny tree from my place that was decorated in brightly. Dr seuss ish colors. I was single. And i could do what i wanted fast. Forward a husband child later. And we started accumulating homemade and keepsake type ornaments. Each year we get a metal ornament with our family portrait on it so in eighteen years will literally have a tree called memory lane but these handmade and photo ornaments. Don't necessarily go with the aesthetic vision. I have each year. We have our ornaments stored in bins by color. So each year we can change up the look or mix two colors or whatever we choose without hauling all the bins. Only those we want because they're labeled my answer to this conundrum of looks verses homemade ornaments was to have both so my tiny twelve inch wide by five foot. Tall grinch tree goes upstairs with all the kid ornaments. My childhood ornaments are photo ornaments and the wool animal ornaments. That my son loves downstairs. It's the more aesthetically pleasing and real freshly cut christmas tree. We get the best of both worlds and we managed to do it without a lot of space. Size and proportion is tricky to judge. If you're going to cut down your own tree because large trees look small when sitting out in a field take you're measuring tape and measure the height of your ceiling and then subtract the height of your star for the top and then subtract the height of your tree stand and then allow for at least two inches of breathing room in between the top of the star and the ceiling. Next measure your maximum width allowing for ample space to walk around and take these measurements with you to the field. When buying or cutting the tree better homes and gardens has a great article titled how to choose the best live christmas tree which linked to in the podcast notes. The douglas fir is a long lasting cut tree that holds its needles well with a pyramid shape and bluish green color. It's one of the most popular types of christmas trees available in most regions. They're lush and full with compact branches and a strong evergreen sent for heavy ornaments. They recommend a frazier for. It's also very fragrant with by color. Needles deep green on top and silvery white below. This tree is more cone shaped so it would fit well in a smaller room or tucked in a tight corner. If you have a collection of heavy ornaments or lots of lights in garland. The frazier is a good choice with its sturdy branches. If you're all about the sent choose a grand a for with shiny by color needles. Bright green on top white striped underneath the grand for has needles that are softer to the touch than some other popular furs which gives the tree a fine textured appearance. This species is possibly the most fragrant among all the first boasting a strong spicy sent. The noble for has well spaced branches covered with upwardly curved blue green needles and aren't as quickly as some of the others though it stiff branches can support plenty of ornaments and lights noble. I have a similar pyramid-shaped. Douglas firs but better homes and gardens. Thinks they haven't even more classic. Christmas tree appearance with an almost layered look to the branches. If neat and tidy is your thing a scotch pine might be the one for you with a conical shape piney sent an excellent needle retention the soft green needle. Stay on the branches. Even if the tree gets dry so you won't be left with a lot of clean up if you forget to water it for a day or two. They often have slightly crooked trunks. Which can be a plus. If you like a tree with a little personality of fresh green color and tiered branching structure make eastern white pine contender. It's long thin. Needles result in a more texture is christmas tree and it's also a popular choice for read this the writers especially love a white pine for a minimalist christmas tree. Look they're flexible. Branches aren't the best for supporting heavy ornaments. But you can still deck them out with garland and lights.

Dr Seuss Douglas Firs Garland
David Biello: Moving The Dial On Climate Change

Environment: NPR

06:23 min | 2 months ago

David Biello: Moving The Dial On Climate Change

"Climate. Change is a problem so vast affecting so many people in so many different ways that it's hard to know what we should do which solutions we should focus on which efforts can truly dial back global warming because the fact is we are running out of time to make the changes. We need to stop a reputable damage to our planet but there is good news. We have the technology and science to do it. And so on the show today how we can build a zero emissions future this global effort underway to accomplish exactly the skull having this ability in our toolkit central can't dot false and it can't be done on a very large scale guiding us through some promising and fascinating solutions is ted science curator. David yellow. david. Thank you so much for being here again. Thank you for having me back and today. You're bringing us ted speakers who are trying to save the planet from the state that we're in right. Yeah except it's More more important than that. I would say because it's not just saving the planet in fact it's not really saving the planet it saving ourselves in the planet has dealt with climate change many times before And honestly the planet will be fine our civilization if we don't act now and act quickly will not be fine and so let's start with the key number which is ten ten years. That is the amount of time that climate researchers say. We have to really turn things around. David wyatt decade. So in the next ten years we will have sort of made the decisions that will determine the climate for centuries if not millennia to come so if we really do want to keep global warming where it's already at around one degrees celsius or most one point five degrees celsius warming than we really have to act now and we have to act fast and that's where the ten years comes. Okay so let's get into some of the big ideas and solutions that can help us fight. Climate change and let's start with something that captures carbon dioxide and literally right beneath our feet swell soils just thin veil that covers the surface of land but it has the power to shape our planet's destiny the a six footer soul soil material that covers the surface represents the difference between life and likeness in the air system. And he can also help us. Combat climate change. If we can only stop treating it like david. I i gotta love these. Climate researchers who love puns soil researcher as morad asif wa bad. Hey tell us about her and why she likes to talk to her. Well you know. This is one of the reasons that people find. Climate change so daunting Soil sexy well. As marines is the answer because she has a certain passion for dirt as a soil bio geochemists and she has been studying it as a dirt. Detective the age of eighteen and soil is actually this really complex skin on the face of the earth that is responsible for life on land everything we do revolves through the soil and that's true for carbon as well you might recognize it from compost compost. You'll know that it creates kind of dark rich material and then spread it in your garden and suddenly you're tomatoes. Are that much better. That darkness that Is the carbon itself. And what the carbon does is allow the soil to retain moisture to retain minerals and other nutrients that the plants need to grow and as we all know when clan are growing their photo synthesizing and that means they're pulling co two out of the air and turning it into more plant and in some cases even bearing some of that co two for us back into the soil there is about three thousand billion metric tons of carbon in soil. That's roughly about three hundred and fifteen times. The amount of carbon that we'd released into the atmosphere currently and this twice more carbon in soil and the reason vegetation and think about that for a second. There's more carbon in soil than there is in all of the world's vegetation including the lush tropical rainforests and the giant sequoia if the expansive grasslands all of the cultivated systems and every kind of flora you can imagine on the face of the earth plus all the carbon that's currently up in the atmosphere combined and then twice over hence a very small change in the amount of carbon stored in soil can make a big difference in maintenance of the earth's atmosphere. Okay first of all had no idea that there was that much carbon under there that we're basically sitting on top of a carbon piggy-bank Correct me if. I'm wrong david but this is called carbon sequestration right and that is a good thing for soil. In addition to being good for the atmosphere it is a good thing. The problem is most of our. Agriculture is is designed in a way to extract that carbon. and what we've essentially done is overburdened. The earth's kind of natural carbon cycle it used to be that a certain amount of co two kind of moved between plants and the air and the land but then we came along and start digging up. All this varied carbon carbon that have been laid down by plants even millions of years ago in the form of coal and oil and when we burn that it releases this fossils co two. And that's extra to that had been locked away from the atmosphere for a very long time. And that's why we're kind of out of

David Yellow David Wyatt Morad Asif David WA
Village in India prays Kamala Harris' victory

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

Village in India prays Kamala Harris' victory

"For her. I suppose it until candidate Kamala Harris ahead of the U. S presidential election villages before with ceremonial prayers Cool pleases in the small settlement over 200 miles from the coastal city of Chennai. The lush green village is the hometown of Harris's maternal grandfather. Who migrated from there decades ago. The prayers organizer hopes Harris will visit the village. If she becomes vice president, he says it will be a matter of immense pride for us. Paris has really delved into her Indian heritage. But that's not stop Indians from claiming her as one of their own. I'm Charles had asthma companies have now 10 56. And it's

Kamala Harris Harris U. Chennai Paris Charles Asthma
"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

Lush Life

02:14 min | 2 months ago

"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

"Twist. <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Our cocktail <Speech_Female> of the week is the <Speech_Female> Tropical <Speech_Music_Female> Flora Dora. <Speech_Music_Female> Put <Speech_Female> all of the following <Speech_Music_Female> ingredients into <Speech_Music_Female> a shaker. <Speech_Music_Female> Fifty <Speech_Female> miles of Porter's <Speech_Female> tropical old <Speech_Female> Tom Gin. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Twenty <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> five miles of lime <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> juice. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Ten MILS <Speech_Music_Female> OF GUM <Speech_Music_Female> WHICH IS AKA <Speech_Music_Female> sugar Sierra. <Speech_Music_Female> Ten <Speech_Female> mils of Ginger <Speech_Female> Sierra. <Speech_Female> And three <Speech_Female> raspberries. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> At ice <Speech_Music_Female> and then shake shake <Speech_Music_Female> shake. <Speech_Music_Female> Then <Speech_Music_Female> strain it into <Speech_Female> a high ball glass with <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> ice, and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> then top it all up <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> with eighty <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> mills of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Ginger Ale. <Speech_Music_Female> Then <Speech_Female> garnished with a raspberry <Speech_Music_Female> and a lime <Speech_Music_Female> wedge. <Speech_Female> I love <Speech_Female> this cocktail <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> to. <Speech_Female> You'll find this <Speech_Music_Female> recipe plus more <Speech_Music_Female> Jin recipes and <Speech_Music_Female> all the cocktails <Speech_Music_Female> of the week at <Speech_Female> a lush life manual <Speech_Female> dot com <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> where you'll find <Speech_Music_Female> all the ingredients <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Advertisement> in our shop. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Thank God both <Speech_Female> the Great British Bake <Speech_Female> off and strictly <Speech_Female> come dancing have found <Speech_Female> a way to be socially <Silence> distanced. <Speech_Female> I don't think <Speech_Female> I, and maybe this whole <Speech_Female> nation has needed <Speech_Female> them both as much as <Silence> we do now. <Speech_Female> The soggy <Speech_Female> bottom and the sparkles <Speech_Female> flying <SpeakerChange> this <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> is all the drama <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I can handle. <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> If you live <Speech_Female> for lush life. Make sure <Speech_Female> you're giving back to the <Speech_Female> bars you love by <Speech_Female> donating are taking <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> part in cocktail <Speech_Female> delivery where you live <Speech_Female> or visiting <Speech_Female> one now that they're <Speech_Female> open. <Speech_Music_Female> Theme. Music <Speech_Music_Female> for lush life <Speech_Female> by Stephen Shapiro and <Speech_Music_Female> used with permission. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> And Lush life is <Speech_Female> always and will be <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> forever produced by <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Yvo. Tara. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> And sampler media <Speech_Music_Female> productions. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> which leads me to say <Speech_Female> the wise words of Oscar <Speech_Female> Wilde <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> all things in moderation <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> including moderation, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> always drink responsibly <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> in wash your hands <Speech_Music_Female> and wear a mask. <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> Next week, <Speech_Music_Female> we're with an <Speech_Female> author, a <Speech_Female> brand new pastor <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and a history <Speech_Music_Female> maker <Speech_Music_Female> all wrapped up <Speech_Music_Female> into one person. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Until <Speech_Female> that time <Speech_Music_Female> bottom <SpeakerChange> <Music> suck.

Porter Tom Gin. Stephen Shapiro Oscar Tara.
"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

Lush Life

05:03 min | 2 months ago

"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

"And? I I stuck around at deadline for for another year doing this stuff on doing time and. It was buddy elated whether lake we can afford someone now this is like, let's let's get someone on full-time You're the only person that we could see for this job sounds like, wow, this is amazing like coal and. The company. was only. people of that time. So I was like the fifth person on the only. Englishman everybody else's Scottish. So I'm very much of everybody's jokes which I mean, somebody's gotta be. It's Yeah. It was really cool. It was very organic kind of fell into it. I spoke with the guys at deadline. Really love what I was doing there. I remember sitting down with Ian and being like Hey. I'm thinking about doing this and he was like, dude, this is amazing. This is an amazing opportunity for you. I was expecting to be like no like you can't leave ever leave you sticking. But he was super supportive and we. Chat, with him a few times about like what to expect because I never known that side of the ball. A never. Never been a rep for anything a never knowing that kind of ambassadorship. You know you get to speak with a load of ambassadors on the Baugh but like nothing. Really. Day today. So well, it sounded like you were doing it anyway. That you were doing it, but on the weekends and all that you know I remember it's I. Think it's two and a half years ago tails on toward an Edinburgh because quarters had an event. Yes, and that's when I I was introduced to it and I went to that event and I was like this is really good and I have a little conversation I think with Alex, all with my little tape recorder I think somewhere on, you know one of my podcasts somewhere in a way back when. Yeah and that was the first time in that was when they only had one expression or wrong they may have had the old Tom as well. But yeah, it's it's been a while they've done really you've done really well. So what was it like the transition of being? You are now the it's the brand master. It was it's It's actually very I thought it was going to be a big shift but actually. Doing all those things anyway. So it wasn't that much of a a jarring. Difference. I think the main. The main difference is the way us you creativity is completely different. and. The way that you wake up is the White Working Ball, you get the full PM and you're there until three in the morning. And and. Answering emails at..

Ian Baugh Edinburgh Alex Tom
Can Airport COVID-19 Testing Encourage More People To Fly?

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:57 min | 2 months ago

Can Airport COVID-19 Testing Encourage More People To Fly?

"So if you're itching to travel the airlines for their part are going to say go ahead and do it many airlines are requiring masks there disinfecting cabins they're touting their hospital great air filtration systems. They're even starting to Cova tests at the airport. Here's NPR's David Schaper. Imagine. A Hawaiian vacation with the lush islands, sparkling beaches. It's the kind of trip people planned for way in advance and then cove. It got in the way we had a trip from last spring that Battie added his wife and four kids postponed their dream vacation back in. March. When Hawaii began requiring every traveler to self quarantine for fourteen days upon arrival that essentially shutdown tourism after all who would wanna fly all the way to Hawaii just to be trapped in their hotel room for two weeks. But the bad he had a family finally landed Honolulu's airport last week after it opened to those who test negative for the corona virus, we got a rapid test. It took about thirty minutes you know. The NASAL SWAB tests. Everybody's clear. Ever excited in airlines are excited to to get paying customers back on their plane. So they're now offering passengers preflight cove in nineteen testing for some destinations united was the first to announce on the spot preflight testing at San Francisco's airport for Hawaii bound travelers for results fifteen minutes it cost you two, hundred, fifty dollars. There are also cheaper forty eight hour in home or clinic testing options and other airlines are following suit now even some. Airports are getting into the COVID testing game. We do the test right here in the main terminal Tampa. International Airport CEO. Joel Lapointe says his airport is offering travellers to any destination two kinds of tests. The rapid test which will give you results in fifteen minutes cost fifty seven dollars, and then the more accurate our test costs a hundred and twenty five dollars and you get your results within forty eight hours a few other airports now offer testing. To, Henry heartfelt heads the atmosphere research group travel industry research firm what the airlines and airports are trying to do is remove every possible obstacle. People have when they start to think about taking a trip but some public health experts our concern because not all of the tests are reliable and what that means is that the likelihood that they will actually identify a positive case in an a symtomatic individual is fairly low Mercedes. Cardin is an epidemiologist at. Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. You could get a negative test but in fact a day or two later, your viral levels could surge and then you're really quite infectious and so I fear that it provides a false sense of security to do the on the spot testing the less the business travel association's joining others in calling for more widespread airport cove in nineteen testing in an attempt to jump-start industry decimated by the pandemic

Hawaii International Airport David Schaper Cardin NPR Battie Honolulu Joel Lapointe Feinberg School Of Medicine Northwestern University San Francisco CEO Tampa Henry
Traveling To Medellin

Travel with Rick Steves

07:26 min | 3 months ago

Traveling To Medellin

"Let's open today's travel with Rick Steves travel writer Dave Seminar. He took his whole family to many in Columbia which used to have a reputation as the headquarters for a dangerous drug cartel. Our interview was recorded just before the global lockdowns kicked in. Hey. Thanks for having me on the show wreck. So you went to Medigene I, mean the image of Medina's like scariest a generation ago is one of the most dangerous cities on the planet. That's right. But but it certainly isn't any longer. I mean these days the murder rate in Medellin is lower than New Orleans Saint, Louis Chicago and several other cities as well. It's an amazing turnaround and. Tourism. Is a booming part of the economy I was just there. My son loves it so much. He bought a condo there and I was there for years this last year with him and we were standing on his balcony and and everybody was blown up fireworks and My son had a Colombian friend there with him and and we were talking about. It and when the Colombians see those fireworks, they remember in the days of Pablo. Escobar. That's what they would explode when they made a deal in the United States with the with the drug trade they're not making deals with the drug trade anymore with the Pablo Escobar outfit that's just celebrating. So they've gone from supplying America's cocaine habit to actually building A. City on live biting entrepreneurs. That's true. They I Columbia is still does produce eighty percent of the cocaine I mean to be frank. However look I went there with my ten and twelve year old sons and my wife, and I would never take them to a place that I thought was too dangerous. So I really consulted with a lot of different people before. Going, there, however, my parents and several other people said, Columbia. You're taking your sons to Columbia you nuts but I did my research and I talked to enough people who had had great experiences there that I felt comfortable doing it and we spent two weeks traveling all around the country and I felt very safe. The whole time tell us about the public tour. It was interesting. You know my wife said Pablo Escobar to are you sure that that's appropriate for our sons who are ten and twelve years old side I called one of the tour companies that had good reviews on trip advisor and he said Oh yes our tour is good for children aged six and up said really okay. Well, let's do it. We thought maybe we can teach them. Okay. He's a bad guy you know here's the. Evils of drugs and teach them a little bit about why the drug violence in and I thought maybe they a lot of it might go over their head but I thought well, they'll learn something. Let's do it but you go through a you goes through your neighborhood community thirteen, which is now trendy. It's filled with street art and is just a festival of good living not good living. It's still a poor area but a festival of happiness. Community Thirteen is sort of an interesting area I've I've found it to be one of the more disappointing stops to be honest with you on the tour I mean, it doesn't really have much to do with Pablo Escobar although it was a neighborhood that was wracked by gang violence, and then in two thousand eleven, the government installed a series of escalators there the idea was. Allowing people to be able to move safely through the community, get from their hilltop neighborhoods down to where jobs and transportation and things of that are. But when I was there in July about the experience maybe if you traveled at a different time of year, you might have an off more authentic experience, but it was absolutely full of tourists which really shocked me because here is. Sort of an impoverished neighborhood that has all credit to them. I. Think it's wonderful. They found a way to turn the violence of the neighborhood into a marketable commodity, but it was absolutely crawling with tourists and I sort of felt like, wow I really don't like going to places that are too full of tourists. So for me, it fell a little bit flat to be. Quite honest. But maybe if I visited another time of year, I would have I would have liked more. No, I don't think. So I mean I was there in the winter but to me, it was a former violence ridden gang ridden community that now is a kind of a tourist trap and it just like an amusement pier in San Francisco, almost or something like that. And what was really fun was the street art I mean, the street art was like it's like going through an art gallery and it's all this edgy colorful tropical kind of street art and you've got it all together by escalators I can imagine before those escalators came you know ten years ago you would have desperately poor people and You'd have the intimidation of the gangs and all of that and and the high murder rate and today there's there's not a hint of that and the escalators let people connect and I think you know the way Columbia has invested in its infrastructure has given poor. Barrios the confidence and the feeling that this is progress and changes possible and and one thing great about going to Medine is you write these cable cars because the city is in a very mountainous area and the poorest communities are pushed way up the mountain sides. But these cable cars, they're just like cable cars had a ski resort. They connect the people in the poor neighborhoods with the good jobs and the good shopping and the good entertainment down in the valley floor and writing these cable cars was just a kind of a celebration of community to me what was your experience on those cable cars? Well I love the cable cars just like you know I took the cable cars up to the park. RV. which is it's a long ride as interesting things that you take two different sets of cable cars. You can take one set of cable cars, which sort of goes through some of the rough hillside neighborhoods, and that one is actually fairly quite cheap to go through and actually when you're. On that first cable car, you're actually getting ordinary people who live in those neighborhoods coming on and off of your Gondola but then to go on the second. Gondola. which takes all the way up the mountain up to the park RV, which is just fantastic and I do recommend that that significantly more expensive so that that second cable you know Gondola is more for tourists in it's it. Would be too expensive for people who live in the humble neighborhoods. But as a traveler, it's worth it's worth it to do both at the lower part words the transportation for the community you you get a sense of the community and you get to talk to people. It's Kinda cool because you're floating above all of these barriers and then after the top city, stop you sort of plateauing you. Go across this amazing lush forest in a giant National Park and they're the only people still on the cable cars are tourists who can afford that but you get to the terminal point way in the middle of the park and I think the locals will come in there by bus, which would be much cheaper because it is a a wonderful jumping off point for for hikes in this nature reserve. Yeah. So the neighborhood that Pablo built I mean now it's called Barrio Pablo Escobar, Pablo Escobar's. But it was originally called million sin to a jury US medicine without shantytowns and the idea was he was really trying to improve his image in the country and he built about three hundred and sixty six humble homes in this neighborhood for people who are down on their locker many of them were homeless and actually living in a garbage dump area and in that region and you talk about street art they're. So there's a number of murals celebrating Pablo. Escobar would say that most Colombians despised Pablo, Escobar and everything he stood for. However in this little neighborhood and I met some of them. There are people who still revere him as quite a small minority of Colombians I would say, but you see mural several murals right in this borrow Pablo Escobar. Depicting. El Patron the hero, the Robin Hood that you're talking about in and some of those people, and there are some young hustlers there who are very interesting entrepreneurs. One of them has created, which you'll find in in the middle of this neighborhood is a Pablo Escobar memories. Museum now there was another Pablo Escobar Museum that was run by Pablo's brother, which was actually shut down and it wasn't in this neighborhood with the government closed that one down. This one is sort of a homemade sort of museum that some young hustlers in the neighborhood of made, and they also sell visits to the US through some of the homes where you can tour the homes and. It's kind of it's bizarre but yeah.

Barrio Pablo Escobar Pablo Escobar Pablo Escobar Museum Columbia United States Murder Rick Steves Medina Cocaine Robin Hood Dave Seminar Writer Medellin America San Francisco New Orleans Saint Barrios A. City National Park
"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

Lush Life

08:10 min | 3 months ago

"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

"With us today to show us all how it's done. I am so excited to have you on the show. Thank you so much for joining me and I can't wait to hear your story. I just want you to know I'm drinking Fever Tree at this moment laid the aromatic, and water and not only do I love its color but I love its taste by itself. Don't tell any Spirit companies extraordinary taste. What can I tell you now? You are such a big man on the campus here. You are CEO a fever Tree in North America and you have done seen a lot of things before this and I would love to start at the beginning. Oh my goodness. All right, it's not going. Don't worry. We're not going to be here for days, but I know that you suck at all life. Well, actually, I don't know where you started off like so let why don't I ask you. Where did you start off life? Well, I wish describe myself as a child of the world because I my my father was in the Army he served in the British Army. And so I grew up all over the world and I grew up in you know back in the UK and I went to school in the UK. But every time I went to it, when when when he would holiday, I went to Germany or Belgium or a different house somewhere and my father was there and not there cuz he was a serving and you know, whether it was Cypress or Northern Ireland or somewhere strange and I had the pleasure of living in you know, Singapore and and and America at one stage and and so I I sort of grew up all over the world and I've always embraced sort of global mobility and and kind of the global community that we live in I think as a result of that was instilled in me at a very early age what because your father was in the service. Did you always know that you were going to head there as well? No, I didn't. I mean he he was you know, he never pushed me in that direction, but it was something that that I am. To do something that I was determined to do. I obviously held him in very high regard with, you know, the deepest amount of respect and I really admired what what he did and and his service to our country, So it was something that I wanted to do and it was a very Natural Evolution I think for me at the time and right after school you went into Sandhurst, right? Yeah. Yeah, I went I I probably didn't have the qualifications get to University nor the patience frankly to do to do the you know, the amount of study. I was a Restless young man, and I wanted to get out and you know attack a world as it were and and and grasp it. So I chose not to go to university and and went to Saint test and did the officer training there and then and then completed that and then join my regiment, you know, the age of whatever it took eighteen nineteen years old. So, you know young young man suddenly thrust into a position of leadership and command of you know in those days about, you know, Thirty soldiers and and spend you know siraj Phenomenally is tremendous Adventures yet serving in the British army. You know, it's funny you were in the Royal Scots, right? Correct? Yeah, so of course, I thought you were going to say oh, my father was Scottish and I grew up drinking whiskey and that's what led me there. But how did you find was there any Scottish? Is there any Scottish in you that led you to join Scott's hundred percent my father my father served in the Royal Scots, you know, I'm a I'm a Scotsman by you know blood cut me open I bleed. I've got a but I you know, I I I have a I suppose a neutral British accent because I grew up all over the world ended up going to school in England and I think I think you know as you evolve and particularly in a sort of global business, you know, I've I've actually I always describe myself as one of the majority of Scots in the fact that I that I read a great statistic once that there are 60 off. Million people in the world who classify themselves as being Scottish, but only 4 and 1/2 or 5 million actually live in Scotland myself at the majority of Scots who who chose to live old now. So the Royal Scots was something that you knew you were going to go into but did you think you were going to be a career, you know in the service for your whole career or were you thinking this was only a short-term thing until I then jump off and do something else? No, it was it was when I joined it was an intention to have a you know, a full career in the Army. And what I discovered was I moved through, you know, the first three ranks as it were very very quickly. I was a second Lieutenant Lieutenant Captain. I was a captain, you know, the age of twenty-three and suddenly I looked ahead and I the Army has has a strange, you know hierarchy where you can accelerate very quickly in your home. Sort of seven or eight years and then suddenly they slow you down for the next ten years and whilst I've done three steps in say five or six years the next two steps, you know, the rules didn't permit them to take the next two steps for another nine ten years. And I think that coupled with the fact that there was a lot of kind of Defense Cuts there was a lot of you know reduction in military spending that I was running around the woods and awful lot shouting bang, you know, as opposed to firing a gun which sounded a bit a bit silly or waving a rattle to simulate machine gun fire and I found myself playing a lot of shocker as you guys call it football and you know, I play football two afternoons a week and I thought just a second there's something you know, I should be doing more with my life than this and of course, so I decided to I decide to leave and decide to resign and a resigned my commission and bizarrely nine months after I left the Army and I'd seen, you know, I'd seen some active service in in Northern Ireland that wage. In the main place that you went in those days in the British Army and of course of bizarrely nine months after I left, you know, Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait and and my Battalion was one of the first, you know across the start line in the first Gulf War and many of my friends who stayed and stayed in served in two Gulf Wars and have ended up in Endless tours of Iraq and Afghanistan back on and all over the shop. So the world was a very different place because I was I was in the army during the Cold War. And I was there right at the end of the Cold War, you know, I always remember being on on exercising in North Western Germany and we saw a trabant, you know, which which basically had come from East Germany and that was the day that the Wall came down and it was an extraordinary day because the brakes suddenly you show up, you know hundreds but usually drips and drabs of Eastern European cars from a drifting across into the west and it was very strange a very strange time to be alive and it's very strange. To be living in Germany and I guess for someone who has trained so long to be I guess at War. It must have been quite frustrating for you to not be able to have that experience. You know, some of them of you probably is like thank God I'm safe, you know didn't happen but part of you probably felt unfulfilled. I don't know. Is that true or not go off? Yeah, I think actually I mean it's it's it's the same as anybody in actually trained endlessly to be something then you want to test yourself in those in those areas. You know, I'm a nurse you never who never has to deal with with a you know, an open wound is made like going on. I did all this nursing training but I didn't actually get, you know, dress a wound or something or a home, you know, you know a surgeon right endlessly to stop, you know, people robbing banks, you know, never gets the chance to stop somebody robbing a bank it right? Of course. There is. You know when you've trained very hard for something the training is that intense. Yeah, you you always want to put yourself to the test. Of.

Army British Army Royal Scots Northern Ireland UK East Germany North America Germany Saint Scotland CEO football Sandhurst Singapore Saddam Hussein England Scott officer Kuwait
"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

Lush Life

01:31 min | 3 months ago

"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

"Have on this Tuesday, then the Tennessee cooler made with Tennessee, honey, just in case you missed it any cocktail made with Jack Daniel's Tennessee. Honey is a favorite of mine, but the Tennessee cooler made with its home. Of apple and ginger. Well, it had to be our cocktail of the week. First fill a highball glass to the brim with ice then start by adding in 50 mils of Tennessee Honey add to that 50 mils of apple juice then top it all up with ginger ale and then stir gently finally garnish with a lemon wedge. You'll find this recipe plus more Jack Daniels recipes and all the cocktails of the week at a Lush Life manual. Com where you'll find all the ingredients in our shops. Thought. I was supposed to be visiting Lynchburg Tennessee this year, but like most travel essential or non it's off the books until our lives are back to normal. Whatever that is dead. Still you can enjoy a bit of Tennessee by watching my guilty pleasure the TV show Nashville on Hulu. Hopefully, you're a country music fan. Like I am If you live for Lush Life, make sure you're giving back to the bars You Love by donating or taking.

Tennessee Jack Daniel Jack Daniels apple Lynchburg Hulu Nashville
"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

Lush Life

02:05 min | 3 months ago

"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

"Would be remiss <Speech_Female> if I didn't have <Speech_Female> this classic as <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> our cocktail <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> of the week. <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> We could fight about <Speech_Music_Female> how the old fashioned should <Speech_Music_Female> be made sugar <Speech_Female> cube vs. <Speech_Female> Sugar syrup. <Speech_Female> Someone once told <Speech_Female> me that in a bar <Speech_Female> in Australia when you <Speech_Female> ordered an old fashioned, <Speech_Female> you received <Speech_Music_Female> a beer first <Speech_Music_Female> name, cuz we finished <Speech_Female> drinking the beer <Speech_Female> by the time <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> they finish during the <Speech_Female> old fashioned. <Speech_Music_Female> That's <Speech_Music_Female> a little extreme, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> but I'll let <Speech_Female> the bar make it any <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> way it wants to <Speech_Music_Female> but <Speech_Music_Female> at home I must <Speech_Female> admit when I want <Speech_Female> my old fashioned. <Speech_Music_Female> I want it now. <Speech_Female> So saying <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> here is our cocktail <Speech_Female> of the week made my <Speech_Music_Female> way <Speech_Music_Female> add <Speech_Music_Female> 50 mils of bourbon <Speech_Female> to a rocks glass with <Speech_Female> one big ice <Speech_Female> pack. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I'm leaving it up to <Speech_Female> you. Which bourbon you prefer. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Then I add <Speech_Music_Female> to Bar spoons <Speech_Music_Female> of Demerara sugar <Speech_Music_Female> syrup to it <Speech_Music_Female> as I like mine. <Speech_Music_Female> Sweet. <Speech_Music_Female> then <Speech_Female> two dashes <Speech_Female> of angostura bitters <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Then <Speech_Music_Female> I stir counting <Speech_Music_Female> for fifty <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> seconds. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Wallah <Speech_Female> an old fashioned <Speech_Female> is born. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> You'll find <Speech_Music_Female> this recipe more <Speech_Female> variations <Speech_Music_Female> on the old fashioned <Speech_Music_Female> plus <Speech_Music_Female> all the cocktails of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the week at a Lush <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Life manual, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> where <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you'll find all the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> ingredients in the shop. <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> Now that you're drinking <Speech_Music_Female> an old fashioned <Speech_Female> close your eyes <Speech_Female> and put <Speech_Female> yourself or <Speech_Female> Eddie would love to <Speech_Female> be drinking his <Speech_Female> dram of whisky <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> right <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> now. <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> old fashioned <Speech_Female> close your eyes <Speech_Female> and put <Speech_Female> yourself or <Speech_Female> Eddie would love to <Speech_Female> be drinking his <Speech_Female> dram of whisky <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> right <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> now. <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Did <Speech_Female> you know could be endorsing <Speech_Female> old Fashions <Speech_Female> wherever <Speech_Female> you went <Speech_Female> by wearing the Lush <Speech_Female> Life old-fashioned <Speech_Female> t-shirt <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> more than just waving <Speech_Female> the old-fashioned flag <Speech_Female> am also <Speech_Female> supporting Lush <Speech_Music_Female> Life. <Speech_Female> You can find <Speech_Female> it <Speech_Female>

Australia
Interview with Mark Constantine of Lush Cosmetics

How I Built This

06:25 min | 3 months ago

Interview with Mark Constantine of Lush Cosmetics

"Back. In nineteen ninety-five I was studying in London my sister. Karen. Came to visit me that year. She'd been to London before. So on her visit, she was the guide we traveled through the market stalls Candan lock we picked up some indie records at rough trade and made a special trip to covent garden to visit a newly open shop. Called Lush I hadn't heard of it but my sister had instructions from all friends back in L. A.. Get me stuff from. Lush. Now at the time, it was one of two lush locations in the world, and this is before e commerce. So unless you went to the store, you couldn't get the products. Remember the overpowering smell of roses and lavender and honey and lemon I remember these long loaves of colorful soap laid out on tables where you could slice off a Chonkin pay for it. By weight there were bath bombs and shampoos and lotions. It looked like the produce department at a fancy grocery store. You didn't see a whole lot of plastic packaging and in front of each product, you'd find a bright colorful chalkboard with a description. It was unlike any beauty product store I had ever seen. And it probably explains why then There was a line to get in. Lush was part of a new wave of beauty companies that came onto the scene around that time. Many of them influenced by the body shock and it's iconic founder Anita Roddick who as you will hear features prominently in this story is well. The main founder of Lush Mark Constantine had already seen incredible success and then catastrophic failure by the time he launched his venture. In fact, right before mark. Open Lush. He's lost most of his money on a mail order business that went bust. But. Lush turned his fortunes. And and today it's a brand with more than nine hundred stores around the world. Now, in recent months, the pandemic has hit the company hard. For time all of its stores in the UK, the US and Australia were closed. But. Lush has also seen a massive surge in online orders and later on, we'll get an update on how mark and the company have navigated the pandemic and the global economic fallout. But first a little bit about mark's background. He grew up in weymouth seaside town in the south of England. When he was only two years old his dad's split from the family and went off to Africa and mark never saw him again while he was growing up. And his mother. She took mark and moved in with her mother marks Grandma. It was me my mom, my grandmother who really brought me up a my aunt. So. I was really bored three. Yeah. What did your mom do? She was a journalist in the local newspaper on I knew my mom had to work in order for us to to be okay. It was very, very comfortable life full of love and hugs and security. My mom was always there and I love my nine I looked up to my nine and so it was comfortable. Very nice. Obey. Feminine Life I've felt. Spoilt To be honest, obviously, my nine drilled into me the proper values as well. with proverbs and all sorts of other things you know I I had to rights repeatedly better best never them rest till. My good is better. My better best things like that. But then I guess. Around the time you were twelve. So you like you stopped living with your grandmother like Yulia mom moved out. what happened was they there was larger a my mother married the lawyer we moved to my grandmother died. I didn't realize probably until much later in my life high much that'd affected me I felt responsible. I think from my grandmother's death for most of my life because obviously I was important to her and I wasn't there anymore and I couldn't after her and she died on then my my stepfather was. Very, cold I would say and violent. But that's very typical upbringing fifties because they'd come is war gentlemen. There was a lost friends some of them had seen that friends killed or relatives and So it was you know not surprising that those people were bringing up my generation went all the best balanced people in the world. What kind of I mean what kind of kid were you? What do you remember about how you responded to those circumstances? Did you I don't know retreat into yourself or did you act out? Did you fight with your mom? What do you remember or didn't fire my mom but I force a lot with my Stepdad physical fights and they would argue we would all argue. It was just I want to say unsatisfactory which doesn't side like this is like a strange word to use it but. Certainly when I came to build my own home I, for example, never locked the front door. You know I I make an effort on those smaller things that tell people that they wanted to. Careful. Kid were you at school? Are you could student? School was still difficult for. Really. Was it was just heart for you. I. Mean there were a lot of gangs. Gangs were normal in the fifties for for everyone there were lots of gang. So I went to the grammar school, which was the best school in. The top ten percents shoots went to the grammar school. Everyone's surprise when I got in. And then I wasted it while I. was there except that I did make friends and we were in particular gang where we could make. Bombs and things. Can. Make bombs. What we were the news like. PIPEBOMBS. They were we killing sugar bombs with batons permanganate. Glycerin Fuses also savings on we went making them for the IRA season, the Perron purposes to intimidate other gang.

Lush Mark Constantine London Founder Candan Karen Anita Roddick Africa Chonkin Weymouth Seaside Yulia UK England United States Australia
Can Simple Fruit Peels Revive Dead Land?

BrainStuff

03:44 min | 4 months ago

Can Simple Fruit Peels Revive Dead Land?

"Of IHEART. Pay Brain Stuff Lauren Boban here with another classic episode from Erstwhile Host Christian Sager. This one has to do with some awesome environmental research almost never came to light. I'll let Christian explain. Stuff, it's Christian Sagar. If some of Earth's most barren wastelands could be transformed into dense productive forests by the most unlikely of helpers discarded fruit peels. It sounds like wishful thinking but that's exactly what happened in the nineteen nineties during promising ecological experiment orange juice manufacturer del Oro plunked twelve thousand metric tonnes. It's around thirteen thousand, two, hundred, twenty, eight tonnes of orange peels on top of bleak Costa Rican Pastureland eventually transforming it into a lush fertile forest but it's a success story that almost wasn't told del Oro donated a seven Acre or three. Hector plot on the edge of the WANNA cast t conservation area after being approached by University of Pennsylvania researchers, Daniel Johnson and Winnie. Hell walks who wondered how the company's discarded appeals could benefit the soil in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, eight, the company deposited one thousand truckloads of orange skins onto the degraded land as part of the agreement but rival Orange Squeezer tico fruit sued del Oro a year into the contract claiming the company was defiling National Park Costa Rica's Supreme Court agreed, and after only two years, the experiment came to a halt. That could have been the end of the story. Were it not for Timothy Truer a curious ecologist at Princeton University in two thousand, thirteen truer and a team of researchers traveled to Costa Rica for unrelated research and decided to look up the orange peel plot. The site sign was so covered with vines in the land. So densely filled with trees that took the team years and dozens of site visits to discover it the team sampled and studied the soil at the site and compared it to samples that were taken in the year two thousand. It also noted tree diameter and species from the Orange Peel site and that of. In Year by pasture that wasn't treated with peels, the researchers found that the treated area had richer soil more tree biomass and a broader variety of tree species including a fig tree with a circumference equivalent to three arm spans. The precise reasons for this one, hundred and seventy six percent increase in above ground biomass are still being investigated but the researchers contend dumping massive amounts of nutrient. Rich organic waste had a nearly immediate effect on the land's fertility changing its lifeless soil into a thick rich loamy mixture. The researchers proposed it's also probable that the orange peel suppressed growth of an invasive grass that was keeping the forest from flourishing. The rediscovery of the experiment, a boon for barren landscapes and agricultural waste, but it also could have a major impact on earth. If more companies institute similar, environmentally friendly solutions to waste the resulting richly vegetated land could help isolate harmful carbon dioxide in the air and improve Earth's polluted atmosphere. So

Del Oro Earth National Park Costa Rica Costa Rican Pastureland Christian Sager Lauren Boban Christian Sagar Timothy Truer Hector Plot University Of Pennsylvania Princeton University Daniel Johnson Supreme Court
Interview with Winstina Hughes, Planner for the Maryland Dept of Transportation

Hallway Chats

08:03 min | 4 months ago

Interview with Winstina Hughes, Planner for the Maryland Dept of Transportation

"Welcome to Hallway Chat I'm Liam Dempsey. And I'm Tara Claes today we're joined by Weinstein Hughes when Stena is an assistant regional planner for the Maryland Department of transportation she created her first wordpress blog for a geographic information systems assignment and followed it soon after with one on community development and suburban planning. She has presented at Work Camp New York City work camp. US and Work Camp Austin. A wordpress meet up co organizer Weinstein a lead were camp new. York two, thousand eighteen. Welcome when Stena? We're so glad here. Thanks for having me. Tara. Thanks for having me. Lamb. I'm excited to join you wearing. So excited to defensive time with you. Can you tell us a little bit more about yourself? Okay. I can tell you. I'm a bit more about myself i. Grew up in northern Jersey in south orange. Maplewood. My family immigrated. From Sierra Leone West Africa And somehow they brought me back to Maryland. Settled initially I'm so I am living and working in, Baltimore? Fantastic there's there's a lot there about that. We could delve into but let me let me just talk a little bit about growing up there since he started with whole were you when you when you move from Sarah alone do you remember your your country of or you're young enough to not have any memory? I have. I have memories of playing in our backyard. Like the lush greenery of it. The red. The red dirt. Just. just kind of outside where we lived I remember just how bad it was. And I remember listening on to my dad calling. To see how I was just a memory of knowing that my parents weren't with me. And just really happy to hear his voice. And? When we moved here. This is. Really. where I grew out. Those are those those memories are of. I'm like a child and when we moved here, that's when things really start forming. That's when I'm you know I started thinking about just you know school like a as a kid. I. Think. We. You know when you're as young as four or five things are just kind of like impressions I'm but then we hit an age where we start understanding what's around us Andy Start. Having. A sense of the places where we're going and the people that were spending time with and when we immigrated here on that was the time where things really started in. No. Forming for me as a child and and. Being aware of the spaces I was in and you know. I grew up here in every part of who I am is really. The experience of being raised here in the states and Being raised in south. Orange Maplewood. have. You been back to Sierra Leone. I haven't been back. I'm one of those children but. That hasn't traveled back. Since I? I can't name. Do you have family there still though I do I do have aunts and uncles and I have cousins. That are from back home. And I have some cousins that have traveled here and they've gone back I'm. But I've I've lived here since since we came in, it's been continuous experience. Yeah. Thank you for sharing that your your story of coming to this country and growing up here. Tell us a little bit. Your experience Sir I think you talked about before we started recording about. Going to school to Grad, school and Can you tell us a little bit about your education background and your wordpress wordpress fits into that picture? Yes So you know you mentioned that I'm an assistant. Planner and I went to college for city planning. And I went to Grad school as well for for city planning sitting regional planning. And you know it's it's really a way of looking at the world. A WAY OF LOOKING And Identifying Spaces right areas that you can contribute to improve, and that's what I really love about. About what I studied and I really enjoy the work that I do currently. I, work for DOD and. Works specifically. With state highway and we see the tangible results of the projects that we work on. You know like when we go to meetings I'm and you know the individuals that we speak with. It's There's a real mess to it as opposed to. If I were in an office. kind of like. We spend a fair amount of time in the office, but it's not like a policy document I'm writing. You know it's like I can go and see where I work is I can listen. To understand what the needs are of of those who live in the communities. that. We that we go to and that's really what's always been exciting for me as a planner I did some community organizing work as well and? Not only that. I worked at a nonprofit in DC as an intern, and I had a chance to look at a Housing Trust Fund I had the chance to look at how they went about organizing around housing issues and an even organizing around immigration issues and and it's it's so exciting to work in a field that that hutchison all those different areas and it's died it's that fluid ness of of of the field working an infrastructure or working with community issues or working on. Economic Development. That led me to. Writing about. you know what I learned in school and then writing about it is really you know what really got me more involved within the word s community I that jess log but I'm that I wrote in college, and then when I graduated I started writing a blog on development. For Me Boyd and just in the process of all the positive experiences move me from just you know blogging on wordpress dot com to building my own sites. And then there's there's so much evolved from that as well. From writing to becoming a a meet up organizer in a work, Camp Speaker, and. You know just just all those those opportunities came from. From just you know blogging sharing my thoughts about. An area that I'm so passionate about that I'm so fortunate to work in.

Work Camp New York City Stena Weinstein Hughes Work Camp Austin Maryland Department Of Transpo United States Tara Claes Liam Dempsey York Maplewood Me Boyd Sierra Leone Grad School Baltimore Andy Start Maryland Northern Jersey Sarah
The confusing world of potting mix ingredients

On The Ledge

05:39 min | 4 months ago

The confusing world of potting mix ingredients

"There is a huge and confusing world of blunt potting mixes out there. You've ever stood in the garden center. bags and not quite sure what to buy. Then I'm here to help and I've elicit another expert to odd that up on the matter my guest this week missed a house plot. Ak Vlada Nicholas Cage is a house plant care specialist from Washington, D. C. With a huge following on Instagram, and he also makes them pretty awesome tiktok videos to I. I came across him via a wonderful Tiktok where he was doing a matchup between computer games and House Plant Care, which is absolutely brilliant. Open link to that in the show notes because we're GONNA be doing some decoding of posing mixes I'm working out exactly what you need I. Guess. The first question is, do you need to make your own bespoke potting mixes from individual ingredients or can I buy something off the shelf? Here's missed the house plans thoughts on the matter. There are two general types of wanting me sold out there. You have mixed plants for succulents and CACTI. We'd succulent Yes. The lot of them are good in you could use straight out of the bag. However with tropical makes in most cases for most Hobby House from growers. This use some extra of the bag. The main reason is most of these commercial makes or not or. Yes. It's all about the holes. POROSITY is really important concept to grasp when it comes to choosing your house plant potting mixes and the truth is that not all hose grated equal in soil water narrow held in for spacey's in between particles in these horse can be different sizes. We can generally classify his micro pores or lower floors in microprocessors smokers. These breweries they're often leads it to the naked eye while Mike reports are not in my reporters important for who who'd area because they hold oxygen. Whereas Mike reporters are important for absorbing holding water so It's important to maintain both adequate. In water supply for all planned growth in a city to have both micro in. In the soil. In when they say the most policies aren't enough. They don't have a lot of these reports. They don't provide a lot of Austin for the roads. In order to have a good solid structure, it has both micro might reports you need a goods ratio of small medium, large particles in particles of different sizes. Probably most commercial mixes the problem is a they contained mostly Moss, which consists of very fine particles. So you'd have only only fine particles the slow only pretend micro voice, which means it will retain water. You won't have a lot of oxygen into also compact very easily. If you've listened tonight sustainability episodes, then hopefully, you'll have some awareness of the sustainability issues that are surround Pete and its use in house plan compost. But it remains the fact that many many production nurseries still supply their house plants in potting mixes that contain an extremely high level of Pete. So how come those nurseries can grow plants the look amazingly lush and well but when we get those plants into our homes with and don't change the potting mix they start to struggle well, fortunately Vlad's on hand to explain that as well when a plant is getting locked to light it photosynthesis more and as a result three, pulling more water from the soil. What this means, the roots will not be sitting in west, salt for a long time. So the chances overthrow brought will be low. And this is why plant nurseries can grow in these next. Nurseries provide huge amounts of light. They have ruled stay have walls made out of glass. Fifty Times more than the plants in our homes. So nurseries actually need party makes they retain a lot of water which is why they can use these leaks. Straight out of the bag, but the problem with growers is bid. We don't have this salon life in our homes and. Most people even if they do have a lot of wife. Did Not provide to their clans is deeply usually choose plan place from based on that where to look good noth- according to how much light is to get in a plant doesn't get a good amount of lights it will synthesize less and. Pulling less water from the soil meaning, they will be sitting sweat soil longer and increase. Should you be changing the soil on your new house plants? The me get them home from the nursery. This is a subject of enormous debate in various house plant forums. But here's Vlad take plants in nurseries. They usually go through periods of very. Intense growth and the soil that the coming could be. Deficient imaging by the time you get them. So if plans is Lutheran deficiency, of course when giving new so soon as you can continue developing well, also there is accumulation of salts in the soil over time, they will burn the roads. So the longer you leave a plan inside soil more damaging will have on the roads. So If a plant needs to be deported usually. Again.

House Plant Care Pete Nicholas Cage Mike Moss Washington Tiktok Vlad Spacey Austin
Plant Parenthood Is More Than A Trend

Therapy for Black Girls

04:59 min | 4 months ago

Plant Parenthood Is More Than A Trend

"If you're instagram be looks anything like mine for months you've probably been seeing tons of beautiful assists in their homes surrounded by lots and lots of Lushes, green plants. It seems like many of us have found solace in plants and other connections to nature in the past couple of months. So we wanted to dig into which driving this for us. In this episode, we're sharing to perspective on growing field of psychology called nature therapy are ego therapy. First of is my conversation with death collier. Beth is in private practice as a nature allies psychotherapist and writes on nature health and race. She specializes in working with relational trauma in our connections with people and Nature Bethany discuss what ego therapy is why. So many of us have turned to plants the psychological benefits of being connected to nature. And steps, we can take a repair our relationships in nature. Here's our conversation. Thank you so much for joining us today. Thanks so much for inviting me, it's really great to be able to join you here from London I'm sat in a woodland fail I mean the city at the moment. Yeah. So of course, the listeners can't see you but you were you have a very picturesque as beg rows. So I'm at peace just looking at your background out there in the woodland. We all lucky. Old People See London is one of the world's major cities still still got a huge amount of green space where we're lucky to have lots of parks but also woodland's to very close and accessible. So I'm happy you're able to join us because I'm not sure how active you are on social media but definitely, since March you know since the pandemic really hit I've just been observing lots and lots of pictures of plants all across the social media feeds seems like lots of people have been getting into buying house plans for their homes planting gardens just really doing a lot with greenery, and so I like to hear from you your thoughts about why that's happening like why do you feel like people are turning things like plants and gardening right now? Nature has this wonderful capacity to sue the since the help us fill grounded I think a lot of us have turned to nature. Help US get through some very stressful anxious times during the coronavirus period and and lockdown in particular for many of us have had policies where we've had to stay indoors most of the time and we can't go out and accessible usual green spaces than bringing nature indoors as being the next best thing. So I think people have been turning to nature for release. It's been a wonderful focus having plans to tend to and care for, but also feel the benefits of being around plants which uplift us that. Make us feel calm. Yeah, and I know a lot of your work is in nature therapy. So can you tell me more about what that is and how you became so passionate about their practice? Yes. So I grew up in the countryside in UK which for a person of color is quite unusual. Any two percents of people of African. Descent live in the countryside. UK and so my childhood's spent roaming the fields playing outdoors learning about nature and how I could meaningfully interact with it. For example, the more knew about edible plants, the less I had to go home to to get something two weeks. So nature became a very meaningful relationship for me. and. When I moved into the city, I realized that not everybody saw nature as normal that had been a real disconnection. Where I opened my door and I was surrounded by nature for a lot of people they have to make an effort to go out and find the natural world. Not Everybody has the kind of connections which makes it possible whether it's they don't have parents that take them or they find that green spaces aren't accessible in the areas that they live. Semi journey into nature was through seeing how for many people there was a distance between them and the natural world and I'd be working with a young boy. who was at risk of falling into trouble with gangs and we were working traditionally indoors in a room and nothing seemed age appropriate for him the toys. Too. Young. He was someone that presented with a lot of provider even though here's about ten eleven, but it wasn't ready for face to face I contact and it made me think back to my days as a child and having natural spaces and being up to Rome and how that let south a lot of energy and how allows us to process things that we're feeling and I wondered what it would be like if I took our work outside, it didn't actually happen with that child but. It did with others in the similar situation and from there I started to all my adult clients, the opportunity at work outdoors to and the transformation was sort of self evident that when we change our environments and we're able to express ourselves differently and we realized that much of the things we're experiencing our to do with the extended violent, wherein not just our own internal

London UK Beth Rome Private Practice
How Do You Know When to Start All Over With a New Lawn?

Your Gardening Questions

02:33 min | 5 months ago

How Do You Know When to Start All Over With a New Lawn?

"Okay if you look at your lawn. What percentage has to be weeds or no grass to completely start over? Clark. That's a hard question to answer. It's a good question. Now, every it's particularly weedy especially the perennial types. CRABGRASS and foxtail don't come because even though they're nasty and caused problems there their annuals they're going to die off you can treat for them the following year if you have perennial grasses of any kind, be Dan Lyons implanting than the sorrel and all that kind of stuff. If there's any percentage beyond ten percent I. I'd be starting to think renovation either spot killing the the bad spots. Or even go if you're headed toward twenty, five, thirty, forty percent in weeds and junk you'd you'd be well advised to start completely over just and a neighbor of mine did it to spend several years now but? it was a a and okay lawn but it had junk in it. He came in and just mystified everybody in the neighborhood. All of a sudden died during Brown boom just about this time of year. Well, he knew to follow through and did and he's had a lush beautiful on every sense I think it is. So darned weeds can't get started in it. Yeah. That's that's the whole key right That's a long way around answering Some people are extremely fastidious. They WanNa lawn like a golf green. or or or whatever but others you know more more lenient. I tend to have about fourteen kinds of grass in my lot. They're all compatible they they kind of selected themselves as to the shades sun areas. But I'm sure there's well the lawn is fifty years old in total run. I have added some seed but I'll bet there's at least a half a dozen to a dozen types of bluegrass. If we wanted to get really fussy there's a little bit of Red Fescue for the shady spots and so on. So but but to me at three inches tall, it's enough of a blend to be compatible and when people are pets. Place at twenty, five, thirty miles an hour. If I'm lucky instead of the regular speeds that they drive if they're not seeing the weeds, I, don't see the weeds either.

Dan Lyons Clark Wanna Golf
Lawn Renovation Do's and Don'ts.

Your Gardening Questions

05:58 min | 5 months ago

Lawn Renovation Do's and Don'ts.

"You know this is you mentioned his midsummer were getting into August and between now and the the middle of August when you like to start lawn renovations. Means Mark and and most of it is getting ready showed. So to speak up until August fifteenth now that's not a magic day, but it's it's a period of time where I like to get the seed purchase. The fertilizer purchased I like to you. If I need to use it, I like to get the roundup ready to kill off the weeds and so on and it depends on this year in my limited travels. Because of the virus and so on I have not seen longs in great suffering condition. Now, they're getting a little brown from here to there but then depending on where you are in varying spots, it does rain get things going again and so on. So in any event to get things around then if I'm watching the calendar, which is just a generality, the August fifteenth period where it's still haunting drive is when I like. To get started on lawn renovation. Now, this when I say renovation, it's where you may be lost lawn and in my case, it's a smaller area. Thank Heavens but it's north of my house. It's it's a spot where somehow some annual bluegrass that started it is always luscious spring to the point of getting well over into the the perennial beds in one place. Then all of a sudden come roughly all this one, it just dies. Flat to the ground, it's done. It's done. It's thing for the year and that leaves me a bare spot or spots spot is not now it's not so big. But at the same time, I, go in with a shot around up. Well, I have in the past this year I don't think I'll need to I'll knock out any weeds that are being substantially nasty and then around the I I'm sorry around the fifteenth. I will scratch that up with a steel Tien Rake and be v. lets you say because of its size and area I will be ready to cede that at any point thereafter I get it scratched up and so on. I usually don't have much breed rakoff I kinda great it out after I've kinds of the ground, half an inch or more and more is better there's no question about it but a half an inch will give me a seedbed. So I get to see down a little fertilizer on top of I have in this case, I use compost that made. It just literally dusted over the top mainly just to keep those seeds moist during the heat of the day of and we'll go on with that thought where now if you have to really renovated lawn, it's a good time to win anytime now and thereafter after good rain or watering, you get the junk weeds grass and so on all growing then you hit them with around up then he weighed maybe ten days or thereabouts to see that everything has been in fact killed if so fine. If not give it another shot of round up then I think it's a ten day week period before you can see then at that point, you have some options and I caused guy great caused a nation and a significant aren't argument. One time we took in the slice Cedar. loaded. The top rack, each of the seed. Each of the little times on the bleed. have their about an inch and a half apart the seed drops in behind those the fertilizer, etc and up comes the grass. Well, the grass was coming up in rows and he's Hey, call me just more than a little bit anger. I didn't want a striped on I wanNA hold on I said, well, we've used bluegrass which will spread it is going to do so take a picture now just for fun sake Fun He's at I'm looking at it is a different situation. Anyhow, he did take the picture and years. Later we talked about his stripy lawn being quite lush and beautiful I happen to use the slice cedar on its own, just sometimes for cultivation sake under circumstances but it's a wonderful tool forgetting seed into little troughs or slits in the grass Amsoil seed should not be very deep into that most seeds well, generally speaking mark on seeds it you put it in the ground twice the deficit it is in diameter. Now with bluegrass seed that means you lay it on top. With with the perennial well with the Turf Type Pretty Well Ryan you put down another sixteenth of an inch but in any event you've made these little flips the. You put the grass seed down and at that point, then you start watering and the seed in terms of setting the depth of these knife blades. So to speak, I would not go any deeper than a quarter of an inch into the ground. You don't want to bury the darn seeds you want them where they can stay moist, they can be rooting into soil. By contacts but you don't want them down buried in in in do much shade from the We'd like up and so on. So you're going to be putting down seed you will come up and rose and give it then Well you have to allow on the BLUEGRASS itself. It's going to take twenty one days for it to germinate in in terms of generality, and I'll SOM-, maybe in fourteen days some maybe as late as thirty days but but twenty one days, it takes to get the bluegrass going in the meantime that they've type tall fescue will be up giving us some color cover and it Cetera, and we're back into a

Bluegrass Mark Amsoil Cedar.
The Hippie Skyjacker, Cathy Kerkow

Female Criminals

05:40 min | 5 months ago

The Hippie Skyjacker, Cathy Kerkow

"On October Sixth Nineteen fifty one amid the lush forests and clear lakes of Coups Bay. Bruce and Patricia cargo brought their first child into the world. They named her Catherine Marie Cocco Kathy to her family and friends by nineteen, Fifty, seven, six year old Kathy had three younger brothers and two unhappy parents. She was too young to understand her mom and dad's problems but old enough to notice that her father was particularly detached though Bruce worked as a truck driver to support his family he dreamed of a life as a musician unfortunately, that wasn't the type of career one could have in coups bay especially with four young children to feed. But while Kathy's father felt trapped in frustrated, he loved his kids. So he tried his best to stick around for them. One day during the summer of Nineteen, fifty-nine Bruce and Patricia to children out for a picnic eight-year-old Kathy, an adventurous type slipped off with one of her brothers to catch salamanders. As they caught critters in jars to black boys, approached her and her brother although she didn't know Roger and see Venice Junior by name Kathy recognized them. The holder family had been the talk of the town after a racially charged attack on one of the youngest sons as Venice junior watched the to unsupervised Kirk Oh kids. He saw an opportunity for retaliation he wanted. To beat them up like the other kids had done to his own brother but Roger wouldn't have it instead ten year old roger approached the girl with glasses and asked what she was doing with the Tadpoles. Kathy corrected him. She was catching salamanders. Roger enjoyed the girls spunk but his brother pulled him away he and Cathy waved goodbye hoping to see each other again. Ultimately however, the budding friendship was cut short when just four days later, the holder suddenly moved to California but Kathy wouldn't forget Roger Holder and their argument over Amphibians. In. The latter years of her childhood Kathy, watched her parents relationship completely deteriorate by the time she turned ten her father's musical ambitions had finally gotten the better of him. He ran off to Seattle in hopes of making it in the big city. This forced Cathy's mother Patricia to take over as the family breadwinner. Meanwhile, Kathy had no choice but to keep the household running and look after her three younger siblings before we continue with Kathy, psychology please note that I'm not a licenced psychiatrist or psychologist, but I have done a lot of research for the show. According to sociologist Monica Kirkpatrick Johnson when kids are forced to take on serious responsibility, they view themselves as older than they are. This is called subjective age and can lead adolescence to believe their maturity levels exceed those of their peers as Kathy's mom took on a full time secretarial job kathy nature her brothers were fed clothed and always ready to go to school on time in many ways, she became the second parent in the home. If, the child chooses to take on additional burdens that will likely manifest into positive characteristics down the line but negative effects may emerge when a child is forced into roles that demand them to perform as though they're older than they are Kathy may have appeared wise beyond her years but really she was merely mimicking adult behaviors. This type of pseudo maturity May. Increase. The likelihood of problems like substance abuse and increased sexual activity in adolescence for Awhile Kathy showed no signs of any behavioral issues she continued to care for her younger brothers as she always had an she applied that same level of dedication to her studies taking on many extracurriculars when she started high school among them were choir, Latin club track and community service. But by sixteen something changed with her brothers now, older county didn't feel so obligated to spend her time caring for them more than that acting like an adult for so long had taken its toll on Kathy, who still repressed the pain and anger from her parents separation. Unable to escape her resentment she rebelled she quit the track team dropped out of choir and stopped volunteering. Kathy dumped her boyfriend for a twenty something beach bomb every attempt her mom may discipline Cathy was met with verbal sparring. When eighteen year old Kathy graduated high school in June of Nineteen sixty-nine, her prospects looked bleak while others left with career goals and college plans Kathy kept dating and partying. So for the next two years, Kathy bounced from one random gig to another unable to hold anything down at first it was just laziness. Eventually, her indiscretions escalated while working at a drugstore she stole amphetamines for her friends when she was caught and subsequently fired it didn't seem to bother her in the slightest to make ends meet. Cathy resorted once more to theft.

Catherine Marie Cocco Kathy Roger Holder Cathy Coups Bay Bruce Patricia Cargo Seattle Monica Kirkpatrick Johnson Kirk Venice California Theft
Ana Forrest & Jose Calarco - Forging Your Own Path

The Flow Artists Podcast

04:53 min | 5 months ago

Ana Forrest & Jose Calarco - Forging Your Own Path

"Hello Joe. It's Jose Calico and Anna Forest Tia on all CA silent USA. And just by what you see what's going on in the mainland in the US I. And we're I a Saif. He only island in a Beautiful Anna's house thirty acres in lush forest with owls and eagles, and deason vouchers. Would really enjoying actually the lockdown. After five or six years of non stop touring thirty five CDs and countries a year. With had the chance to settle down and? We do have still very, very busy with our online channel and running out business each day we do a nice lengthy yoga practice. I'm a vegan chefs are cooking more than ever. Where actually very, very healthy. And so much has changed joke. Since we last spoke the world has gone absolutely crazy. And the US is one of those places where just off the mainland here. And not too far from here there's riots and shooting and racial tensions. All sorts of crazy crazy stuff going on a lot of it is a countdown to the election. Coming up here in the US I. There's a lot of manipulation lots of lies. Very hard to trust many people right now. So. Much. Going on. But We a happy to announce that old during this lockdown. We've had the opportunity to finally record all online yoga music ceremony shamanism philosophy Joe Prayers, go out to Victoria and all Ustralia Week here how harsh the lockdown is over there and I just lucky that we were able to do the lockdown thirty Acre forest. However, we seem to allow best wishes to Victoria and Australia, and we pray that our freedoms come back again. Go, and Jose. Thank you so much for speaking with us today all the way over in New Zealand the beautiful. Put Her. Could. We stop heads of your connections to first nations culture. Would you like to share how you live and work within indigenous communities and Foams what you share today? Absolutely. Well. I have been director all descendants aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Dance Company for twenty. Five years. People can see that descendants dot com you. We've traveled to the four corners of the planet we have done the world's biggest events over forty countries were visited. And this is where I got my background. In, aboriginal culture and my aboriginal Mahba spiritual mother Imelda Willis came from the dingy. Kanju clans Al-Faw North Queensland. She is now deceased. And we still descendants still together. And this just gave us the idea I had already. Doing first nations work in forest job. But I took it a couple of steps further by doing. Exchange all over the world while wearing Australia, we do Australian aboriginal stuff while we're in the US CY cultural exchange with the Americans. All first nations people in Mexico in Canada. Everywhere we go. We liked to do cultural exchange because first nations have spirituality was is beautiful and untouched by white middle class sort of new age is symptoms. So, with the aboriginal culture, it's the world's all this culture. It goes well over fifty thousand years and it was well before yoga and a lot of people site what has first nation. Philosophy principles and culture got to do with Yoga. And it actually has a lot to do with Yoga when we look at Yoga in the broader perspective as a place learning and healing.

United States Jose Calico Imelda Willis Australia Victoria Anna JOE Torres Strait Island Dance Com New Zealand Usa. North Queensland Director Mexico Canada
Rejuvenation and Propagation With Ken Druse

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

05:39 min | 5 months ago

Rejuvenation and Propagation With Ken Druse

"I called you the other day and I'm like Oh, it's a mess everything. So overgrown and I'm telling you about my call is that's taken the. Anna's hip in the Salvia swamped by the whatever and you're laughing at me and so. What's the time for can? Besides facelifts. But just just because you aren't having guests visit doesn't mean you let the whole thing go to pot. Or you're thoughts go to pot. He's GonNa Discipline Me I publicly out loud on the radio. You said, you're pinching things so they get kind of thicker but. You May. It may be time to cut stuff back I. Guess I'm I'm using a modest sounding verb but yeah, you're right some cutbacks will you I have these big balls you've been here and you know people who visited if seen them through like big low terra cotta bowls on the patio and other places they're kind of you know and I group smaller pots around them but they're they're sort of the big statement centerpiece things for my annuals usually and and you know. Not. Everything grows at the same rate and put it all in when it's small, you know little things from the garden center but then something's grow more lushly than others and so like the Coleus, for instance. 'cause you know. Yeah. When you're cutting those Coleus bag you you mentioned that you could route them in water. You can also in some situations, just stick them back in the same container if you've got space and then that'll get even more lush and full without hanging over and losing its Bottomley's and stuff. Because, when you when you pinch or break off that parent plant branch and you'll get more leaves on that one, and then you have these pieces that you can either sticking or route in water or I like to use per light. Okay. So containers with like a pot of per light. SMALLPO- of per light and. Moist in the per light Tampa down really hard that really seems to help, and then I drill a hole in the per like with a pencil and sticking my cutting and firm the per light back around the cut and again, and you want to remove a couple of bottom leaves of the cutting the cuttings about. Four to six nodes long. So it's depending on the type of plant. Three to five inches long and some some plant. Coleus. Might route and two to four weeks. Then you have a new plant with roots and you carefully pry it out of the per light or in the case of water, you want to move it when the roots are less than an inch and a half long and sometimes roots made him water have a little trouble adjusting to a lower oxygen or higher oxygen medium. But anyway, you can stick them back in the same container that you took them from or just what you need Margaret. Another container of Coleus definitely need that. That's absolutely what I need. 'cause I'm doing such a good job managing the ones that I have this year. But seriously it has been kind of an epicure in the sense of We all are realities are changed Completely you know our patterns of life are changed. I mean, I'm stating the obvious and and on top of that in our region and many other regions, there's been severe weather so we have had. I've had almost no rain until a hurricane in fact, I should ask you how did you do during the hurricane that was just a couple of days ago I had a couple of inches of rain. Outages Day or two but not. Terrible terrible like many areas nearby had much. No, you were praying for rain. Also, a lot of areas they're still places New Jersey that don't have electricity. We lost power for almost twenty four hours. But we had five and a half inches of rain, and then that's stopped and then the wind came in the wind was really a lot of wind but. Knock would not trees and I've got tree did trees here. So I thought Oh that's GonNa be something there was there was one stick about four and a half feet long from the ash tree that was stuck into the lawn straight up. It's always funny when that happens in a big storm when it's also like spear gets thrown and it yeah, it really lands like right as if someone. INSERTED. It with with force while someone did. Yeah. Now, I had a couple of inches of rain and ninety. I keep saying to myself is this whole year? The theme weatherwise has been it never rains, but it pours it won't rain for a month practically and then we get the torrential gully washers. It's almost no rain. Yeah. Half. An hour of tons of you know you think finally and then it turns out it's dry under the trees sometimes. And you got to listen to half an inch but I was thinking about what we were talking about just before if you make a new plant and you potter it up of Coleus or a sweet potato vine or Begonia. You can carry. You can try to carry that over in a very sunny window inside and by March that's probably not going to be a very pretty plant, but you can cut that back and it'll make new growth and then make cuttings of the new growth and you can save a lot of money because you can use that to fill your those cuttings to fill your containers.

Bottomley Anna New Jersey Tampa Margaret
Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

The Vergecast

48:04 min | 6 months ago

Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

"So, this hearing just going to say it, it was six hours of chaos. So. So many things like individual moments of pure chaos happened this hearing. But because every member of Congress was only given five minutes to ask the questions in and they moved on, no one could process the moments of cash. So here are some things that happened during this hearing. Jeff. bezos just started eating nuts on his call. That was just a thing that you started snacking for the first ninety minutes. It appears that basis had tech issues was operating in some kind of delay. So we didn't hear from him. They just answer any questions and they'd take a ten minute break Jeff. bezos could fix his computer. Amazing. Jim Jordan, who McKenna pointed out. On the show last week is always sort of chaos element. Try to talk over several members of Congress got yelled to put his mass back on floated. Just elaborate conspiracy theories. was when I say was chaos I. Don't know if there's any other way to describe it. I. Think that led a lot of people to think the hearing itself didn't accomplish its goals, but I think in many ways it did. But Kennedy you WanNa Kinda go through what the committee was trying to accomplish the themes they were pointed at in. How hearing played out, right. So okay. First off. Harkening back to last week I mentioned Jim. Jordan's mountain dew obsession. Definitely drink a handful those throughout the hearing I took notes in screen shots. So, I, called it. But regardless of their pores soda choices, there were a lot of lawmakers who definitely did their homework and I think that was really apparent throughout the entire hearing and when I look at. The picture that they tried to paint I think that became really clear in chairman Sicily's opening statements. So this is the guy who liked. And spearheaded the entire investigation from the beginning, and in those opening statements, he pointed out that yeah Apple Amazon Google facebook. There are different in a lot of ways and they exhibit anticompetitive behaviors potentially allegedly and a lot of different ways. But what they tried to pull together and was a story, and it's really hard to tell a story and five minute fragments. But what happened yesterday was Sicily. Ni, and a lot of the Democrats on the Committee wanted to point out that these companies they become bottlenecks for distribution whether that's information or just like APP stores marketplace's they control what gets distributed in how what was really key to the investigation was how? How they survey competitors. If you have so much control dominance over a market or a specific part of the tech industry, you have a lot of insight into your competitors and you can do a lot of dangerous things with that, and then lastly, after that dominance has gained, it's how they abuse it. Right? How they abuse it to make harder for small businesses in competitors and I think that's exactly what Cellini pointed out in the beginning and I think they did a poor job that storytelling throughout the process. But I think that's also our job. Right is to pull that evidence together and tell that story for them in a way that isn't like. Yes, no yelling at CEOS and like stopping them and I think by getting that in the evidentiary record doing all this questioning, I think they really did achieve their goal in the end. Yeah. I mean, I think the thing that happened sort of next to the hearing was that they released a bunch of documents from these one point, three, million documents of clutch. Over the past year, they released pretty targeted selection documents for every company showing some of this stuff, Casey, I wrote a story about. facebook. INSTAGRAM. My I'm going to frame this email or mark Zuckerberg. Literally one sentence, no period. The Andrew says I need to figure out. I'M GONNA buy instagram like I would love to just be in a place were sending that email like super casually like I got this thing to figure out and it's not like am I gonNa buy the model of the car. It's like instagram. I've been thinking of the text messages where so and so says that Mark Zuckerberg's didn't go destroy mode on instagram ever since they got that up. Case she this to Kevin and right that text was. Yes. Well, it was Kevin. System was talking to an investor and Kevin said to the investor. If we don't sell well, mark, go into destroy mode on us and the investor side probably. Of course, stray casual. So there's just a lot of documents and I think one of the functions of hearing was to get those documents into the official congressional record to make the CEO's account for them. That did not seem very successful to me. Is like a takeaway people should have from this hearing, right? No. I think a lot of people that go into these hearings are expecting like these big Gotcha moments and expecting like a lot of news and all this stuff. But it really, it wasn't oversight hearing. You know it wasn't. They didn't come. They came at this like in a report last earlier this week that they came out at as investigators. They didn't come at it to make a big show horse and pony show out of it, and yet I think the CEO's didn't. The record well enough to the extent that they could have. But there was definitely, I was expecting them to do a lot less evasion and I expected a lot less room probation with the documents, but it's just the process of a Congressional hearing. It's. It's hard to do that in a congressional hearing. But if you put those documents out there, you get the CEO's on the record a little bit who does excite this excites the FTC. J, and that's who can take this next and then it's also congress. You know they can't break up a tech company, but they can regulate going forward and it's those three key themes that I pointed out earlier that they could regulate. You know what I mean. They could legislate to forbid companies from surveying competitors and things like that, and that's where this goes. So the format of the hearing, every member and five minute chunks, it seemed very clear that the Democrats had some sort of coordinated evidentiary strategy, they would start and. And they would say, I, want to read this email to you. What did you mean by this email and then Jeff bezos would say something like I have. No idea is on works. I. Was real pattern that developed was basis really not doing or claiming he definitely knows claiming not really no way Wayne is under the thing they did or they would ask sooner Pichai about the very granular add deal google made by an ad product, and soon I, would say I'll get back to you, which is basically all responses. So the Democrats seemed like they were coordinated to move through their documents. The Republicans seem to be doing something else that also seem coordinated intentional, but what was their focus because that seemed clear split my takeaway from Jim Jordan who? We got into earlier, he he was interviewing. As if they were all Jack Dorsey. And as we talked about like, yeah, he invited Jack Dorsey to testify, but he doesn't sit on the antidote subcommittees. Anything. He says, it just doesn't matter. So it sounded to me as if he prepared questions Jack Dorsey and then it was like, oh, he's not coming I'll ask Tim Cook the same questions. Another completely crazy moment that happened just seen by and five minute chunks is that. Represented Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin Dear Sweet Wisconsin. Definitely. Asked Mark Zuckerberg why the Donald Junior was banned from twitter and mark. Zuckerberg was happening on twitter facebook and there was just like a moment of confused silence, and then he tried to move on and that just sort of floated by in the river of chaos to tell you how much chaos there was kneeling. When you started to tell that story, I thought you were going to tell the story about when Jim Jordan asked him cook if the famous one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, Apple Super Bowl, AD was actually about twenty twenty cancel culture, which is another thing that really happened. I think that's out of context. He didn't ask him. He said clearly, this is. That's definitely what Steve Jobs was thinking IBM is canceled culture and Apple's going to break it with hammer and Jeff. Bezos said that social media is a nuance destruction machine and all this crazy stuff from that. It was a wild will that that particular question when Jim Jordan asked, do you support the cancel culture mov, you could see the CEOS like. 'cause they went in order. He asks them all in order. So First Tim Cook just like basically muttered nothing. Here's like I don't. I support speech whatever. The iphone a keyboard like that was his answer. Sooner per child also, just like muttered, right? He's like Google has always supported free expression Zuckerberg like saw the opportunity and took it and the forces of liberalism I rising I, and then basis was like I cannot. I cannot do in like went for it, and that was just totally insane moment. But it also seems like the Republicans were intentional to try to create their own moments where they were yelling at CEOS about bias on platforms is obviously something cover a. At. You were paying a lot of attention that case you're paying a lot of attention to it. Do you think that was effective in creating because you know there's like a parallel conservative Universe Jim? Jordan was on Tucker. Carlson. Last night like was that effective or d think that the CEO's were able to sort of tamp down on interesting the Tucker Carlson pointed out that Google and other companies are all big donors to Jim Jordan another folks. So that is a weird side, but I think it was actually besides the moment where they mixed up twitter with facebook I. Think this was much more effective off. Off Topic yelling about technology than we usually see like are genuinely issues that like they are upset about that, they could point to largely around like cove nineteen misinformation and they could at least like pick those topics and stick to them rather than kind of asking vague questions about like, why is my phone listening to me? Well, they're definitely asked questions about why are my campaign emails getting filtered by G mail? Yes. I should. I should mention that they have really and they have all of these cases where they ask about extremely specific one off incidents that anyone who has used social media knows happens constantly. And, then turn them into a sinister pattern. But I think they managed to come off as sounding more like they understood what they were talking about the unusual. I think that was a real theme of the hearing, Casey. What did you think of this sort of bias side show that occurred? Well, I mean the the idea that conservative voices are being suppressed is foundational to the conservative movement and is behind the rise of conservative talk radio. It was behind the rise of Fox News. Now that social media exists, we have seen it in this new form, but it is sort of being presented as extra, sinister and worthy of. Some sort of legislative intervention what frustrates me about it is that much more than newspapers or or cable news like Mark Zuckerberg Dorsey. These people benefit hugely from having all possible voices on their platform. None of them is incentivized to drive conservatives off their platform. What they are incentivized to do is have rules that make the place safe and welcoming. So that people want to hang out there and so to the extent that there are issues on the platform, they've largely come because these platforms have rules. And you know you would think that a bunch of free marketeers would realize that the alternative to the system that they're so mad about would be creating a new system, but they don't seem at all interested in doing that. So I just sort of dismissed all of them as charlatans I actually thought it was interesting that the opposite track came up, which was the Stop Hey for profit campaign I kind of wasn't expecting that. The representative Raskin I believe asked facebook. Basically, why aren't you kicking more hate speech off. I forget who else asked like look is the point that you're so big. You don't care about advertiser boycotts I. Mean, you know it will here. Here is a fact that the number one complaint that facebook gets from its users, the thing that users. About. FACEBOOK is that it removes too much content and so if you're running the place, you do have to take these complaints seriously in a way. Right? It might not be you know that you shadow band conservative whatever that even means on social network in twenty twenty. But the fact that you're removing content is really upsetting people. So you can't dismiss that idea entirely, but I still don't feel like we're having that intellectually honest conversation about it. So this was definitely I feel like you can connect the you control distribution. We're GONNA show the abuses of power narrative. We got other. Democrats. With the you control distribution. You're banning conservatives right like I. Think what's Sensenbrenner Again, cups and conservatives are consumers to is that people don't realize that like fifty percent of the population in many ways. But facebook has like famous conservatives working its highest levels Kevin. We last week, we're talking about Kevin Roose keeps sharing the list. List of the most engaged content from crowd tangle. It's all conservative content, and that's so problematic for facebook that they're. They're pushing back with other metrics and graphs of their own, making the facts just aren't there, but it doesn't seem to be convincing. Brett Kevin is being asked to recuse himself from facebook case because he's like best friends with facebook I, AP I wrote a column almost two years ago. Now, arguing that conservatives were trying to redefine. Any conservative identified person having any unwanted outcome on a social network, right? So bias is your name was higher than mine in search results. Bias is used suggested that I follow a Democrat and not a Republican right, and if you take action on your policies that apply to everyone against me a conservative that is biased against conservatives, right. So and by the way I have to say this has been hugely successful because we've talked about it. How many minutes now and the longer that these discussions. Discussions. Go on. They just sort of refi people's minds. The idea that there really is a vast conspiracy to silence conservative speech because he's networks are so big millions of conservatives are having experiences like this every day, and now there is an ideology that is basically a religion for them to attach to, which is although Silicon Valley liberals are out to get. Reason I wanted to talk about the conservative side show, which in many ways was a circus is it feels like the notion that we should be punitive to the companies or mad at the company's. Bipartisan, right we were. We were not looking at a hearing where the Democrats were on the attack. Republicans are saying we love. Apple. We're looking at hearing where they were. Everyone was mad. There are a couple of exceptions to that. There were a couple of I think sensenbrenner and a few other folks were like look we want to be clear. Big is not bad. We just WANNA make sure we're not punishing you for your success, but you were like almost entirely, right? Yeah. I. Mean I. think that's it's important to. To capture that mood like Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg, Tim, Cook soon. Darpa, try they usually get to finish whatever sentence they start saying. Right. They're not used to being interrupted. Their thoughts are usually like you know they get to live in complete sentences and people take them seriously here in five in intervals, they were interrupted almost every time they started speaking to be told that they were wrong that they were filibuster at one point Sicily said stop thinking is for the questions. We can just assume they're all good questions. They. Were getting yelled at and they're going yell that about a variety of things that were pretty specific. So you kind of in your kind of structure here. The first one was controlling distribution. What did you hear as a hearing went on the indicated to that? The committee had a case here? I think the apple's APP store is one thing you know charging thirty percent cuts on certain things is just controlling an APP store. It's the same thing with Amazon's marketplace. They can inherently in control what gets placed and what gets sold and you know if they want to play with search results on Amazon, they can do that, and then on facebook and Google, it's not just like products and software that's information. And it could be information when it's like Google. Google. Stealing yelps, texture views right in putting those in its little info boxes in search queries in facebook if facebook is just like an. Mation, distribution platform and. It can decide Algorithm Mickley. Knowingly. What people get to see this bution was very keen to the committee's hearing yesterday and they pointed out different aspects in which you know each company exhibited that kind of behavior. So the one that will you bring up apple? We wrote about this, say there's much emails. Apples document production is just one hundred and thirty pages of unrelated emails and whatever order see it's like scan through it. So there's a lot of little stories in there. There's one about right to repair and apple realizing it needed to repair. By watching PR people operate by reading their emails journalists. Very entertaining. They're like we had a break like here's our strategy. Here's we're GONNA. That's all in there. You can look at it, but there's a lot about the APP store itself and how they're going to use the mechanics of the APP store to control their platform, and it started at the beginning like the first emails in this production from twenty, ten there. From Phil, Schiller Steve Jobs saying, are we GONNA? Let Amazon Sell Books in the kindle store. Store, it felt like I saw an Amazon ad was hard to watch this hard to watch this ad where a person's reading a book on an iphone in the kindle APP in the pick up an android phone keep reading. He's like literally like it was hard to watch like Schiller's at home like pain what a customer is having an experience that good it really just. Heart and so he's like it was hard to watch. You fours Steve Jobs. They're like we gotta shut it down jobs is the bookstore will be the only bookstore on the APP. Store. That's the way it's going to be everyone's gotta used to it. We know that restricting payments will hurt other things, but that's what we're doing and they started there in two thousand ten and they pulled it out, and then that ladders up into everything that we've seen with, hey, ladders up into the analysis group showing up to. Apple, can pay them to say that there's independent study has revealed. Everybody has a thirty percent cut. It has landed up into Tim Cook, forwarding. He gets a letters from developers that are in this direction. It's like apples breaking my heart and he just like Ford's it. Tim, Cook forwards that email to filter credit eighty, just as thoughts like amazing like they are constantly thinking about the APP store as a mechanism of control for the platform in the leverage and other deals. So the other one was apple is this Amazon one which I have very mixed feelings on saying that this is bad or legal I'm curious for all of your thoughts famously. Did, not have the prime video APP on the Apple TV and all these other places apple, Amazon came to a deal. There's an entire presentation in this production like the slide deck of how the deal is going to work. Apple got to be the preferred seller of its own product. So third parties cancel. Apple. Products, Amazon pages, they got. They have a custom by flow. They've custom product pages, all the stuff in return. Amazon got a lower commission on the APP store and gets to Selatan products which no. No like you can rent a movie from the Amazon APP on the Apple TV, no one else gets to it in one world. This is just pure platform collision, right? Apple cut VIP deal for big companies because it wanted something and you could say this is legal in another world. It's like this is how deals work apple something valuable. Amazon s something valuable and they came to a conclusion wherever made more money and quite frankly the consumer experience platform has got better. How do you read that? Casey? That is good and fair analysis of it. I. Think I did read slightly more scandalous. Tones into it in part because apple would never acknowledge that some developers are more important to it than others even though if you assume that that's true, I think maybe one of the things that's frustrating about it is there is no transparency accountability around which developers get sweetheart deals is that once you hit a certain threshold of revenue will cut your price. Why couldn't they extend that deal to everyone right? Or is it just if we withhold something that seems particularly valuable, we can eventually drag you to the table. Table, which is sort of what seems like happened here. I think in all cases, what I'm always looking for is the accountability, right like and some sense of of equitable treatment of developers and I understand the guys are always going to get the best treatment, but it can that be publicly visible. Can it be acknowledged and there'd be routes for others to achieve that same level of success and treatment, and that I'll just seems missing here. Did you buy Tim Co? He said it twice. It was obviously A. Glimmer, of sympathy for all four CEOS. There is a lot of reporting that they had spent months preparing for this hearing like being grilled there, they'd hire outside law firms. They. Practiced they all clearly had soundbites memorized in none of them. Got To say him because it kept getting interrupted. Tim Cook had this one where he is like if we're the gatekeepers, the gates are open wider than ever. We've gone from five hundred. APPS to one point seven, he said like. A whole speech. and. The thing is there's fierce competition for developers. They don't like our store can do for android the windows. For xbox and PS. Four. Which I was like the idea that adobe is going to be like we don't want to be on the IPAD. Here's PS. Four Photoshop is insanity to me. I'm going to build a spreadsheet. APP. For the five. That's how frustrated with Tim Cook. To that ring. True to you I. Mean, there's no, it does not ring true. There is a, there is a duopoly. In the United States when it comes to smartphones, iphones have majority share in the United States and you can't say, well, you know there's there's a rogue fork of android in Malaysia that you could go develop for if you really wanted to and have that come across as a credible argument to Americans. Right it is. Natural for any monopolist to spend most of its time, arguing that it is much smaller and much less consequential as as you think it is and they're essentially always asking you to ignore what is in front of your face, which is that they are the giant. They are in control. What they say goes, and it doesn't matter which small businesses get hurt along the. The. Way I would point out that the contact and we're gonNA talk about earnings eventually. But the context for that is apple had its biggest third quarter ever this month, their revenues went up eleven percent year over year, they're making obviously making billions of dollars in their services revenue, which is a lot of the narrative around the APP stores increasing that services line. Also went up. I think it was thirteen billion. So you're right. They're very big in their earnings the day after the hearing did nothing. To reduce that impression. I want to switch to Amazon a little bit McKenna. You really focused Amazon was basis first time up there. They came at him a lot about marketplace. How did you think that went I think it went pretty good. I. Think. John Paul specifically was just like killer her questions with breakout star. Yeah. She was just like killer and she's the representative for. SEATTLE. So this is where Amazon is right. So she just like killed it and. And I think there were a couple of instances in the documents and in questioning yesterday that really pulled important things out there was like testimony from one bookseller who was like, yeah. We just can't sell a category of books and we don't know why Amazon doesn't let us do that just like testimony like that or even when it comes to like acquisitions, the ring acquisition especially, I wrote about that today through the documents and how. They said, this is for market position. This is a for technology, your talent or anything. We just bought this and that's something that base said again, yesterday he was just very clear. It's like, yeah, we do buy things market position, which is like so insane just here like the richest person in the world. But like, yeah, we're buying market position. It's just what happens. That's another one I have mixed feelings right, and by the way, people should read McKenna story because those documents have just a very funny breakdown like the pros and cons of buying. Buying ring in many of the cons like what if this turns into nest, which if you're just the verge cast listeners like it's just like the Keyword Bingo, but it's fine to say, we're buying market position like this isn't the best product out there, but it's the category of video. doorbells is not huge, right? So to by the the market leader in video doorbells is maybe the most rational use of the money. What is the problem that you think the committee was trying to show an address sense of we're just going to market position. Pointing out, they can just do whatever they want and how casual it is, and there really isn't. It's really funny to read an email like that, and we could buy it or we could just copy it or are. We could just watch. You know that was one of the emails that base from someone. Those are just three options you know and it's like just pick and choose you know. Pointed out like a lot. Just that email itself really pointed out just how easy it is for them. They used a lot of that time history to talk about copycat behaviors and to talk about just like you know buying up competitors and it just seeing that all in one little e mail having to do with the ring was like really i. think it was really kind of I opening and especially like useful for the committee. So Amazon got hit a lot for the data collection side of it of copying competitors. bezos did not seem to have great answers there. Right. So that's the. The thing they got in trouble with this. There is that Wall Street. Journal article from like April where employees were literally like, yeah. We dip into data and we use that to guide our own private label products and everybody was like Whoa and Amazon basins. Yesterday said, well, we do have a policy that bans that but giant pointed out yesterday. It's like, okay. So what's your enforcement look like you can have the policy, but like if you don't enforce it, then it's like meaningless. And then yesterday I. Think Paul was like, can you give me a yes or no answer? Do you dip into data and he's like I can't I can't give you. Yes or no, and we're just like we're looking into it. The story had anonymous sources. So that isn't very helpful to us. You know what I mean. So that was one of the main things and that Wall Street Journal article and I think it's the same kind of examples in the committee's documents. They point out specific examples like car trunk, organizers of all things. It's like weird little products like Amazon's like this is a little hot. Maybe we should do that. So I, I think. I, think they made a good case yesterday. Yesterday on that. Yeah. I mean bezos brought up that Wall Street Journal, Article himself twice, and he was like, well, your policy against it. But I can't guarantee never happened. Then there is a strange just didn't come across clear I. Think I know what the committee was trying to get at their like US aggregate seller data when there's only three sellers and then only to sellers? Yes, I. Think what they're getting at is when you're down to the aggregate data of two companies, you heard effectively looking at individual data. What is the problem? They're like the I get what you're doing. You're just reducing the denominator to get to one, but like it, why is that particular problem? Right? Well, none of these. Dipping into individual seller data and looking at aggregate data. That's not a legal. There is no law. This is all voluntary of Amazon. So they have a voluntary policy where like we can't do individual seller data, but they say nothing against aggregate and aggregate what you're getting at eight. Here you is. Does the same thing if it's just like some goofy little product they. They bring up pop stock. It's all the time before pop tops in a moment. Right? There's only like one pop. So company like you know pop soggy, it was kind of an innovative product. It's like well, if there's only two of them and use the aggregate data, you you you have everything you need to know you know about that product line looking aggregate. If that's what you decide to qualify as do you as you're looking through the other Amazon documents and other stuff. So anything jump out at you is something the committee was trying to prove or get at. The questioning seemed very focused on. Like are you using the state at a copy products? Are you buying things? You shouldn't buy. There's one question which I did not understand why came up about DMC. Take downs on twitch and Jeff as just had this look of panic in his eyes. He's like I don't know man I bought Wedge because my kids want to. Do something like that was like the side show stuff, but the real focus here, it just seemed like it was definitely in the marketplace, right? Amazon, everyone came at Amazon for the marketplace. That's what everybody knows him as like they have all these little sides. They got rain. They got Alexa Alexa was one thing too. That was kind of interesting. It's like. Are you buying things like ring to put Alexa into and dislike expand your like Titan Ism as like an Internet Internet connected home. Thing and make that more closed off and walled gardening. That was one thing. But no, it was just focusing on how much power they have to kind of change. What happens in the marketplace to kind of decide what companies in what products are able to come up on the first page of results. You know that's also something that they dug into Google and in something that one of those like themes that kind of ties everything together. We should say they all spend a lot of time talking about counterfeit goods, and why is it Amazon removed? Fake stuff from the platform and how much is it profiting off of you know selling pick rolexes? Is it surprising? The whole foods didn't show up at all they're. Like that is a really massive thing. Amazon owns that. Is it moving into a huge new product category? I think whole foods is not an online marketplace, which was the title of the hearing, not that that restricted anybody from doing anything except that, one of the things Amazon says is we have lots of competition from offline marketplaces, right? Brought up kroger a lot I mean, this is the case he's point. They all made. It seem like they were beset at any moment. They could be crushed by the likes of stop and Shop Right? Like I think the point though was really on the. Digital. Experience Consumers have and like I, don't know Ho-. Foods fits. Into that narrative, especially, because it is itself not dominant like they bought it because you needed to grow in their. Good at that at my question for you on the Amazon stuff was when you think about, we talk about two thirty a lot right like you and I in particular spent a lot time to thirty, which regulates with the platform can do with content. There's not really an equivalent of two thirty for goods on store. Right like there's some case is out there saying like you're liable for what what happens on your online store page, but Amazon doesn't have that like second order of like Messi nece around it that twitter and facebook to with two thirty, I. Mean, it gets invoked a lot for marketplace's, but it's way messier. Well, I just wanted to like this question at counterfeits question about ranking the store like they are even more free than any twitter is to to sort tweets algorithm. Algorithm clear to modern like it just their store. Do you think that they're like that Algorithm transparency? Your wire things ranked. Did you catch a sense that that's where the regulation is GonNa go. So much of the conversation around Amazon really felt like it was individuals sellers being wronged for reasons of Amazon being unresponsive or stealing. It's data. So I don't know it didn't. It didn't seem like a really big focus of the hearing, but it is a huge deal. Yeah. The, digital marketplace frame of this, which is where we have talked to. Cellini. That's where he's going right like facebook and Google very digital. They have like they don't do physical goods. Really. Apple is the APP store. It's all digital goods. Amazon is the one where it's. Front to a lot of physical things, and that is the only place where I can see this regulation needing to make some sort of like major meaningful distinction in I. Didn't see it in the hearing, but I was curious of you caught a glimmer of it. I'm not positive that they have to make a huge distinction there like depending on what they come up with because. So much of this is about their companies and whatever product they produced. The issue is more or less whether or not they're being surveilled and unfairly by targeted and crushed by that data surveillance. All right. We have gone for forty minutes. We should take a quick break. I said I wasn't going to go by company and it happens. So we should come back and talk with facebook Ango. We'll be right back. This is advertiser content. When I say utopia what comes to mind. Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the perfect social body. Every Body Matt Place. Everybody happy now while the peacock original series, brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. A concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago. 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These are really difficult crazy stressful times, and if you're trying to sort of cope, it could be helpful to find something that gets beyond like doom scrolling and like obsessive worried. But digs into what is really going on underneath the surface, and that's what the weeds is all about I. Matthew Yglesias. Weeds podcast here on the box meeting podcast network. This is podcast for people who really want to understand the policy debates and policy issues that shaping our world. We've seen now more than ever like how relevant policy is to our actual lives, but so much in the news isn't focused on really understanding and explaining detail way if that sounds good to you, join us for the weeds, every Tuesday and Friday to find out what's going on why matters and what we can do about it. You could download the weeds on apple spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Tracy. When it comes to facebook I turn to you. FACEBOOK is patience consumer of startups as what we've learned. Yeah. But you said something to me yesterday was interesting, which is everyone else's problems are forward looking and it feels like facebook's problems are actually in the past break for people explain what you mean. Yeah. So when Congress is looking at any trust with respect to these four companies for three of them, it's It's sort of about the marketplaces that their operating right now with facebook, the question is much more about should we have allowed it to buy serum? Should we have allowed it to buy WHATSAPP and most of the antitrust conversation that was around facebook yesterday was all about that. What did Mark Zuckerberg know about Instagram, and when did he know it? We wrote a story based on some documents that the house released yesterday. In which facebook has clearly identified instagram as a competitor. In at least some ways and wants to go after it and knock it off the table, and so that's kind of where the focuses their facebook and Burke did get a lot of other questions yesterday, but it tended to be much more about content moderation and things that don't have a lot to do with antitrust. So there was weird section where they asked the face. Face Research APP in the novel, Vpn? Any kind of got lost well, explain what happened and I'm curious reactions. Yeah. So facebook has a bunch of nifty tech tools to figure out what's trending which APPs or the kids using, and so that can essentially have an early warning system if it needs to consider acquiring something or more likely in these days, go out clone it. and. So Zuckerberg was asked about the way that the company uses these systems and if they are anti competitive I, think you know traditional antitrust law probably would not say copying an APP feature is anti competitive, but could lobby written in the future about it shirt I. Think the one that caught me was I mean, this is what I'm. McKenna's points from earlier is like one of the themes here is, are you so dominant that you can collect data that's unfair and then use that to crush or killer competitors, and definitely bought the Inaba VPN to do it. That's true. Now, when I've asked executives at facebook about this, what they'll say is they don't get surprised anymore. When you have three point, one billion people using your apps around the world. You know what links they're sharing, you know what they're talking about. And so you're not going to need some kind of specialized tool to know that WHATSAPP is really taking off. Right. So they would argue that, yes, these tools were useful to them, but you know at their scale, they know what's popular now, which doesn't really seem like addresses, the problem is reached. The fact that we're so big that we're all knowing is maybe not the defense that they sometimes presented as so here's what I didn't get. I thought, Zuckerberg I want to the instagram. What's about who's issues, but on the facebook research front, the data front, they him about this APP facebook research, which you were giving to teens. They were deploying with an enterprise certificate that story broke apple revoke the certificate, and all of facebook's internal APPs went dark, and this is a scandal story after story about it, they went on for two days. So I can I, don't recall that APP? Just how he you know, he remembers the day that all facebook's internal APPS went down and people couldn't go to the cafeteria. I would agree I found that answer. Extremely, ed? Persuasive. that. Do you think that was like actually strategic for him to be like, I, don't know and then come back later and correct the record I do remember when that happened I. Mean. I really don't know I mean also you know during a six hour hearing, it's also possible that you just you get flustered or you miss here something or or something because. Yeah. As as you say, I'm sure he remembers the day that apple turned off their internal APPS I mean. Honestly. Seems like an opportunity to talk about apple's market power, and the fact that you know a day of work canceled at facebook because apple got mad. But I think most of the CEO's didn't go into yesterday a wanted to pick fights with each other. It was kind of sad that they didn't. I was Kinda hoping that Tim Cook take a shot at soccer burger. Point that the other two APP platforms I was expecting it. It was there. It was. There was all there. So cellini ended and he ended the whole meeting with closing statement. He said, some of these companies didn't get broken out. They all need to get regulated in the off too much power that some of them I. don't these breaking up apple. What sort of break. Right like. The division get sent into the corner thing about what it's done. Right. Does should spin out the finder team I've always wanted to. A clean is always that they want to. They want the APP store to be separate from the IPHONE. Basically, that's the thing I always hear. Can't break I. Think you can write some strong regulations but not playing you're on store, right. But like Elizabeth Warren's point was it's cleaner if it's two companies, but it's still a gigantic remedy that I don't think there's a lot of like like consumer or public opinion is going to walk into an Apple Cup I think you'll radio at marketplace. It seems very clear that we says some of them she broken up he is talking about facebook. I have a twenty percent conference level. He might be talking with Google and Youtube as well. But if he's going to say some of the need to get broken up like it's facebook, did you hear anything yesterday that supported that conclusion or Saudi stocks I? MEAN HE I don't remember which Republican it was, but he was like the Obama FTC looked at this and they said it was minding love. Obama. Right. Like. Why would we go back in time to relook at I? Mean, there is a belief and I mean. Somebody who thinks there could be a lot of benefit in instagram and WHATSAPP being different companies from facebook. And the reason you ask. So many questions about that acquisition as you're making the case that it never should have been approved in the first place, and so now you need to remedy it. So that was actually like the entire thrust of the argument against facebook yesterday. I think, you could probably make just as good a case that Amazon after spin out aws, but lawmakers chose not to make that case. Yeah. I think that also gets into. Politics of the acquisition of the time. To his credit is like nobody knew instagram would actually be a success like we made it a success. It didn't happen by itself. I, don't know if the lawmakers. By award, these guys said, but I don't know that he actually made that case very persuasively. and. Who knows I mean? That's like anything could have happened. Right? Cram could've stayed independent and rapidly grown and overtaken facebook like that's something that could have happened. It could have kind settled into a middle zone like snapchat or twitter seems more likely to me although I think probably would have been bigger than those two but. You're never going to know I mean it is true that facebook gave Mike and Kevin it instagram enormous resources. A lot of the reasons why Mike and Kevin sold was because running tiny startup that's blowing up is absolutely exhausting Mike. Krieger. was dragging his laptop all around San. Francisco. Because the servers were melting at all times of the day whenever Justin Bieber. Posted like the site stopped working and they really we need help. Finding a person who can quickly fix this? So we don't have to like that is the reason that they were entertaining these offers and wanted to sell it. So that is also thing that happened. Do you think that that same kind of argument or approach can apply to what's up? What's up basically did not come up yesterday and all the focus on Instagram, but that's the other one, right? Yeah, and we know weirdly a lot less about that acquisition I. Think it's because people in America just have so much less love for what's APP generally. That, it's never seemed as important. What happened to WHATSAPP as what happens to instagram even though WHATSAPP, is used, you know way more, it probably has way more engagement even than instagram does so I don't know why that didn't come up as often. We know there was a competitive bidding war for that as well. Goule. Wanted it as well. You know Mark Zuckerberg made them an offer, they can't refuse. Do you think everyday Google's we should've spent more money on what's whatsapp like this could have been solved. Should have, but Google has been placed under an ancient curse that prevents them from ever making the right decision about any social product. So it was doomed never to happen. It's fun looking through the documents and watching them casually say they should buy facebook dot com. Yeah, that. Point. That is how they talk like the window into these executives just casually being like we should just this thing or maybe not, or we should just copied ourselves and kill it before it gets any traction like it's repeated over and over again last facebook question. This one is like harder to parse because I. There's a chance, it's October is just joking around but. But. He's in many of these emails. He's like the thing about startups, as you can always buy them, which I think the committee thinks is a smoking gun, right? Like facebook's entire plan is to buy the competition to get the data from wherever they get it to say, oh, man, this apps popping, we just buy it and kill it before it competes with us. I. Think he actually said at one point. That's a joke. Yes, he did and I believe that you know it was two thousand, twelve, right? He was probably still in his mid twenties. At that point, the company was a lot smaller like people were joking around like there's more loose talk when companies are younger and I do think. It was it was part of that. I think the more interesting question becomes. Let's say facebook is telling the truth about everything. Let's say they thought it was going to be a successful acquisition, but they never knew it was gonna big as it became today and they invested in it and it got super big. Okay. Well, now, it's as big as it is. Should they be allowed to keep? Keep it or should they be forced to spend it out and if you're GONNA force them to spin it out. What's the argument that you'RE GONNA. Make about why one question that I have a lot is clearly the referral they're gonNa make, and it seems like if you don't have some other reason, we've heard hints that there's some other reason, the FTC scrutinize this that will eventually be revealed. But what you're saying is the antitrust standard at the time, the Consumer Hartman stand, which is still our standard. Says, you have to prove prices will go up both products for free. You're screwed. Right? There's nothing to review because you're not gonNA prove prove that free products are gonNA get more expensive. I think it's pretty unfair if you change the standard and you go back in time and say you missed that standard. So I think there has to be something else there. Well, what was the standard by which at and T. was broken up? Right? Like presumably at and T. didn't used to be that big, and then it just got really big and then they broke it up at least. That's the thumbnail understanding I have of that break-up. Well, yeah. But then reformed itself. Right. But because of lax antitrust regulation, right? Like it wasn't a naturally occurring phenomenon that all those APPS got back to the other or was that just sort of like inattention to capitalism It's like in the seventies and eighties. This is Tim moves book the cursive bigness in the seventies and eighties Robert Bork I can't talk about Robert on this podcast. Are we doing this right now. Robert was very influential judge Appellate Judge Federal Appellate? Judge. And basically moved the antitrust law to the consumer harm standard as part of a movement called and economics. A whole thing Robert. Bork. Mostly famous because he was not appointed. He was nominated Supreme Court by Reagan but they leaked video tape rental history, and then he didn't get nominated and that is where the expression getting bork's comes from. This is all true Netflix's still has to abide by videotape data privacy act is a whole. This is all true when facebook and Netflix had some partners, Nansen? Partnership. To. Automatically share your net flicks, watch history to facebook. They're like pending the change of this law which we are working on Robert Bork. He haunts us all. I'm sorry, I can't believe this much. Yeah I. think that's just like the law changed in the in the seventies and eighties, the standard change. The conversation right now is a very much about changing it back months and months ago, pre pandemic, we had an economist from I. Think it was Nyu Thomas Philippon came on the show, and he was like look you have this natural ab test going on in the world where the European Union when it formed was like, how do we get an economy like America's? So, we'll just take their competition policies pretty good, and at the same time we changed consumer harm standard. So everything you're seeing the EU is basically our old competition antitrust standard in. You can see how active they are in everything. Here's a new consumer welfare standard. Whether you believe, this is actually a functional Ab test given. The state of both governments is up for debate, but that was his point I thought. It was spare can say.

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Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

The Vergecast

46:42 min | 6 months ago

Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

"Everybody from the British. Ask this week's interview. Episode has any Greenberg senior writer at wired. He just SORTA book called Sand Worm New Era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's Miss, dangerous hackers, it is all about hacking group inside of the Russian government called San Worm. They were responsible for the most damaging cyber warfare attacks over the past year there behind not PECI. The hackers took out in the mayor shipping line hospitals across the U. K San has totally escalated. What we think of Cyber War, and he's book gets all into how they were discovered how they were flushed out the. The intricacies of these various hacks. It's super interesting. The book is a thrill ride. If you're looking for something that isn't the virus. This is like a thriller, a highly recommended. It was really fun to talk to her about the stuff. one thing I. WanNa know we're all at home so during this in every might hear some kids in the background. I asked you just be a little forgiving that we're all. We're all dealing with it and he was a great interview. Check Out Sandy Greenberg of sand worm, a new era of cyber war and the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous hack. Any Greenberg your senior writer at wired you're also the author of Sand Worm, new era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous. Welcome glad to be here so even writing about cybersecurity frontier I think you just said two thousand six and writing about Cybersecurity, but this book sand worm as I was reading it. It seems like it's called the new era of cyber war. It seems like there's been a huge turn in sort of state-sponsored. Particularly Russians sponsored cyber attacks. How did you come onto that notion? How did you begin reading this book I'm I'm very curious how you see. See that turn happening well. In late twenty sixteen, my former colleague Kim Zetter she had been the one who really covered state sponsored hacking in cyber war stuff, but she left wired, and this was also at the time. When you know Russian hackers were meddling in the US election, they'd hacked the democratic. National Committee and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and the Clinton Campaign, so my editors were really primes on face, mantra hacking all of a sudden, but what they? They really what they told me they wanted was a actually like a big takeover of the whole magazine. All about cyber war, but cyber war to me is different than those kinds of espionage election, meddling tactics so I went looking for no real cyber war story, which means to me like a actual disruptive cyber attacks, and as I looked around. It seemed like the place where that was really happening was in Ukraine not really in the US in fact maybe. Maybe what was happening in? Ukraine seemed to me like it was in some ways, the only real full blown cyber war that was actually occurring where Russian hackers were not just attacking the election which they had done, they tried this spoof the results of a presidential election, but they had also attacks media and destroyed their computers. They had attacked government agencies and tried to like destroy entire networks, and then they had turned off the power for the first time. In December of two thousand, fifteen, the the first actual blackout triggered by hackers, and just as I was look into this happened again the the effect, the seem hacker group caused a blackout this time in the capital of Kiev so I wince looking in Ukraine for this cyber war story that. Turned into a cover story for wired that kind of gave editors what they wanted, but then also kept unfolding This cyber war kept growing in scope and scale and. The original story written for wired was kind of about the fact that you could look to Ukraine to see the future of cyber war that will what was happening. There might soon spread to the rest of the world. And that is actually what happens to like just after we publish that cover story to same hackers released this climactic terrible cyber attack in Ukraine. Called Not Petiot that spread beyond Ukrainians became the worst cyberattack history cost ten billion dollars, so when that happened, that was when I saw that there was potential to do a book about this that it was not just a kind of case study about Ukraine or even kind of predictive story, but a an actual full story arc about this one group that had carried out the what I would say was not only the first. First Real Cyber War, but the worst cyberattack in history and the you know I wanted to capture the the Ark of that story in the effects, the real experience of cyber war. Yeah, so the group is called sand worm in this is just one of the the sort of opening arcs of the book is how they've come. They come to be named this because references and code walk people through just like it's so. relatable that like even these hackers are using using this language that leads them recalled Sandwich Tell people about it. So when I started to look into the origins of this group after that second blackout attack I I found that this this company called eyesight partners which have been acquired by fire I I, said partners was the first to find these hackers in twenty, fourteen, basically using fishing in kind of typical espionage tactics, plant malware in the networks of typical Russian hacking targets like groups across Eastern, Europe and NATO in a look like what they were doing was just kind of typical espionage. They were planning. This by wear calls lack energy buds will first of all they could see that they were rushing, because they had this server that they were using to administer some of these attacks and they. They left the server, so anybody could look at it in. There was a kind of Russian language to file for how to use black energy on the service, so these guys seem like they were rushing, but even more interesting in some ways. was that they to track each victim each instance of black energy? This malware has little campaign code in each campaign was a reference to the science fiction novel Dune and you know so like one of them was something about Iraq is, and then one of them is about the sutter cars, these like imperial soldiers in in that SCI FI universe so I said partners named this group sand worm, because well just because it's a cool. Name associated with doing, but it turned out to me. It became this very powerful because a sandwich miss this monster that lies beneath the surface, and occasionally arises from underground to do terribly destructive things. partners didn't know that at the time, they they soon afterward realized what sand. was doing was not just espionage, but they were actually doing reconnaissance for disruptive cyberattacks. They were also hacking power grids. They were planning black energy, not only in the European Eastern European targets in the US power grid networks as well. The Ultimately Syndrome was the first twenty fifteen to cross that line in use black energy as the first step in a multi step attack that led to a blackout. So this was not just espionage really was kind of like you know this monster that rises from under the ground to do terrible acts of mass destruction that came to pass so one of the things that comes up over in the book. Is this growing sense of dread from security researchers and analysts? Oh this is an imminent threat to the united. States just Ukraine, but like this is happening here and then there's a sense that the United States actually open the door to this kind of warfare with stuxnet. which was an attack on Iran? How how did those connect for you that it seemed like there's a new rule of engagement new set of rules of engagement for cyber warfare that actually the United States implicitly created with with stuxnet by attacking Iran. Yeah, I mean I tried to highlight. Clearly sand worm are the real bad guys in the story, they are the actual hacker group that did these terribly reckless destructive attacks that actually in some cases put people's lives at risk, the kind of in some parts of the story they actually shutdown medical record systems and I. Think may have cost people's lives with cyber attacks today they are the actual antagonist here, but I also want to highlight the ways that the US government is is partially responsible for the state of Cyber War, and there are a few ways that that's true. I The US! Open the Pandora's box of cyber war with stuxnet. This piece of now where that. That was used to destroy Iranian nuclear enrichment centrifuges that was the first piece of our that actually have caused that physical disruption destruction, and we now see Sandra doing the same thing in Ukraine. In in fact, in some ways around the world, also the the US hordes, these kind of zero day, secret hacking techniques, some of which were stolen and leaked and used by sand worm, but then I think the in fact, the biggest way that I tried to highlight that the US is responsible or complicit or negligent. Here is that we did not call allows what Santorum was doing in Ukraine and say to Russia. We know what you're doing. This is unacceptable. Nobody should be turning out the lights. Two civilians with cyber attacks. There wasn't a message like that I. mean the Obama White House sent a message to Russia over this kind of cyber hotline to say your election hacking is not okay. We see what you're doing and we want you to stop, but they said nothing about a tube blackout attacks in Ukraine, and that was kind of implicit signal to Russia. They could keep. Keep escalating, and even as all the cyber security, researchers and Ukrainians were warning that what was happening to Ukraine, would soon spread to the rest of the world, the US government ignore this both Obama, and then the trump administration until that prediction came to pass and a sand worm cyberattack did spread to the rest of the world, and it was too late, and we all suffered globally as a result, so let's talk about patch it. WAS CATASTROPHIC IN SCOPE, right? It took out the mayor shipping line, which is a massive business. It took out some hospitals in UK like it was huge in scope. I don't think people really put it all together. Talk about how it started and how big it grew. Yeah, so not too was kind of like big apotheosis sandwich, where all of these predictions of the terribly destructive things they were doing to the rest of the world came to pass but it did it started in Ukraine. They hijacked this. The the software updates of this accounting software called me doc that is basically used by everybody in Ukraine. The quicken turbo tax of Ukraine. If you do business in Ukraine, you have to have this installed, so sanborn hijack the updates of that news to push out this worm to thousands of victims mostly in Ukraine, but it was a worm, so it's spread the mmediately end quickly kind of carpet bombs. The entire Ukrainian Internet's every computer at spread to would encrypt permanently. You could not recover the computer, so it very quickly took down pretty much every. Every Ukrainian government agency twenty two banks multiple airports for hospitals in Ukraine that I. could count and in each of these cases. What is eight took them down. I mean it destroyed essentially all of their computers, which requires sometimes weeks or months to recover from, but then as you know, this is a worm that does not respect national borders. So even though it was, it seemed to be an attack intended to disrupt Ukraine. It immediately spread beyond Ukraine's borders. Borders to everybody who had this accounting software installed? That was doing business in Ukraine and some people who didn't so that includes Maersk. The world's largest shipping firm and Fedex and Mondelez, which owns cadbury, NABISCO and ranking manufacturing firm that makes tylenol in Merck. The Pharmaceutical Company in New Jersey on each of these companies lost hundreds of millions of dollars. The scale of this is kind of difficult to capture but I in the book I tried to. To I focused in part Maersk because it is just a good company to look at because you can. They had this gigantic global physical machine that is they have seventy six ports around the world that they own as well as these massive ships that have tens of thousands of shipping containers on them. And I told the story of how on this day seventeen of their terminals of were entirely paralyzed by this attack with ships arriving with just. Piles of containers on them. Nobody could unload. Nobody knew what was inside of nobody knew how to load or unload them with around the world of seventeen terminals, thousands of trucks, Semitrailers, carrying containers were lining up in Lyons miles long because the gates that were kind of checkpoints to check in the these trucks to drop something off or pick it up. They were paralyzed as well. This was a fiasco on a global scale is responsible for a fifth of the world's lable shipping capacity. They were truly just a rendered brain dead by this attack, but yeah displayed out at all of these different victims MERC had to borrow their own each vaccine from the Center for Disease Control because they're manufacturing. Manufacturing was disrupted by this, and it ultimately spread to a company called nuance, nate speech to text software. They have a service that does this for hospitals across the US to dozens of our possibly hundreds of American hospitals at this backlog of transcriptions to medical records that were lost because of this, and that resulted in patients, being do for surgeries or transfers, other hospitals in nobody knew their medical records were updated. I mean this was scale where hundreds of hospitals each of which has thousands of patients missing changes the medical records. We don't know what the effects of that work, but very well could've actually harmed people's health. Our lives I mean the scale of not petty is very difficult to. Get your mind around, but we do know that you know monetarily cost ten billion dollars, which is by far the biggest number we've ever seen, but it also had this this kind of harder to quantify toll on people's lives, so it it you know you read about it at length and wired. Obviously these companies go down of ripples in mainstream sort of general press, but I don't feel like people really not like Oh. This Russian group called San Worms sponsored by the Russian government. Unleash this attack in it caused this cascading effect of failure and disaster cost in that because we know what we can attribute it to the government, our government. I don't feel like that connection got made for people. What is the gap between other as a hack and Oh, this is actually a type of warfare engagement, because that that connection seems very tenuous. I think for a lot of people. Even as sort of the more general mainstream press covers this stuff. Yeah, you know. I don't think that that's is just like the nature of. Of Cyber War I think that was a failing that that lack of connection is a failing on our government's parts, and on you could say even on the part of some of these victims like these large companies I mean I at the time did not pitch it happened. I was fully on the trail of standard within days. I was talking to cyber security researchers who? Who had piece together? Some of the forensics to show the not petiot was Sandra that it was a Russian state-sponsored attack in yet none of those companies that I mentioned mercker Mondelez or Maersk or Fedex, or any of them wanted to say the Russia had done this to them and know governments were talking about either like the Ukrainian government was. They're always willing to point. Point the finger at Russia, but the US government was not, and you know that to me seemed to be just kind of I mean I felt like I was being gas. Let's at that point. I had watched Russia due to Ukraine for a long time at that point tonight. I sort of understood that NATO in the West. We had this kind of cruel logic that. Ukraine is not us. Russia can do what it likes to Ukraine because they're not NATO not e you. They are Russia's sphere of influence or something I think that that's very wrongheaded, but at least it made sense. You know to have that that viewpoints, but now this attack had spread from Ukraine to hit American soil American companies in many cases and yet still the US government was saying nothing I just thought this was bizarre and you know so i. For months I was like. Trying to get any of these companies to tell the story of of their experiences, not Peta I was trying to figure out why the US government wasn't talking about the fact that this was a Russian cyberattack and ultimately I. Think it was I. think it was kind of I know partly disorganization negligence. I think it may have something to do with the fact that the. The? Trump administration doesn't like talking about Russian hackers for obvious reasons, but eight months after it took eight months ultimately for the US government to finally say not that it was a was Russia it was the worst cyberattack in history, and then a month later. The White House impose consequences in put new sanctions on Russia and response, but it took nine months and more importantly it took. Multiple years this without was the first time this was twenty eighteen, and the Russian cyber war in Ukraine had started around the fall of Twenty fifteen, so that's just incredible span of negligence when the US government said nothing about these escalating unfolding. Acts, of Cyber Award that there should have been unacceptable from the very beginning I mean these are the kind of quintessential acts of state sponsored cyber attacks on civilians, trying out the lights. You know that's the kind of thing that I believe that the US government should have called out and drawn a red line across at the very beginning took ears, so I do think it was a big failing. Of of diplomacy, it just seemed like that part of the problem, and this is kind of an expression is it's so hard to describe like if the Russian government sent fighter jets to America and live their support. Okay, like everyone understood, you can see it. You can understand what happened there. In the you know, there's like a however many decades of movies about how to fight that war. This is a bunch of people in a room typing. Like it there's just an element of this where the dangerous Oh federal where the attack is invisible, and while the effects might be very very tangible, the causes are still sort of mysterious people so. My question is who is sandwich. What what do we know about them? Where do they work? What are they like? Do we have a sense of how this operation actually operates? In some ways the the biggest challenge of reporting this book, and I spent essentially the third act of the book, the last third of the reporting of the book, trying to answer the question of who is in worm, who are these people? Where are they located? What motivates them and I guess to partially spoil the ending here. They are a unit of the year you. They are a part of Russia's military intelligence agency, which is responsible for you know, this is not a coincidence. They are responsible for election meddling responsible for the attempted assassination of You. chemical weapons in the United Kingdom they're responsible for the downing of a seventeen as commercial passenger jet over Ukraine were three hundred innocent people died on the G. R.. You are this incredibly reckless callous out military intelligence agency, but they act like kind of almost just cut through mercenaries around the world. Doing Russia's bidding in ways that are very scary, so I threw essentially like a combination of excellent work of a bunch of security researchers who I was speaking to combined with some confirmation from US intelligence agencies, and then ultimately some other clues from the investigation of Robert Muller into meddling all these things combined created the trail that led to one group within the JERE. You that were you know I? Eventually had some names and faces even address of this this group, and all that was actually only finally fully confirms After the book came out Justin in recent months when the White House finally actually was the State Department's. End as well as the UK on Australian and other governments together finally said yes, sand worm is in fact that this unit of the year you so this theory that I developed in positive near the end of the book was finally basically confirmed by governments just in recent months. So one thing that strikes me at that is I, think of the Russian military things. Gru is being foreboding being obviously, they're very very good at this other a buttoned up in then they have like a incredible social media presence that kind of POPs up throughout the book that distracts from what doing. They set up Gucci for two point Oh when they were doing the DNC hacks that fed to wikileaks in the. That account insisted it was just guy. They set up the shadow brokers which was. I read. It is just like your some goof-balls like they wanted to seem a lot dumber and a lot smaller than they were. They were very effective at it to people I. Talk About those that strategy, and then I guess my question have is like a re better at seeing that strategy for what it is well. You make a really interesting point. The uses these false flags like throughout their recent history that we I should say we don't know that they were responsible for shadow brokers. In fact, nobody knows who shot a brokers. The shadow brokers truly are, and they are in some ways the biggest mystery in this whole story, this one group that hacked the NSA apparently and leaked a bunch of their zero day hacking techniques, or maybe they were even say insiders. We still don't know the answer to that question, but the other other incidents you mentioned. That are you are responsible for this Guja for two point zero fake hacktivists leaked a bunch of the Clinton documents. They're responsible for other false flags like they at one point to call themselves the Cyber Caliphate pretended to be Isis. They've a pretended to be like patriotic pro. Russian Ukrainians at some point they they're always like wearing different masks ends. They're very deceptive. in the a later chapter of the book, some of the biggest one of the biggest attacks they. They did was this attack on the twenty thousand Olympics where they not only wore a false mask, but they actually had layers of false flags where as cyber security researchers W. This melwert was used to destroy the entire back end of the two thousand eighteen winter Olympics. Just as the opening ceremony began, this was a catastrophic events. The aware had all of these fake clues made look like it was Chinese or North Korean or maybe Russian. Nobody could tell it was like. It was this kind of confusion bomb almost designed to to just make researchers throw up their hands. Give up on attributing mallards. Any particular actor was only through some amazing detective work by some of the analysts that I spoke to the able to cut through those false flags identify that sand was behind this essentially, but yeah, it's it is a one very real characteristic of the jury you that they are almost they seem to almost take pleasure or like be showing off their deception capabilities to and their evolving those capabilities they are getting more deceptive over time as fake gets more, destructive aggressive. Advertising content when I say Utopia what comes to mind? Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the Pathak social body. Everybody in that place. Everybody happy now. While the peacock original series brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. The concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. 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Not Connected Right, but the way they throughout the book the way they execute East campaigns they're deeply connected, and that seems like not only just a new kind of warfare, and you kind of craft, but some just consistently seems to work in surprising ways like the tech press is GonNa. Be Like Gucci. I says this and we're. There's never that next step of also we think it's Russian government, and that seems like first of all I'm dying. I imagine the meeting right. I would love to be a fly on the wall of the meeting where they decide what their twitter name is going to be today. I'm very curious how they evolve those attacks in such a way that it just seems to be more and more effective time. Yeah, I mean. I also love to have been those meetings in. It's my one kind of regret in this book that I never actually got. Interviews, it's almost an impossible thing to do. They liked find defectors from the R., you or something. He will tell those stories at a knock it murdered I mean. It's kind of a possible, but but. In some cases? I think your earlier points. They almost seem kind of bumbling in these things they do them in a very improvisational way. for two point Oh seemed almost like it was a justice thing they invented on the spot, tried to cover up some of the the accidental ups like they had left russian-language formatting errors in the documents that they had leaked from the DNC, so they admitted this guy who appeared the next day and started. Talking about being a Romanian. Friends as motherboard Lorenza, Franceschi decry he started this conversation. Align with with Guja for two point, oh basically proved at the guy could not actually properly speak Romanian. BE Russian speaker. In fact, it was. It was almost comical at the same time. They're using very sophisticated hacking techniques doing destructive attacks on a massive scale, but they're also. They seem like they're kind of making it up as they go along. They do things that don't actually seem very kind of strategically smart. They kind of seem like they're trying to impress their boss for the day. Sometimes with just like some sometimes, it's just seems like the Jere. You wakes up in asks themselves. Like what can we blow up today? Rather than thinking like? How can we accomplish the greater strategic objectives of the Russian Federation? So they are fascinating in that way and very stringent colorful group. That's I think one of the biggest questions I have here is. We spend a lot of time trying to imagine what flat and Mirror Putin wants. You know when he grows up, but it. None of this seems targeted like what is the goal for Russia to disrupt the Winter Olympics right like. Is there a purpose to that? Is that just a strike fear? Is it just to? EXPAND THAT SUV influenced. Is it just to say we have the capability furious is there? has there ever really been the stated goal for this kind of cyber warfare? That one is particularly mystifying. I mean you can imagine why Russia would want to attack the Olympics. They were banned from the two thousand Eighteen Olympics doping, but then you would think that they might want to attack the Olympics and send a message maybe like eight deniable message a message that you know if you continue to ban us. We're GONNA. Continue to attack you like like any terrorists would do, but instead they attacked the winter. Olympics in this way, that really seemed like they were trying not to get caught, and instead like make it look like the was Russia North Korea? And then you have to like what is the point of that was? The could kind of. Sit there in Moscow and kind of like rub their hands together in gleefully. Watch this chaos unfolds. It almost really does seem like it was petty vindictive thing that they just for their own emotional needs wanted to make sure that nobody could enjoy the Olympics if they were not going to enjoy them I that was, but that one is i. think outlier in some ways for the most part you can kind of see. The Russia is advancing. The G. R. You that sand worm is advancing something that does generally make sense which is that. In Ukraine for instance, they're trying to make Ukraine look like a failed state. They're trying to make Ukrainians. Lose faith in their security. Services are trying to prevent investors globally from funneling money into Ukraine trying to create a kind of frozen conflict, as we say in Ukraine where there's this constant perpetual state of degradation. They're not trying to conquer the country, but they're trying to create a kind of permanent war in Ukraine and would cyber war. You can do that beyond the traditional front end. It is in some ways the same kind of tactic that they used in other places like the US which. which here we saw more than influence operation that they were hacking leaking organizations like democratic campaign organizations and anti doping organizations to kind of so confusion to embarrass on their targets. They're trying to influence like the international audiences opinion these people, but in Ukraine, it is in some ways, just a different kind of influence operation where they're trying to influence the world's view of Ukraine. Influence Ukrainians view of their themselves under government to make them feel like they are in a war zone even when their kid hundreds of miles from the actual fighting. That's happening on the eastern fronts in the eastern region of. Of Ukraine so in a book you you you go to Kiev. You spent time in Ukraine. Is there a sense in that country that while sometimes light goes out sometimes our TV stations. Their computers don't boot anymore. Because they got rewritten, the Hydros got Zeros like. Is there a sense that this is happening? Is there a sense the defy back is there does Microsoft deploy you know dozens of engineers to to help fight back. How does that play out on the ground there? Yeah, I mean to be fair. Ukrainians are very stoic about these things and regular. Ukrainian citizens were not bothered by you know. Know a short blackout. They didn't particularly care you know. This blackout was the first ever. Hacker induced blackout in history but Ukrainian cyber security. People were very unnerved by this end, people in these actual utilities were traumatized I mean these attacks were truly like relentless sins very kind of scary for the actual operators at the controls I mean in the first blackout attack. These poor operators Ukrainian control room in western Ukraine they were locked out of their computers, and they had to watch their own mouse cursor. Click through circuit breakers, turning off the power in front of them I. Mean They watched it happen? At these kind of Phantom hands to control of their mouse movements, so they took this very very seriously, but yet Ukrainians as a whole I mean they have seen a lot. They are going through an actual physical war. They've seen the seizure of Crimea and the invasion of the east of the country. You know the the date hits. A Ukrainian general was assassinated with a car bomb in the middle of Kiev, so they have a lot of problems, and I'm not sure that cyber war is one of the top of their minds, but not patio I. Did, actually reach Ukrainians normal. Ukrainian civilians to it. It shook them as well. I talked to two regular Ukrainians. who found that they couldn't swipe into the Kiev Metro. They couldn't use their credit card at the grocery store. All the ATM's were down The Postal Service was taken out for every computer that the postal service had was taken out for more than a month. I mean these things really did affect people's lives, but it kind of. A until that kind of climactic worm. Not Patio for I think for this to really reach home for Ukrainians. who have kind of seen so much. How do you fight back? I, mean I one of things that struck me as I was reading. The book is so many of the people you talked to people who are identifying the threat. They're actually private companies. Eyesight was the first even detect it. they are contractors to intelligence agencies the military in some cases, but they're not necessarily the government right like it's not necessarily Microsoft. Who has to issue the patches from the software not necessarily GE which makes simplicity, which is the big industrial controls talk about a lot. How does all that come together into a defense because that seems like harder problem of coordination? Yeah, I mean defense in Cyber. Security is in an eternal problem. It's incredibly complicated, and when you have a really sophisticated determined adversary, it know they will win eventually ends I. think that they're absolutely lessons for defense in this book about you know. Maybe you need to really really think about software updates for instance like the kind that were hijacked to a with this medoc accounting software. As a vector for terrible cyber-attacks. Imagine that like. Any of your insecure apps that have kind of updates can be become a a piece of Malware, really unique to signature networks need to think about patching on. There are just an endless kind of checklist of things to every organization needs to do to protect themselves so. In some ways that just like a Sisyphean task and I don't. I don't try to answer that question in the book because it's too big, and it's kind of boring as well, but what I do really hammer on is the thing that the government's really could've done here. which is to try to establish norms tried to control attackers through diplomacy through kind of disciplinary action through things like kind of Geneva Convention for Cyber War if. If you think about a kind of analogy to say like chemical weapons, we could just try to give everyone in the world a gas mask that they have to carry around with them at all times, or we could create a Geneva. Convention norm that chemical weapons should not be used in if they are than crime, and you get pulled in front of the Hague. Hague and we've done the ladder and I think that in some ways should be part of the the answer to cyber war as well we need to establish norms and make countries like Russia or like organizations like the G. Are you understand that there will be consequences for these kinds of attacks, even when the victim is not the US or NATO or the? The EU and I think we're only just starting to think about that. One of the questions I had as reading is it seems like a very clear red line for almost everyone you talk to is attacks on the power grid right? That is just unacceptable. You should not do it if you do it. You've crossed a line and there should be some consequence. Is, that clear to governments. Is that something that our government says? It's something that the says it has been established. It seems like it's it's the conventional wisdom wants to salvage, but I'm not unclear whether that is actually the line that exists. It definitely has not been established, and when I kind of did these I managed to get sort of interviews with the top cyber security officials in the Obama ends trump administration Jay Michael Daniel was the cyber. Cyber Coordinator for the administration was the kind of cyber coordinator boss in the The Homeland Security Adviser for trump and both of them when I asked him about like wiped. Why didn't you know to put it bluntly like? Why didn't you respond? When Russia caused blackouts in Ukraine? Both of them essentially said well. You know that's not actually the rule that we want to set. We want to be able to cause blackouts in our adversaries networks. In their power grids when we are in a war situation or when we believe it's in our national interest, so you know that's the thing about these cyber war capabilities. This is part of the problem that every country. Absolutely the US among them isn't really interested in controlling these weapons, because we in this kind of Lord of the rings fashion, we are drawn to them to like we want to maintain the ability to use those weapons ourselves and nobody wants to throw this ring in the fires, of Mount Doom. We all wanted maintain the ring and imagine that we can use it for good in out. So that's why neither administration called that Russia for doing this because they want that power to. Make the comparison to to nuclear weapons but Negotiated drawdown and treaties with Russia in the past we count warheads where aware that the United States stockpiles can destroy the world. Fifty Times over today maybe tomorrow one hundred hundred like what we have a sense of the the measure of force that we can. Put on the world when it comes to nuclear weapons, there's a sense that Oh, we should never use these right like we have them as a deterrent, but we've gained out that actually leads to his mutually assured destruction like there's an entire body of academics. There's entire body of researchers. Entire body is got scenario planning with that kind of weapon. Does that same thing exist for for cyber weapons. There are absolutely. Know community is of academics. Policymakers who are thinking about this stuff now, but I don't think it's kind of gotten through to actual government decision. that. There needs to be kind of cyber deterrence in how that would work. In in the comparison to nuclear weapons is like instructive, but not exactly helpful. In fact, it's kind of counter-productive because we cannot deter cyber-attacks with other cyber-attacks i. don't think that's GonNa work in part because we haven't even tried to establish it yet. There are no kind of rules or read lines, but then I think more importantly. Everybody thinks that they can get away with cyberattacks that they can. They're going to create a false flag. That's clever enough that that when they blow up a power grid, they can blame their neighbor instead, so they think they're. They're gonNA. Get Away with it, and that causes them to do it anyway. A not fear the kind of assured destruction so I think that the the right response, the way to to deter cyber attacks is not with the promise of a cyber attack in return. It's with all the other kind of tools we have, and they've been used sometimes, but but they were not in the case of Sand Werman. Those tools include like sanctions which came far too late in the story indictments of hackers. In some cases, we still haven't really seen syndrome. Hackers indicted for the things that they did in Ukraine or or even not petty. And then ultimately just kind of messaging like calling out naming and shaming bad actors, and that has happened to some degree with Sandra, but in some cases there have still been massive failures there there has still been no public attribution of the Sandwich attack on the twenty eighteen Olympics I mean. My Book has been out for months. I think show pretty clear evidence that syndrome is responsible for this attack. The very least it was Russia and yet the US and Korean War, These Olympics took place at UK, none of these governments have named Russia as having done that. That attack which almost just invites them to do it again whenever our next Olympics are going to be, I guess maybe not this year, but if you don't send that message than you're just essentially inviting Russia to try again so I think might my big question is what happens now? I mean right we you write about. The NSA has tailored access operations, which is their elite hacking group. We are obviously interested in maintaining some of these capabilities. We've come to a place where people are writing books about how it works. What is the next step? What is the next? does it just keep getting worse or does this kind of diplomacy you're talking about? Is that beginning to happen I? Think there is some little glimmers of hope about the diplomacy beginning to happen I mean this year in February I think it was the State Department's called out a sand worm attack on Georgia, where a worms hackers basically took down a ton of Georgian websites by attacking the hosting providers as well as a couple of TV's broadcasters in the US. State Department with a few other governments not. said this was sand. Worm named the unit of the GRU. That's is that was confirmation that I've been looking for for a long time, but they also made a point of saying that we're calling this out is unacceptable, even though Georgia. Georgia is not part of NATO or the U. so that's that's progress. That's essentially creating a new kind of rule. That's state-sponsored. Hackers can't do certain things, no matter who the victims and that's really important. Also, it was kind of interesting because federal officials like gave me a heads up about that announcement before happened, which they have very very rarely do and I think they were trying. To say was in we. We read your book and we. Got The message okay like Stop attacking us about this like we're trying. We're doing something different here I. Don't want flatter myself that I actually changed their policy, but it did seem interesting that they wanted to tell me personally about this so i. I think that like maybe our stance on this kind of diplomacy is evolving, and we're learning lessons, but at the same time we also see the attacks evolving to. To and their new innovations in these kinds of disruption happening, we've seen since some of these terrible Sandra attacks. You know other very scary things like this piece of our called Triton or crisis that was used to disabled safety systems in a oil refinery in Saudi Arabia on that was you know that could have caused an actual physical explosion of petrochemical facility? The the attacks are evolving to okay final last real question. Tell people where they can get your book. You can find all kinds of places by on indie Greenberg Dot net. Written another book as well previously, yes. That's right. I wrote a book about wikileaks. Cypher punks and things like that. That's right well. I'm a huge fan. It was an honor to talk to you. Thank you so much for coming on I know it's. It's a weird time to be talking about anything, but the coronavirus I was very happy to talk about something else, which is that it seems a little bit more in control Even if it is quite dangerous, a thank you for the time. I appreciate it. Yeah, I'm glad to provide people with a different kind of apocalypse as a distraction.

Ukraine United States Russian Government Nato Olympics Kiev United Kingdom Sandra Cyber Award State Department Kim Zetter Barack Obama Clinton Russia San Worm Sandy Greenberg NSA DNC
"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

Lush Life

01:48 min | 6 months ago

"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

"The week. Our cocktail of the week is the most modern summer Greek cocktail. There is the name kind of gives it away. The gene, GIN and tonic. Start by opening your new bottle of stray. Dog Wild Jen. And then pour two ounces of stray dog into a glass filled with ice. Then, twist open, one eight ounce bottle of Greek owned three cents, a Jan tonic and top up your jen with. Garnish with one sage, leaf and orange slice and then. Yama us. If you're confused by the US use of. How many milliliters to us, you can find a downloadable cocktail measurement converter on my website, a lush life manual dot com, where you'll find this recipe, more gin and tonic recipes, plus all the cocktails of the week as wells links to all of the ingredients. So bars restaurants are finally opened in London. But who really wants to go on the tube or boss to get to one. Thank. Goodness I petite sued, which just opened on my street and owned by one of the great bartenders in town. You'll know where to find me. If, you live for lush life, make sure you're giving back to the bars you love by donating are taking part in cocktail delivery where you live. Theme Music for Lush Life is by Stephen Shapiro and used with permission. and. Lush life is always and will be forever produced by Ego Tara and simpler media productions..

US jen Stephen Shapiro wells London
The Distraction of Technology & How To Live In The Moment

Optimal Living Daily

04:08 min | 7 months ago

The Distraction of Technology & How To Live In The Moment

"Olinda by Josie Michelle Davis of Josie. Michele Davis DOT COM. Hiking through the rain forest can be a magical thing. The lush greenery all around the far off sounds of bird. You've only ever seen in a zoo chatting with one another the light ray on your face, and the deep smell of Mossy rocks. Was Not so magical is getting stuck in a downpour under a lean to with a woman named Linda who insists on calling everyone. She's ever met and loudly talking to them about how her arthritis is putting a bit of a damper on her dating life. I don't mind rain for few minutes million and stood together under the lean to watching the rainfall with only the steady beats of drops falling around us. Love the sound of rain, probably because I'm fairly privileged, Weicker, whose only really bad experiences with rain were when it put a bit of a damper on our families day at Epcot and I had to buy children's large sweatpants because my jeans got soaked through seriously, though why does it always rain on Epcot Day I mostly fine rainstorms charming in even calming, and was perfectly happy to stand with. My husband's arms wrapped around me watching the rain until it slowed. And then Linda came I'll standing on the edge of the lean to looking down the hill, when a middle aged woman came towards me, waving frantically and yelling. I found. You is still attempted to hide behind frank, which doesn't work so well since I'm a nearly six foot tall shreve ago, the woman quickly realized that me and my husband were not the date that she had lost on the mountain, but decided it was best to hang out with US under the shelter, anyway. I did what I always do. Awkward social situations an promptly pretended I'm deaf mute and have no way of communicating with other humans so I might as well just face the opposite direction and watch the rain. Some are and hope you don't insist on talking to me. Linda was not hindered by us, not budding up to her, though even though we were thousands of feet up the side of a mountain, she somehow had the teeny tiniest bit of reception on her cell phone, which made it possible for her to voice to text. Leave rambling voicemails and call everyone she's ever met. We heard all about her date that presumably had abandoned her and left her for dead in a Puerto Rican rainforest. We heard about how she was aggressively trying to get a CO worker to spend more time with her. Despite this woman spurring her advances, her words by the way, and we heard her lament about how tough dating is when you have arthritis in your hands. It was awkward to say the least after five minutes that felt more like an hour. We decided to venture into the pouring rain and hike as swiftly as we could down the mountain in fear that Linda might catch up to us, and we would be forced to listen to more phone calls and dictated text messages. I couldn't help but think how incredible it is that you would hike through the rainforest in still be unable to put your phone down and enjoy what's around you, but if I'm totally honest with myself, I do that, too sure. I don't make phone calls unless absolutely necessary. Why can't doctors just text you anyway? And I certainly am not going to voice to text in public when my hands are perfectly free. I mean come on guys. Why even bother texting at that point, but I'm sure way more often than I realize I'm standing somewhere amazing and beautiful. Too Busy scrolling through Instagram to even notice. I'm not someone who thinks technology is evil, quite the opposite in fact I have no desire to get rid of my iphone or live in some remote cabin without Internet I think all of that stuff is awesome. Actually I believe instagram has truly pushed me creatively. I love that I can check out an e book or Audio Book for my library and read it right on my phone. Heck without the Internet and aim I wouldn't have had half my boyfriend's. The real question is am I able to disconnect when real life calls am I able to put down my phone and enjoy the sound of rain in the actual rainforest when his right there in front of me. I really hope so, but maybe Linda was there to remind me to pay attention and not miss out on what's happening. So thanks Linda I really. We'll try to be more present this year, and also we'll try my best to avoid arthritis by whatever means necessary.

Linda I United States Michele Davis Olinda Josie Michelle Davis Instagram Weicker Frank
"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

Lush Life

02:21 min | 8 months ago

"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

"Bidders company. Tune in next week to hear it all. For now, you'll have to be content very content with her incredible cocktail of the week. Our cocktail of the week is the fermented pineapple south side. The South side is usually ginny. Many Limi- mix, but not surprisingly lauren has raised it to a whole other level by adding in fermented pineapple cordial. You'll need to add the following to a shaker. Sixty miles of tanker number tenjin. Two dashes of bittered slain grapefruit and hops bidders. Six Min leaves. And thirty miles of her fermented pineapple cordial. At is to the Shaker and shake shake, shake and double strain neat into a coup glass. Garnish it with grapefruit cheek with a threaded mint sprig. To make fermented pineapple cordial. You'll have to go to a lush life manual dot com, where you'll find this recipe more recipes and all the cocktails of the week as well as links to all the ingredients. If. This cocktail doesn't want to make you go out to ferment something. I don't know what will. I've never fermented anything I've pickled stuff like cucumbers and carrots pretty easy. But there's something about this cocktail. That really has me. To ferment something. If you live for lush life, make sure you're giving him back to the bars you love by donating are taking part in cocktail delivery where you live. The music for life is by Stephen Shapiro and used with permission. And Lush life is always and will be forever produced by Yvo, Tara and simpler media productions. which leads me to say, the wise words of Oscar Wilde? All things in moderation, including moderation and always drink responsibly in wash your hands day say. So next week. We're back with Lauren as she wins the Dr Joe world-class Canada final an she chooses. The flavors are bittered sling bidders. Until that time bottoms off..

lauren Dr Joe world-class Canada Oscar Wilde Stephen Shapiro Yvo
"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

Lush Life

04:03 min | 8 months ago

"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

"Lush life manual dot com. Now let's get locked in and ready to go with Mosh was born and raised in Prague Czech Republic I was really little. I was really suffering. Whatever the Hay fever and with Asthma actually in the time as well so I spend my birthday in the hospital. So let's not like Louis at 'cause like all my stories is like really big rollercoaster. So so just get ready for the opposite and so Nobody's it always end up bell and it always end up really good. So don't worry. Yeah so Yeah I will suffering with with these diseases are are dysfunctions so my parents made me to go to learn how to swim. 'cause it was basically only one thing which I could do or like once bit a spot or like one activity On Yeah Yeah I. I just started to swim even before school when I was five years old. It happened that it was big bottle of my life in the end so I will spread the good day I go some Talland I made it in and the swimming team in brock and I was I was pretty good I was free junior a champion in Czech Republic in a swimming butterfly Honda two hundred meters. So I have lots of sports sport bigger around Bremmer school was was Regla. Absolutely normal so. Did you think that you were going to be a professional swimmer? Like Olympics and train and train and train until then I will. I was dreaming for that Definitely US I had hopes on. I was working really hard for that. So definitely as My father bitsy himself in me so he would also effort than a than a bless him for for everything would eat it for me Goals since my eight year olds it was every single day waking up at five o'clock in the morning and I will jumping into water at six o'clock so it will slow so sacrifice from my family's thanks for that and it will just amazing About a swimming from really young age I sorta Kinda Kinda like going to work Saw I haven't seen that like something. Special is a sound. Founded like yeah. I'm just going to sway him and I'm working like breaking out like crazy of just part of my life. I haven't seen that something special until I will. I will saw and so did you think I saw you studied physical education. Yes yes what did you think your future would be before getting into the bar industry? Yeah so the On the primary school are I haven't really seen the way to go. Solo Everything about the computers so what actually started studying. It By founded furred year that I will never be good at it so You know I kind of I kind of backup from that finished at high school and then start. Fidel video of Physical location and It helps the swimming again.

Prague Czech Republic Mosh swimming Asthma Fidel Olympics Bremmer brock Louis Regla
"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

Lush Life

01:45 min | 9 months ago

"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

"Leave <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> one bottle untouched. <Speech_Female> For <Speech_Female> Classic Negroni <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> infuse one bottle <Speech_Female> with one to two <Speech_Female> whole peals of <Speech_Female> your favorite citrus <Speech_Female> fruit. For at least <Speech_Female> a week <Speech_Female> and then start <Speech_Female> tasting it daily <Speech_Female> until it's perfect <Speech_Music_Female> for you <Speech_Music_Female> infused <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> bottles with two <Speech_Female> three grams of your <Speech_Female> favorite dry spice <Speech_Female> for <Speech_Female> at least one hour <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and then start tasting <Speech_Female> it hourly <Speech_Music_Female> until you love <Speech_Music_Female> it. <Speech_Female> Giorgio <Speech_Female> like say Sean Pepper <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and last <Speech_Female> but not least <Speech_Female> infused one <Speech_Female> bottle with fifty <Speech_Female> grams of your <Speech_Music_Female> favorite fresh herbs <Speech_Music_Female> for at least <Speech_Female> one day <Speech_Female> and then start <Speech_Female> tasting it daily <Speech_Female> until you <Speech_Female> love that one to <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Giorgio <Speech_Music_Female> used eucalyptus <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> store those <Speech_Female> in the fridge and when <Speech_Female> they're very cold <Speech_Female> enjoyed them <Speech_Female> as you wish with <Speech_Music_Female> or without <Speech_Music_Female> ice <Speech_Female> you'll find <Speech_Female> this recipe more <Speech_Female> classic recipes <Speech_Music_Female> and all the cocktails <Speech_Music_Female> of the week at a lush <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> life manual dot <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> com. Where <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> you'll find links <Speech_Music_Female> off the ingredients? <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Female> I've been <Speech_Female> so inspired by <Speech_Female> John. Kaczynski's youtube <Speech_Female> show some good <Speech_Female> news. <Speech_Female> The generosity <Speech_Female> of people has been <Silence> incredible. <Speech_Female> My <Speech_Female> friend Gregory Benjamin <Speech_Female> has been bringing <Speech_Female> food deliveries to my parents <Speech_Female> for at least <Speech_Female> a month <Speech_Female> and knowing someone <Speech_Female> is watching out for them. <Speech_Female> When I'm <Speech_Female> here <Speech_Female> well. There aren't any <Speech_Female> words. <Speech_Female> If that <Speech_Female> doesn't make you WanNa buy <Speech_Female> his award winning Jams <Speech_Female> Marmalades <Speech_Female> than I assure <Speech_Female> you the taste <Speech_Female> will <Speech_Female> you can find <Speech_Female> them at preserves <Speech_Female> and Marmalades Dot Com <Speech_Female> and I highly <Speech_Female> recommend the dark <Speech_Female> and stormy Marmalade. <Speech_Female> Please <Speech_Music_Female> support <SpeakerChange>

"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

Lush Life

02:14 min | 9 months ago

"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

"Tables though to gas though. Listen to feedback so I do whatever it takes to make them happy and leave them a memorable speeding well. I can't wait to see you back in the bar so walking was gonNA save a Bloody Mary for me and thank you so much for joining me curious. Thank you for having me. Of course it would have been remiss of me to not ask him where he loved to drink around the world. You WON'T BE SURPRISED BY HIS FIRST ANSWER. So if you had to drink anywhere else but the connaught of course. I don't know what are your favorite places around the world so I always divided the world in three session. I think now I can dividing full you. There's no choice you know the columbine the US will be the nomad by in New York. Asia is Menachem Biden Singapore and my latest discovery. Is Maybe semi talking about Australia. It was so lovely to have George on my show. You can find a few of the Connor signature cocktails already on my site. A lush life manual dot com from when I interviewed. I go put on the director of mixologist for this week. I asked Georgia what he recommended for those with a little bit of time on their hands are cocktail of the week is Georgia's flight of the new GRONYEA's to begin with you'll need for empty bottles and a big bowl. Then start by mixing together in your very big poll. Seven hundred and fifty miles of SIP. Smith Chen seven hundred and fifty mills of Martini. Rubio seven hundred and fifty miles bidder and seven hundred fifty miles of stillwater. Mix those together and you're very big ball and then split those equally into four different bottles..

Georgia Asia US Smith Chen Rubio Connor New York Australia stillwater director George
"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

Lush Life

03:04 min | 9 months ago

"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

"I got chatting to the guy sitting next to me at my level to wine and spirit trust class. The place you go when you want to learn about the INS and outs of distillation and the history of some of your favorite spirits as you do I sparked up a conversation with the Italian by asking him what he did and then he said. I'm a bartender at the connaught hotel and at that moment I knew we would be friends Susan Schwartz. You're drinking companion and this is lush life podcast. Every week. We're inspired to live life on cocktail at a time by everyone in this industry yes that fateful day about three years ago. I met George. Oh Bar Johnny now head of mixologist. At one of the most famous bars in the world the coconut bar in London. We've remained friends ever since and I have longed to have him on the show. Learn a little more about my fellow student who I found out began his career by polishing plates. Before we begin you can find links on how to donate to some of your favorite bars during this rough time on the homepage of my website. A lush life manual DOT COM now to George O. Who I am sure you will realize very quickly is sitting in his garden. So I'm from Pisa as well as multi in the art of too skinny very famous worldwide for the tower beating. The wrong way. But you know that our has been our luck for the lobster the nominee under the ads because people WANNA CPO in is risk cdn and that's really Of of my beginning of my begun because my family has always been been Restaurants and shops in general like my father always had most of their lives the restaurant scene my CPA and my mother family the perform shop so far Food and drinks the always the parcels of me of my background. I'm not from Like Vati complicated background. I mean my family is about easy people and the steelers ended to beauty of them and spa always being very good dealing with people that that's what make my main background you know socializing was it just assumed that you would go into hospitality because of Your parents having restaurants Not really because when I was very young I was very good at school. Psych until high school was studying law. The wanted to study a lot. I think I changed my mind when I was fifteen..

George O. steelers connaught hotel DOT COM Susan Schwartz London Pisa
"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

Lush Life

13:53 min | 9 months ago

"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

"Hudek of maybe Sammy and Sydney and global coffee ambassador of Mr Black had a passion like no other for coffee and coffee cocktails. He kept it under wraps until winning the world. Coffee in good spirits award in two thousand seventeen since then. He's gone on to move to Australia. Open an award-winning Barbizon. And Win The international bartender of the year through the miracle of modern science. I was able to interview him in Australia. And discover what led him to go down under? And how is coffee? Loving became spiritual before we begin. You can find links on how to donate to some of your favorite bars during this rough time on the homepage of my website. A lush life manual dot com. Now it's time to hear from Martin. Do you know that I have known you for almost three years? Which is crazy because we met when you were at the final of the world class. Uk The audio. And you were our our bartender for the night all my life. Isn't that crazy? And you know what I realized that. Even though you're my friend I consider your friend because I know you for so long. I know absolutely nothing about you except for you have a beard now. You live in Australia. The global brand ambassador for Mr Black. And you've done at maybe same. You've done won all these awards so I. WanNa know how you got there? So why don't you tell me a little bit about your upbringing and where you grew up and we'll go from there yeah cool. That's Tristan Lega. It's been yet two thousand seventeen. June Jim southcenter remember. That is beautiful. Time it's long time ago but It's true we know each other since then and That year was one of the most Forgettable one but I'll get to that And immediate soon so I started out. I started with my origin because many people are confused by accident that you know like. Aw You must be Swedish even the diluted menial like blue eyes blown a hat and even a in Australia be confused by origin. Nasa's Central Europe Slovakia Fora for other friends which are not familiar with Slovak May Be Czechoslovakia. Might come up in their minds but replace it was centrally over Eastern Europe Working Working University for more than ten years Studying University or culinary school where You learn about all topics from the kitchen to the restaurant. The Bar Barista a reception. Basically everything I graduate as a chef and we diploma show and to be honest right after I finish my studies in two thousand eight nine ten hours like good. I'm going to the kitchen. Obviously I should be in the kitchen and I headed so much that after three weeks I went to the pharmacy and About this fake bandage for my arm. So look like my arm is broken so I put it on my arm and I went to wearing. All guys SORTA had broke my arm. Mike and working kitchen anymore. you're going to pay me some money 'cause now. I'm on a on a sick leave and election forever. Since for the reason you cannot be boy. Yeah well and by the way by the way you're going way too fast we gotta go back a little okay because already practically in London. Okay so groping Slovakia. Did you always WANNA do hospitality? Was that something that you Dreaming About No. I was dreaming to do musicals and an TV show was basically doing anything. What he's around Art Sambre Artistic Person? I had the band for like five years. I was lead singer. I did the I did some. Tv shows like voice or factor in some countries. They call it a made it to almost semi finals in national TV Then I went for some Like musical events and I tried to get the role. I I applied for Art School a painting school by my parents were like Nah. I shouldn't do it. You know it's not a safe job In our country that are not earning money. Should something what you're going to have paper from and that's culinary school and I did that. I got that paper and once had this paper in Slovakia. You speed it easy to find job. 'cause you have like a staff yes? You know how to Cook Biting Slovakia. When I was cooking for those three weeks I hated it so much. You know because now I have a question. There's a lot of things that you can do We had you cooked before at home. Did you make drinks at home now? It's just like something to do something to do I was. I was interesting in coughing cocktails. Obviously by these kind of naive junior level. You know at school doing these sort of IBM competitions in following the rules. And you know the six color drinks with big army. She's than I was pretty successful. I was like one of the best Baristas bartenders at school. But it's easy because like it's cool right. There's other life but once you step out of these a naive junior competition life and you walk into reality of everyday job then you realize the competition is there you know your guests you know they want something which you how to do it and it sits right. He was real challenge. So right after studies. Because I didn't want it to work in the kitchen. I start working at local cafe so in my hometown working local coffee shop and in Slovakia coffee shops are not famous for making cocktails or drinks. Like you serving coffee from the morning until night people drinking wine. Maybe some mostly hard spirits offseason beers. And of course like I had this dream to do cocktails and do Martinez Annette. Groening's by own creations During that you know in my part of the country and and I was in legal. Coffee Shop Almost five years and I always had this dream that one day discipline. I'll be small for me and I want to grow up and challenge myself and go somewhere. You know go somewhere where I can really see how bad or good I am. And in those five years in Slovakia I became like one of the top Slovakian bought at which is easy. 'cause like ten of US you know. Beg Holy still in that little town yeah L. Still in the little town and our capital city practice law was on the other side and I was always travelling competitions. And I won't couple of them you know. I went to Cuba. I went to Sweden. I went to so many places because I was out of the basin Slovakia but again it was very easy. It was kind of naive way of being the best by country. But I had this idea. It's time for Change Stamford at a challenge. That's when a London came into my mind than changed my life completely. How'd you been to London before? One of the competitions never never apparently a one. I want beefeater competition and the price will saw finals in London. But meantime our supposed to go there for finals. I move there and establish a new career sell it. Did you pick London? Because you just thought this is the center of Creation Right now. Exactly it will. It's yeah. It was a makeup cocktails and it still is and I took as well advantage of having many friends. There has been no Czechoslovakian communities very big around the world especially in London in every big bar. Begging SOM- some Czech or Slovak and I was relying on the fact that if I'm going to text them and be like hey I'm thinking to move and take another challenge in my life which you recommend me something so I sent capital messages. The big names like Alex. Cortina Marion Becker. Rusted Survey Threats right and one of them was because Eric Lawrence and I didn't expect an answer But the one of the most busiest guy on the Earth Eric Lawrence. He responded to me thirty five minutes and he was like yeah might have something for you. It was like Oh cool so maybe some little coffee shop next door. Maybe I can be like far beggar kitchen porter the civil and he was like well. Actually if you know about Tim Walker Legacy Weiner he's leaving and we looking for replacing. We're looking for senior. Bartender was like eight possible. I can apply for the job. I didn't even speak English and I don't even know what he's become legacy competition for example in like an and he still like. Would you be interested? I was like well. Okay I'll try so for those of you. Listen Grind if you think to get job at the Savoy is like very easy and just for knowing someone like arrogant being counter like him. It's kind of advantage. It's not Eric. Just recommend me and put my name on the list from many many other people. And what question question had you ever met him. Personally I met him five years before or free as before in. Slovakia won the local award for like a like a young rookie rookie of the year like superstar the young talent and he gave me the trophy and finding out that. I like the trophy thing happened again last year in December in China. We'll get to that But I might like once or twice and I met you once in progress. Peter Derelict everything some presentation and I and I make a picture with bitterly Eric and me and that was in two thousand fourteen and posted on facebook. Our of all the stuff that a past present and future you know with a big ego big ego while he was kind of squished your margin ause like thing like hoping for hoping. I had this kind of dream you know to be next the demo work with them. So yeah I met Eric I wouldn't scalding friend or someone. He knows knee or something like that. So yeah he pulled by name there and that was like Friday on Sunday. I did the first part of the Hiring process which was the online literally. Two Days. Later yeah. I did psychological tests which is through the online agency to from the US sixty questions. Each question is like thirty seconds. And it's more about your Charisma character who you as a personality. The Personality. Nothing about bartending questions lied. It's through that you have a tidy house yes no I dunno et Cetera. And then question fifty five. You walked to the room and there is a paper on the floor. What would you do? You pick it up or you leave it. Ignore it to draw so like the testing you know. What kind of person I you and then on. Jesus Day Eric Texts me. And he was like congratulations. You pop psychological tests. You are right feet and personnel before American Bob. Now would you like to come for a personal interview in London and I was like. Oh my God. I've never been in London a Yes. I would like to come and he was like so when I was like come tomorrow so I booked the flight tickets on Tuesday like super expensive lighting and day after Wednesday. I came to London clean shaved bleeding for my neck because they didn't have to clean. I bow tie for my cousin jacket from my father. I good luck. I didn't know how to get there from Tropical Gust grabbing which direction on the street. I came too late and Alice like so stress. And then Eric just showed me the bar manager. Declan mcgurk still about manager and berate the Savoy and then he introduced me to him. He took me to the Office. This little tiny office in a jar and I think through with him with. Hr People that interact with the food and beverage director as free different people and again like almost nothing about cocktails like I was getting ready. You know like learning. All the classes dreams Everything it was more like personality and You must weird and remind I guess. They just assume that you've already been in competitions. You know how to make a cocktail you know. It's really can you get along with us who've been here for a while and are you. You Know Savoy word the I guess yeah and I remember when declan asked me okay so now we are done. He would go downstairs with kind of drink. Which like to have and I was like I would have orange juice or water. 'cause like I was reading about interviews. Have you should be able to say. Oh come on your you want and I said like I would like to have a moonwalk though. 'cause that's the classiest drink from nine by Joe Gear more dedicated the moon landing and it's kind of celebrate the trump injuring and I remember a sub there in the bar like free our sippy One drink during every safe and also there was an hank. hungry that. I'd like free And it was forgettable moment than dafter flew back to Slovakia. My phone went of judge. Didn't have a battery. I got law. I couldn't get to the airport. I was just like all my guy was such a hard time and I go back there after the Slovak at Thursday was working legal cafe and the last phone call from. Gm of the hotel. He was in for some work trip so toward the phone. I had to convince him on. The right guy was like last. You know like stamps. Yes he's right guy and then Friday thirteen November two thousand fourteen. He was eleven thirty five in the morning. I was in the car on the way to PROC the Czech Republic for Coffee Festival. And I got the message from Eric. Congratulations welcome in the best. Buy Team in the world. And I'd like a baby. I cried like a baby and Manti later ten of December. Two thousand fourteen. It was Wednesday or Thursday afternoon. I did my first sheep. American bar is a senior bartenders. Now I heard an urban myths and I don't know if it's true or not that I read that the first Martini you ever made was at the Savoy. Your first shift. Is that really true? Yes probably true for Israel. Botany by someone. Who are there? It was devoid so no one ever ordered a Martini at the cafe. Where you worked before. Now people are drinking straight GENE HUNDRED MILE. Triple shots like the straight. Gin and beer..

Slovakia London Eric Australia Savoy US Mr Black Uk Barbizon Sydney Central Europe Slovakia Fora Martin Eric Lawrence Sammy Cortina Marion Becker Czech Republic Nasa Tristan Lega Sweden
"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

Lush Life

01:32 min | 9 months ago

"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

"Can make it pretty by sliding the lemon wheel to the glass edge. You can find this recipe more easy recipes and all the cocktails of the week at a lush life manual dot com. Where you'll also find all the ingredients in our shock. Most of you don't know that my partner is a separate while we've been stuck inside we've been trying our hand at making some Cipriani cuisine number one black-eyed peas carrots and potatoes. I talked with loads of olive oil. Salt and lemon juice and olive oil. Pack Tuna as good as it is. It tastes that little bit better in Cypress accompanied by glass of local white wine and the sun on our faces if you live for lush life when you consider supporting us by buying us a coffee just go to buy me a coffee dot com slash lush life and you can donate once or monthly to make sure we're still here. Every Tuesday the music for lush life is by Stephen Shapiro and used with permission and lush life is always and will be forever produced. Yvo Tara and simpler media productions which leads me to say the wise words of Oscar Wilde all things in moderation including moderation and always always drink responsibly. Yes I said it again and wash your hands and stay safe next week..

"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

Lush Life

14:59 min | 11 months ago

"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

"Twenty years ago a bar was born in New York City. They changed the way we drink today. Two years after that it arrived in London fast. Four those twenty years and milk and honey in London is still open and justice cutting edge as it was all those moons ago. Our guest today not only manages that legacy but as creating his own Susan Schwartz you're drinking companion and this is lush life podcast every week. We are inspired to live life on cocktail at a time by the best in the Industry Pierre Marie Basaltic hold a special place in my heart. Not only is he general.

Pierre Marie Basaltic London Susan Schwartz New York City
"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

Lush Life

13:19 min | 11 months ago

"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

"The idea of sitting in a trendy breezy and bar in the eleven arondissements waiting for the author of many of the world's best selling food books and the first ever food blocker could make anyone's knees slightly tremble but then our guest today walked in with a big smile on his face and said Vaujour Susan Schwartz you're drinking companion and this is lush life podcast every week. We're inspired to live life on cocktail time. By the best in the Industry David Lieber vets is known to every chef Home Cooke Baker and lover.

Vaujour Susan Schwartz David Lieber Cooke Baker
"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

Lush Life

15:34 min | 11 months ago

"lush" Discussed on Lush Life

"Wait right there. This is the second episode of to where we meet a bartender at the top of everyone's game so if you want to hear the first part of his journey stop and go back to the previous episode. Oh did I mention Eric? Lawrence's at bartender. Susan Schwartz your drinking companion and this is lush life podcast. Every week. We're inspired to live life. One cocktail at a time by the best in the industry. So we left Eric at the doors of the connaught hotel wondering whether he would take the leap as history shows. He did and from there his career skyrocketed into the stratosphere landing where.

Eric connaught hotel Susan Schwartz Lawrence