37 Burst results for "Lulu"

Fresh update on "lulu" discussed on Forum

Forum

00:44 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "lulu" discussed on Forum

"Came. We're trying this hour by E. Joma Lulu, whom you may know from her best seller. So you want to talk about race in Louis New book, She dissect the roots and manifestations of white male identity and power by asking what happens to all of us when generations of white men are told they deserve power? Regardless of skill or accomplishments, and when success is defined by status over women and people of color. The book is mediocre. The dangerous Legacy of white male America. Andy Jo Malo. Welcome to forum. Hi. Thanks for having me your new book is quite different from your book from 2018. So you want to talk about race, which was almost a guidebook of sorts for having difficult conversations about race. It flew off the shelves again in 2020 after the killing of George Floyd. And I've wanted to ask you how you felt about that. Um, you know, I would say I felt the same way that many other black writers who suddenly saw their their works playing officials felt, which was kind of heart broken in a way. I don't think any black writer wants their book to reach the best seller list because a Black man was murdered. It was troubling, you know, and and heartbreaking And it was. You know, it was really hard to find joy in that moment, but You know, we do, Of course, Want to see people engaging with our work s so they could start to do their own work towards deconstructing racism. But you know it was. It was heartbreaking to realize that so many people could have been engaging this whole time and it took such horrific ends for people decide to And do you see this new book? Mediocre. The dangerous legacy of white male America. Do you see this as Necessary advancement of that conversation on race. Yes, I do think that you know this is He has problems that are similar. We're talking about race and gender, right? And I think that we really can't separate the two when it comes to you, American society and I think that this is looking at, you know, not necessarily the conversations we need to have. But how we need to investigate our society and our role in society and what we value is a society And so I think that you know, books have different purposes and So you wanna talk about race was kind of a guide book. And I would say that mediocre is more of a diagnostic s O. So describe the ideas and beliefs at the core of this system that promotes what you call white male mediocrity. So I would say it's important to recognize that this system is first and foremost an offshoot of hyper capitalism in the West, when you have a system where you have to get people in idea of success, so that they played their part in it. And yet, you know that the majority of profits and you know, measurable well being from the system are still going to go to top investors and you know people at the very top of power. You have to offer up something else and what has been offered since the birth of this country to the majority of you know, white men in this country has been power, the semblance of power over women and people of color. But you know, it only accounts for so much, but when it's all that you have, it's what you're going to. And so when I came to show is by continuing to define our in success in this way, we harm everyone and we harm our society, our environment in ways that you know we need to be looking at and addressing because it is quite deadly. Do you see the recent insurrection as A manifestation of this idea of this sort of animating force in our system. Absolutely. And I would say that you know, it was interesting for me to watch it because as this was unfolding, you know, when I was writing my book, I Became really afraid. When I was talking about issues of You know militias in the West Wing When I lived in Washington State's looking at you know these these areas were white men are kind of holding onto these guns and waiting for this battle that will show that once again, they have power over women and people of color. This. This kind of thing becomes inevitable when you look at time and time again how often there's this rise up against programs that woman and people of color of making, and so it did not surprise me. I mean, you know, I don't think anyone was prepared for what we saw. But when in looking at our history, it didn't surprise because I've had this sense of foreboding and this kind of general panic and say, Why don't we looking at this address in this it is going to you reacted violently, and I don't think this will be the last time you see it either. Yeah, one of the things that made me think of that was just reading about How one of things that this create this sense of deserving power. You know, wealth status, Regardless of whether or not you deserve it, whether or not you have skill or talent. That it created a deep sense of entitlement that's divorced from her merit, but a deep sense of entitlement that you know felt like it. It took a really brutal form in that insurrection. But I'm also struck by the fact that you you talk about, you know, varying degrees of this you you've talked before about how sort of over, you know, racist or gender violence, You know, While horrific is not necessarily the biggest force or the biggest Issue. It's rather the way that we all play a role in reinforcing a system of white male supremacy. Indeed, and I think it's important to recognize that this violence is violence is really an enforcement off the status quo that acts in, you know, everyday ways to really harm women and people of color and white men themselves. And so it's not. The violence is not the end of itself. Right? It is to get things back to a place where every day systems Kind of reinforce white male power at the expense of women and people of color. And so we see these everyday systems in our workplaces and our local government and our schools on BC. The cost of you know the idea that things will never be built to consider Women and people of color. First and foremost that you know we will our skills and our talents will never be rewarded because even a simple promotion can threaten the identity of white men in an office space. And so it is. There are so many different ways and so many different impacts tow us day in and day out, whether impacts our ability of theater family to feel safe walking down the street, you know to have political representation. That is actually what the violence six to reinforce the idea that you know the best jobs will always go to white men that the security you know, income security will go to a white man that the best neighborhoods will be will have be for white men and their families. You know that any political power social power will be reserved for white men that are media will reflect the needs of white men and Any threat to that is where we see the violence. But the violence that you know is impacting our ability to go through the world is that actual day today system It's interesting to the reinforcement of that ideal can also be among people who are saying that they support the dismantling of it. I mean, I was struck by your analysis of your so called feminists of the early 19 hundreds, right? You describe Max, Max Eastman and Floyd Dell, you know, saying that they were all for feminism, and then it really being centered on On a desire not to have to be financially responsible for women with Yeah, it's it's amazing to me. You know, I think we're looking at that. When when I When I kind of stumbled upon these two men, it was just there was this little addict out and some of my research and I was like, Gosh, these guys some familiar, You know, I've met these guys and I need to know more and and build into, and that's really the response I've been getting from so many women going, You know, I feel like I you know, at at a rally I've run into this guy all of the time, who really was promised that you wouldn't have to do anything and he would be the first To be rewarded for his minimal effort and where he wasn't you know, kind of became this destructive force within the movement, And I think that part of the you know what that stems from is the fact that when we talk about solidarity, and when we talk about even doing the right thing, we still often center right man, and we talked about the white man who's going to show up to be a hero or who's going to demonstrate personal growth and come out of this better and rewarded. And it really begins and ends with white men. And they become the hero of the story, even when in our progressive movements, and that could be incredibly toxic, because when they aren't rewarded, or when they are pushed to investigate the ways in which they're bringing toxic behavior into movements, then often they think they've been cheated and they react with the same kind of violent entitlement that we see people who oppose our movements. You know, in people who opposed our movements in the beginning..

America E. Joma Lulu Andy Jo Malo George Floyd West Washington State Max Eastman Writer Floyd Dell BC
Families tied up at gunpoint during restaurant robbery in Oak Cliff Dallas

Chris Salcedo

00:35 sec | 1 d ago

Families tied up at gunpoint during restaurant robbery in Oak Cliff Dallas

"You know. Dallas Police are searching for three armed robbery suspects accused of targeting an oak cliff eatery Saturday. Two families in several restaurant workers were inside Lulu's authentic Mexican restaurant. When one the patrons saw three armed men storm and I looked at my husband. I said, We're not going home. The woman told W F A A TV that everyone is ordered to the floor at gunpoint away just emerged from the kitchen to find the adult zip tied and Children's hands bound with duct tape. Another waitress who was hiding the restroom, called Police. Police chase the suspects out the back door. They got away with $200 in cash from the register and other personal belongings.

Dallas Police Lulu
Fresh "Lulu" from Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:00 sec | 8 hrs ago

Fresh "Lulu" from Morning Edition

"Lulu dot com. If you're making way through Glendale right now on that eastbound 1 34 Keep an eye out. This traffic report is brought to you by the Goetzman group getting conflicting reports of a contact Big rig. Not quite clear right now, if it's on the East 1 34 if you're trying to connect to the north five or actually could be on the West 1 34. But apparently there's taking up the right lane. So please keep an eye out for that. The near USC South found one tenant Adams. It's a conked out car, no lights on in the left lane.

Big Rig Glendale USC Adams Goetzman
Here are the 10 best places to work in 2021, according to company employees

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:26 sec | 2 weeks ago

Here are the 10 best places to work in 2021, according to company employees

"Is Number one on job site Glassdoor is 100 best places to work in 2021 List. Glass Tower analyzed over 70 Million employee reviews of more than 1.3 million companies. Vein is followed by tech company and video and fast food chain in and out Burger. Others in the top 10 include Google, Microsoft, Delta, Lulu, Lemon and grocer H E B. That's your Money Now on Wall Street today. Nice

Lulu Delta Google Microsoft
Myles Cosgrove, who FBI says shot Breonna Taylor, expected to be fired

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

00:33 sec | Last month

Myles Cosgrove, who FBI says shot Breonna Taylor, expected to be fired

"Police officer shot and killed. Brianna taylor was not indicted by a grand jury that investigated the incident but the new york times is reporting tonight that police officer myles cosgrove will be fired the times reports lulu police officer who fired the shot. That killed brianna. Taylor was told on tuesday that the department was moving to oust him from the force as was a second officer who obtained a judge's approval for the poorly planned nighttime read on her home.

Brianna Taylor Myles Cosgrove Lulu Police The New York Times The Times Brianna Taylor
Saudi women's rights activist sentenced to prison

All Things Considered

00:50 sec | Last month

Saudi women's rights activist sentenced to prison

"Saudi Terrorism Court has sentenced a leading women's rights activist Nearly six years in prison. MPR's Jackie Northam reports New Jane L. Has Lulu led the charge to allow women to drive in Saudi Arabia. But just weeks before the driving ban was lifted in the spring of 2018. She and several other female activists were arrested. Slew was convicted, among other things, of agitating for change and pursuing a foreign agenda. But human rights groups say the Saudi government is trying to quash to send has little sister Lena says a reduced sentence and time served me She may be out of prison in less than three months. Incoming national security advisor Jake Sullivan tweeted That has sloughs conviction was unjust in troubling and that the Biden administration will stand up against human rights violations.

Saudi Terrorism Court Jackie Northam Jane L. Has Lulu Saudi Government Saudi Arabia Jake Sullivan Lena Biden Administration
Saudi women's rights activist sentenced to prison

The World

00:50 sec | Last month

Saudi women's rights activist sentenced to prison

"Terrorism court has sentenced a leading women's rights activist to nearly six years in prison. NPR's Jackie Northam reports New Jane L. Has Lulu led the charge to allow women to drive in Saudi Arabia. But just weeks before the driving ban was lifted in the spring of 2018, she and several other female activists were arrested. Ah, Slew was convicted, among other things of agitating for change and pursuing a foreign agenda. But human rights groups say the Saudi government is trying to quash to send Has little sister Lena says a reduced sentence and time served means she may be out of prison in less than three months. Incoming National security advisor Jake Sullivan tweeted that house lose conviction was unjust in troubling And that the Biden administration will stand up against human rights violations.

Terrorism Court Jackie Northam Jane L. Has Lulu Saudi Government NPR Saudi Arabia Jake Sullivan Lena Biden Administration
"lulu" Discussed on All Creatures Great and Gone

All Creatures Great and Gone

04:53 min | Last month

"lulu" Discussed on All Creatures Great and Gone

"That happens we wanted to make sure that we were to say okay. You know what it's not acceptable to trash. Someone's business because they had to is an animal because of a behavior problem and it's cool to call someone names. It's just not cool. it's not right. it's not appropriate. And so what we what we did at the beginning was anybody could talk about anything. I didn't wanna put any. That's on anybody and one of the things that happened right off the bellas we started having people talking about dogs and cats and animals who were pending euthanasia. So it's a you know My my cat is very very difficult. And she's very aggressive to me and we can't give her medication and we can't touch her and sometimes when we're just sitting there she'll randomly attack our feet and she sent my son dos bottle. Okay and that you you know. And they said we've chosen euthanasia and we're going to is her on saturday or thursday or whenever and what we found is that those people would sometimes then come on on friday and they'd say we've changed our mind and they might become frequent flyers of of that and that actually really became a full so we then started having a rule. You couldn't talk a living lulu or an animal. Who was not yet deceased. And it wasn't that we didn't talk to them. It's that we didn't want to substitute working with a professional one on one. Because you know the internet is just absolutely full of people who are going to say. Well if you give that dog to me all six or you need to just try this and we'll be able to solve the problem completely so it was. We said we're not here to avoid a euthanasia or treat an animal. We here to support people who are already grieving an animal who is gone. And that's what lulu it came really our guiding principles and then we we have a bunch of rules the chief amongst them the first rule. We've got his be watched their. I know you're you're on looney probably seen this is that on on. Losing lulu Everybody practices being kind. The kind takes practice. It's not something that you just do it something that you have to practice and get good at you know. At first you may just practice by hitting an emoji and hitting the carom or you may just practice by saying..

lulu
"lulu" Discussed on All Creatures Great and Gone

All Creatures Great and Gone

05:52 min | Last month

"lulu" Discussed on All Creatures Great and Gone

"Krish mcmillan. Who is a trainer in north carolina. Had this dog lulu. And she placed her once and loon back and then she had tried another placement. That didn't work mulu came back. In december summer of two thousand eighteen. Trish went away for a couple of days. I think she was on a road trip and she left lulu in the care of pet sitter and when she came home it was when she walked in the door. Everything was really really exciting and lulu had an episode of redirected one of tristesse others other dogs and was a devastating fight. It was an absolute attack and it took two of them to try and get lulu off of the other dog. They had to use break. Stick luckily Tristesse pet sitter is trainer and they were able to get break sticks very quickly and they were able to contain it but in the very short time that that fight happened Lulu inflicted about eight hundred dollars american of damage on the other dog. Now because Trish tristesse rescue one car lou. Lou was in another car and trish phoned the vat band. She explained what had happened. And she said. Will you do behavioral ethan asia and the vet said yes so they brought mulan and lulu was really good for that and they kindly said goodbye because lulu was just too dangerous to place anywhere that she would have would have killed this other dog and it was. It was also. It was really really hard and trish was feeling really really badly about this. And she bet at for a day or two before she posted to her page. Lulu had gotten a lot of coverage on tristesse paid bling with theodore and You know she'd been boasting about lose. Updates and louis training and how lou. Who's doing and so she posted that lulu and then the internet trolls got going with vengeance. And we've seen this happen before this happens with relative frequency and on her private page where it's just her friend you pull that..

lulu Krish mcmillan Trish tristesse Trish ethan asia Lulu trish north carolina lou mulan Lou theodore
Nearly 30 arrested after clashes at Trump supporters rally in Washington DC

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:49 min | Last month

Nearly 30 arrested after clashes at Trump supporters rally in Washington DC

"With police arrests and at least four stabbings yesterday as supporters of President Trump held a Maga march here in Washington, D. C. The crowds were smaller. But the message stayed the same. A defiant rejection of Joe Biden as the next president, based on debunked accounts of election fraud. NPR's Hannah Allam was at the rally and she is here with us now. Good morning. High. By now, states have certified their election results. Courts have weighed in, and there's simply no evidence of significant of voter fraud. What's left for Trump supporters to say with these rallies well, they definitely want to keep up the pressure and keep alive the stop the steel narrative this baseless idea that the election was rigged, but it's also about much more than that. It's a networking and recruiting opportunity for the right right wing groups that always show up to events like this. And while some say they'll never accept Biden is president, the reality is setting in for others. Now that you know they're guy will indeed have to leave the White House. So several speakers were talking about looking ahead, organizing around some of their other pet issues. The Second Amendment rejecting a Corona virus vaccine, keeping quote unquote, the Socialists at bay. So it's just a rich soup of conspiracy and disinformation that doesn't go away when Trump leaves. And then, for a smaller French. There was a much more overtly violent tones in the last march, not only in the Chanting and the slogans but an actual violence and beatings. I witnessed least late last night after the rally, some really chilling scenes. And so yeah, the most militant right wing activists have said quite clearly now that they won't be settling for marching in the streets and that they're ready to fight. Even before the rally began, one extremist group made headlines. The leader of the proud boys, Enrica Terrio, visited the White House early Saturday. The proud boys, of course, were known as a violent gang. Some extremism trackers call them a hate group. Trump famously told them during a debate to stand back and stand by. So what? May I ask? Was the leader of the proud boys doing at the White House? Yeah, that's still a bit of a mystery. The White House has said Torrio was not specifically invited that he was part of a public tour. But that's just not exactly how it works for the general public. I saw Enrique Terrio at the rally and asked him directly about the visit. He told me he was their quote as just a guest. Hey, said he didn't see or meet with the president. He didn't get into specifics, though. I also asked what it meant for the proud boys to have that kind of access. And he said it shows they've come a long way as he put it. And he says they're using their platform to push for election reforms, for example of federal voting card Here's Terry Oh, it's not for the next four years. This is all you're going to see. When Biden preaches a message of unity, he asked him Listen to us, too. So the problem with stereo talking like he's moderate who's interested in Biden's message of unity is that you can't say that by day and then unleash remembers at night to roam the streets, harassing and beating up anyone you perceive as a leftist, and that's exactly what I and many others recorded the proud boys doing last night. One of the national security implications of the ideologies we saw swirling around yesterday at this big public rally Well for many years now, According to the FBI, the violent far right has been the deadliest and most active domestic terrorism threat. These ideologies and groups were mainly confined to the fringe. Now we see the leader of the proud boys getting a tour of the White House Later the same day I saw his members corner and beat two young black men. The member proud Boys were filmed ripping a black lives matter. Banner off a historic black church and you see a zoo. You noted their stabbings and arrests. So yeah, the mainstreaming of extremist groups is a hallmark of the trump era. And analysts say it's going to be a heavy lift for the Biden administration to reverse that and to prevent political violence from snowballing. That's NPR's Hannah Allam. Thank you very much. Thank you, Lulu.

President Trump Hannah Allam Donald Trump Biden Enrica Terrio Joe Biden White House Torrio Enrique Terrio NPR Washington FBI Biden Administration Lulu
COVID vaccine distribution underway as first trucks hit the road

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:54 min | Last month

COVID vaccine distribution underway as first trucks hit the road

"It is a massive, complicated undertaking and it is underway. The first doses of covert 19 vaccine will be delivered to every state tomorrow. Files are being loaded up on two ups and FedEx trucks to ship to hospitals around the country. This has taken months of work and planning and here to talk us through what's next? Is NPR Health reporter Selena Simmons Duffin. Good morning. Morning, Lulu. So the vials were getting on their way. Now what? Well, next is the rush to start getting people vaccinated to try to slow and eventually end the pandemic. How it works is this. The federal government is coordinating distribution to predetermine sites around each state. And then the baton gets past a state and local health departments and healthcare providers to actually start administering the shots. I checked with a bunch of state health officials yesterday. Most say it's going to take a few days for providers to get trained up on how to properly give this vaccine. There's a lot of information coming at them really fast from Fizer and from CDC about exactly who should get the vaccine, So if there are some vaccines administered on Monday, it may actually take a few days for the campaign to really get under way. This is a really hopeful moment on D. I want to underscore that because we really need hopeful moments. But what what could go wrong? Despite all the planning, there will be hiccups. The big fear is that some of these precious vaccine doses could be wasted or it doesn't get to the right people. Remember this fax he needs to be kept ultra cold minus 70 degrees Celsius. It comes in kind of a pizza box filled with vials and try ice. The vaccine on Lee lasts a few days in the fridge after it's thought you need to dilute it before you injected. There is just no way everything will go perfectly. So our health were officials worry about that. Most of the people I talked to are confident that when issues come up, they can resolve them and learn from them clear hand and made this point. She's the executive director of the Association of Immunization Managers. Those are the people in every state in charge of vaccination plans. And here's what she told me. We're going to learn so much from the first hospitals who are vaccinating, you know how What is it really like to get this box? How long does it take to mix the vaccine with the deal you in? How long does it take to actually vaccinate someone? Lots to consider. I want a vaccine, obviously, but the next question is, who is going to be getting these very first doses? The CDC has prioritized health workers and residents of long term care facilities in what's called Phase one A. But there's a lot of hunger for details from health officials and I'm told that that should come in the next few days. So you know, we've all heard about the allergic reactions When vaccinations started in Britain, we're talking about guidance about the kind of history of allergic reaction to be aware of. And then what about pregnant or lactating people are people with immune disorders. All of this guidance is frantically getting hashed out right now, so providers can get answers as the vaccination campaign actually rolls out, and how long before it will be widely available? It's not yet clear exactly who comes after Phase one a on DATs, giving health officials some heartburn. It's also not clear how much vaccine will be available next. What pace of shipments is going to be going forward? It could be speedier if there were two vaccines and distribution instead of one, And that could happen soon. There's an FDA committee meeting to consider authorizing the Madonna vaccine this Thursday. But the short answer is the hope is that the vaccine will be widely available in the late spring at the earliest. Maybe the summer of 2021. That's NPR's Selena Simmons stuff and thank you very much. Thank you. So that is the good news and it comes as the U. S is rapidly approaching yet another horrific milestone 300,000 deaths from covert 19. The next few months, experts tell us it will be worse before it gets better.

Selena Simmons Duffin Fizer CDC Association Of Immunization Ma NPR Lulu Fedex Federal Government LEE Britain Selena Simmons FDA U.
Black Friday crowds thin as shoppers go online but many still show up in person

WBZ Programming

00:26 sec | 2 months ago

Black Friday crowds thin as shoppers go online but many still show up in person

"Black Friday, Sony's PlayStation five was drawing big crowds. Shoppers lined up both in person and virtually hoping to snag one of the consoles. Microsoft's latest Xbox is also hot. It looks like there will be lots of yoga pants under the tree this year with Lulu Lemon, a big draw among holiday shoppers. Long lines were reported at malls, including King of Prussia in Pennsylvania and Scottsdale Fashion Square in Arizona. US safety

Sony Microsoft King Of Prussia Scottsdale Fashion Square Pennsylvania Arizona United States
"lulu" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

08:12 min | 2 months ago

"lulu" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Talk nerdy and i want to give a shoutout to this week's top patrons. They include. Michael gauchet mary neva. Christopher pits june sara pasquali gelati will wreak hagman dudas Charles payet brian holden. Pedro amro's dario barbosa. Daniel lang david j e smith robert chris and alise christie. Thank you also so very much. Let's talk about this week. Show i have the most exciting guest for you guys. So not only is she. A co founder of npr's invisibility a- she's also the co host newly newly joined. She'd been on the team for a long time. But newly joined the co host of radio lab. What we ask congratulations. And she's the author of incredible book. That i highly recommend for all of you. It's called. why fish don't exist a story of loss love and the hidden order of life. Her name is lulu miller. You're going to love her without any further ado. Here she is lulu miller lulu. Thank you so much for joining me today. S thank you for having me in this nerd safe space. You have created for all. I have to say the very first thing you know how you have these like first impressions of people based on really superficial things that have nothing to do with them at all the. Yeah one of the most obvious ones is somebody's name because it sort the first thing you see it's written in print before you even meet somebody you see their name and lulu speaks to me on this really deep level because my grandmother's name was lula and when i was born my parents were like well. We don't wanna call her lula but we wanna give her something similar so my middle name is louise named after my grandma and louis anymore just not a very common name but it evoked sort of like my grandma burrow pat will scored of named after my grandpa lewis and and But usually what i get is like i have a dog named lulu so i'm very Association with is humid. Oh and it's kind of like a very classic nineteen forties kind of. There's something really cool about it. And i feel the same way but my middle name. Louise i hate. When i was young and now that i'm older. I'm like louisa so like maude. I love it. I hate it. I actually hated my name growing up so much. And i i'm formal formally end ended the day. I am formerly louisa No been called lulu my whole life by ever in my mom really loved the little lulu comics which was like nineteen forties girl and address getting into trouble kinda named after her really and and i just thought it was weird and i didn't want to stand out and thought it sounded like a cow nine hundred twenty s flapper just hated it and then at some point kids were like doug means toilet and british lou and it just hated it and so when i went to summer camp i went for like eight weeks. Sleep away like i was gone. I had a different identity there. And i my middle sister came up with the idea that she was like. If you hate it so much why didn't go buy something else there. So i went by lizzie for like seven or eight years. I had a summer identity. Where i was lizzie. Because my middle. There's listening and like lizzie was normal. Like i like lizzie. I don't know i and i didn't. I made all my friends. And my family address letters to me as lizzie. Didn't want anyone to know. I was actually a lulu anyway. How but then. I came to love it and i eventually came to like it. But it's so strange. How much like this very arbitrary label like. I don't wanna out my friends. So i'm not going to say who they are but i have some friends who just had a baby girl and they are already had two boys and they named her and you know there. There were like figuring name okay. We named her and then like after a couple of months there were like i. Don't this name isn't right. So they went through the whole process changing her name. Legally is it just wasn't right. Which is until i wash through all the red tape to realize like a bad and it is a lot of red tape. They had to put a notice in the newspaper out to see if anyone wants to object. I guess he's on the paper trail for history. Maybe so that that's so wild and they were like we're gonna change apple just to sarah never mind like and then it's like this whole thing. We were talking about it. The other day with a big group of our friends were like. Does anybody have a name that their parents were gonna name them but they changed their mind. And i was like i do. My mom was going to name me. Sally you made on that name because that is my number one girl named if we have a girl double but no you get paid on it. I don't care i'm immune. My mother-in-law has similarly let the worst payment. And i'm like kate you can't because i want it and i'm gonna to defend maybe on it but maybe that's good. That means you're weren't. It's like cheerful classic. Have you ever met a down sally. No i have not. That's which is why probably would not be very well because because your career is focused on death and tight dr. Sally might be kind of weird. No so funny though. Because i think about it and i'm like i'm such keira i would never be a sally like pobably. My personality would be different if i had been. It's so weird that a physical label like not even physical. A literal of figurative label actually can be conceptualized in such a way that it affects how you think or feel like you said. Sally is so bright and sunny and cheerful. You meet someone named sally and you're instantly like she's probably nice. Yeah sneaky segue into my like a label has power on the matter and not actually an inert linguistic you slap on the air. Ab yeah no. It did weird. I remember early days of radio lab. There was once a story that mentioned something like this. And the little throwaway thing which we should now fact factcheck in. Today's world was like that man named dennis. Were more likely to be dentists. And your name your yeah that there is some weird like a fact you know probably very small but that it your name influences what you become your career and just that there are yeah. There's this kind of magnetism both of what you think for yourself and others expect for you and there's a million examples of people who had has nothing you know doesn't do that but but that there is little little magnetic effect i just crazy. It's you're right it's fascinating. It absolutely speaks to your book. I think before we dive into. Why fish don't exist. We should talk a little bit though about like some of the new things that happened for you because as of the time when i reached out to start to schedule this it was like. Oh let's talk about your new book But of course since then all sorts of amazing changes have happened. General life so you you ultimately started in radio. Let me see. If i'm getting this right you started in radio working as a producer on radio lab right. Yes correct okay. So you've been you've been doing that for for a while now and then you started doing science reporting for npr yup and then now what has happened more recently. Yes i yeah. I've just like producers this big term that just means anything and everything which is one of the things i love about radio like it might mean reporting it might mean interviewing might mean cutting tape and so i got in the early days of radio lab i had no journalistic experience but i freaking door did. I heard it on the radio and was like you.

lizzie lulu miller dr. Sally louisa No npr lula Louise Michael gauchet dario barbosa Pedro amro producer co founder Daniel lang david Christopher alise christie hagman brian holden Charles payet apple robert chris
Interview With KAREN RONTOWSKI

THE EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

05:03 min | 2 months ago

Interview With KAREN RONTOWSKI

"Good morning karen. Many good morning motorcycle goes by my house. Let's do it again. Monica morning again. I didn't hear okay motorcycles. Coming back. I live on a very busy street. How you. I am so good. I'm so glad you're doing this this morning i I know a little bit about tara. i've done. I did a reading. I'm going to tell you this story. My own personal story. I have a friend whose wife does this. And when i first heard about it. I thought like a lot of people this is not just fanciful nonsense and you know like a fun. Little aside thing. I i didn't believe and i decided well i don't i'm not going to disbelieve. Believe until i see something. So this is when i was doing stand up a lot and it was my career and one of the cards. I'll never forget this card came up and it was a guy Jumping off of a cliff into the dark. it was. it was a career card for whatever reason. I don't know how this works. But and she looked up at me and she said you're going to have a really big career change. I had not thought about it. i'd had not explored it. I didn't have any intention of doing that. I went what are you talking about. So i was sure at that point that it was nonsense. Well several months later this was you know back. Twenty five years ago. The bottom kind of fell out of the standup scene. And i was making a lot less money and there were outlets gigs. And i I sent an email to tom. Arnold who was getting a tv show called the jackie. Thomas show and asked him for a job. I had never written on a sitcom in my life. I i wrote jokes. So i call them up. Which something. That's not something i ever did. It was just out of desperation for income and he said no i my. I'm staffed up but you can start on roseanne in three weeks. So that was my first job as a tv writer and i remember thinking that card was right. I in this. This is less than six months later. There's your card there. I see the card is the fool card. She might have had a different deck but it is literally taking the leap into something else. It's the it's the first in the last card of the deck. It's there's a lot to be said for this stuff. I mean maybe they're just strong tendencies and you can. Obviously i could have not called the guy not taken the job. I could have done that. I suppose that was my free choice at that point but the fact that that possibility entered my brain that moment because she sat it and it just it just rested there in the back. I never thought about it until circumstances changed. So i know you're doing a lot of readings. I'm doing a lot of talking. And i wanna hear. That's okay i can give you a good nation that will make you feel a little scientifically better about the cards because in there's i almost you know there's an effect that i wonder happens to because ladies come to me a lot that can't get pregnant and i will pull immediately like to pregnancy cards and she'll say no we've been trying for twenty years and i go. I don't know the problem is it's right here literally a call in a month. You're not gonna believe it. I'm pregnant happens all the time. In sometimes i wonder if subconsciously. I've given them permission to let it happen but the tero which is i'm sort of a terrible historian all the Symbols the colors what they mean. I studied the cards for probably thirty years. I still get up every day and find a new book. Because i love them that much. But they're actually they call the archetypes that are that young talked about and the dream are sort of the same as a dream arc. Typeset that you would You would actually be dreaming this same thing. In other words it all means the same thing. The high priestess would mean mystery in your dreams. So they're not just sort of cards that come out of nowhere. They sort of been built on the subconscious and psychology for many many years or vice versa. The cards built psychology but It's it is coming from something. They they used to say. Somebody told the story that gypsies that didn't speak the same language used to carry different decks with them so they could come up to a different tribe in they could say showed him a picture of the medicine. Man showed him the picture of the magician so they could communicate through them but every time someone tries to say this is where they were developed. They find another car deck back further They also Are the know people that. Get weird about lulu. This is where our regular paint playing debt comes from. This is also where chest house room.

Monica Tara Karen Roseanne Arnold TOM Thomas Young
MacOS Big Sur reveals Apple secretly hates your VPN and firewall

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

MacOS Big Sur reveals Apple secretly hates your VPN and firewall

"Os big sur has exited beta and been released to the public. Despite this there is no indication that apple has changed this behavior Some default apps on macos big sur which remain in beta bypass any network firewall. Vpn connection a user has connected This behavior was first spotted by twitter user amex x. s wd and is more thoroughly explained by security researcher. Patrick wardle according to patrick on older versions of mac os. A firewall could be set up using the network. Colonel attention but on mac. Os big sur. Apple has deprecated the extension which allows for many of their apps to bypass the firewall. Patrick provides to mac. Os big sur firewall examples. Lulu and little snatch so. This is frustrating

Patrick Wardle Apple Twitter Patrick
Trump Lawyers Pressured to End Role in Election Challenges

Weekend Edition Sunday

01:24 min | 2 months ago

Trump Lawyers Pressured to End Role in Election Challenges

"The president's lawyers are suffering defeat after defeat in their attempts to overturn the election results, and a federal judge says Trump's DHS secretary is in his position unlawfully. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson joins us now. Good morning, Mara. Good morning, Lulu. How does that posture We heard from the Vic Murthy and the incoming Biden administration strike. You sounds like convince her you can work around who you can't and let's not forget executive orders. Well, if they can't get legislation through the Senate, they're going to have to rely on executive orders. Just as President. Trump has But I think that there is a tremendous amount that President elect Biden can do. Just by using the bully pulpit. It's going to be a huge change from a president who poo pooed the wearing of masks at some point said that they were a sign of political correctness. To Joe Biden, who was now sending the message that masks or not a political issue. It doesn't matter what party you are. This is something that you can do to keep yourself and your fellow citizens safe, So I think that there is a lot that they can do. But, yes, it's a Herculean effort because President Trump has focused almost totally on the vaccine and not on public health. He hasn't attended to Corona Virus Task Force meeting in Months. And so the Biden administration incoming Biden administration will be inheriting a huge, huge problem.

Mara Liasson Vic Murthy Donald Trump Biden DHS Lulu NPR Mara Senate Joe Biden Corona Virus Task Force
Mike Tyson might not stop after Roy Jones Jr. fight

The Adam Carolla Show

02:48 min | 2 months ago

Mike Tyson might not stop after Roy Jones Jr. fight

"Asked roy jones junior and mike tyson. What is your take on. Roy jones in tyson. Anyone has seen the footage of tyson working. The focus pads lately says Tyson looks like the scariest fifty two year old on the planet What's roy jones is plan with tyson. Roy jones lulu lot. Roy jones lot roy jones was one of the most gifted athlete of all time and was completely dominant in his in his prime. But he's not a bona fide heavyweight tyson tyson. Pretty much is how does that first off. What's the weight that what are they doing. A catchweight where. Where's that thing gonna land. Well mike tyson. I spoke to him yesterday. Called me on my birthday. Which was very nice and A mike is lost one hundred pounds. He told me yesterday. One hundred pounds. Wow he's in fantastic shape and he says he really feels good about where he is and himself and you know his weight and his mental outlook is is just fantastic. I've been overseeing the gym. I'm going to work on that. Fight showtime nice enough to let me go work on that broadcast and so. I think it's really interesting. He's fifty four years old. He hasn't Fifteen years okay. Said since mcbride and he was done he was done after that fight and he just said it to me in the ring that night he said. I just don't have this in me anymore. Don't have that instinct to go out and be ferocious. Wanna do this anymore. So i think now the passage of time and getting in shape and you know seeing what's what's gone on with athletes who have extended their careers. Obviously and other sports are not getting hit like he is but to see just how well lebron james plays at an age Getting older see. Tom brady to see drew. Brees to see these guys now. You know lengthening their careers. You know it's an exhibition. So we'll find out but tyson did tell me in an interview that he would be willing to fight. If you know see how this goes he would be willing to fight evanger holyfield on third and if he does well he would consider one of the champions right now possibly a joshua or fury down the road and you know everybody can point to george foreman right. The our was wasn't fifty four years old But let let's see how he looks. I i know. I know that a lot of boxers of told me that what they see in the gym. Just the speed that they would not want to be hit by that.

Roy Jones Tyson Mike Tyson Lulu Lot Tyson Tyson Mcbride Mike Lebron James Tom Brady Brees Drew Holyfield George Foreman
Biden Secures 85 Votes in Electoral College

90.3 KAZU Programming

00:36 sec | 3 months ago

Biden Secures 85 Votes in Electoral College

"News. This is special coverage of the 2020 election of Lulu Garcia Navarro and I'm Ari Shapiro. Polls have now closed in Florida and Pennsylvania, two key battleground states that could sway the results of the presidential election. And, according to the AP, the race is too early to call in both states. As of now, this is what we do know about the race. So far, President Trump has 55 electoral college votes after winning and reliably Republican states like Kentucky, West Virginia in South Carolina and former Vice President Joe Biden has 85 electoral college votes after winning in Democratic strongholds like Vermont, Virginia and Illinois.

Lulu Garcia Navarro Ari Shapiro President Trump Pennsylvania Florida AP Vice President Joe Biden West Virginia Kentucky South Carolina Vermont Virginia Illinois
Making Art in the Modern Day

Innovation Hub

07:02 min | 3 months ago

Making Art in the Modern Day

"In 1993 the group. The Breeders released this song Cannonball, and it started to climb the charts. The lead singer Kim deal was by that a pretty important person, alternative rock, not somebody who seems like they would later be featured in a book called The death of the artist. She's a big indie rock icon and has been for a good 30 years. Maybe more. William to Russell. It's is the author of the Death of the Artist in which he argues The arts world, which has always been hard to break into, and is always hard to squeeze a middle class living out of It's crumbling. As Kim deal has seen, you know she grew up in Dayton, and she lives back in Dayton. She's doing okay, she said to me, but again, fame does not equal wealth and she said to me, you know, I'm a coal miner, I'ma steal man. I'm just another person whose industry is gone. Obsolete. The perplexing part about that door is wit says, is that while Cole is not used in the same widespread way that it once was in America, we still listen to music quite a bit. And it's still produces a ton of money. But not much of that money goes into artist pockets. Instead, lots of it goes to the tech companies that bring you the music. These companies are too powerful. They can dictate terms, especially to independent artists and even tow labels and publishers because there's so much bigger and so much more powerful, and we need to do something about that power. We need to reduce that power. Then there is the notion that we can all record her own songs with tools on our Apple computer and People we can break through the noise. But sister Jesuits That's mostly a pipe dream, one that has gotten way too much traction like this is a profoundly irresponsible message to be disseminated, and it's been disseminated with all the marketing power of Silicon Valley. Still, he acknowledges that Tech has in some ways widened the playing field. It's increased access, even if that's no really consolation to those who Ping to turn art. Into a living. My argument is not that the Internet has been terrible for the arts. In every respect. I think it's been terrible for working artists financially. It's done a lot of good things, and one of the things that's done is that it has democratized creation, and I think it's great for a lot of people. I mean, I'm a big fan of amateur creativity and people making their music and people writing their books. But there's a big difference between that and serious. I'm gonna just say it's serious, talented, dedicated artists who make the stuff that the rest of us actually want to read and listen to. I mean, that's the issue, right is like, Think about it. First of all, think about how much time you spend in an average day consuming art, meaning every kind of art music and narrative television and books and everything. Probably several hours. And then think about how much of that art is created by amateurs who just put their stuff out there. Probably none. But in any case, maybe at best, very little. So God bless all the millions of people who want to do this and put their songs online. This is not the way to have a culture. And it's also not the way to have an arts economy. Are there break spots You mentioned television and ah, I for all people over the last 68 months, we're doing a lot more television watching. Not that we weren't doing plenty before. Are there places for screenwriters or things that that have bossom DH because of technology because of streaming services like Netflix, and I'II bet Amazon in the TV business and on and on Yeah, There's no question that television has blossomed, You know, not just in terms of the numbers of shows, but aesthetically artistically, right? I mean around 2000. We got the Sopranos, and there was a 1999 the same years Napster and then all these terrific shows on HBO and Showtime and L. Amazon and Netflix and Lulu. And it's great. I mean, TV is the one art that's that's confident. That's blossoming. As you said, Why is this happening? It's not because we can get TV on streaming versus our television sets. It's because we pay for it. We pay a lot for it. I mean, if you add up the money that goes to television in your cable bill, Amazon Prime Netflix, HBO Max ESPN, plus all the money that each of us is paying every month. That's flowing through the system, and that's why television is flourishing. That's why movie stars and movie directors and screenwriters have migrated from movies to television because that's where the artistic Opportunities are if somebody does the television what Napster and now Spotify have done to music that's going to disappear. Overnight. Okay, People are not going to you know, Nicole Kidman is not going to do a TV series for 10 bucks. And maybe that's when people will realize what's been happening across the arts. I wonder what you see ahead. I mean, obviously. You know, when you talked about this notion of sea and like the death of the artist that was even before, as we talked about like that arts in many ways, kind of shut down for several months. What is the way forward? I don't know that there's a good answer. But let me let me say this in the last few decades already something we now call the food movement has arisen where people have realised, you know, we're eating a lot of processed food, reading a lot of fast food. It's bad for us is bad for animals. It's bad for the planet. It's bad for the people who make the food for us. We need to consume in a more responsible way. So people have started to pay more for food, and we've Started to restructure the food system a little bit around the edges, then, more recently, the same thing with clothing. People call it fast fashion like like fast food, and we're trying to be more conscious consumers of you know, cheap clothing that's made in places like Vietnam and Bangladesh. I think we need the same kind of movement for art. Because now we have what I call fast Art. Because this stuff has to be produced fast if you're going to make enough To make a living. At the very least, you have to make a lot and it's produced cheaply and it's consumed in haste. Music, text, visual images moving images, everything. So Yeah, I do think that we need to become more conscious consumers and pay what we can but also like with food and fashion. Larger structural changes also need to be made and the more conscious we are as consumers and the more we are aware of. The need for these changes and demand them from our public officials. And again, That's especially going to mean taking on big attack, which we now have so many reasons to do this, I think has the potential to maybe turn things around.

Netflix Kim Deal Amazon Napster Dayton Nicole Kidman Silicon Valley William Cole HBO America Russell Spotify L. Amazon Showtime
More companies pledge to give workers time to vote

Bloomberg Best

04:11 min | 3 months ago

More companies pledge to give workers time to vote

"Are involved in this next organization. You know their names were talking about all birds. Amazon Lulu Lemon lift Major League baseball uber target. The list is kind of endless and they've got a common interest. It's about strengthening our democracy. And encouraging participation. Now there's 545 of these companies in total. They basically just want to encourage civic participation. Okay, get out involved. So we're going to talk to the executive director of the Civic Alliance. He's Stephen Levine. He's on the phone with us from Los Angeles is also the co founder of Meteorites, Social Impact investors. Steven. It's great to have you. I imagine you guys have been quite busy over the last few months. We definitely have Kaylie and thank you for having me on this evening. I appreciate it. A CZ you mentioned the Civic Alliance is a nonpartisan business coalition that is strengthening our democracy by supporting face healthy and accessible elections. And by really inspiring every American to participate in our democracy. And I'm really proud of the work that we've seen so many extraordinary cos. Lead this here many for the first time encouraging both their employees and their consumers. Tio specifically active and get out and vote. Can you give us some specifics on what you've done? What kind of what kind of efforts Absolutely. So we've helped many companies, many major employers think about what policies they could have to make sure that all of their employees not only feel supported but also encouraged to vote. We're very proud to share that companies like best buy and Tax office are actually closing their retail locations. Either early or opening them late on election day to make sure that all of their employees have time off to vote. Other companies are closing completely for the day like Fiat, Chrysler on Patagonia, which are literally shutting down all of their operations on election day to make sure that their employees have the time they need to vote. We're also helping companies think about how they can message and provide all of their employees and consumers with the latest information about the different ways that Americans can vote in this election cycle. 20 is definitely a unique election cycle because you can say that again. The challenges represents so so we're really we're really excited that that many companies are are helping to fill in the gaps and educate Americans about about how they can vote early this year. Interesting fact. 99% of Americans can cast their ballot before Election Day in 2020, and we're thrilled that more than 75 million Americans already have. It's pretty just 30 million more than 60 students. It's no forgive me. I'm interrupting you. It's staggering, though. When you kind of get your head around those numbers. It's also staggering that you know, we talked about a story last week. About a Silicon Valley tech CEO that emailed all 10 million of his customers urging a vote for Joe Biden specifically like it used to be go back a few years. It was a no no for CEO or an executive to get out there and talk politically. What's different. We have about a minute and they will come back and continue. Okay, Great. Well, what I would say. First of all, I want to reiterate that specific alliances a nonpartisan all right, No, I understand Organization, but I think it's pretty exciting is that I think companies have started to realize that that civic engagement, nonpartisan civic engagement actually isn't partisan or political. It's patriotic and its civic And I think what we've seen is that because employees are really pushing companies take stands on important social issues. Companies are in turn, turning back to their employees and their consumers and saying, You know what? We will take a stand and we're taking a stand to encourage you to vote and really helped shape our country's future in our communities future and so I think. Encouraging voting and civic engagement eyes really the both politically safest and a really powerful move that many, many companies they're coming? Yeah, I would say employees. Consumers also, you know,

Civic Alliance Stephen Levine CEO Major League Kaylie Amazon Los Angeles Executive Director Joe Biden Steven Co Founder Fiat Executive Chrysler
Travel to Bogota, Colombia

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

06:50 min | 3 months ago

Travel to Bogota, Colombia

"I would like to welcome to show a Lauren Pesky from wonder Lulu Dot com, which has way more use in. Lulu than you would expect, check the show notes for how to spell that. Lauren welcome to the show. Hi. Chris thank you so much for having me. I'm really excited to be chatting with you today and were chatting about Bogota Colombia and Lauren. What is your connection to Bogut all? The Age old question I truthfully never had Columbia on my list was really on my radar but love brought me here. My boyfriend moved here five years ago, and so for the past five years I have been visiting on and off and finally kind of made the move down here this year. And you picked a good year to move internationally. I know talk about crazy timing. I finally five years in Ra do this I'm going to get the visa all of that, and then I got here in February and. March the whole country shutdown. Excellent. So we're GonNa talk about the things that you're going to be able to do win it opens backup starting to do now but why should someone go to Columbia specifically Bogota? While let's start with Columbia as a whole is one of my favorite countries I've ever been to and the reason for that many many reasons but I just love how diverse the country as from region to region. So in one country you have the Amazon rainforest, you have the Andes mountains you have desert you have the Pacific Ocean you have the Caribbean it's really just in terms of bio-diversity. It's pretty incredible how many landscapes you can see in One place and beyond that region to region the cultures are so different that people in the language event. I have a friend in get Mungo, which is another major city here who says when she talks to her family on the coast in Bonn Akhir Carthagena sometimes, she doesn't even know they're using a phrase that she's never heard before i. know that's in a lot of places that it's just it makes it a really really interesting place to visit. And what kind of tenor are going to recommend for us? So today, I'm going to be specifically talking about Bogota. I feel like Bogota is the capital city. I know a lot of people fly through here but often I feel like it's an overlooked major major city most people when they think of Columbia, Colombia's really gaining popularity in recent years. The first thing they think of Karma Hannah are medigene and so now that I live year and I've been visiting for so long feel like so many things are overlooked here. So I really kind of want to dive into that and talk about kind of what makes this place special. And we should say up front that Lauren doesn't claim to be native Spanish speaker. Hearsay medigene and you think it should be many Yien or something else. She's still knows better than I knew it. So what do in Boca? I if you don't mind just talking a little bit of language and so far from ever Oh you must be fluent you're visiting so much. But the reality is I'm not in so I kind of have a perspective on what it's like to be here in traveling around when I know very little. Of course, I've gotten better over time but still learning you can I assume you know the essentials like survey support for? That's the first phrase you learn the clerk. Learned one beer please. Exactly exactly. Go back to your your question about, but was how I always to me. It's an eclectic mix of traditional and modern Colombian culture, and I just love how you can kind of go from playing Tejo and eating a maybe another EPA bay case on the street to dancing salsa, and then the next day you're at a fine dining Peruvian fusion restaurant in high in cocktails at a jazz bar and it's Kinda got it. All excellent as long as you're going to promise to explain to me what you were just talking about with. The two things that you're eating and going to somewhere in the course of the conversation. I will. Definitely. To that. So don't don't even worry. What are we going to see in Bogota? Where are we GONNA START? Okay. So I kind of want to break this down is a massive city. It's eight million people. It's a sprawling city. There's so much to do so much to see. So I, kind of want to break it down by by neighborhood because it's so big I feel like it's less of A. Hit these top ten things? Would you see a lot of those lists just great which is fine. But a lot of those lists stay in only one neighborhood. Probably. Heard of it I'm pretty sure you've talked about it before in Candelaria in. So I kind of want to talk about each little neighborhood and kind of what each place bring. So the first place like I was saying is the most popular I would say it's the most heuristic part of the city which you know sometimes I think you hear its touristic which equals bad to some to some but to me candelaria, it's a beautiful part of the city. It's the Old City it's the cobblestone streets and the colonial Spanish architecture, and so I'm going to start there with kind of like day one, right so the reason I start. There is because there is this place in that area of the city that's in the more southern part of the city, not all the way south almost like mid south is monster at day, which is this big beautiful mountain that overlooks the entire city. It's a really great like first thing to do because you really get the lay of the land and see just how massive the city is. You can get up there three ways you can hike up, you can take the there's like a dealer kind of train that goes up and then there's the cable car and the cable car ride up if you're not afraid of heights. Is Beautiful. When you get to the top I mean like I said, you have this beautiful sprawling view of the city and just kind of a little tip even though I do recommend going early on and during the day the careful because on the weekends it is mental. I've seen lines that are probably three maybe more hours. Okay Yes I really recommend if you can go during the week. That's great and then if you kinda wanted using a little different if you go right before the sun is setting, it's like a beautiful beautiful view bogus some pretty gorgeous city sunset. So that's kind of something to keep in ninety.

Bogota Lauren Pesky Columbia Colombia Candelaria Bogut Chris Andes Pacific Ocean Boca Bonn Akhir Carthagena Amazon Mungo Tejo EPA A. Hit
Interview with Maria Hinojosa

Latino Rebels Radio

06:11 min | 4 months ago

Interview with Maria Hinojosa

"So as you know, Latino rebels is part of Food Doodo Media, which is the nonprofit independent media company founded by Marina Hosa, and if you've been following what Matia has been sharing the last couple of weeks, she has a new book. It's called once I was you it to memoir and I've seen Muddy A- work on the book talk about the book worry about the book. Love, the book hate the book. To seeing her the whole creative process. and. Now, the book is out and everyone loves the book and she's been on every other podcast. Since we worked together I I said, you need to be back on Latino rebels radio. Not. Only because. You know we work at full Doodo media. OR WE CO host an in the thick podcast. But. Because we're friends and we're family so. Here's money a wholesale on Latino rebels radio talking about. Book. Once I. was you. Maria. This is the fifth fourth or fifth time I've had you on some form of Latino rebels whether it's radio or streaming. So. You're quickly becoming quickly becoming enough Latino rebel. He knew I knew I. Knew About Latino rebels before I knew about you know crazy. No but listen I, know it's been. It's been such a historic week for you. With the book launch, and then you're on Lulu Garcia now audio and we're doing it in the thick, and then the Lou Garcia now laterals interview shows up on Latino USA and you're doing all this promotion. AT OPRAH DOT COM YEAH OPRAH DOT com, and then you got these amazing reviews and and it's I'm an you know you're like. It's crazy what's happening but I wanted to just have a conversation you and I with no like the book will come out of this conversation but I'm not going to be like Maria tell me about your book you know what I mean. Like I, want I want us to be like just you and me. TO GIVE PEOPLE SORT OF A. I don't know like a feel of what we do behind the scenes a little bit I mean there's a little bit of crazy that has to happen when you're like I'm in a launch, my own company or I'm GonNa Launch, you know something like letting rebels and I'm just going to do it and I'm Elliot died. So there's a of you know. For one way or another for one reason or another jumping off a cliff and just being like but we got this in one and so I feel like food thorough and Latino rebels and everything that you know in the fake and everything that has come as a result is really because we have nothing to lose Indian this you know that we had. People are like what am I ain't got none your so it's like I. Mean I have a lot but I'm just saying like A. doodle I didn't have. My own company and I was like. How scary was that house like we've talked about this but how scary was that moment for you because you talk about it in the book but you. Know I talk about it in the book because there's it's a very important moment because what you gotta get the book to really get all the juicy details but they. Don't reveal too much. Basically I'm told by a very important network show. That that I should like, take a hike and comeback. When some of the white guys had died and I was an I get into the subway and I'm crying Hulu I'm crying in the subway I'm alone I think that there's a real understanding of you know. We are psychic psychically and in many ways tied to our family but we're also very deeply existential. Alone I'm sorry. I go there. You know it's just like we stomas Finale Quintas sister solo or in says, I got home I called my sister and I said Britain. I said, I cannot go on unemployment. I've never gone on unemployment and I don't have a job. And very immigrant t very Mexican. The I was like I can't. I cannot tell my father that I went on unemployment and so people. Who See your brightness your star, your shot they see it from afar. You have a hard time seeing it yourself. You know this often happens to us and people had said why don't you do your own thing deepa Sunday that you're of our board was like do your own thing I was like this look what are you talking about? What my own thing and at that point you know somebody else had said I'll help you and so then I just said. All right. Well, let's do this and we had no assurance. We had no funding. We had nothing we drew up some paperwork. and. You start it in your in your in your apartment in my apartment. In Harley, actually I ended up I. my first office was exactly in the area of the apartment where I ended up finishing writing the book because we had to rearrange the apartment. You know we live in New York we don't. We don't have like a huge apartment so. GotTa move some things are actually the altar had to be moved the friend had. And the kids were still I mean, your kids were still kids I. Mean I know they're older now but you're talking we're talking ten years ago. Yeah yeah, Yeah Yeah they earn motherhood you were in the well, you know we'll. Yes. Although I think that's an ongoing conversation honestly, and the book is in inspiring these conversations in my own family, right? which is so where was mom? Where was she was she here where she present? Did she feel present? Did she give us what we need? So those are ongoing conversations especially because right now while I'm getting a lot of attention for the book this time also when I have to be giving attention to my family, there's always that balance and I think that's part of what the message of the book is. Is a psycho Saddiqi. Oh, you have it all you can have many things, but you're going to have to work at them and it's going to mean sacrifice and risk anyway to answer your question will you he was a very scary time I was so scared, I had no idea what to expect.

Maria Lulu Garcia Food Doodo Media Marina Hosa Matia Elliot Afar A. Britain New York
"lulu" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:10 min | 4 months ago

"lulu" Discussed on The Business of Fashion Podcast

"Welcome to be Oh F- lives. . Today we are talking to Lulu Kennedy, , the Godmother of British fashion who last night celebrated the twentieth year of Fashion East, , the initiative that she started two decades ago, , which is probably had. . As much impact on the course British faction as. . The Great Fashion Colleges <hes>. . It's like a it's what what do they call it fan baseball. . You have the team that produces the you know shapes <hes> young players that can go on into the major leagues. . Have a sort of. . Home team will feel seat or something like that. . Anyway. . Let's. . Kind. Of . thing. . That's what fashion aces so so great to talk you congratulations. . Anki. Yeah. . . Mid Twenty S. . What did that Guy Twenty years you twelve when you started doing? ? It's actually quite it's quite shocking in a way and. . Put off to the last minute kind of even dealing with it. . Because it's just been, , you know one of these tons. . But exhibit. . A reminds me when I turned fifty I, , just Kinda put it to the back of my mind is just. . Beginning. . I think that's where Jiang otherwise you might feel at wellness under pressure I just didn't really want that. . But it seems to me that that that. . You'll ability to deal with. . Pressure and the overwhelming elements of the fashion world. . A, , I've been the things that you've to me of. . Its voice felt like an incredibly stable nurturing. . Supportive. . person in the in the fashion world and and I. . Often thought you haven't really had the do that you should have had been I I feel trumpets should've been blown a lot longer and harder for you monitor it yet I'm. . Okay. . Thank you. . I'm always much happier just lacking around in the shadows in the background, , I'm. . Yeah. . I'm not really I don't I bring front of House I'm putting on the talent the talent the focus is like, , of course it's lovely very kind words people saying I'm writing. . As we turned twenty and I really appreciate it. . But I I'd WanNa <unk> make about me. . The. . Yes pretty incredible. . The, , rest of the world can do that. . In twenty years ago, , tell me about how fashiony started what <unk>? ? What was the original concept on? ? What were you responding to at that time? ? So I just moved back to the from Naples and I was working not gotta remember line and was. . Just. . Chatting to this guy at turns out here insists incredible alantic <unk> Lane Katrina Bryan he's not coming on. . Help. . Me Decide what to do that this incredible space <unk> I was just how cools after one day I wanted to come back lucky I did back on to you. . And that was very typical to make I was kind of not really sure to I wanted to stay. . To be honest I had no fashion background training navin experienced doing <unk> but he got any house was staying in Renton renting his big industrial experts warehouses for fashion <unk> I I'm <unk> seminal. . United line-up. . Them fully gowned tonight. . That was my first door adult. . Yeah. . Mind violent mind was blown and I. . I was living in shortage <unk> gotten all these incredible characters. . <hes>. . Because of the time it was <unk> MT waistline <unk>. . It's incredible creativity because with. . So. . There are laws nine these incredible fashion designers but without any real kind of context. . I just need you. . I need and. . So has the jazz and people who in France. . Could you could you hustle warehouse and that is honestly how it started weakening to my boss knock on his door hang my friends talented. . You'll love. . Could we just borrow warehouse show Katie Grand Styling and he was like he's Already know, , but she's always the punch. . Very Fun. . Honestly, , this is my very naive very on A. . Without a plan kind of just wondering my. . I wanted to be doing, , which was helping my friends, , and that is honesty how it started in sounds like making it up, , but it just started from. . Knock, , on the door. Hey, . , can I borrow house an anti loved it. So . much the fashion we helped lint. . He was lying these kids were amazing and I want to give something back. . This is a big property owner developer. . It's very much as it was when you put. . It. . Just became his pet project. . It was enough to do to give back I. . Guess you just don't really find patrons.

Lulu Kennedy Tim Blank Imran Ahmed founder and CEO Bela London editor
Lulu Kennedy on London's Young Creatives

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:10 min | 4 months ago

Lulu Kennedy on London's Young Creatives

"Welcome to be Oh F- lives. Today we are talking to Lulu Kennedy, the Godmother of British fashion who last night celebrated the twentieth year of Fashion East, the initiative that she started two decades ago, which is probably had. As much impact on the course British faction as. The Great Fashion Colleges It's like a it's what what do they call it fan baseball. You have the team that produces the you know shapes young players that can go on into the major leagues. Have a sort of. Home team will feel seat or something like that. Anyway. Let's. Kind. Of thing. That's what fashion aces so so great to talk you congratulations. Anki. Yeah. Mid Twenty S. What did that Guy Twenty years you twelve when you started doing? It's actually quite it's quite shocking in a way and. Put off to the last minute kind of even dealing with it. Because it's just been, you know one of these tons. But exhibit. A reminds me when I turned fifty I, just Kinda put it to the back of my mind is just. Beginning. I think that's where Jiang otherwise you might feel at wellness under pressure I just didn't really want that. But it seems to me that that that. You'll ability to deal with. Pressure and the overwhelming elements of the fashion world. A, I've been the things that you've to me of. Its voice felt like an incredibly stable nurturing. Supportive. person in the in the fashion world and and I. Often thought you haven't really had the do that you should have had been I I feel trumpets should've been blown a lot longer and harder for you monitor it yet I'm. Okay. Thank you. I'm always much happier just lacking around in the shadows in the background, I'm. Yeah. I'm not really I don't I bring front of House I'm putting on the talent the talent the focus is like, of course it's lovely very kind words people saying I'm writing. As we turned twenty and I really appreciate it. But I I'd WanNa make about me. The. Yes pretty incredible. The, rest of the world can do that. In twenty years ago, tell me about how fashiony started what What was the original concept on? What were you responding to at that time? So I just moved back to the from Naples and I was working not gotta remember line and was. Just. Chatting to this guy at turns out here insists incredible alantic Lane Katrina Bryan he's not coming on. Help. Me Decide what to do that this incredible space I was just how cools after one day I wanted to come back lucky I did back on to you. And that was very typical to make I was kind of not really sure to I wanted to stay. To be honest I had no fashion background training navin experienced doing but he got any house was staying in Renton renting his big industrial experts warehouses for fashion I I'm seminal. United line-up. Them fully gowned tonight. That was my first door adult. Yeah. Mind violent mind was blown and I. I was living in shortage gotten all these incredible characters. Because of the time it was MT waistline It's incredible creativity because with. So. There are laws nine these incredible fashion designers but without any real kind of context. I just need you. I need and. So has the jazz and people who in France. Could you could you hustle warehouse and that is honestly how it started weakening to my boss knock on his door hang my friends talented. You'll love. Could we just borrow warehouse show Katie Grand Styling and he was like he's Already know, but she's always the punch. Very Fun. Honestly, this is my very naive very on A. Without a plan kind of just wondering my. I wanted to be doing, which was helping my friends, and that is honesty how it started in sounds like making it up, but it just started from. Knock, on the door. Hey, can I borrow house an anti loved it. So much the fashion we helped lint. He was lying these kids were amazing and I want to give something back. This is a big property owner developer. It's very much as it was when you put. It. Just became his pet project. It was enough to do to give back I. Guess you just don't really find patrons.

Great Fashion Colleges Jiang Lulu Kennedy Katie Grand Developer Navin Naples France Renton
"lulu" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

02:47 min | 7 months ago

"lulu" Discussed on Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

"Manhattan and Yes this survey and then I moved to. Like two years after college, I moved back home, and then I lived in Brooklyn for a little bit up until now. Five years from Brooklyn. Yes, so little, but anyway thank God knows correcting me because we would have killed ourselves, so Torrey went to look for an apartment. Just to let you know you're in La comes back. She's not feeling well now. I know she doesn't want me to talk about Colbert. I heard you. I watch you an interview and you had a lot of anxiety. And came towards just like that when were talking about? Here in the symptoms and I'm the same way. Yes, Corey comes back sick. She now comes to stay with me for a week and we really disappointed to begin the march. You know what we didn't know that much. Right back then. Yes, no, you comes to stay with us. Intruders lime disease, so we thought it was alignment. She's in the bed with me and was fighting. Fighting our usual anyway, so because she was like Let her appointment go at that point yet. She goes home and she calls me because I think I have the Colona virus, but you WanNa, know even men back then in the very beginning March, you will lie. I was like Oh. Don't believe ridiculous. Don't talk. Complaining Rain Wall. She probably did then I got really sick. And I actually been sick for like the last two months. Like wait. We've all tested. We have a prom. Heck is wrong men. We don't know we have every symptom. So I was listening to you and my husband, he brought. He's a dentist, so we've got an oxygen tank from his office, so. Now tree goes to La. Because now on. Just like get rid of our can't be sick and deal with to southern. Call me and I'd have the oxygen mask on my face talking talk because your mother like that. Oh my God and I mean I. Know I! The thing is my dad picked when I called my mom, my dad up and I was like. Oh, where's where's mommy? And then he didn't show her, and then because I think my mom thing where be like I? Don't WanNa scare her, but then to second to none of you know what I'm GonNa scare so then she takes the volunteer. Say Look, look what you did to me. Look at me. And to like set. You went to the doctor on pointed to like I made you a video goodbye video This has always been her, though not just in Kobe. Calling me like who's going to get the jewelry? Since I was like three I was like what jewelry like this is your jewelry, your sisters? MOM's okay. It's that time of the pod where I sit back taken the beautiful scent of my home and tell you about the company I love I'm talking about Cowdrey. You've probably heard me talk about how I've been loving. This brand and Jason's been.

Corey Colbert Torrey La Brooklyn Manhattan Kobe Cowdrey Jason
"lulu" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

08:04 min | 10 months ago

"lulu" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"I'm good. We had such an adventure last night. What is your adventure consists of. It was so weird. He's usually a great sleeper. Usually and he woke up at like ten screaming almost maybe with night terrors. Or something which we'd never really seen. He was so spooked and disoriented and like almost afraid of us which was made him hard to settle and then he would not settle until we were saying my in laws and so like we didn't want him to like cry it out and burn their night so we tried to like bring him in the bed with us which we never do and he for like four hours stayed away saying Zoom Zoom which is his new word and then finally we were like okay. We have to drive home so it like three in the morning. We drove back to her badly but it was just like I don't know he was off. Can I tell you crazy thing? Yeah my daughter who was born six days after your son. Yeah also had her first like nightmare last night on my God. The exact same thing happened to me last night. So what? Yeah what have very shortly after you and I got off the phone. She lost her mind. She sleeps through the night. She like. It never happens unless you sick. And I like went in and she was not sick. She was just freaked out. I never happened before and the only conclusion I have is that as a bad dream and she was also like a little scared of me for second and then was like. Oh you are you. This is good and then she's also not like a clingy baby. Yeah she would not let me go once he realized who we were he could like. That's going on last night with. Did they liked? Attacked are are like debut And Get freaked out about the meeting. I don't know man. That's why all the entity wake up like totally great spirits. Fine totally yeah told him to jolly as can be like choose even. Yeah she was sort of like extra psyched this morning. Yeah wow that's so weird. Oh well I'm sorry you had to go through it but I'm glad we went through it together just means it's a natural phase of development the old year and a half night terrors simultaneous terrorist shore a diagnosed thing. Hey so in the very short window between when we hung up last night and when my daughter had a nightmare I realized that I have not asked you like a very fundamental Lamilla question okay which is basically about how you tell stories and from a very practical sense you tell these really complicated science stories which I feel like are not accessible or have the chance to be not accessible to a wide swath of people and I realized that I didn't ask how you think about that and particularly hey think about what to keep in and what to leave out and how to make these kind of like complicated ideas relatable or understandable and entertaining. How do you do that? Yeah I think that. I think I'm always always worrying about losing people and because I am drawn to Science. I think I'm always thinking on some level. There's a lot of people that are going to be put off or inherently think. This is boring or too small stakes or Gee Whiz so that is kind of like this giant fire under me that that I'm afraid of and I'm trying to outrun. And so yeah I think like I may be mentioned this but I think one of the main things I think about is whiplash and like to just have a listener. Never know what kind of story there in. So if it's may be gonna go toward something really scienc- and seemingly irrelevant from everyday life. I WANNA start out with something really relevant and like let you get that point only when some sort of authentic emotional question has been raised and then suddenly the science feels like almost this explanation. You're grateful for like. Oh thank God someone who's studied you. Know what air particles do in seventy two degree heat or whatever but Yeah and so. I think I'm always just trying to mess with what people think the stories about like I want it to balance from emotional to scientific to ernest to irreverent or a little low brow highbrow and just I think that that bounce that whiplash. That's how I try to hook people in and but yeah I think the main thing is just you know I learned at radio like I feel like that's where I really learned how to do journalism and that was five years of training in an era mostly before podcasting where the stuff was just going out on the radio and so there was this sense that talked about of just you know like this kind of old school. Campfire suspense. Like you. Just gotTa keep someone going because they can flip that station and if they just tuned in how can you give them enough to keep them oriented and hooked and he had a really low tolerance for like too much meandering and and I think that kind of just classic suspense and give seen details and let it be the kind of story that's GonNa like Hook Caveman you know? I think that that is something that's with me. I don't always succeed but that's like I'm trying to get someone not to flip the station. And so that's how I try. And then emotion like emotion never fails I think is dislike showcasing people's actual humor actual sadness like that. Is this powerful grenade that we get to work with in radio that like almost like this three D. paint. I like just the way that people's voices contains emotion is so powerful and select you just after interview. You find those hot moments in the new kind of like string as many of them together and set them up to really succeed. I think that that mix of emotion and whiplash is how I try to do. It does such a good answer does. Don't you feel like when something's not going where I think it is? I mean you can overdo it and then just feel disoriented and whatever but like I like it as a listener. I love it when I think like in some really ernest thing and then there suddenly taking the air out of themselves or the premise. Like I like that as a listener. I feel really well handled. I'm like oh. They kind of anticipated my secret judgment and that makes me feel safer and now. I WANNA like keep curling in close so I'm trying to think about that stuff as I go. And then tell you about molecules well. I'm not sure that we we undercut our own earnestness all that well last night but I know I know that's why I was self conscious I was like do. We need some more process questions but that was a process question. Sort of or that was that was a structure question but whatever the world can use some earn. I mean the world's got a lot of that. Maybe it's a moment for for K- thank you. Thank you for coming back on. Thank you for For last night and I'm so sorry about the simultaneous nightmare syndrome. Well hopefully they'll they'll It'll make their sweet dreams even sweeter..

ernest
"lulu" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

13:56 min | 10 months ago

"lulu" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"Getting to go at it. Almost felt like interviewing him because he left behind so much primary source material because he was funny and at times boring and my job was just mind the gems so I think that was part of what made it feel like a refuge or like a pillow or like there was just something about the archives. Were there aren't windows in? I was a little scared of the world when I started everything and like there was all these archive rooms are low on the windows. They're low on the noise like they're very hallowed protected space and paper is physically soft and this is a person who was dead and the meanings I drew. They weren't going to have an immediate effect or offend. Anyone hopefully to knows but I there was something like profoundly Just felt like refuge on refuge because it was also the thrill of getting lost in a story at least the illusion of a hunt of trying to find out how it ends in trying to make some sense of it so yeah I do think that was like that was maybe my like wading pool back into it all. Yeah I do when I in that process like when in your research did you encounter the darkness? The count for a long time before he found the darkness so. I saw hints of it fairly quickly because Google so he gets involved in some some scientific movements which in the light of today are horrific but I also knew that a lot of scientists of that era did and I didn't realize the particular role he played so like. There was a hint of like okay. There's some blood on your hands or there's some questionable things but I didn't understand the extent of it and then there was like a vague rumor that someone had written a book that suggested something kind of outlandish and I actually initially called the Stanford a retired Sanford archivist. Who just was like? Oh my gosh. That book is Hogwash. Like don't even bother with it and so I will. I knew there were like some hints of darkness but I wasn't sure what to make of them. But they certainly provided the part of the lust to dive into it like I was like this is GonNa be complicated. Those part of the reason I ask is that it's slow. Played in the book pretty seriously it. It takes a while for the darkness to show up and for the first I dunno third or half of the book or something you really just Kinda in it with him as this kind of pillar of optimism. Yeah and curiosity like he's he's not a deck at first like he's he's curious like he's often mystic but he is so devoted to like thongs and Dandelions he cares about the quote hidden insignificant. Like he's he's not just a pillar of confidence. He's there's like a humility to him. Which is just so alluring and appealing. Yeah he seems like it'd be a good hang totally and he's funny. Yeah he's just He's very charismatic. Really smart really curious person and so when the darkness arrives for me it was like real whiplash you know and I wondered in hindsight what it had been like to write that first third or half or whatever. It is kind of knowing what was coming. Yeah that I would say is like that's like the genius of my editor Johncock so the first draft I did so many more hints and foreshadows about the darkness. And there's still a few in there but they're I think they're way subtler and he was like no make this the reveal like he just kept being like you are giving too much away because to explain it in his life like. I do think that's how it unfolded in his life. I think it was a slow burn and that came from basically him starting to cling to much to his beliefs uncertainty. That's where I see the turn really start to happen for him and and so he. Yeah John was just like you gotta hide that more. Don't give it all away and I kind of fought against it at first but I think that makes it a better read like it makes it more interesting. Study where you're just like. Oh people aren't they? Don't start out bad. You know like they can start out. Great and things can just quietly go really wrong. My mom read the first draft to and she was like I just feel like he suddenly like I loved him and then I just was like so repulsed yeah. She had whiplash in that kind of like that. John also made me add this chapter chapter. Eleven it's only like a page and a half long but it's called the ladder and it's where you just like It's like Oh my God. Yeah we're trying to make some kind of sense of it which again I actually really resisted writing that chapter. But now I think it helps track the reader's experience of like what just happened. Can I ask you some Can I ask you some more like personal meeting of life stuff? Yeah if you want them. I worry that it's like this this so bored like I can also talk about ice cream if you wanna talk about meaning down as soon as you said. The words Mount Everest of emotion. This is where we are headed. Yeah right there let's go. Let's keep on climbing put on your crampons and listen. This is the moment we're limited. This is time for. It's time for question okay. Could you be a sense of where at vis-a-vis optimism at the moment? How does your current relationship with optimism? I think that I'm more optimistic now than I've ever been and I have a lot of grey hair sunlen. I wonder if those are connected like I think that I still get horrible lows. I totally do and I feel very like still in touch with the meaningless and current corona aside just like harsh. Oh so so much that's going on Says not to say that. I don't think about that and that that doesn't some days just like put me in a puddle but I think the thing that's changed is like having more like is this so weird to say in this moment but actually having more faith in humans like I think going into all this like. I just had a very unquestioned sense that humans are inherently selfish. And it's horrible kind of and like any time find someone who's not that is a giant win treasure you gotta hold onto it and celebrate it but like. I think there's just been years and years of studying people who are stubborn in the face of like whether it's an earthquake or virus or just a social pressure you know like what is every activist. What is anyone who's made any social change? It's just this likes maybe comes from rage rather than optimism but it is stubborn S. unlike that that force actually like so tremendous and I think I have more like yeah. I guess it's like the faith I can't find in the stars like it is in humans and I think I don't feel that every day but like to even feel that some days or to be able to meditate on that or think about it is really beautiful and it's a very different feeling to me. Than just like everyone is a selfish bloodthirsty monkey who doesn't care like it is a different feeling like it to believe in. Our species profoundly different experience of faith for me and did that come from reading the book I think it partly did it partly came from like growing older and continuing to report on other things and just seeing it around and but yeah there was. I mean there is a real moment like a small but big moment of learning for me in in these two women that I meet through just reporting on the book and trying to understand like the effects of some of David Starr Jordan's decisions on real people today. In kind of going down this whole huge wormhole of how policies he put in place hurt people who are not just living but are still hurting people like trying to just put some human measure or like experienced to that led me to these two women who just like helped me to see very clearly that like the small ways that we tend to one another even conversationally lifting US admiral with a dumb joke or you know like just the really small things the really freaking matter that they can keep a person tethered to this place. That is what makes up. The you know the fiber of the tether eighties. These tiny freaking interactions like laughing. Someone's joke making a joke. Cutting the tension out of the air sending a cheesy card like that stuff. That is how you like. Make the moral fabric in that has consequence in like just hearing it in their lives and how they talked about it was was powerful like it was nice to think about those things as almost concrete objects the matter in a life like. It's not just wishy washy be nice. It's just like the clumsy ways we are human to one another can change the trajectory of life and then thereby society. You just said matters. The word matters like fifteen times I think. Yeah which is like a little bit. You know what the book is about is about like Does anything matter and the jumping off point for the book. Is You like sitting on the Massachusetts Coast. With Your Dad. When you're seven. And Him telling you pretty bluntly that nothing matters. Yeah and don't believe anyone who tells you it does. They're liars and they're fools could super just read about it. Yes but also funny about it. He's a very joyful person. But yeah very much. That was his answer right by says that you know like it. It left a different impression on seven year. Old Lulu. Yeah yes. And that's part of the whole thing is trying to figure out whether it is whether that's right and in a way I feel like you landed on this alternate definition. Yeah I think part of the giant Ha The big. Aha I have for my dad like comes in the form of what I call them. The book Danny Line Principle. Which is this very simple thought exercise. That essentially shows that worth is relative. The idea that like a dandelion to Gardner might be a weed and something to call but to an herbalist. It might be a profound herb that is useful for laxatives are eyesight or whatever or two hippie. It might be a crown to be might be a meeting better. Just this idea that like worth is in the eye of the beholder or the hands of the utilize like the just worthy subjective and that there are so many ways of defining worse and actually like to even. Just be smug. A nihilistic Dark and funny like my dad and only about worth from the perspective of stars and chaos. Which is you know. He subscribed to the like. We are on a SPEC on his back. Spec which Neil degrasse Tyson's famous one of his famous lines like just the were nothing and soon gone and that is super valid. That's an important way to consider are worth. I agree but don't stop there and I think it was just this simple like for me flick in the forehead of like yeah. His ways is totally valid but there are other ways to define worse than the whole point of Darwin is like. Don't get stuck on your hierarchies or your intuitive sense of narrative or of nature like that is one of the main points just time and time again. He hammers like humans are really bad at understanding. The whole he calls it the quote whole machinery of life and just that there is more complexity than our humble little. I can handle and so like there was something really satisfying to me about like taking Darwinian the to the concept of if we matter or not unlike coming back to my dad in my head and being like we do if you want to be scientifically accurate from some perspective. We better from the perspective of another human life. We matter like we do and again on one hand like so simple but the way that I think I finally like perform some just like rhetorical gymnastics to get there for myself felt really satisfying because it felt like it was by his own terms like at the end of the day was by like a scientists atheist nihilistic terms. I felt like I had a a retort thirty years three decades later. You touch on this little bit but along the same lines of optimism. Like what's your relationship to chaos right now because the book is about on some pretty profound level.

John Google Sanford Mount Everest Neil degrasse Tyson US David Starr Jordan editor Massachusetts Coast Gardner
"lulu" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

06:35 min | 10 months ago

"lulu" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"So we got you know a three course meal delivered to our house with a bottle of wine and the link to the film to watch it but you know at the end of the. What was that like? What was that experience like other than novel? A little weird you know is really it was nice. It was like you know Friday night movie and to have this meal that we We we didn't choose it. They just said. Are you allergic to anything? And it was just we'd been cooking for ourselve- like for the last two weeks. It was nice to get something new and different and so that was a nice surprise. Did did you have the feeling that you were watching it with other people at the same time? No that's the thing that you cannot replicate because at the end of the day when you're watching it at home you can still hit pause to go to the bathroom. You can control the condition under which you're watching it. You're not hearing the collective gasp the collective laughter the collective tears and for me I remember so distinctly the first time we screen the publicly was at the premiere at Sundance and it was at the eccles theatre which is like really like a student auditorium so it has all these weird echoes and stuff. But it's kind of infamous experience of that that theater and so you really really see the room resonates and I didn't WanNa stay for it. I was so nervous that I wanted to leave and and Kim mutiny. The head of the festival said you have to stay and it's an experienced this you know so. I did and I remember like the first ten minutes when the room laughed. It was this like I visibly like fell or viscerally. Felt this sense of relief because the whole room just laughed and there. Was this lightness. Even though it's such a dark subject matter and I knew that it was going to be okay and you just can't replicate that at home. How do you think that this period of our lives is going to change your work? Well it's already changing a lot of things because any speech that I wrote before all of this happened that I was going to do a keynote. Honor a tedtalk on. I have to reevaluate you. Know because the context of the importance of what I'm talking about has shifted and so I have to reevaluate what things I want to talk about and I'm not and I don't know the answer to that yet but it's also affected the kind of stories I want to tell for. Sure like my priorities. In my life have become focused in a different way when you sort of downsize. Right everything you you you kind of really cheap have to think about what is important in. Your Life. Let's talk about the farewelled just a couple of minutes. Lou was one of my very favorite movies last year and it did such a such an elegant job at speaking to two cultures at once. And now we're going through a period in the US where Chinese Americans are under a lot more pressure and more hate is being directed toward them than previously. And I'm curious if it makes you. Think differently about the work that you created last year. It's underscored the importance of what I was trying to explore. Because I'm experiencing it now on a much greater scale right so here in America we talk a lot about the hate For Chinese Americans and because people are ignorant They clump everyone together. So it's more Asian Americans So they might see somebody Japanese or Korean and just think that they're Chinese And so you know. There's a lot of ignorance but what I also experienced that maybe not everybody is experiencing in America is that it goes the other way too right. Which is that. A lot of Chinese are hating Americans because the narrative that they're being fed is that Americans brought the disease over there And now in Hong Kong you know. They've really contained disease but people returning from abroad Students ETC FROM EUROPE FROM AMERICA. Coming back or bringing the disease the virus back in and so they're having a second wave of it And so it's again it's It's this disorder pointing fingers back and forth end It's a lot of it has to do with media and how they're forming the narrative for their citizens And it's honestly creating a lot of divides within my family because I have family in America at family in China and based on the news that they're hearing the stories that they're hearing they're going to direct their anger in a different place and as the person once again in the middle who's trying to bring peace and say hey guys like with all of so many people dying in the world. Are we really going to sit here and fight over whose fault it is because if you know if if one of US somebody got sick and And they were no longer here. Is that the last that you WanNa have that you spend you know on some kind of video chat arguing about whose which nations fault. This all is So yeah it's it's very relevant and I think more than ever it's about a global community coming together. We'll we'll keep reading. Thank you so much for taking the time with US. Lulu thank you. That was Lulu Wong. She wrote and directed the farewell. If you're looking for a good quarantine film and you haven't watched it yet or even if you have. I highly recommend watching it special. Thanks this week to Madison. Shaffer for producing this bonus episode. I'm Jessi Hempel. Thanks for listening. Keep your distance but stay social. See You on Monday..

US America Jessi Hempel Kim mutiny Sundance eccles theatre Hong Kong Lulu Wong Shaffer Lou Madison China EUROPE
"lulu" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

11:25 min | 10 months ago

"lulu" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"Hey it's Jesse. Last month I was supposed to go to south by southwest. I was going to be doing a ton of interviews for hello Monday and one of the ones I was most excited about. Was this interview with this writer and film director Lulu Wong and Lula's having moment she wrote and directed the farewell. Maybe you saw it. It was this movie about a Chinese family. The grandma had cancer. Her family decided not to tell her but then they all wanted to see her so they concocted this elaborate story about one of the grandkids was going to get married so they'd all have an excuse to get together in China with the movie was really about was how the granddaughter who is an artist living in New York how she made her peace with this weird kind of lie anyhow. It cleaned up at the awards this year. The Globes critics choice awards independent spirit awards and we were going to talk about all of that at South by South West and then there was no south by South West and we were both so busy in the weeks that followed that we shelved the conversation but then I saw that Lulu had started using her twitter account to ask for donations of masks and personal protection equipment. She was literally willing to drive all over L. A. To pick it up and bring it to the hospital so I called her so Lulu. I want to start by asking if everyone in your family is okay and where you are. I am in Los Angeles. Right now. Quarantined WITH MY PARTNER. Very Jenkins And everybody's okay. You know so far. Everyone is safe. my brother lost his job. He's chef and so I think the restaurant industry is really Taking a huge hit but aside from that everybody is healthy so far. I understand Lulu that. You've actually been very involved in in trying to lend support and being service during this time. I wonder if you could talk about that a little bit. Yeah I mean I you know have social media like a lot of people do and Often question why I have social media and often threaten to get off of it and it can often be toxic by in this particular situation Where a friend of mine her sister is an Er Doctor. and The hospital asked all of the healthcare workers to procure their own. Ppa personal protection equipment Which is pretty outrageous. You know to Be at the front lines of This emergency and putting their health at risk their lives at risk and feeling very alone in having to just have the basic resources to protect themselves so my friend asked me to help amplify the message of the call for P. P. E. N. That you know threw me into Just sorting through messages trying to figure out how to create a system where we can actually get people who have these Supplies whether it's n ninety five masks surgical masks gloves shoe protectors etc. You know how to get them to the people who need them so how does expect that doctors and nurses are going to find protection particularly right now. I don't know what the hospitals are thinking. I mean what I heard and I'm not an expert. I just have to say you know 'cause I I don't work in that industry but my friends who do have told me that they were being told not to wear masks. You know a lot of the executives working at the hospital Were discouraging nurses and doctors from wearing the end. Ninety five Basques unless they were certain that they were treating a covert patient now with the lack of testing as well. It's pretty impossible to know who Scott Kobe in. Who doesn't if somebody comes in to be treated for flu like symptoms or otherwise. You just don't know what you're getting yourself into. And so they felt like they couldn't trust the leaders And a lot of them are the you know. The executives are administrative. People are are working at a corporate level. There's just not enough. That is overwhelming to think about. It's sort of inspiring to think that there might be people who just have one or two extra masks in their quake kit and are willing to give them up right now because it's kind of a scary moment to give something like that up. It's also a scary moment not to give it up. Yeah absolutely and I think it's just really sad too because when we Put the call out and we got a bunch of these donations For you know certain. La Hospitals. I got so many messages from people all over the country saying I saw what you did. Can you help us to and it was just really sad because there's no way for us to help all of these people that's an overwhelming feeling right. Now right like how do you figure out how to make your contribution? When you know it's pales in terms of what's needed yes absolutely you can get involved by following Lulu Wong on twitter. You know next week. We're launching a special two part series on artists performers. I'm thinking about it. As our attempt to highlight the lost art of twenty twenty. There were so many amazing musicians and creative people and artists who just didn't get their debut. Maybe they didn't get to perform at all this trouble for their business. It's trouble for their art. It's trouble for all of us so I asked Lulu to think a bit about how the viruses impact on her work and the larger film community would play yeah. I'm really fortunate because the projects I was working on have all been in development stage so I had a feature that I'm developing with big beach the producers who made the farewell And it's called children of the new world and It's adapted from a short story And then I have a TV series with Amazon Nicole. Kidman called ex-pats so I was in the writer's room for that when all of this happened And so now we're doing our writer's room remotely and writing our own episodes I also have another TV series called family meal that we were starting to put together. A writer's room for that I was going to go into the summer But you know all of it is writing and so the the fortunate thing is that I can still do it from home. It's not the same as being in person of course A writer's room is where you know me and other writers get together every day. We're brainstorming and we're putting beads of the story up on a whiteboard and so of course it's not quite the same to do it remotely but at least we're still able to minster projects forward. Are you able to? I guess. Replicate that chemistry. Does it change? It does change. It changes a lot. You know and it's one of the things I love about. Film IS THE COLLABORATION. I love being on set. I love the. It's my first writer's room. I've never worked in television before. But it's been really eye-opening because it is so wonderful to be in a room together to order lunch together We were in an office space and there were other people in other industries and we would be like. Did you see that guy in the hallway or you know like you have all of these jokes and it's it's like going to school or going to summer camp and it is really bonding and I really miss that. You know it is now back to just like me in a room and when we do our remote writer's room everybody's in different situations in in different spaces. There's kids in the background. There's a lot of distractions and then the signals. Never quite so good and so it is a lot of this like you go ahead. No you go ahead and then everybody starts talking at once and then you go you go so. It's you know all of the frustrations of technology. It's great for you that you had nothing that was about to debut that you're in the part of the creative process where you might have decided to take time by yourself to work on. Big Ideas My friends who were writers sometimes joke that actually the world is just sort of resorted to do their best case scenario all the time. Yes a lot of introversion. But you're also part of a writing community and curious how this might impact if you have any thoughts about how this might impact. I'm creative projects. At Large that would have debuted the spring. Well I mean I think it's It's something I think about a lot because I have a lot of friends who are film. Makers that would have had a film perhaps even their debut film premiere at a Film Festival and I think You know of course. Production is going to be affected and pushed You know we. It's a bunch of scouting trips for various projects. That are you know now on the back burner But I I think. The most devastating thing are for the people who have projects that were ready to be released into the world's because they been working so hard for many many years on a film and You know as a filmmaker who I just had my film premiere at Sundance in two thousand nineteen and admit so much to how the world was how the how the film was introduced to the world you know to be able to have that. Sundance Premiere to have twelve hundred thirteen hundred people in a room for the premiere the energy of that. You can't replicate that and people who had potential theatrical releases that are now cancelled the studios are trying to figure out. If it's worth it to hold the film and release it wants. This is all over or what's happening more and more is that they're just releasing it digitally so. I think it's it's really hard for the filmmakers and I think it's also really scary for the state of Movie theaters particularly the Independent Small Art House theaters. That are really struggling. Louise spoke to the feeling that comes with gathering around the premier being in person for the big debut Anything that comes close to replicating that. I don't think so I mean I guess we're going to find out how because I know several films That were made by friends who are doing like digital premieres and We just did one with Amazon for a film where they sent us dinner and then gave us the linked to the film to watch that particular night.

Lulu Wong writer twitter China South West Sundance Premiere New York Los Angeles Globes Jenkins PARTNER Sundance Scott Kobe La Hospitals Amazon Nicole Amazon P. P. E. N. Small Art House Louise
"lulu" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

01:36 min | 11 months ago

"lulu" Discussed on Asian Enough

"Is so <SpeakerChange> lovely <Speech_Music_Male> all right. So that's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the second episode of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Asian. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank you so much <Speech_Music_Male> director. Awam <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for joining <SpeakerChange> us and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> thank you for <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> listening. Asian <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> enough is hosted <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> by meet Johnny <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Motto. And by <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Frank Sean. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Our senior <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> producers are <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Palta and Line <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Anwar <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> our executive <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> producer is abby <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> venturous Swanson. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Our engineer <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is Mike <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Heflin. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Original Music <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> was composed <SpeakerChange> by <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Andrew. Ethan <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> tune in here next <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> week. We've got <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Pulitzer Prize winning <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> novelist. Tom <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> went so when <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Jonathan Brandon <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> puts a description <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of a sandwich in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> his in his novels as <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I understand what <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> period <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> are the Vietnamese person. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm expected to say <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I eat a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> comma <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> delicious beef noodle <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Vietnamese soup <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> when you said <SpeakerChange> that you know you're <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> talking to these people <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> if you like <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as in enough <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> subscribe and leave <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> us a five star <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of you need <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> all five of those stocks <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the most flattering <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> things that you can think <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of derided bones <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> special <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thanks to Julia. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Turner Geoff Berkshire <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Read Johnson. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Shelby Grad <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Neela Victoriano <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> finch <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> shots and eight <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> twenty four <SpeakerChange> for that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> clip from the farewell <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> remember <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Sunday <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> shift. Maybe <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a female <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> filmmaker will <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> hear <SpeakerChange> those magical <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> words. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> know you've only done a couple <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of documentaries. But <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> how would you like to do <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> this? Twenty million <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> dollar. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> You know studio <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> comedy. I think <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you'd be great <SpeakerChange> for <Music> it.

"lulu" Discussed on Asian Enough

Asian Enough

11:53 min | 11 months ago

"lulu" Discussed on Asian Enough

"From the La Times studios this Asian every week on this podcast. We talk to one Asian American celebrity about the joys complications and everything else that comes along with being Asian American. I'm frank show and I'm Jenny. Moderate we know that the world feels crazy right now and that. There's a lot on everyone's mind. We recorded most of this podcast before our current National Public Health crisis exploded so we hope that this show gives you a brief break from the anxieties. That were all feeling right now. And we'll have a bonus episode for you later this week. A special quarantine that takes a look at how the corona viruses affecting our communities this week on episode two of our show we have our conversations with the thoughtful the fund the fierce the powerful. Luwan sheet erected last year's filmed the farewell. I knew that I didn't want to tell a story that was biased. And that was just that exists only to prove my point of view. That's interesting so just to set it up. Luang filmed farewell is the semi-autobiographical story of an American woman named Billy was played by Tina who travels to China where her family is gathering under false pretenses to saved. Because they're keeping a very big secret from Billy's beloved grandmother. She called nine. The farewell won the Spirit Award for best film. It went off a fina a historic Golden Globe and it is one of the defining movies about the Asian American immigrant kids experience. Yeah this movie wrecks me and it kind of wrecked. My Dad saw watched it with him and I saw this tier will dad tears. We will talk to Lula about the movie of course but also about what it was like to be in the middle of thunder and bidding war like she was the farewell and the problem with diversity programs in Hollywood and she has a funny story about what was going on right before she walked onstage to accept her indie spirit award. She gave this really amazing and true speech that went viral. And I've really been looking forward to this conversation so let's get started so you and I met just over a year ago at the Sundance Film Festival where the Farewell World premiered and left me cry like we being seriously like weeping in my seat In the theater lights came up. All these ushers. We're trying to get me to leave and I had a ride so hard like I had snaffled into my jacket sleeve. It was like it was a bad scene for me So it's very special. That's where we met and then we spoke for the first time. I heard your story and I heard more about in. I have been so happy to see how the rest of the year unfolded for you. But what does it feel like for you to be on the side of it I think I'm still processing all of it because it's been such a roller coaster of emotions and I was telling the rest of the team this weekend. That in some ways sundance was the most meaningful moment. 'cause it's the introduction of your baby to the world and just having no idea how it's GonNa land and we were all together. You know that was what was so beautiful. Is that we. We are all in that same room and we all experienced it. We all brought our fears and excitement. And you feel like you're not sure and of course everyone's like looking at reviews right after but I think everyone felt the energy from the first moment that the room laughed. Everybody just broke into laughter and it was very unexpected to. It wasn't a place that anyone thought was like a hilarious joke moment. And then you know from there you can hear people cry you. Can you just feel this energy? This communal thing which is what's so beautiful about The theatrical experience and then the sale the late night like you know bidding war that you've heard about as a filmmaker that's like the dream and then you're actually they're being driven. I'm like in my PJ's with a giant co being driven into like this mansion. You're just like what is going on as what happens like late at night you know like they literally were like get out of bed right now. The car is going to be in front of your house. Get in the car like we're taking meetings you know it's like you're not sleeping. You're like celebrating. But you're anxious and we're all together and then the weird thing about this whole year. Is that for the rest of the year. You're kind of separated. You know it's like oftentimes at events it's like me Aquafina sometimes just me. Sometimes there's Jau sometimes you know maybe Danny's there but It just we just everywhere and you're not sure how many tickets we get to this thing or that thing in who can come and what's happening and a we lost. You know you're you're like. Oh we didn't get nominated but you're like trying to still like hold on to the feeling from that. You made a movie that mattered. And like we're all trying to like remind each other of that and but it's complicated and so by the end of the season it was like how do I bring everybody together. And so I rented a house and just said everyone come over. Watch the awards and let's just really like be in a small space together and my brother cooked and other show I'm brother WHO's a chef. Yes and he had come to China and men everyone and So I think when you were filming when we were filming yeah he actually came to China and hadn't seen anyone since then but that was really important to me because at the end of the day. It's like you know we know what we went through to get this film made. And you know we were on the ground and Battling and And and so I think it's just important not to forget those things and it becomes about like this other thing you're part of this bigger conversation and everyone so angry but for us. It's so like everyone does get angry. I'm like we made a film that's like eighty percent subtitles in Chinese. And no one wanted to make. And then it ended up making like twenty million dollars domestically in theaters. Like we've one guys like me but also yes. We should be angry. You know about the bigger picture about what we're but at the same time it was important for us to just feel feel the weight of The change and and and what everyone contributed to okay so in this scene? Billy's visiting her parents when she senses. Something's not right and this is before they go to visit nine. Nine China and Billy's prodding her mother and she gets some surprising news. Billy's mom played by Diana. Lynn Speaks I. I always going to leave like this. Parbat sexy I hope so. Why not try to save them? You should change expensive lifestyle. Give me shit every time I come home. I'm not coming home anymore voice. Xp Beats Evening at six PM. What's wrong with them? Nothing tired see okay. He's fine. We just busy busy with white. It's going on getting married so we'll have to go to China since when girl you. You don't need to go no expecting you to go. I mean it only cousin days. They should be there okay. Knocked her up. How as you want five. That's not enough. Make a dozen cans. Good I love this movie. And there's also such a great international cast here from time up playing Billy's dad to Zhao Shuzhen. Who Plays Nine I. And they're filling in these great really specific nuances across generations in his family. When I heard you talk about what you were asked to do to the film what financiers wanted and when ironically heard that the farewell was classified as a foreign film. I cringed really hard in this very specific way. It kind of felt like what the film was going through. His what Asian Americans go through and part of that is probably because this is a story inspired by your own actual life but you talk about how you like push back against all of this stuff You know why did you push back? And and and do you think people understood what you were trying to say or whether you're just trying to change it I think that when I was first pitching eat people. Don't ask questions enough in this town. I think I think that's a something to look at because you know as journalists. That's the first thing that you do. Is You interrogate. You ask questions you try to understand and I think that so often in Hollywood. The first thing that is done is such a cynicism that immediately you pitch a story and it's immediately like how do we make it like that other successful movie and when you're film doesn't have a lot of calms Which is like the industry term comparisons And you can't like name like a calm. That didn't do well like that's not gonNA work. You have to name a calm that similar in tone similar plot and then also successful in the box office. And you'RE GONNA like you're like this foam is going to be like that and it's going to do just as well but when you're trying to do something original that you can't have that so. I think that was the pushback from the People. Initially pitched it to where they were like. We have to change it to be more like one of these other films already exists and I was trying to say actually. I'm trying to do something that hasn't been done But it's based on my own experience and that's why I wanna make it because I haven't seen this before so that was really challenging this interesting. It's almost like a structural response against new stories. If you can't related to old stories it's harder to understand Lulu also did this American Life Story version of the farewell That came out. How many years ago was it? The two thousand sixteen thousand sixteen so that was kind of like the first. Go at the story. Yeah exactly and then of course when I did this American Life. The experience was so different because it was like that's fascinating. Why did your family do this? And how did you feel about it? But then how did they feel? And the what did you say? And then what did your mom saying? What did your dad? San was all of these questions that some of which I had the answers to some of which I didn't have the answers to and I said well let's explore that. Let's go talk to them. Let me call my great aunt because you know what I actually never asked her that question and so through that process. I got to understand my own story. Better it's engine. You bring up ca kind of having to call your great aunt. Both Gin and I have had to tell stories about our own families on occasion is very awkward sometimes chosen to really yeah. Yeah but then. There's this like really complicated responsibility that you take on. How do I tell my family story? How much of my family's story do I want to reveal? How much of my own family's experience have I processed myself and understand and you're so scared to get.

Billy China Hollywood La Times sundance Golden Globe Lula American Life Story Danny American Life San Parbat Tina Lynn Lulu Diana
"lulu" Discussed on The Brilliant Idiots

The Brilliant Idiots

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"lulu" Discussed on The Brilliant Idiots

"Just because they're both basketball players like what he's leaving it's over. I'm not don't you mentioned Lisa Lesley's Lee's role in L. A. With the sparks right into basketball and how she's been a a a trailblazer for females in basketball L. L. ages went through the definition. See how so. Let me put this context. La In general right now is so deep down like you just went to this now coby on a whole other level the day Eh. Grammy's nobody was even talking about the grammar talking about Kobe. And and like the dust isn't even settled yet and not just keep thinking about his daughter and the fact that her Her school has an empty chair. Her House has an empty. I just can't get over that so I think it's just way out of pocket but again we've just made it permissible for these icons. Do whatever they I wanNA do. And and what's the point. Yeah Asian Yeah. What are you trying to do what I don't understand the point and I I love whoever wrote them courses is I was like wow shame on her questions out but gail had to say that I mean you you saw what was on the paper see Gazza of cloud through like now? I'm not going there. I hope she explains it. I'm sure she will. You know once you start to see back last. I just WanNa know what what she was trying to get out of that conversation. I felt that I would like to have you do remember that Oprah had received achieved award at the Golden Globes. She spoke about Me Too and she said you know. I can't wait till the day she ended up by sad. Can't wait to the day that no woman has to utter. The words metoo again again. She had the world behind her and champion. And your champion women who wanted to get behind the me too movement but I have said like me too movement has become the new HIV. It's it's just moving all over to everybody's catching it. Anybody can catch it. There's no regulation for it. There's no cure to it. And if you say somebody has it you just treat them a certain way. It's nice to corona bars uh-huh HIV. We don't know Corona Byron me to take you to fuck out okay. Maybe maybe there's been events investment in Madison. Addison maybe allergy but you know what I mean like at this point is not really. I don't feel like it's really fair And so yeah I mean. I think it's something that she started out. Really getting in a lot of women behind our on but now it's just too much and I hate to say and I'm a woman it's become like a joke really it's not. The seriousness. Nisa has been diminished so certain extent because they put everything in one basket. Don't saying like like it's like if a guy you know grabbed your book back in the day NATO. The same bucket is bill cosby like it's it's levels right like everything is not the same. Everything's shouldn't be in one basket. And that's what they did. Sounds like. Oh well listen Jason Lee Garden must've forgotten about me is out right now. Yes okay. Thank you for coming. Jason you won't twitter instagram and all that stuff all that oh my go was on posting The only Jason Leeann add Hollywood on Knox Lulu Lala Rams at Louie Louie La. We share one L. U. L. U. Y.. La La Lulu. I follow I follow along. You follow follow all be. We share one into one of your personal glaciers. Now I don't have my personal page out. She I get really matters the public profile but listen Lulu Lila. I love y'all Jason. Say it back the Avi to Charlemagne Bro. Come on come on Hollywood online there. Okay I'M GONNA be in March. It's like I got like ten elevates much 'cause I'm taping something so I'll be out there is a wax wax wax and keep it fly. Flyover you dig out. How can we get to the Barbecue restaurant? The bathroom came back leaning on the counter. Can't like really out. He leaned on still registered the sexiest the world. The Graham Wax King W X K Y and G in the bullying willing to be S- podcast. Yes check out the bully Beat podcast and you go to my gratify Angelo right. Always have you listened to. The podcast was smart. You think we're intelligent. You think we're brilliant. You absolutely right but if you listen to the podcast and you think we'll just a couple of years don't know Shit you're right to this podcast. I can't thank you for listening..

Oprah Jason Lee Garden La La Lulu basketball Jason Nisa Lulu Lila Grammy bill cosby Corona Byron Lisa Lesley Kobe gail Jason Leeann HIV Louie Louie La Lulu Lala L. L. Angelo Golden Globes
"lulu" Discussed on The Brilliant Idiots

The Brilliant Idiots

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"lulu" Discussed on The Brilliant Idiots

"I told them like look. You're pretty messed up to me last year. When I was helping you out I need to give me like a month for me to get over the resentment towards you and nine nine days later he was already with a girl in the bed with her too? Yeah it was his ex and Cottam Dan. When in your gut is telling you something you'll find ways that's something I gotta give? Women was he when he got his accent was. He's on pills hills. He's on drugs very wet area. This guy's drowsy came down to the point. You know what. Honestly he wasn't a lot of painkillers. He was on a lot of medication. Drive you it's crazy thoughts. Thank you very fair point. Nigga go out. It's not like he's villages some Newport see he went back to his exile. He claims that he didn't fucker that she was just on under the bed. And I'm like now I gotTa tell me the Shit Man hurt on your pain medication entertainers Bush's it's a real quick. What if he really didn't do nothing? Did you ever think of that drive and bring your valid respect. You weren't there. He probably needed some water. Take appeals I think about it. WHO's the next person he probably could call to bring him something his mind that maybe check? I wish him the very best driver. It is what it is but he cheated on you. I finally got him to admit like just fucking being. That's one thing I already know. Just man up okay and just tell me tell me that you only at least that that's the other problem when you do commit lying and cheating and you've got to commit all the way like you can't you got you. I would deny that shit all the way if I was GONNA lie. Idle haven't been so far for that. She just tell me the truth and everything will be easier to just say the fucking truth because now you're complicating everything so much more. Just say the truth is that what is it true. I really didn't do anything but you won't accept that because you have in your mind which I did so you won't accept that maybe this then you have to take ownership because why did you lie from the beginning. Had you just been honest and be like you know what in this award for the pills in this whole conversation. which has been exhausted? Is The reason why I'm fucking single. My only dilemma is what you doin' tonight what you do this weekend. What are we doing next month? Lonely Life Jason. No it's not but I have not lonely. I'm not lonely by any measure I I wasn't I wasn't lonely either but I just wasn't on. What the fuck you gotta flashlight now? So you've got leslie down to me. I did it. Just try. Brian play around with I. It's not like my new girl you need said about how he's fucking this flashlight. It's that's what you gotta do. I do that's not cheating isn't it. That's the girl vibrant all the time she cheated on me but he's arguing with his self of whether or not he should come in the flesh light because coming and all boys he's like this. The flashlight is only flight practicing. You're supposed to counter pumps and not when I know when I do the flesh that I'm doing around like six seven hundred pumps so I'm like I. I was running on the treadmill county and two hundred and fifty would be in a matter of you said what ten minutes like. If I'm if I'm like I did leg day is like twenty five bucks a minute if I do leg day like forty minute so in ten minutes did about like four hundred dollars. I've never counted pump and I bet you as as long as you do. Why do you look so confused? I'm trying to figure out what the fuck. If he took all bully and the beast I told you like you got to sit there and pound kamalia pumped do not gender does because it keeps me from compass. I've never heard this shit. My my count his pumps too he probably. ABC's or something like that. No Ah your favorite song. I'm GonNa tell you what you're coming back. I got like the metal rod on the bed reached up and grabbed her odds on your hand touches that cold steal. It just keeps you from like you've got to do something from how beautiful you woman is. How was your brain? So I guess count and I'd like it for the. Oh the the best thing to do is like fuck up on the calendar. Start over what you're saying. What are you guys like to minutemen? Is that what it is. Yeah I mean you will ski do that in two minutes off on women for when we come back because number ever wonder you smell good in the pussy is amazing very hard not to come fast when you're beautiful. That's the COP OUT USOV beautiful. I just came in like two minutes. Yam blame it on your beauty. You see yeah made always try to blame you for some shit. Don't just don't do something this don't Moan too much of you're gonNA definitely get to get outta moaning tens you guys off of you. If you moan too much. Just shut up for the you know that like literally ninety percent of a man sex life is spent trying to figure out how not to come fast talking about since we from time we fucking I guarantee. Now you've got to come for every time everytime nobody's messy girl. My first thing is I can't Fast I gotta think of something before I smoke a blunt I got US I think about some bad do. I'm a fall play king like you know what I'm saying. You just gotTa make sure that she gets hers a couple of times before you even start. He didn't days as toy pumps. Because I'm at the point my life where I'm happy. I'm happy when I you know. How do you make though twenty thirty two year? How do you keep sex fresh with just two people for twenty two years I mean that's I mean listen we we've been together kids? Yeah well it's not like we the only people we've been with you know but as you get older you start to realize that it's not just about the physical is about emotional and spiritual and mental like those connections with the sex totally different ballgame August. I haven't got to that level yet. 'cause love y'all when Y'all get to that point against point with somebody really love y'all and Y'all difference. Oh my God lanes weren't hub for my mind is just. I can't have sex with the different races at a different island. I can have park sex. I have all kinds of seconds. It's so crazy. Why have more you know when I need more when I have time for more of that one person could really know you could count on fine on a personal level like success in God? That's who I share everything with God but you know you're never made love. Who never made when I was in a relationship of course but making now I'm literally it's moving slow to make you know like I'm I'm just in the pursuit of something with my business like I'm really just in love with that? Like oh I think you know. Forty two now advocate Eric. Yourself you need to advocate for your legacy. My Book is my legacy. My brand is my legacy like what I do is my legacy. I know that I'm not going to be you at least right now. A good parent. I just don't have the time now. I know if I had a kid I'd be like where's my kid all day long. That's all I would add whereas my my kid I just don't have any right now. I never made love Lulu Lulu in La La of course thousand times I have but now I haven't that's like he said you can get a man. I mean he's still contact..

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"lulu" Discussed on PTI

PTI

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"lulu" Discussed on PTI

"No i think that this thing was entirely stage was what if it wasn't staged and he's got to felony arrests and ten misdemeanors on this then then you know what then try them and sending the jail if he gets convicted and then he'll be even more of a draw staged and it's real i mean he's got these charges it doesn't doesn't hurt him if you want to do and some jt i don't know i don't think court i would bet no i would bet he's going to make more money i would laugh at all these pooh bah's sport should diamondbacks manager torey lulu be fined for what he said to y'all year melies or have to explain this the diamondbacks manager was upset the leaner framed a couple of pitches they look to be low they got punched out so he runs out there and he says to the pyre you you gotta stop this mother leaving right and he says it twice so molina wants him to be fine he's not going to be fine he shouldn't be fine but you know what i want to see if the next time they play the velo is that his name avello he orders pitcher to drill molina them i'm entirely on the side of yada your molina and he should have gone after the veloping fire and should if he could get them right now should the manager no if you take that hyphenated word out of baseball you got nothing left preferred is it not it was actually needed it was absolutely determined because you're saying he sees big i'm so good you understand your all right thanks.

molina baseball diamondbacks torey lulu
"lulu" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"lulu" Discussed on WLOB

"On right that was one of our boys hey look who it is it's mary sister bay hello jack well now that you mentioned your voice i wish you try to raise a little might be confusing what do you mean confusing people think they're hearing lulu on both network were you raised in little now tell me how come you drop in on the program bait mary sent me why the doctor wanted to take it easy for another week or so but baby you haven't you know any acting experience you were graduated from high school.

lulu
"lulu" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"lulu" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"Lulu he did put a lot of thought into it and the hungry how is pizza was delicious i have they done it at the fair is coming up this weekend i i think it's coming up this week thought it was thursday how is meeting challenge sing for promoting an event tomorrow three p pm okay tomorrow at the florida state fairgrounds they've already selected there are other contestants uh but show up and and watch at the four state fairgrounds tomorrow from three to seven and shut duty unveil banks over that smells sopaz only gonna get worse oh man those chicken feed look good yeah down on oh we're going to start with i think i'll start with a try because the chicken so much more visually disturbing art with the smoked levi's as lines smoke with the smoke tried i'd rather hear it it looks like a sponge oh my god dad's vehicle if you could survive there buddy all that stomach lining oh look you oh is the stumbling all right here we go stomach lining of a man all right i'm gonna go four k you have nice we've already peace tonia uh home a gop oh my god what good or not good if not good a oh my god the vote rhetoric and the whole way while get it up paul unwilling it up it gets better though you started with the hardest thing yeah you've got to get another bit more delicious from here you i probably should've boiled at for labeling the vaxxers little chewy yet its own little crew we what is it like the taste of fiber and a high there a lot of flavor going on which i what i appreciate that there is this game me earth be a ton describable taste of an animal yeah with the consistency of just like i'm chewing and crewing and is just not going away i need a little water yeah profitable thorough completely in the shape it was when it went into my mouth there you might want to don't do it doubt artist builder yeah yes spit it added yeah yy'all round on wednesday almost a smaller i'm a miracle oh god yes there cultures people fight over the they do they do that flavor is just what our taste of the trial oh yeah that is something i mean i've had came he before right but not far from the.

levi paul florida gop four k
"lulu" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"lulu" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"During the edges alternative pop music friday all of them look created love lulu were as known this is a love the b two new oh no more than lift some who were zac efron this say only lulu love the no meemaw longoverdue so my life will be in your lucky man moya anxiously being laughing we may know them all way his his in law long time the and love lien mind no i am now live may fall where is your no one else mojo flo rida no the love you oh loan all of them same munwar his god saying lulu so love you a day long then you know so you my life yagi bring norway sleeping lab laugh at them the laura liam payne no.

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