30 Burst results for "Lucinda"

"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:26 min | 3 months ago

"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"This is Alban, hit pause. We'll be right back with the rest of this beautiful. So lucinda with moin box dot com, you're reading this letter. This is raw. It's beautiful. Please continue. I can very clearly tell you where my strength comes from now. It comes from all of you. Just as a house is built brick by brick, so our companies built human by human. Each one being part of the whole. And the joy of life is created not by the events of the day, but the people we love, the journey along with us. Isaac Newton once said that. If I have seen further, it is because I have stood on the shoulders of giants. I feel that way about my life and the success of moin. You are the Giants on whom's shoulders I stand. Thank you for being a part of my human experience. My life is better because you were in it. I go boldly into the new year with a newfound strength. One that was not given to me, but one that I have earned. That gives me the confidence to walk softly and curious which blade. Lucinda. Now, the thing is, what I want you to know, Eric is in that whole balling and squall and praying and meditating. I came across your book. And in your book of miracles, when I picked it up, I thought we were going to have like, I don't know what I was thinking that I was going to learn what miracles were, right? I was going to get one because I was thinking, well, I'm yelling Marco, God. Can I get a polo? Yes. Right. And so I thought this was going to be my polo. Yeah. And I don't know what other people took away from that. But what I took away from that and some of the stories in your book, life is a miracle. The fact that I get to do what I love every day with people that root for me help me are loyal to me that work hard for me that I get a voice for American family farm when I was just a little girl, and it was like, all you get to ask for in this world is opportunity. And if I can't see in my life, that my miracle from God is that I was given opportunity. Then I'm a spoiled little punk. And so if you really want to know what I took from your book and there was a couple of things in there that I was like, yes, I'm supposed to be reading this. One because I always think it's a cute little party trick when I tell people, did you know there's a 104.5° between the two hydrogen molecules and in your book you mentioned that who says that? Who knows that? That's a weird thing to know. Everywhere you so I said, I needed to read this book. I was meant to read this book, and I was meant to be exactly where I am, even if I'm balling and squalling and worried that I'm going to turn into Britney Spears. This is the miracle. Don't miss it, folks. This is America. I think you're ready to come out of your conservatorship. It's so amazing because as an author, you never know where does your book go? Where do people find it? So the fact that somehow, in your part of Missouri, you found a copy of that book and that God used it to minister to you in that way. It's just fascinating to me. We've got a lot more to talk about, but I wanted people to know your story. Because, you know, I'm a people person. So when you approached us with moint box and whatever, you know, it's about the product about the story behind the company and you're a big part of the story behind the company. So that's important. We will end this hour, but if you want to order for you can go to moin box dot com slash Eric, I guess if you don't do the slash Eric part, this show doesn't get credit for it. And I'm going to have to go back to the shelter. So. Box dot com slash Eric. It is tremendous stuff. I want to do another show with you where we actually talk about some of the details because some of this stuff is so fascinating. And I want my I just want my audience to know what it is that they're buying, what it is that they're eating and just stuff. I've become so fascinated..

giants Alban lucinda moin Isaac Newton Lucinda Eric Marco Britney Spears Missouri America
"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:14 min | 3 months ago

"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"And let me talk to you on a personal level. A few years ago, a friend and I were discussing all things life when she asked lucinda, where does your strength come from? I made up some sort of fluffy answer that sounded good, but truth be told. I didn't really understand that question as I didn't view myself as having any sort of strength. That was, until I lost it. Earlier, this year about March. I'm not sure how or what the straw, it was that broke the camel's back, but one day it was okay and the next day not. I was once resilient and like Teflon. No matter the blows, no matter the circumstances, negativity couldn't stick to me. I could take a look at and keep on a ticket. Then what seemed like out of nowhere, it was all gone. I couldn't see my way clear. I fell apart. I realized I just could not mount a comeback. What was this heaviness and how do I get it to go away? How do I unclog that wellspring of joy and forward momentum? I seem to have all my life. Somebody fixed me. And while you're at it, go ahead and break that darn rearview mirror of life, I keep trying to look through. I declare to those that are close to me that I was either having a midlife crisis or a mental breakdown and I wasn't sure which, and the way I saw it, there was only one way to find out. I was going to try some things. And see what happened. If I pull a Britney Spears and shave my head, start dating a backup dancer or buy a sports car, you might want to do something. But otherwise, give me a wide berth folks. And so they did. And so I tried some things. Like leggings. I went to doctors. I went to a bike rally. I bought an RV site unseen. I listened to middle aged white women podcast. I bawled, I squalled, and I prayed. I went to Southern Baptist him sings. I meditated. I did yoga and wore Jane Fonda outfits with booty bands, nothing less. Where had my strength come from and more importantly, how could I get it back? I couldn't seem to figure it out. So finally, I just surrendered. I said goodbye to who I once was and started to embrace this new me. When folks came in hot at me or said cruel things, I let them. Old me would have body checked people or life verbally speaking. But I just not did not have any fight left in me. So I didn't. I gave myself permission to not be strong. I just meandered through the day to day task of living. I took my knocks on the chin, so to speak. The motorcycle was a no. The leggings were a hard no. But the RV was a holy heck yes. I even upgraded to a bigger one. My children and I would drive to the four way stop. Flip a coin and heads we go left and tails we go right. We kayaked the mighty Mississippi, we hiked mountains, chased waterfalls, made fires, and visited friends all over the country. Those precious memories I will forever cherish. Then I started going south in my RV. To visit my aunt and uncle on a regular basis. If I got freaked out by life and people, I'd load up and start driving. I'd use the time to think about everything. The what ifs the Woods, the Curtis and the shutters until finally. South of Memphis in the middle of the night on highway 55. I realized I was ready to get up. I declared my midlife crisis over. A song came on my playlist called rise, seemed rather fitting to the end of my mid life crisis or mental breakdown or whatever that was. I still don't know where my strength came from before. I suspect it was something I was born with. My God given gift as my granny would say. And as such, the lord giveth and the lord taketh away. But I can tell you where my strength comes from now. It comes from all of you. Just as a house is built, brick by brick. This is our company. This is too hot..

lucinda Jane Fonda Britney Spears Mississippi Curtis Memphis
"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:38 min | 3 months ago

"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Not to tell Monaco's every night, so it's fine if you call in Kansas City strips. So then maybe you want a tomahawk ribeye, so you'll say you'll click the little picture and say, yeah, instead of those New York strips, I'd like to get tomahawks. And then it's shipped directly to your door with dry ice, and then we publish a magazine now that's got some recipes in it. I've seen that magazine. It were in my box. Tell me I got to read in that magazine. And it's great actually. It's really cool. Yeah. That's great. It has recipes and all this kind of stuff, yeah. And on the back of the, you know, we had to put a dry ice warning because for some reason, you know, I could get sued like if you touched dry ice. People eat the ice and if you use it in a cocktail. I literally had to say, no really, don't put it in your drink. Anyway. There should be a cardboard warning. Don't eat the cardboard. There should be legally because you could get sued. Okay. But on the back of it is your thaw instructions of how to thaw your meat because it's going to come to you frozen. Obviously, that's how we ship it. Yeah, so that's the bones of how the moin works. Now sometimes people are like, okay, why is it subscription? This is important to understand because it's by signing up for a subscription, even if you need to customize how often you get it or you're going out of town, you get a step in order. But what you do for the small family farm when you sign up for a meat subscription with us is you give us the opportunity to plan ahead. Yeah. Which is actually one of the hardest parts of farming. Right. Because you give us a stability. Right. So did you know that every time you eat that moy box steak, Eric? You get to feel good because you are the farmers, like, oak tree, right there, right? I'm feeling good right now. But I'm also feeling hungry and there's no sizzling steaks in the studio. We need to fix that. Yeah, no, the food is great, the way you do it is great. The family farm. There's a lot of this, as I said, the reason I wanted you in here is like, I care about these things. And I've had many people on this program and talk about stuff and they're not sponsors on the program. People need to be informed and most people don't know half of what we've been talking about. So I think I do think it's important. I do think your stuff is great. So I'm happy that you're doing this now. This is a big operation. How many, how many employees? How many farms? How does this well we do about $25 million worth of annual revenue. Not bad for the fact that our warehouse is in a town in 97 people. So but I mean, that could be way, way, way, way, way bigger. The market for the stuff. See, I think people are just getting more and more sensitive to this. And there are many people in America who can afford to spend a couple of bucks more for something. Well, the thing is we're actually very price competitive because I know that. I know that. I checked that out. You saw that. But I'm still saying people care more about this than they used to in the past. They're hearing more about this. And they care. And so I just think it's interesting to give people options. So now, if people Alvin and I, we're going to link to the Shark Tank video also so people can see that. And so people can see this. What else do we need to know if we have like 20 seconds, anything vital that we've forgotten about? Thank you for giving American family farms a voice. I really appreciate that from the bottom of my heart, Eric. Well, I got to tell you it is a privilege and an honor. It thrills me that I have this program and then I get to do that at actually thrills me. So lucinda just fantastic to get to know you a little bit. Welcome to New.

Monaco Kansas City New York Eric America Alvin lucinda
Lucinda of Moink Reflects on America's COVID Food Crisis

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:39 min | 3 months ago

Lucinda of Moink Reflects on America's COVID Food Crisis

"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:55 min | 3 months ago

"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Looks I'm talking to lucinda of moin box dot com. Lucinda, the only reason you're here talking to me is because when I heard your story, I said, I want my audience to get to know you. You're a sponsor on the program, but I have plenty sponsors on the program. I don't have the mind to tell their stories. Your story is compelling. It's beautiful. I think it's important. But since you're a sponsor, let me tell my audience that they can go to monk box dot com slash Eric. And Alban tells me that this is true album. Is this true that right now, if people sign up and use the code Eric, they get free fillet mignon for a year. Is that right? Is that, does that make sense? Yeah, so we're going to put a fillet mignon in every box. We're just going to throw it in. Don't look too closely at it. Just throw it in. And ship it. You know, I personally hope on the pack line. So I will personally. I'm not supposed to be involved with putting that fillet. Well, that's just an incentive that people want to try it out. But we did try it out. And I love the I love the idea of getting the box like it's going to be exciting. It is. I'm a child. It's exciting to open up the box and what's in there. But so people can get a variety of things. So what are the variety of things that we have different stakes? So you can get, well, we call it a tomahawk ribeye, but I think the atomic word is what we call it here. We call it a tomahawk ribeye. Okay. That's the proper term. Yes. Okay, in the meat industry. Yes. But the tomahawk ribeye, that's my favorite. Yeah, it's got the bone. Whether it's whether it's got the tomahawk or not, the ribeye. Why is the ribeye so good? It's a marbling. It's the fat. Yeah, that's the fat. I like yeah. Yes. Yeah. No, but no kidding because I prefer a ribeye. I've just learned this recently to any of the other cuts to the fillet mignon to the well I just prefer the rib eye. Me too. I don't know why. And so we have a Flank steak. On pork, we have bacon, pork chops, ground pork, actually people use a lot of ground pork. Ground pork. Yeah, because you can use it in place of like ground beef and different things. Chicken, of course, we have all the variety. There's only like 5 ways to cut a chicken so you've got all of the 5 different varieties of so there's a lot of people eat chicken obviously. And now that I've heard what I've heard about chicken, I'm going to be more excited to be ordering chicken from you all that bleach free. We're bleach free bleach free. Yeah, some who doesn't want to cut down on bleach in their diet. So you weren't kidding. I think this was a phone call we did. You said that most chicken is dipped in bleach. Yeah, chlorine. 97% of the time. Why do they dip it in bleach? Well, because they started on sanitary growing conditions and then when they're processed and it's what they use. Who wants fecal matter in their chicken? So they dip it in bleach. Isn't that nice? That's a nice gesture. This is so disgusting. So thank you for existing and for doing what you guys do. So chicken, you can order different kinds of chicken. Yes. Okay. So the way that boink Fox works is that you sign up to get a box you tell us how often you want it every 6 weeks, 8 weeks, every four weeks. And then we put into the box. Here's a curated box. Right. I personally do that. So lucinda's curated box. But then if you want to customize it to your preferences, right? So maybe I put in there like New York strips, of course we'd call him Casey strips, but for your sake, I'm calling him. Is that true? Why not? Who cares? But anyway, so let's say that you decide.

Eric lucinda Lucinda Alban mignon boink Fox Casey strips New York
"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

06:40 min | 3 months ago

"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Dot com. Folks, we're talking about meat. Meat, do you understand me, meat? Talking about all kinds of meat. We're talking about fish, and we're talking to my new friend lucinda. Is it cramsey? Is that your surname? Yeah, but I mean, is that? Is that too complicated of a question? It's going to be like Madonna with just one name. Lucinda with moin box dot com slash Eric. Okay, but you were talking about regenerative say it again? Regenerative agriculture. Okay, and so what is that? So I'm going to say it in a way that everybody can understand. I'm going to explain it because you're going to hear this term a lot, right? It's becoming a buzzword. Here's what it means. Okay, which we use it more. Our farmers do. Lion King, did you watch The Lion King? Merit. I don't eat Lion. Okay, so anyway, let's say you did. And at the beginning of it, when Mufasa is on the throne, all the pride lands are beautiful and the animals are moving in packs and they're singing pretty songs and we're all happy and feeling good. Right. And there's some of the terrible happens in scar gets on the throne and everything goes dark and twisty and we're sad and there's nothing to eat. Yeah. Okay, regenerative agriculture is team Mufasa. All right. Okay, so let me explain it to you. Commercial agriculture is scar. So in regenerative agriculture, the animals move in packs. And the reason they do that like in Montana, they stay safer from bears. When they move in packs. And so you move them regularly, think of the buffalo or whatever. Who cares? I know what you mean. Whatever they are, whatever you're calling them. Yeah. Think of when they moved across the Prairie. They moved in packs. And they were always on the move, right? Yeah. So animals on the move. Yeah. Because it aerates the soil, it doesn't over grace. So we move on. So we move our animals frequently. Secondly, animals are a part of this whole ecosystem of putting topsoil back into the soil of having a healthy, I forget what you would call it like a bio something. But anyway, my farm has a healthy balance of poop sphere. I'm pretty sure that's the term. Really? That's where we're going with it. I just made it up. But the thing is you're talking about something that's so radically different from animals that can't move in cages in buildings. You're talking about animals roaming and being part of the ecosystem. Because you hear people when they get it, I'm sure you've heard somebody who is a vegan or something, get into this whole greenhouse gas and animals produce. And yeah, you're right when you're talking about confinement buildings. Yeah. But when you talk about how they should be on the family farm with regenerative agriculture, your science doesn't stand up, right? So this is something that is good for the soil is good for the land is good for the animal. Right? Look, I'm very tender hearted. I'm not going to try to raise an animal in a way that's going to give me the EBG bees, right? It's a beautiful team Mufasa. We're taking fossa regenerative agriculture. So now you do obviously beef pork pork chicken. Non funky chicken. The funky chickens for the dance floor, and that's it. So tell me. So what is so funky about some of these you said 99% of the chicken we get in grocery stores is you'd call it funky. What do you mean? What are you talking about? Well, first of all, I don't really want to know but tell me quick. I know right, but I'm in the business of making this my business story. I know. Cramped conditions because even if it's labeled free range, that means I've got so much square footage. They're not really raised outdoors on pasture. They're just given access to so much like a square footage. Secondly, the reason is really funky as a human impact. What kind of human impact was a chicken and a half? Well, if you go and read the numbers and see what the chicken farmers in the United States, it's almost like indentured slaves or it's just terrible. We pay 4000% more. Than the big four when it comes to our chicken farmers. That ought to tell you something. So you're saying that the chicken farmers are suffering under these conditions. Oh, absolutely. Just to be clear. Because it's an integrated vertical supply chain is what they call it, but essentially the larger corporation owns the chicks, the feed and then the farmer, these poor farmers have to go out, they spend like a half a $1 million putting up the confinement building, having been sold a bill of goods that if they raise animals like this, their life will dramatically improve. And instead, they get under the clutches of commercial agriculture and there's no way to get out without losing their farm. It's absolutely terrible. It is like almost like a human rights crisis in my opinion. What are some of the most exotic animals that you have? I mean, you don't get into you're not raising ostriches and emus and llamas and stuff like that. I mean, I have long was on my farm, but I can't eat them. I protect my sugar. Can I eat these? What about polar bear? Have you ever tasted polar bear? Oh my, it's delicious. I feel like we're going pretty far out there. We can try it one time. No, I'm just being stupid. But you do not sell eggs. No, and you know what I let my yard birds. I raise chickens out on pasture that you eat. But I also have what I call my Yardbirds. My banty hands up my house. Yeah. But they're wild like me and my children. I would say only feral things. So they get in the trees to stay safe. But and then they keep their eggs and lay on them. We'll get more chickens and we happy. Except in the height of COVID, I did let them know you're going to pay rent. So okay, but you don't like so that's another question. But all this other stuff well, the difference, look, your taste buds don't lie. When you do the right thing, it leaves a great taste in your mouth. And it is literally you can taste the difference when you taste a moin steak when you taste our chicken. I could sit here all day until I'm blue until you millions of different things, but really none of that matters..

Mufasa lucinda Lucinda Lion King Madonna Eric Montana buffalo United States
"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:05 min | 3 months ago

"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Sexy. Folks, welcome back. Yes, yes, I'm talking to lucinda, who is, I don't know, listen to how to describe you. You're the woman behind moin. I want you to say it. Where does moin come from? Moin. But you gotta go to moin box dot com to order the and so you can say oink oink just so happy I got moist. You could, but I never will. Okay, now listen challenge accepted. Now listen, so you were talking about when you were on Shark Tank. This is behind the scenes. Yes. And they had treated some dignified woman with their business, whatever, in such a way that she walked out of their sort of beaten up. Yeah, you know, look, she was very poised and confident and educated and like I said, all the things that I envisioned, maybe one day I will, I'd never be. But I had a lot of respect for it and so she walked in and she glad it in there. I was rooting for her. You're not supposed to see the people that go before you, right? And when she walked out her shoulders were hunched down, and I just thought to myself, oh, lord, no. If you are going to do that to me, I'm going to earn it. Right. So you went out there with a chip on your shoulder. Not literally. But Barbara corcoran. She wasn't in the room. I'm sad 'cause I felt like her and I, no, no, no. I thought she was the one that said you seem like you have a little chip on your shoulder. Who was that? John, who said Damon? Yeah. He said that. Yeah, they cut out what I really said in response because it wasn't TV appropriate, but it might have been something along the lines of if I've been disrespectful in any way, please let me know because I'd like to get right. But if you just think I'm a strong drink a whisky, you're I am. And not everybody can belly up to the bar and other words like, look, you don't come from nothing. And a small farming community, I lost my daddy when I was 11. My mother struggled, will you're absolutely right. This is a personal business to me. I'm gonna have a cookie. I'm gonna have a chip on my shoulder because the family farm is something that I'm passionate about. I'm with you. And I didn't know all the terms I had to learn them before I went on. I had to have a crash course of what these words meant because I knew the concepts I just didn't know the words, right? But anyway, so yeah, I went in there like, all right, if y'all want to fight, let's go back. Right. Right. But I'm saying like you go in there, you've been through it in your life. And you're going to facing these pompous well coiffed billionaires. And so I would have an attitude. But so you go in there with an attitude and I watched it and now I don't remember. You didn't get in any investors from there. Oh, I did, though. So in season 5 in season 5, a man named Jamie siminoff went on the show, he has invented something called the ring doorbell. He went outside. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. Anyway, on season 5, he went on and they did not give him a deal. So then he ended up selling his business to Amazon for a $1 billion and in season ten, he came back as a guest shark as a kind of like how you like me now kind of thing, right? Right. And so he didn't say much to me while we were in there. Yeah. But in the end, he offered to invest and but that's on the show. Yeah, on the show. Okay. And all that's on the show, you can yeah yeah. And what's so great is we speak different dialects because he's from Jersey. But we got a similar sort of fight. And because he's not a real shark, if you win. He's a guest investor? Right. Believe it or not, do you know that he bought a farm 16 miles from where my farm is at in this small town because his wife and his child love it out there in the middle of nowhere? I love it. So he's been a real partner in terms of helping to grow our business, but also he believes in what we're doing. So that was a very successful Shark Tank thing for you then. As it happens. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. All right. It crashed our website within 35 seconds..

moin Moin lucinda Barbara corcoran Jamie siminoff Damon John Amazon Jersey
Moink Founder Lucinda Describes Her Experience on 'Shark Tank'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:18 min | 3 months ago

Moink Founder Lucinda Describes Her Experience on 'Shark Tank'

"Yes, I'm talking to lucinda, who is, I don't know, listen to how to describe you. You're the woman behind moin. I want you to say it. Where does moin come from? Moin. But you gotta go to moin box dot com to order the and so you can say oink oink just so happy I got moist. You could, but I never will. Okay, now listen challenge accepted. Now listen, so you were talking about when you were on Shark Tank. This is behind the scenes. Yes. And they had treated some dignified woman with their business, whatever, in such a way that she walked out of their sort of beaten up. Yeah, you know, look, she was very poised and confident and educated and like I said, all the things that I envisioned, maybe one day I will, I'd never be. But I had a lot of respect for it and so she walked in and she glad it in there. I was rooting for her. You're not supposed to see the people that go before you, right? And when she walked out her shoulders were hunched down, and I just thought to myself, oh, lord, no. If you are going to do that to me, I'm going to earn it. Right. So you went out there with a chip on your shoulder. Not literally. But Barbara corcoran. She wasn't in the room. I'm sad 'cause I felt like her and I, no, no, no. I thought she was the one that said you seem like you have a little chip on your shoulder. Who was that? John, who said Damon? Yeah. He said that. Yeah, they cut out what I really said in response because it wasn't TV appropriate, but it might have been something along the lines of if I've been disrespectful in any way, please let me know because I'd like to get right. But if you just think I'm a strong drink a whisky, you're I am. And not everybody can belly up to the bar and other words like, look, you don't come from nothing. And a small farming community, I lost my daddy when I was 11. My mother struggled, will you're absolutely right. This is a personal business to me. I'm gonna have a cookie. I'm gonna have a chip on my shoulder because the family farm is something that I'm passionate about. I'm with you. And I didn't know all the terms I had to learn them before I went on. I had to have a crash course of what these words meant because I knew the concepts I just didn't know the words, right?

Moin Lucinda Barbara Corcoran Damon John
"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:55 min | 3 months ago

"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"That. Now let's be clear because you and I talked on the phone the other day. When you said, you know, if you saw turtle crossing the road, you'd pick it up, and I want to be very clear with my audience. Lucinda would not turn it into turtle soup. She would actually let it go and live the rest of its little turtle life, which could be very long. So I just want to be clear about that. I don't have any problem with eating turtles, but I just want to be clear. That's what you meant. Because it would be funny. You'd be like, yeah, I care for the turtle. I picked it up and we ate it the next day. What? What's the problem? But you really you care about these animals, and that's why I thought it's important to talk to you. Just the other day, I think it was yesterday on this program. We had Phil Robertson, duck commander. And my daughter, and I went duck hunting with him and uncle's side. How'd you do? And people would pay millions of dollars. Wealthy people pay millions of dollars for that. But just because he loves us and we love him. He let us do that. There weren't a lot of ducks that day, which for duck hunting is bad. If you don't have a lot of ducks in the sky, it's tough to shoot them. So I think one of the pellets for my shotgun blast nicked one of the ducks that eventually fell into the drink and was retrieved by blue. But let me ask you something. Very serious. Did he take you snipe hunting? No. Okay. You might want to ask him about that. I can't believe you missed out on snipe. Well, we were just there for, you know, a day and a half after something like that. So we just want to start with the doctor. We'll move on. The next time's my punishment. For sure. Okay. Well, so we're talking about a lot of stuff here. I want to get to your story too, though, because first of all, you were on Shark Tank. Fight Club. Because we was fighting when I know. Well, because you're feisty redheaded gal and they are jerks. No, some of them are. But I love Shark Tank. I've learned so much about businesses by watching it. But when you came out and you told your story I thought this is fun just to watch you. So what year was that? So we filmed that and the fall of 2018. Right. And then it aired in early 2019. Okay. Now, I should let everybody know, I did come in like a chip on my shoulder, but you're not supposed to see the people before you go. And I did. And this woman was poor. She was like, everything I thought I might have one day could be, which I'll never be. Which one? You guys never saw or didn't air, but she walked in with this good idea. She'd went to Harvard. Behind the scenes. You're talking about not one of the panelists. You're talking about another one. Another woman and it never aired, but I watched her walk in with her shoulders back and when they were done, she walked out like this and I thought, you're going to treat me like that. I'm going to deserve it. So I did kind of walk..

Phil Robertson Lucinda Fight Club Harvard
"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:16 min | 3 months ago

"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"I've got to be clear, too. I only know you through moin box dot com slash Eric. Do you all produce meat and so on and so forth that people can find in other ways or how does that work? No, we currently only do direct to your house. So you order online and pick your different what you want. You customize a box. It works on subscription because in the farmers can plan ahead when of course you can skip your orders. Do what I really need to do. But anyway, then we deliver it straight to your doorstep. Right. And so yeah, we have grass fed and grass finished, beef and lamb. Yeah. Pastured pork and chicken. Wild caught Alaskan salmon from the last independent fishermen. And Bristol bay is named Tony his wife's Heather. I mean, this is amazing. So you want salmon and you're telling me that you get salmon from the last independent fisherman in Alaska? Yeah, in Bristol bay, Alaska, which is this one area. Yeah, because it's become kind of, again, it's the market to where it's hard to make a living. If you're not aligned with the right corporate interest, right? And so Tony and Heather, oh, they're amazing humans. They fish about 6 to 8 weeks as this heavy time of Bristol bay when they do all the salmon and it's fascinating stuff. I could go into it at a different time. But anyway, the rest of the time they live in Illinois. So their fellow Midwestern nurse. And you have a real impact. On people's lives when you order from moik. You now know. Tony, that's the man's name. But the man behind the fish. Right, I can tell you there's real people real lives real names behind moin. Right. And so you can have a very impactful difference on farmers, rural America. And you get to eat really good quality meats. Okay, now speaking of good quality meat. Yeah. I am a carnivore. But that's just me. But let me just ask you the bacon is amazing and I guess you said it, what did you call it? You call it naked bacon. It's not honey cured or anything like that. What do you do with the bacon? So it is smoked. It is smoked. It smoked. And so it's got salt in it. And that's it. A lot of the bacon that you'll find at a typical grocery store has some preservatives or nitrates or nitrites or sugar is a big one. Which is funny to me, 'cause I'm like, if you're gonna eat a pop tart, just eat a pop tart, but stop trying to act like you're baking needs to be both a pop tart and bacon. Yeah. Just let your bacon be baking. And naked. But Shark Tank host Kevin O'Leary, mister wonderful. You know the jerk who sits in the middle, just kidding. I think he's deep down a nice guy, but he plays a he plays the role of nasty the shark. I'm going to crush you like a cockroach. He actually said that your bacon is the best bacon. He's ever tasted. He doesn't just say stuff like that. He's not giving away compliments for free. But okay, so but that's the bacon. You guys, what is the deal? I read something in your literature about, if you go to a grocery store, you can't get the same steak that you would get in a restaurant. What is that? Do they have a different? I can't remember how that works. Do you age it? With a cuts or I don't know. Right. So you want to know why our beef is different. It's probably worth it. I guess. So we do wet age. We age our beef for about 30 days. Ours is grass fed and grass finished. And it's raised outdoors on pasture. The majority of the cattle produced in the United States 78%, I believe. End up in what's called a feedlot. Which is the kind of cramped up. They're giving corn to finish them out. Ours are both grass fed and grass finished. And we do something called regenerative agriculture. Yeah, right? That's a big crazy buzz word that's coming in. So how are you on top? Agriculture. I can tell you right now, we don't have time for that. We're going to be talking to lucinda. What do you say the head hand? She's the head hand at moin box dot com slash Eric will be.

Bristol bay Tony Heather Alaska moin Eric salmon Kevin O'Leary Illinois United States lucinda
"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:37 min | 3 months ago

"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Dot com, go there. You seem that life was so wonderful back to your taxes show. I'm talking to lucinda of the red hair. It's easier than saying lucinda cramsey of moin box dot com. In your natural redhead so I can say that, right? Yeah. All right. I mean, you could say it's corn. I know. I know. My wife used to be an actual redhead. That sounds like a joke. It is true. So you were just going to tell me something about family farmers. Yeah, you had said something about you got some blowback from some farmers once with somebody on the show. First of all, I had no idea how many people milking cows at 4 a.m. are listening to this program. That thrilled me to death. I thought that's really wonderful. But they were telling me that a lot of what Susie Welch had shared on this program was flat out untrue. And I think they were right. I think a lot of what she said was true. But she has a very strong vegan ideology. She probably doesn't realize that Jesus ate fish. And he also ate lamb and since he's got and he's perfect, there's nothing wrong with that. So but whatever. So what I was going to say to that, though, is there is so much, well, less than 2% of Americans are farmers, right? So there's not very many of us. So I'll tell you those fellow farmers out there listening. I see you I hear you, I am one of you. But let's also dig into why there's sometimes this animosity and angst because you'll hear people say, well, I only, these people that don't farm organically. There seems to be this hatred cultured or everybody's getting fussy, but they don't know what they're fussy about, right? So let me break that down just a little bit. Because yes, my farmers use regenerative agriculture. We raise our animals outdoors on pasture. They are not given antibiotics or hormones and we do use non GMO grains. Now, does that mean for our chicken? Does that mean that I am anti farmers that row crop? Oh no. You wouldn't hate a sweatshop worker? You'd hate the sweatshop. JFK once said that a farmer is the only one that buys everything at retail. Sales everything at wholesale pays freight both ways. He wasn't wrong then. And if he were alive now, he wouldn't be wrong now. So farmers are in a struggle because of the system that is set up because we really do not participate in free markets because at the end of the year, we're not allowed to set with the prices for something that we've grown. That said on the Chicago board of trade. You know, that's so weird. I don't get any of that stuff. Why is that? It's just how that turned out, but they even trade a pork bellies on the Chicago board of trade now. I don't understand it, but at the end of the day, that's why I created moin is because if you can not compete in a playing field because it's not level. You must get in your own playing field, which is to say, when you put the small family farm up against big ag and you remove the cheats, if you will, right? You level that playing field. Those that come out on top are those that work the hardest. And I can guarantee you one thing. There's not a lot of things I know for sure in this world, but I do know that those that form because they love it. And because it's our culture and our way of life. We are never outworked. Right. You know, so this is like, I need to say that because I often feel like people will say, oh, well, for instance, if I got into the data about how chickens are raised in the United States. And there's confinement buildings. Now, no, I do not believe that chicken should be raised and confinement buildings. It's not humane. It's not good for the bird, but it's also not good for the farmer. What muy does is good for the animals and the farmer. But I often get pigeonholed into this. Are we going to be fussy because confinement buildings exist? Yeah, we're fussy about it, but we're not mad at the person that has the confinement building because they weren't given an opportunity to make an honest day's wage for how hard they work. They were putting that corner because our system is set up like that. And so because there's less than 2% of us here in America that are farmers. I feel like it's important to kind of get into those few of us that are listening.

lucinda cramsey Susie Welch lucinda Chicago board of trade JFK moin United States
"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

04:27 min | 3 months ago

"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"And on and on. We talked about it on this program. But I was saying, that to me is a headline. That's a big deal. So I always say that no consumer ever went to the grocery store and said, today, I'd like to buy a funky chicken and screw over a farmer. But it's a high probability that's exactly what you did. And I know what you're going to say to me because most people do. But organic. That's cute. You bought an overpriced funky chicken. Because at the end of the day, when you have to look a label is only as good as the people that stand behind it. So you have to get behind something. So when you talk about, okay, smithfield farms, I'm just going to look for what smithfield farms because now lucinda told me their control in 60%, right? Well, they have a lot of subsidiaries. So you have to look at their subsidiaries. Because you might be buying organic pork or this at the other. And so you really sometimes have to dig behind behind. To see, because you're right, you went to the grocery store. There wasn't a blaring sign that says, now let me tell you what you're doing when you buy this pork chop. You just thought you were on a train. These people buy here. Didn't say that, did it? Well, see, this is what's so interesting. It's kind of funny because I had Susie Welch on this program. I don't know three, four years ago. She's now the widow of Jack Welch. And she is a vegan and on and on and on and she's telling these horror stories and whatever and I got all kinds of blowback for farmers around the country. But I thought it's at least interesting to begin to think about how our animals treated. What kind of farming is going on? We should care about all this kind of stuff. And that's why when I heard your story, I thought, I want to have you on this program. And in the interests of full disclosure, moin is a new sponsor to the program, but I've got a lot of sponsors on the program and I don't have them sit down here in New York and have a long conversation. This is something to me that people need to begin thinking about very seriously. We're at that kind of tipping point in culture where how you spend your money, you need to think about it. Okay, so when we come back, we're talking about lucinda, hang on, we're gonna go to a break. We'll be right back. Lucinda moint box dot com. It's here from Texas show. Don't go away. 47. Didn't think before deciding what hey folks, I've got to tell you a secret about relief factor that the father son owners Pete and Seth talbott have never made a big deal about, but I think it is a big deal. I really do. They sell the three week quick start pack for just 1995 to anyone struggling from pain like neck shoulder back hip or knee pain, 1995, about a dollar a day, but what they haven't broadcasted much is that every time they sell a three week quick start, they lose money. In fact, they don't even break even until about four to 5 months after, if you keep ordering it, Friends, that's huge. People don't keep ordering relief factor month after month. If it doesn't work. So yes, Pete and Seth are literally on a mission to help as many people as possible deal with their pain. They really do put their money where their mouths are. So if you're in pain from exercise or even just getting older or to the three week quick start for 1995, let's see if we can get you at a pain too, but a relief factor dot com relief factor dot com or call 805 108 three 8 four 805 108 three 8 four relief factor dot com. I use it. It works. Hey folks, if you could make money off of abortion or pornography, would you do it? I hope the answer is no. But I want to tell you Robert Nestlé, the founder of inspire insight dot com, he was the president of his local pro life pregnancy center. When he discovered that he owned investments in three companies manufacturing abortion drugs. Well, God helped him to see that he was making money from abortion pornography LGBT activism and the list goes on. And that's why he created inspire insight dot com inspire insight dot com gives you instant access to biblical values data on over 23,000 stocks mutual funds and ETFs. You can invest to the glory of God. You need to go to inspire insight dot com today and screen your four-o-one-ks IRAs and other investment accounts. I did and I was shocked. Now I'm able to clean out the junk and invest in companies actually doing good things. Go to inspire insight, dot com today and register for free. That's inspire insight.

lucinda Susie Welch Lucinda moint Seth talbott Jack Welch moin Pete Robert Nestlé New York Texas Seth
Moink Founder Lucinda Will Help You Buy Ethical Meat

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:15 min | 3 months ago

Moink Founder Lucinda Will Help You Buy Ethical Meat

"But you're telling me that none of us basically knows it, but that 60% of all the pork we get. We are helping subsidize the company that strengthens the economy of a wicked regime that crushes people of faith, Christians, Uyghur Muslims, and on and on and on. We talked about it on this program. But I was saying, that to me is a headline. That's a big deal. So I always say that no consumer ever went to the grocery store and said, today, I'd like to buy a funky chicken and screw over a farmer. But it's a high probability that's exactly what you did. And I know what you're going to say to me because most people do. But organic. That's cute. You bought an overpriced funky chicken. Because at the end of the day, when you have to look a label is only as good as the people that stand behind it. So you have to get behind something. So when you talk about, okay, smithfield farms, I'm just going to look for what smithfield farms because now lucinda told me their control in 60%, right? Well, they have a lot of subsidiaries. So you have to look at their subsidiaries. Because you might be buying organic pork or this at the other. And so you really sometimes have to dig behind behind. To see, because you're right, you went to the grocery store. There wasn't a blaring sign that says, now let me tell you what you're doing when you buy this pork

Lucinda
"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:36 min | 3 months ago

"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Her? You may already know her as the woman behind a company that I'm excited about. It's called moo plus oink equals moin. Do you get it? Box dot com lucinda. Welcome to the program. Well, thank you for having me, Eric. Well, now where do you come from? Well, I come from a small town called Lebel, and Missouri. In Missouri. They call it Missouri. I know it's Missouri. I mean, I know that you're not close to an airport if you pronounce it Missouri. You're a real missourian. Right? Something like that. Come on. So your story because I want my audience to get to know you and the whole story. But tell us the short version just to start of what is morning and moik box and the family farm. And just give us that. And then we're going to get into the backstory. Yeah, sure. Well, I'm an 8th generation farmer. 8th generation farmer. You don't look that old. How's that possible? Right. Thank you. You're an 8th generation farmer. Yes. Can you tell us how far that goes back? What year are we talking about? Well, since they came over and actually they came through New York than Virginia. And then they end up in Kentucky. But you don't even know when this is. I know in the early 1800s, we moved from Kentucky to Missouri, which is why I sound the way I was. But I was saying, but if I were part of an 8th generation something, I would give you dates. I give you the day of the week that we came over. I mean, 8th generation is so far back by American standards. I'm wondering if you didn't come across the land bridge, the Bering strait language from Siberia because we're talking way, way, way back. Okay, but so you are now, you're it. You're the 8th generation. Yes, so I was born raised and still hail from a town of 600 people. And so I grew up on a family farm, obviously. And when I was 11, my father died and my mother was left with 6 mouths to feed in a farm she couldn't afford. I know that seems crazy that she would have land everywhere and we would go hungry, but it's kind of like that water water everywhere and nothing to eat. And not a drop to drink. Yeah, nothing. What is that from Alvin? Coleridge? The ancient Mariner. And by the way, who cares? Go ahead. So anyway, didn't make sense to me. So I really made it when I grew up. I felt like it was my life mission to help family farmers be independent outside of big egg to be able to make a living to have an honest day's pay for an honest day's wage.

Missouri Lebel Kentucky U.S. Bering strait New York Siberia Coleridge Eric Alvin Virginia smithfield farms Smithfield farms New York City packers Google
Lucinda From Moink Shares Her Story

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:36 min | 3 months ago

Lucinda From Moink Shares Her Story

"Her? You may already know her as the woman behind a company that I'm excited about. It's called moo plus oink equals moin. Do you get it? Box dot com lucinda. Welcome to the program. Well, thank you for having me, Eric. Well, now where do you come from? Well, I come from a small town called Lebel, and Missouri. In Missouri. They call it Missouri. I know it's Missouri. I mean, I know that you're not close to an airport if you pronounce it Missouri. You're a real missourian. Right? Something like that. Come on. So your story because I want my audience to get to know you and the whole story. But tell us the short version just to start of what is morning and moik box and the family farm. And just give us that. And then we're going to get into the backstory. Yeah, sure. Well, I'm an 8th generation farmer. 8th generation farmer. You don't look that old. How's that possible? Right. Thank you. You're an 8th generation farmer. Yes. Can you tell us how far that goes back? What year are we talking about? Well, since they came over and actually they came through New York than Virginia. And then they end up in Kentucky. But you don't even know when this is. I know in the early 1800s, we moved from Kentucky to Missouri, which is why I sound the way I was. But I was saying, but if I were part of an 8th generation something, I would give you dates. I give you the day of the week that we came over. I mean, 8th generation is so far back by American standards. I'm wondering if you didn't come across the land bridge, the Bering strait language from Siberia because we're talking way, way, way back. Okay, but so you are now, you're it. You're the 8th generation. Yes, so I was born raised and still hail from a town of 600 people. And so I grew up on a family farm, obviously. And when I was 11, my father died and my mother was left with 6 mouths to feed in a farm she couldn't afford. I know that seems crazy that she would have land everywhere and we would go hungry, but it's kind of like that water water everywhere and nothing to eat. And not a drop to drink. Yeah, nothing. What is that from Alvin? Coleridge? The ancient Mariner. And by the way, who cares? Go ahead. So anyway, didn't make sense to me. So I really made it when I grew up. I felt like it was my life mission to help family farmers be independent outside of big egg to be able to make a living to have an honest day's pay for an honest day's wage.

Missouri Lebel Lucinda Kentucky Eric Bering Strait Virginia Siberia New York Coleridge Alvin
"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:01 min | 3 months ago

"lucinda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Great news from rocket mortgage, you could unlock more cast than you realize from your home's equity with a cash out refinance today. In fact, in the last year, average home values have gone up nearly 20%. That means you can unlock thousands of dollars and with rocket mortgage, you could unlock all that cash in less than three weeks, but you've got to act right now before rates go up because nobody knows how long these low rates will last. Put your hard earned money to work, make your life better, build a home office, remodel your kitchen, or simply save that cash for a rainy day. Today's rate on a 30 year fixed rate mortgage is three and a quarter percent, 3.48% APR, so you can lock in a great low monthly payment. When you're looking to unlock the cash in your home, rocket camp, call 8 three three 8 rocket today or go to rocket mortgage dot com to get started. That's 8 three three 8 rocket or go to rocket mortgage dot com. Race commanders of 1212 21 call for confirmation and conditions equalizing under license in all 50 states from less consumer access dot org number 30 30 call 804 9 zero one two three three for disclosures and cost information. Folks, welcome to the Eric metaxas show, sponsored by legacy precious metals. There's never been a better time to invest in precious metals, visit legacy p.m. investments dot com that's legacy p.m. investments dot com. Welcome to the Eric metaxas show with your host. Eric the Texas. Oh hello there. Folks, as you know on this program, I like to talk to people that I like to talk to. Have you figured that out yet? Today, I have on a new friend, her name is lucinda, lucinda with the red hair, lucinda cramsey, but how do you know her? You may already know her as the woman behind a company that I'm excited about. It's called moo plus oink equals moin. Do you get it? Box dot com lucinda. Welcome to the program..

Eric metaxas lucinda lucinda cramsey Eric Texas
"lucinda" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

03:13 min | 10 months ago

"lucinda" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Sources growth caregiver. This the game plan. That's a good if i like it too. Well i'm excited to be a small part of the team. However i can help and i look forward to learn more about you guys and what you're doing and sharing your community with mine and bringing them everybody together so we're not separate little communities talking at each other. Yes i want that thank you. You're welcome the i. Ali website is linked in the show notes. So slide on down there and check them out even if you're not a millennial caregiver i am sure there are resources and advice that benefit all of us and it's really important to grow the community of caregivers providers and everybody involved in this journey. It also helps support the podcast. So that advertisers know we can get people to their sites and speaking of official sponsors. Please make sure to check out joy gauge and sign up for your fourteen day free trial to their streaming service. And i'm telling you definitely gonna want neuro reserve. I've been taking nerve for about three months now. My sugar cravings have gone through the floor which is a miracle and it tells me that the supplement is definitely giving my brain things. It didn't have before last on the list. And i know kinda getting a little long winded here this afternoon. Make sure to enter the survey. The link is in the show notes. It's on all my social media. Check it out. You will be entered to win a fantastic gift. Basket that has two bottles elevate which is two months supply and over one hundred dollars value a beautiful fidget blanket. Lap sized a special item specifically from me and my hometown. Some children's books on alzheimer's all kinds of wonderful gifts from past guests and other sponsors. There are three weeks before we end the survey and find our winner. This information is really important to me. Because i would like to know what you think of the show. What you think is good. What you think can be approved upon. What episode you like what you don't want to hear anything about again. Just you're not going to hurt my feelings. Just let me know. Been doing this for over three years. And i don't get too much feedback so it would be very beneficial for all of us with that. Said i'll be in your ears again next. Tuesday have a great week everybody.

Ali alzheimer's
"lucinda" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

07:19 min | 10 months ago

"lucinda" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Millennial caregiver is twenty-seven about one of six of these millennials. Care for someone with dementia because these caregivers already different life stage than older spousal caregivers. They're needs are widely different. Many young adult caregivers put their careers on. Hold move back to their childhood home and become twenty four seven caregivers overnight. Loneliness and depression are common. Almost all caregivers feel isolated but this is worse for the younger population this episode features lucinda cause a young adult who is taking care of her father after her own experience becoming. Her father's fulltime caregiver lucinda. Those life mission became to advocate for millennial family caregivers lucinda is part of tech crunch and she has created a platform specifically tailored to the needs of millennial caregivers. Good day everybody. We kind of have a double dip for you today. First up is lucinda from alley. And she's going to talk about her caregiving journey and what she created as a result. And then you may remember matt from last summer. He's been on but not released because we recorded an episode about his app and then lucinda decided it was so worthy of her scooping. It up that we had to start over on this episode so could afternoon. Everybody how we doing okay. Like don't all talk at once a so. The audience should remember matt. So let's start with lucinda. I understand that you became a caregiver at a very young age. Like many of us in a kind of emergency. So if you tell us a little bit about your sure. So i was super young way too young to have any sort of education around what this might be like any you know infrastructure bill That would help me provide this enormous support for my father as well as myself You know. I was just sort of getting started in my own life that i was. You know just sort of getting my crap together. financially and you know all of that and then suddenly. My father had several strokes and kind of ignored by everyone in his life. And i was living in another state so heavenly got see hand and you could tell that something was really wrong and had to really like grabbed situation. You know take control. i had The switch go off inside me. You know you're not the daughter anymore. You know you or lease you have to act like you're in charge of fake that confidence because my dad didn't want to go to the hospital. I mean he didn't wanna go to er and It was you know of course it was the dementia talking but he started saying things like you. Don't love me in you know. Don't touch me in you. Tricked me and stuff like that so it was really traumatic and horrible in. I have a brother and sister but it was just me and you know of course now. I know that that's incredibly common. Which still is not an excuse. His i still don't get it at all. But basically i took the whole responsibility myself and just thought such a lack of support from know hospital staff or health insurance or even like his colleagues and his wife at the time you know everyone is very keen to just be like okay. His daughters here like she scott. You know so once. I really felt this lack of support in felt myself falling through the cracks. Really i saw you know there has to be other people out there like may and of course there are millions and especially young. You know young people when it hits us at this stage we're totally uneducated about it and just really not equipped to take on such a responsibility. So i decided to create something that has evolved into i ally To really bring us all together to share resources and support and just be there free gentler. If even if that's all we got you know we can have each other basically Long short well. Fortunately i think it's about twenty five percent of family caregivers and this is probably i think the number of family caregivers is actually an undercount but at least twenty five percent of them are millennials joy daughter as millennial now and it makes me insane thinking about and the and the ones that i know who don't work because they're taking care of a mom or grandmother and it's like the society not see what's going to happen here like this is not. This is not rocket science. Like i'm an artist. I was a photographer podcast or so. I don't do like math and statistics and that crowd. It's like you know. I can multiply dollars when you owe them to me. But that's the extent of my. You know math skills but it's like if you're not building your career and your retirement your personal wealth by a home putting money aside for retirement like thinking about like. I'm getting to that point. So i'm thinking about that. You think and if something happens to you then like what the heck you're not gonna have any there's gonna be no financial background for you somebody to help take care of you. I mean it's i can people not see this like the storm that is about to just you know it's gonna make cova look like a walk in the park and it just kills yes. That is so true. It's like we're society.

lucinda dementia matt depression scott
"lucinda" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

07:19 min | 10 months ago

"lucinda" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Caregiver is twenty-seven about one of six of these millennials. Care for someone with dementia because these caregivers already different life stage than older spousal caregivers. They're needs are widely different. Many young adult caregivers put their careers on. Hold move back to their childhood home and become twenty four seven caregivers overnight. Loneliness and depression are common. Almost all caregivers feel isolated but this is worse for the younger population this episode features lucinda cause a young adult who is taking care of her father after her own experience becoming. Her father's fulltime caregiver lucinda. Those life mission became to advocate for millennial family caregivers lucinda is part of tech crunch and she has created a platform specifically tailored to the needs of millennial caregivers. Good day everybody. We kind of have a double dip for you today. First up is lucinda from alley. And she's going to talk about her caregiving journey and what she created as a result. And then you may remember matt from last summer. He's been on but not released. Because we recorded an episode about his app and lucinda decided it was so worthy of her scooping. It up that we had to start over on this episode so could afternoon. Everybody how we doing okay. Like don't all talk at once a so. The audience should remember matt. So let's start with lucinda. I understand that you became a caregiver at a very young age. Like many of us in a kind of emergency. So if you tell us a little bit about your sure. So i was super young way too young to have any sort of education around what this might be like any you know infrastructure bill That would help me provide this enormous support for my father as well as myself You know. I was just sort of getting started in my own life that i was. You know just sort of getting my crap together. financially and you know all of that and then suddenly. My father had several strokes and kind of ignored by everyone in his life. And i was living in another state so heavenly got see handed and you could tell that something was really wrong and had to really like grabbed situation. You know take control. I had felt the switch. Go off inside me. you know. you're not the daughter anymore. You know you or lease you have to act like you're in charge of fake that confidence because my dad didn't want to go to the hospital i mean he didn't wanna go to the er and it was you know of course it was the dementia talking but he started saying things like you. Don't love me in you know. Don't touch me in you. Tricked me and stuff like that so it was really traumatic and horrible in. I have a brother sister but it was just me and you know of course now. I know that that's incredibly common. Which still is not an excuse. His i still don't get it at all. But basically i took the whole responsibility myself and just thought such a lack of support from know hospital staff or health insurance or even like his colleagues and his wife at the time you know everyone is very keen to just be like okay. His daughters here like she scott. You know so once. I really felt this lack of support in felt myself falling through the cracks. Really i thought you know there has to be other people out there like may and of course there are millions and especially young. You know young people when it hits us at this stage we're totally uneducated about it and just really not equipped to take on such a responsibility. So i decided to create something that has evolved into i ally To really bring us all together to share resources and support and just be there free other. If even if that's all we got you know we can have each other basically Long short of well. Fortunately i think it's about twenty five percent of family caregivers and this is probably i think the number of family caregivers is actually an undercount but at least twenty five percent of them are millennials joy daughter as millennial now and it makes me insane thinking about and the and the ones that i know who don't work because they're taking care of a mom or grandmother and it's like the society not see what's going to happen here like this is not. This is not rocket science. Like i'm an artist. I was a photographer podcast or so. I don't do like math and statistics and that crowd. It's like you know. I can multiply dollars when you owe them to me. But that's the extent of my. You know math skills but it's like if you're not building your career and your retirement and your personal wealth by a home putting money aside for retirement like thinking about like. I'm getting to that point so i'm thinking about that. You think and if something happens to you then like what the heck you're not gonna have any there's gonna be no financial background for you somebody to help take care of you. I mean it's i can people not see this like the storm that is about to just you know it's gonna make cova look like a walk in the park and it just kills yes. That is so true. It's like we're society.

lucinda dementia matt depression scott
Vegans and other non–meat eaters are more likely to suffer broken bones, Oxford University research shows

The KFBK Morning News

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Vegans and other non–meat eaters are more likely to suffer broken bones, Oxford University research shows

"And Oxford University research study shows vegans and other non meat eaters more likely to suffer broken bones. They have to be more aware of calcium, right? It is indeed, you know, Lucinda. That's exactly what it is. A lack of calcium, iron and vitamin B 12 could mean a rise in popularity of veganism causes some bone health

Oxford University Lucinda
The Latest On municipal Elections

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:12 min | 1 year ago

The Latest On municipal Elections

"A little bit about municipal elections of course in Brazil What what what's that? Give us give us the the big picture festival well, I voted a big deal because every single one of five, thousand, five, hundred. Seventy Brazilian cities will be voting for mayors and for councillors as well. So it's a big election, and of course, it's always as it happens to other countries it's a preview of the two, thousand, twenty, two presidential elections. So be interesting to see what's going to be the role of both sonar because of the beginning just a few months ago said, he's not going to get involved but now we're seeing that he's supporting a few of the candidates, but the thing is, of course, there's You know there's there's thirty or forty percent of the electorate that you know would vote for Bush scenario candidate but he's extremely toxic as well. the order. The same amount of number would never vote for a candidate supported by both sonar. Again I think it's going to be a very tough divisive election and again, Workers Party used to be such a strong political party Brazilian losing the appeal order. centre-left parties are starting to kind of gain more traction instead of the workers spiders. So that's an interesting thing about this election as well, and what do the polls say I mean just ready to? An association whether perceived or real with both narrow can be a boost or it can be a problem depending on where in the political spectrum you are. Do we know what the polls tell us and there's another interesting things on there in terms of the sorts of characters who are standing for action a big increase in number of military personnel. Explain also that we've talked about before absolutely and again this increasing military personnel of course, it comes more from the right-wing part but even the left they have some candidates and even in their names when people are voting is like major tone. Exactly. Or you know they they actually add they're tied to pseudo name. So people know exactly what they used to do but you know I was talking about another classic example here's some Paul the first South who someone is, is a hat on the polls he's supported by scenario is a TV presenters will kind of a populist even though he's ahead I'm not sure if he's actually going to win because there's he has a vast number of people that will never vote for him just because of his association with both Sonar, and in Rio you know we're loosing the blue. Shoe, quite a lot about this. Myself Valleys the current mayor and a former gospel singer as well. Again, he only have like forty percent of the polls. He didn't do a very good administration from. What I hear from people living there as well but he's the candidates have been supported by both sonar. I wonder if we're that can tell us a bit more house the reaction. Rio above that listen to I was going to bring you speak about Venezuela in a second but just on this point about it's both scenario I mean is he he sort of overshadow everything? Is it one of those things being Vanessa mentioned if we look at Rio these races, they're also have proxies for people's view about both in our that's certainly what it seems like sometimes looking from the outside. Yes. But also particularly that the main issue in. The minute always been it's totally economic, right so aside from all these elections and everything, it's really which parties are willing to offer some sort of boost to to the people living there and what we have. She had underneath the Bulls Nar administration in recent months, which allows cariocas from, which is, of course, this this payout to to the most deprived in the population, which is and so will very much depend on whether that sort of extended over the next few months to tidy through the election or not I. Think I think economic issue is a big thing. Here we go. There's some interesting aspects. Of this election as well so far we had the record number of candidates thirty, four percent of all the candidates are women. That's a record that doesn't mean that they will be elected sometimes they come from the smaller political parties as well, and for the first time we have candidates, they are either black or mixed race then white, that's a that's a first So even though we are under the administration that probably don't care that much about quotas or this kind of things but you know you see a little bit of change in Brazil perhaps the candidates are beginning to start to look like. The population in general. So that's an interesting aspect of this election and certainly something to welcome just briefly Fernando. Last point on. This is one of these areas where it would be a mistake to read too much into what happens in the municipal elections where we look ahead to the next general election or actually is quite a good indicator of which way the political winds on a national level also blowing I think we should definitely pay attention to this election in two thousand sixteen. We saw the rise of the right and kind of you could kind of understand Wassenaar was elected two years after. Okay interesting. Stuff listen. Let's cross back to you and I I mentioned Venezuela let's talk about this. You were living there I think some some years ago, but there's this really complex interesting legal battle that also comes right here to to London town as well. Tell us a bit more about this. Yes. So don't remind listeners the Maduro government launched legal action against the Bank of England earlier this year to try and force the Bank to release gold that the country has stored in the bank sports and England's quartered appeal decision that was made earlier this week on Monday isn't as definitive, some of the headlines had suggested. And they're sort of several layers to this. But essentially, the appeals court overturned a judgment which said that the UK had recognized opposition leader one guy do as Venezuela's rightful president. So in other words that local ruling is a victory for Maduro essentially sidelining any perceived power that Guido had as Venezuela's rightful president but Monday's decision actually means that this whole I mean it's a lot of money is a one billion. Dollars equivalent in gold. It will go back to the High Court in England and it will be up to a higher court to determine more definitively which of these two rival leaders is in charge in Venezuela and therefore he has control over the shiny gold bars which obviously tend to grab the column inches but I guess into this is a case where. This case speaks to a bigger picture dozen and it does also reflect this ongoing, very divisive political battle in in. Caracas. Can you just tell us what is the latest there what? What's the situation? Is it one of these things where again Everything that flows politically flows out of the economic strife, the country still during. Quite right I mean reading the actual ruling it disorders show unpick really the mess that Venezuela and the international community has got itself into with this to President Saga that's been going on since January twenty nineteen and the upstate new nothing the people who've been living there I mean in abject poverty fleeing the country in the millions and that has no proper healthcare system i. Mean when I was living back in twenty seventeen lesson learned today to do with this highly contagious virus. So the situation is critical as I say, having having an uncleared dramatic stance, own issues like the Golden, the Bank of England, which mode no doubt will go on for months only wasn't the the situation inside the country and creates stalemate when nothing moves on or improves. Tricky Times still ahead listen to it was good to hear from you, and if you're here in studio thank you. That's Markle's if you had noticed and Lucinda Elliott

Venezuela RIO Bank Of England Brazil President Trump England Workers Party Vanessa Bush Bulls Nar Caracas London High Court Markle Maduro Government Wassenaar Paul Fernando
Tensions simmer over Northern Cyprus' plan to reopen Varosha

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:01 min | 1 year ago

Tensions simmer over Northern Cyprus' plan to reopen Varosha

"In nineteen seventy, four intervention by Turkish military forces after Greek inspired coup in Cyprus the famous Borussia Resort region was shut down over one hundred hotels with a bed capacity of ten thousand has been empty. No forty six years United Nations Security Council resolution states that the ghost. Count Ghost town. Can only be resettled by its original inhabitants. But now the Turkish. Separate Prime Minister has announced that the beaches there will open today causing much consternation from Cyprus and Greece one, hundred Lucinda Smith. The eastern will correspondent for the Times joins me now Hannah. Thanks thanks for coming on. Can you remind us of the events leading up to the closing of the region? Show well, of course, Cyprus in Nineteen, seventy, four, a war broke out but really the tensions on the been going on for more than a decade already between the two communities. The Greek speaking community on the Turkish speaking community. Now, in nineteen seventy four, what happened was that backed by Greece the Greek Cypriots tend to do. In response to that the Turkish army INVADED IN THE NORTH And progress down to the South and actually the line that they take. Shami was planning to progress to stops just north of Rocha. Rocha shouldn't have been part of the part of the territory take. Mohtashami. But they did in fact, take it. Well, it didn't do was opening up again to the public. They kept originally kind of bargaining chip hyping to sort of extract some concessions from the Greek separate side using this kind of faulting chip of Rocha. But she what's happened is that for forty six years, it's remained behind barbed wire, its military zone, the only people who are allowed. That are Turkish military personnel I'm very occasionally U. N. personnel now. On the did kind few images that we've seen coming from. This is really kind of striking quite eerie. Once, very, very lavish resort place where people like Elizabeth Taylor and severe ran went on holiday. Now just completely crumbling to dust. So what are the latest developments? So actually totta are the north separate prime minister announced. August. That the Russia was going to be redeveloped and reopened. Now this is something entirely near this is who come up cyclically disgust every so often. And so in a way. You know again it's you know one of these ideas and they'll never come to fruition. But as you said on Tuesday nights totta made the announcement while he was nine crowd that is going to be open today, not the whole town, just the beachfront But the really significant thing about this is that that was just five days away from the presidential elections in no Cypress scheduled to be held on Sunday Ersan Tatars candidate in those elections and I think the really interesting thing you mentioned that it's this announcements is met with a huge amount of opposition from. A Greek Cypriots and from Greece is also met with quad loss of opposition from Turkey separates as well It says caused the government of North. Cyprus a coalition government collapsed to one junior partner said it was pulling out that coalition and so her fide by this kind of sudden announcement and submit Prank and I think you know lots of people that know Cypress particularly Essen Tatas political opponents thing. But he's really using this as a kind of political stunt to give him the edge in Sunday's elections but I mean it's illegal isn't it? How does Turkey justify it? It. Is Legal Yeah as you said, according to the UN if anyone's going to be resettled in Russia, they have to be the original residents, most of whom were Greek separates. Now thought present factors has recognized the ship of the proper does the commission up. To, look into how the original owners of properties in brochure could be compensated Most of those people wanted some kind of compensation. Some wanted their properties back. But yeah. The fact is you know if any redevelopment of that town is going take place, there's this two major issues in all Cyprus firstly is the town the for forty six years has just been crumbling into the ground. It's GonNa take music. You're going to have to be kind of a demolished and reconstructed which might work, and secondly that is an she is going to cost Cyprus huge amounts of money if they want to do this in the kind of legal and proper way, and let's not forget the no. Cypress's is a country this only recognized by Ankara, it's pretty widely embargoed eighty four. For its economic survival is much propped up by Ankara saying it's places kind of ready access to to the funds needed to do something like this. So I think the question amongst. People position or is this just an election stunt? Is The beach just going to be open for feed is a member. She was just going to be closing lucky walls before a finally Hannah. How this feed into Turkeys dispute with European Union members Cypress and Greece territorial rights in the eastern Mediterranean. Yes sure I mean I think it's coincidence that is nouncement was made in Ankara. The obviously, no cypresses almost entirely dependent on anchor for it survivor. Essen Tatars. I said is the is kind of anchors favored consciousness elections, but we'll see this is why dispute going on in Syria and Cyprus and in the eastern Mediterranean more broadly which she the tickets very much. The House of it's about the converged UNSEE gas. It's about maritime sovereign say on that those people down over the past few weeks rather still not been resolved and I. Think this is hugely emotional for for separates greek-cypriots particularly, and it's just another thing I. think no guide to sort of. Prolong this arguments this maritime arguments niece.

Cyprus Greece Rocha Cypress Turkey Ankara Hannah Turkish Army Russia United Nations Security Counci Borussia Resort Prime Minister Elizabeth Taylor Mediterranean Lucinda Smith
"lucinda" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"lucinda" Discussed on KCRW

"Matt Barrie, Lucinda Williams and the Brent A marker Death squad News is next from NPR. I'll see you on the other side live from NPR news. I'm Laxmi saying In his quest to secure four more years in power. President Trump is campaigning in the American Heartland on the promise of restoring law and order. My best notice Clear. I'm here to help you. We will bring back a lot of 100 year community. We will bring it back. As Trump makes his way to battleground states that also include Wisconsin and possibly Iowa. The Democrats are hours away from launching their party's national convention, and it will be unprecedented instead of many thousands of people descending on one city for the event. Which could potentially exposed them to Corona virus. The convention to formally recognize former Vice President Joe Biden, is the Democrats. 20 presidential nominee is going virtual and NPR's Brian Man reports trumps handling of the pandemic will take center stage in New York Governor Andrew Cuomo speech tonight. Cuomo previewed the speech of his daily briefing, where he said New York showed the country the Corona virus is beatable by containing it spread once a deadly hot spot now well under 1% of New Yorkers air testing positive, Cuomo said. It says sin, there's not a national mandate to wear masks. Administration is moving forward with controversial plans to allow drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Liz Ruskin of Alaska Public Media has details. The coastal plain of the refuge is a place where caribou from the porcupine herd give birth environmental groups call it the biological heart of a valuable ecosystem. The area is also believed to contain Ah lot of oil. Today's decision opens up nearly the entire coast, 8% of the refuge for oil companies to make bids. It does not set a date for holding the first auction of drilling rights. But Interior Secretary David Bernhardt says that could happen soon. I do believe that there certainly could be a leaf tailed by the end of the year. Once drilling rights air sold, it will be harder for a future president to reverse course. For NPR News. I'm Liz Ruskin in Anchorage. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says the US is ordering more restrictions on the Chinese telecom company Huawei. We have more from NPR's Michelle Kelemen. Pompeo calls it a direct blow to what way, which he describes as an arm of the Chinese Communist Party surveillance state. He says the U. S government is taking several measures. To limit China's ability to acquire US technology and to protect the privacy of American citizens. The Commerce Department is tightening rules announced in May to make sure the Chinese telecommunications giant can't obtain chips made by foreign firms that have been developed or produced with US technology. And the U. S. Is adding 38 walkway affiliates to a blacklist. Barring them from receiving certain sensitive technologies. Pompeo has been encouraging other countries to take similar steps. Michelle Kelemen NPR news This isn't And support for NPR comes from see three dot a I see. Three dot Ai Ai software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence at enterprise scale solving previously unsolvable business problems. Learn more at sea three dot A I.

NPR NPR News Mike Pompeo Arctic National Wildlife Refug Governor Andrew Cuomo President Trump Liz Ruskin Michelle Kelemen US New York Matt Barrie Corona Vice President Chinese Communist Party China Joe Biden president Lucinda Williams Alaska Public Media Secretary
"lucinda" Discussed on The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"lucinda" Discussed on The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

Turkey reconverts Istanbul's Hagia Sophia museum into a mosque

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:08 min | 2 years ago

Turkey reconverts Istanbul's Hagia Sophia museum into a mosque

"Eight acres court is expected to announce today that the conversion of Istanbul's world-famous argue severe into a museum almost ninety years ago, it was awful. The decision would pave the way for the building's Restoration Mosque and we'll represent a victory of sorts for president recipe type one, but it may cause anger elsewhere, including in the Kremlin and UNESCO HQ, joining us on the line now is Hannah Lucinda Smith is stumble correspondent of the. Times Hello Hannigan off new thanks for being with US I. Guess this was what we had perhaps predicted nevertheless. Oh, that's not gonNA. Stop a number of people being pretty disappointed with the outcome. Yeah well. Absolutely I mean affair is such a symbol, not just in Turkey or not just in the region in the whole world at points it was built in the sixth century. It was the biggest cathedral in the world. It was the seat of eastern Crescenzi for more than a Millennium and then it's really been kind of the symbol of the struggle for the soul of Istanbul. I guess when the autumns took control of the city in fourteen, fifty three, they converse into a mosque, and then when Kemal Ataturk the first president of the secular republic. Took over the country he then. Signed an order basically deconsecrated intending into museum in nine, hundred thirty four, and that's the status it. It's hard since then, but it is such a powerful symbol for Muslims. Christians and also for the Turks who are really bondage this idea of a second second they sit. It's kind of one of the ultimate symbols of their secular country. Just when you're out, and about as it sounds like you are indeed right now, is this one of these things where people are talking about it, and it's upsetting people, or is it one of these strange things? Actually seems to be much more stark much more controversial through the prism of I'm in London or etc. People looking on from Moscow which maybe we'll come to in a in a minute it does it excise people out in about. March she stood in the courtyard. Safia right now. It is a few Tori style. It's actually quite quite mean that's mostly because of the current virus pandemic coming normally at this time of year that would be crowded with tourists actually took his most visited tourist attraction, but I think the interesting thing. Is that inside Turkey this debate? That's not new. It's been going on for a couple. Couple, of decades, it's a question that sort of comes around quite six. In fact, you know I've I've been in Turkey for seven years. Now is the ton. This is come up in my time here and so there is this of feeling of fatigue I you know this is just the same policy policy again but I think it's undeniable, the for certain positive the Paul is. Very, much behind prison on the move is part of the society would be seen as. A big victory pick symbolic victory, but I think in terms of the kind of. The opposition to it. A lot of that comes from outside country. As you mentioned that the star obviously the Greek government's in holy. They still see Istanbul Constantinople. This is the as the center of Greek Orthodox also the Russian Orthodox Patriarch earlier this week, voiced his objection and of course UNESCO Ted. This is a world heritage sites listed by UNESCO. That's partly because of the The mosaics that were uncovered once this was ten years. In the nineteen th that is. On. The big questions is of course. If this is ten back into a mosque, what will happen to those mosaics depict Christ pizza version married picked him of the apostles. You know seen in, Islam, FIT Is is not allowed inside mosques. So this is the kind of places where the real objections are coming from, but it's quite interesting I'm you know it's? Really doesn't feel like much. Is happening at the moment here high? Sophie, let's see. We got the announcement in June a couple of hours. That's what we're expecting so. Possibly something will happen after that, but it's kind of. Yeah. It's still the same very peaceful, very unique. Is indeed sort of an eerie call just on some of those other international stakeholders. And he'll be watching on. We mentioned already you mentioned the Russian. Orthodox Patriarch of course. What about the relationship mean does this tell us anything about the relationship between assemble in Moscow more broadly, maybe more politically because there's various other sort of proxy disagreements agreements. There's other places Libya that seemed to sort of muddy. The waters is this. Does this need to be to be viewed in that context in your view? Show, I think the relationship with Russia is actually the one thing that might give president or pause for thought on this now what we see as I said before the Greeks are. Very opposed to this the US. State Department might POMPEII stems as well, but you know that's kind of old hat fred when he doesn't really care about. Stoking rows with Greece and with the US. Because he's got huge amounts of disagreements with those countries anyway, but when it comes to Russia, it's been quite an interesting situation in Russia. Turkey for the past five years on one level as you say in Libya also in Syria they're. Backing opposing forces, but at the same time, the personal relationship between two President Putin has gone incredibly close, and in other ways. Russia has been backing sick. I guess trying to woo. Tick to a certain extent away from its more traditional allies in the West, so we've seen for example side of the one hundred defense system. From Russia Turkey we've seen many many pets meetings in about trade and defense mutual security between. One impeach him now. The question is if this. Decision goes ahead and the conversion goes ahead then how much opposition will come from from the Kremlin? Clearly, the Patriarch Russian Orthodox Patriarch. Expressed his opposition. That's to be expected, but we also know that religion plays a big part in Russian. Politics today, so would it. Would it carry on further? The featured does it were? Would President Putin be the next person's kind of expresses displeasure, and how would that affect the relationship Tweeden's? I stopped really great to speak to you and thanks for reporting for us right from the scene of this Hannah Lucinda Smith In estan standard joining us on the briefing Monaco Twenty Four.

Turkey Russia President Trump President Putin Istanbul Hannah Lucinda Smith United States Patriarch Russian Orthodox Pat Russian Orthodox Patriarch Moscow Libya Restoration Mosque Kemal Ataturk Unesco Hq Crescenzi Istanbul Constantinople London Tori State Department Paul
Australia's Extreme Heat

Environment: NPR

05:07 min | 2 years ago

Australia's Extreme Heat

"By and large are pretty direct people so it figures walking into Mary Con Yards House west of Sydney. She would get right to the point. Good how are you hot cooking here? It's about thirty eight degrees Celsius outside one hundred Fahrenheit which is relatively cool compared to what it's been like this frontal at least it keeps some of the heat out some not much. Three fans are humming in Conrad's living room. The lights are off to save money on electricity in con- yards banks cleaned to her forehead like she just got out of the shower. Just vacuumed ZANU. Coming and this is what happens to me. Lives in community housing a rental unit for lower income. People that's located in Greater West Sydney a fast growing part of the country's largest city that a few months ago held another distinction the hottest place on Earth about one hundred and twenty degrees Fahrenheit or as Conard puts it. It was hot and when its stinking hot door. Just you know hot hot like it is on this day. Conard like many people in West. Sydney has a really hard time running. The air conditioner. Day is not an option. It's too expensive so is moving. It's a struggle. It's really a struggle. You WanNa do things but the heat just zaps it out of you. Heat waves as well as being a silent killer. It's a social killer. Lucinda coats is a scientist with risk. Frontiers a private research center that focuses on natural hazards like bushfires cyclones and flooding about twenty years ago. Coats had the grim task of cataloging. How many people? Each of those natural disasters had historically killed in Australia. And that's when we first thinking hang on a minute hate wives. They seem to have killed more people than all the other natural hazards combined. Yes all other hazards combined with elderly people in the poor. Most at risk code says it's too soon to know how many people may have died during this past. Summer's extreme heat but history might provide a somber clue in one thousand nine thirty nine in two thousand nine. Australia had devastating bushfires black Friday and black Saturday as they're now called both were preceded by heat waves and those heatwaves alone code says are each believed to have killed more than four hundred people the deadliest fire a hundred and seventy three is twice as many as succumb to the bushfires but the heat waves didn't get nearly the same attention. It was all fire photos of crying families. And cinch teddy bears and you can see why the the newsworthy bushfire is a terrifying thing but heatwaves. How can you take a picture of a heatwave? I've got a powerpoint presentation with a young chap just holding a water bottle and drinking out of the water bill. That's that's my picture of a heatwave. So it's really hard to communicate the immediate danger and there's a fast growing need to communicate that danger. A recent climate report by the Australian government found the country has warmed by more than one degree Celsius just in the last century. Extreme heat events are increasing in frequency as is the risk of extreme fire and extreme flooding. All of which has happened in Australia and just the last few months. Sebastian vouch is a research fellow at western Sydney University. Who's focusing on climate change in urban heat? Everything's extreme. It's exactly like how scientists for thirty years predict climate change to actually pan out and it's not twenty thirty forty or fifty anymore. It's twenty twenty. We have it. It's happening vouches. There are ways you can build for heat. For example houses could be painted. Certain color to reflect light. Green or living roofs could provide insulation. Houses could be built smaller with more room for treason greenspace. Australia is updating. Its National Construction Code in twenty twenty. Two and extreme heat is being considered in the changes but new codes would primarily be aimed at new buildings and the people most affected by heat tend to be folks like Mary concert living in older buildings that were designed long before bouts of extreme heat. Were much of a thought. Don't get me wrong. I appreciate the refi. Have my head and being able to pay pay for it and do that but I think sometimes it's poor design went with public housing. The nonprofit that LISA'S COGNAC. Thome knows this is an issue. Divisional Manager Heather Chaffee says she hears it from clients all the time for us as a housing provider. Tricky housing market. It's it's distressing to be honest. When often doesn't own the homes they rent chaffee says so? It makes it hard to make modifications instead. They focused on warning tenants. When extreme heat is coming but she knows that's not enough heat. She says is a global social justice issue. It's the poorest people that are going to suffer them iced so she says there needs to be a larger societal discussion about how we prepare for extreme heat because as a summer just showed. It's already

Australia Heather Chaffee Sydney Mary Con Yards House Scientist Conard Lucinda Coats Greater West Sydney Conrad Australian Government Western Sydney University Research Fellow Thome Mary Divisional Manager Lisa
The God Concept in Alcoholics Anonymous

The Scathing Atheist

05:13 min | 2 years ago

The God Concept in Alcoholics Anonymous

"It's probably an indicator of something. Deeply Miss Wired in my psyche that I've thought to myself multiple times man. I sure wish I used to be an alcoholic so that I could prove that step would as program is a Lotta Shit step one. A is seven step. Recovery Program is but God though right to blanket statement. That says it's literally impossible to quit drinking if you aren't religious. As one of those statements that lends itself to empirical testing and like all religious statements. That do that. It fails the test consistently there is no correlation between religiosity an addiction recovery. We'd we'd have a lot more data to work with of course if they would release their own recidivism rates but in this instance. I feel like the fact that they won't as the only data point. We really need any but to this point in my life. I've always seen two ways that you could explain this rules existence in light of the fact that is demonstrably untrue. The more cynical interpretation of course is to say that people at rock-bottom are more susceptible religious indoctrination and won't be able to fight you off as well now if you're inclined to be more charitable though you can also look at it like the bloody volleyball that Tom. Hanks talks to in castaway. Right a person who's tried and failed to quit drinking especially a person's failed repeatedly at that. Might need an imaginary hand to hold your the only way that they're likely to believe the person you can do. This is if that person is lying about who you is in this scenario so you know they tack on some God Shit and they say no matter how insurmountable the goal might seem. Our guy is dependent so he can handle it. Of course even that. More charitable interpretation. Even if it's all the fucking way correct would be insufficient to explain the first step because you can get all that shit without insisting on God bully right. You could just have that one of the available menu items and still gain all the same benefits from it now in the past. That's where I've left it intellectually because let's face it the fact that the charitable explanation just doesn't add up as well as the cynical one isn't usually in need of further review when we're talking about religious questions but I've been thinking more and more about this since I quit smoking. And another possible factor occurred to me the other day so first of all. Quick Update. By the time you hear this it will have been ten weeks since my last cigarette. Thank you thank you know. Seriously thank you because if I hadn't done it in such a public way and if you guys hadn't been holding me to account and if so many of you hadn't reached out to help it probably wouldn't have been able to do it so thank you and to be honest like at this point. I'm so damn confident that like I'm saying it's been ten weeks even though I'm recording this motherfucker. A week in advance and throughout. I've been trying to keep my eye open for what purpose God might have served in all of this. You can't help but replay this whole nine week ordeal. Imagine what if I had been Christian throughout because you know to be perfectly honest with you. Quitting to this point hasn't been as hard as I feared it would be big in the first couple of days. Were pretty miserable. I'm hardly all the way out of the woods. But ultimately I found it to be much less difficult to my fears had led me to believe it would be imagine Christian right and even better measuring just became a Christian or like you know I was already a Christian but I just rededicated my life to Christ or whatever exactly the kind of thing that Christians might do when they're turning over the kind of leave that you would turn over right before you quit smoking. After thirty years so Christian me praise to mighty Jesus to hold my hand. Carry me through this. You know because Baikal e a higher power strong enough to do it and then Lo and behold I observe all the same shit that atheist may just observed quitting turns out not to be as hard as I thought it would be. But it's no longer though because I was mistaken about the level of difficulty is because God was on my side. You know. Maybe the guy was could've done it but he certainly wouldn't have done it. So painlessly praise the Lord. Hallelujah of course in this instance. God didn't actually help me quit smoking. I quit myself and then I gave him all the credit. So what purpose did he serve? Did we just land back on that cynical interpretation we started with will consider this? There are a lot of things that I should do with my life and most of them are easier than giving up thirty year nicotine habit just demonstrably easier than that. I should give more money to charity. I should volunteer my time. I should eat better. I should exercise more. I should be a better husband. I should get angry at fewer inanimate objects and if I just proved to myself that I can quit smoking. Rake Ed traditionally considered to be one of the hardest. Damn things a person can be called upon to do how the fuck can justify continuing to fuck up all that other stuff. How can I rectify ability to quit smoking? But my inability to be as attentive as should be Lucinda. Well God sure makes a great excuse. Doesn't he after all if I quit smoking not because of my own willpower but rather because I beseeched God and he heard me? Well I don't have to do all this other stuff. I I can't go pastoring God. Every time. There's a problem in my life now can I? Sometimes I gotTA handle this shit on my own. I don't have the kind of willpower. It takes to quit smokin or quit. Drinking I failed at that shit repeatedly. Only God could do that. Look I'll admit it can be kind of intimidating to realize that something you've thought yourself incapable of for a really long time was easier than you thought it would be. What other comfortable limitations are illustrating? What else is possible? Don't get me wrong. I'm all for believing in yourself but if you do it correctly it can be downright

Hanks TOM Nicotine LO Lucinda
How the Syria deal between Turkey and Russia will work

Monocle 24: The Briefing

11:45 min | 2 years ago

How the Syria deal between Turkey and Russia will work

"And welcome to today's edition of the briefing with me Andrew Muller it is difficult to conjure a grammar prospect than having in your future decided on an agreement between Turkish President Richard Type One and Russian President Vladimir Putin such however is exactly the outlook facing the key words in the area of northern Syria they had come to Coleridge Uva and who until very recently considered themselves rock-solid allies off and perhaps therefore protected by the United States Turkey and Russia have agreed to what they call oversee what they call a withdrawal of Kurdish forces the Kurds IC- matters differently I'm joined by Paul Rogers a professor of peace studies at Bradford University who has written extensively on the war in Syria and Hannah Lucinda Smith Istanbul respondent for the Times how in Istanbul first of all what do we know about how Russia and Turkey expect this deal to work because on the face of it it would seem to require an amount of cooperation from the Kurds good morning well yeah I think the first thing that we should say about the deal that was struck in Saudi last night this is hugely more details than either of the deals struck between Turkey and the US previously on the safe zone finds exactly where the safe zone is going to be how exactly it's going to be patrolled in court Rodney as you say most of those areas is going to be cleared of Kurdish fighters guide to be patrolled either by acids and Russian forces or also with Turkish forces as well joint patrols now of course this completely relies on on the Kurds agreeing to this agreeing to withdraw from his areas but quite frankly they don't really have much other choices they turned to ask that assu weeks ago when Turkey I launches assault there was a military memorandum of understanding signed between the two sides that point and to be honest they really hunger and yet the cause to play it's difficult see how they have any leeway to oppose this agreement just to follow that up is clear then at least on the in terms of this agreement where they intend or expect the Kurds to go now all we know is that they're going to be goes out of an area generally ten kilometers along the border apart from certain towns also from the towns of manage and tell Ra fats to the west of the area and everyone is going to be pulled back thirty clumps away from that border now obviously that's a small sex Shen in in kind of pure land mass terms of what the the Kurdish dominated forces controlled in Syria but it does also include almost all of their main towns this is the commish that factor capital falls outside of this arrangement it's unclear exactly in the long term how that's going to be trolled. The moment is a mixture of Kurdish regime fighters but all the other towns on the border that's where the huge bulk of the population in Syria Lebanon redan clear at that at this point where if they choose lead times they civilians are going to go Bring Paul Rogers in at this point Paul how do you expect this to play out because it would appear that militarily at least the the military wing of the Syrian democratic forces the white PG they don't really have any options Jackie and Russia both huge well-equipped military's the Kurds have very little heavy weaponry they certainly don't have an air force will they make any attempt at all do you imagine to defend what they have I think is unlikely that they will do any defense in the conventional sense in the slightly longer term may be the equivalent of of Salter Grid warfare but in the short term degree very much that they're in a very weak position I think the point that hunters was making very significant in terms of the out of control the techs are prepared to ensure if not control themselves with a mixture of Syrian and Russian forces so also saying that Turkey really like is to be able to control the area right across the border Syria from the the whole sort of length of the border winches many hundreds Columbus the area that they do control in the West because of their own associates is quite big what remains is something like four hundred twenty kilometers this particular agreement appears to cover about one hundred and twenty kilometers Ms Hammet says this is an area where the Kurds each populations particularly concentrated for the still nearly something like two thirds of the total area which isn't under this agreement we simply don't know what's going to happen there but in direct answer to your question I think it is unelected the that's what offer any major resistance to this at least in the short term but just to follow that up poll should we therefore assume that agreement that was struck between the code and the Syrian regime for all that was ever worth is now formerly a dead letter it seems to be yes I mean if you look at this in a wider sense trump's decision to Morris withdraw the troops and Syria although they've not been large they've been pretty significant we tend to forget an addition to these troops what nobody talks about in polite circles is the presence of question number special forces including it suspected special forces from Britain and France that have involved in trying to prevent escape of the Isis fighters they haven't been very successful in that at present because there are so many isis fighters in some of the detention camps but from the Russian perspective that this is really very good for them I mean their overall plan is to have as much influence a series they can for minimum cost on the way they played the air war was very rough very tough but not huge costly a while they now seeing is the will be actually be some Russian forces even quite small a nominal in these zones as part of the sort of protection patrols which means that they will be extending their influence geographically very little costing sells out of that expect it is pretty Kaputin and one would say that in that respect is also good for the United States how does it look like this is playing the one domestically is is it proving popular with Turks generally this idea that I and his pitches basically two fold that he has cleared what he described observe terrorist menace from away from Turkey's borders and he has now opened up spicing which Turkey can repatriate some of the millions of Syrians who have fled into the country since two thousand eleven sure I think it's very important burdwan he manages to to spin every get series of victory at home you know I think we shouldn't forget that a major part of his reason for launching this operation in the first place was to kind of Rowson domestic supporting tools to deflect attention away from so many other things that have been plaguing in this year the economy's going terribly he suffered major losses in local elections at this yes now taking the Turkish front pages this morning and you know should remind you the only sort of the Turkish media is controlled by one and his allies the reaction to the deal last night is a lot more kinds of restraints than was the reaction to the deal with Mike Pence last Thursday after that deal the headlines thank took his one and Turkish victory now the much more restrained they're saying the Terry corridor has been committed to history so there's a lot more restrained language I think it's almost certain that presentation on even though he's got nowhere near what he was setting out to get when he first started talking about launching this unilateral campaign a few weeks ago you know he was talking about taking a stretch of border four hundred forty kilometers long he's got far less than that but I mean certainly he's going to into a victory he's going to say the state of Rosia varies name more the Thai have got rid the terror threat from our border and this is another victory for me and my policies all the the Syrian conflict which is now approaching the end of its first decade has proved ceaselessly in depressingly inventive in finding ways to perpetuate itself but bearing that in mind do we at least see some outline of what a final settlement might look like because isn't this Turkey coming around ever for the to the idea that Bashar Al Assad has basically one that he will remain president of Syria I think that's true a and I would agree generally that this is being a good period for a set himself and his regime not least because the Kurds are having to accept that he can be a kind of counter to the increase Turkish influence the one big question remains though is what this does to the other kinds of militia groups are not much talk about the ones in North West Syria in Italy province but more the Isis elements and here there is a lot happening although against very difficult piece out precisely what the Americans of taken about a thousand of their troops from Syria into western Iraq but one report from the Pentagon this morning suggested this is a temporary there's thousand we'll be withdrawn entirely so it makes it to the American seem to be persisting in trump's wished rashly with morton withdrawal more fully than it is his phone one can say extremely good news in perhaps the the group that may benefit most is actually isis itself who far from going away I'll still there regenerating in Syria and in Iraq and the connection here is they still had many hundreds property several thousands of their toughest paramilitaries in detention one sort or another in the in the powder Syria those are really coming out back into circulation it's very similar to what happened in two thousand twelve thirteen with the so-called operation breaking the walls when what was the remnants of the old HQ I in Iraq managed to break out many that toughest paramilitaries from Iraqi prisons now it's not so much breaking out now because these went so well protected this time but it's the same kind of thing playing at a smaller scale and it's gone who almost certainly boost isis overall now that has an impact in Iraq or serious very difficult to tell but that's the one unknown in this current situation ought to come back to you finally a major part of President Prospectus that the the P. G. R. A. Anti-kurdish terrorist organization has been the alleged relationship with the Peak Aka the Turkey the Kurdish rather organization which has been waging war against Turkey for decades we'll doin be anticipating or nervous about any potential response to this deal from the PKK well I think the listening to say as you know the the the links between the what PG and the and the PK care real I mean when I first started reporting on the war PG in late two thousand thirteen you know well before they had even heard much indefinitely before before they go US backing I mean they were very very open about the fact Turkey ideologically that clearly linked to the to the PK K.. And you know I think everyone probably should be very worried about retaliation from the okay inside Turkey a ceasefire broke down in the summer of two thousand fifteen since then we've seen really wide scale conflicts across southeastern Turkey happening often in the city centers in many cities enters destroyed by fighting between Turkish security for some pick the

Turkey Syria President Trump Istanbul Paul Rogers Vladimir Putin Bradford University United States Coleridge Uva Andrew Muller Russia Hannah Lucinda Smith Assault Richard Type The Times Professor Rodney
Saudi Arabia allows women to travel without male consent

Joel Riley

00:37 sec | 3 years ago

Saudi Arabia allows women to travel without male consent

"Saudi Arabia saying attending a longstanding guardianship policy that didn't allow women to get a passport to travel abroad without consent from a male guardian who is usually a father or husband sometimes even sun now anyone twenty one or older can travel abroad without consent apply for a passport on their own rules are still in place however the requirement can require of male consent for a woman to marry leave a domestic abuse shelter or leave prison the ban on women driving was lifted last year and rules on gender segregation also Lucinda so I mean are those big steps forward of other people have to tell you that I'm just reporting on what's

Saudi Arabia Lucinda
Study: Great Lakes hit hardest by climate change in U.S.

Climate Cast

04:07 min | 3 years ago

Study: Great Lakes hit hardest by climate change in U.S.

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America financing clean energy, initiatives and advancements in renewable energy and spurring innovation and the growth of environmentally focused companies markets and jobs. Bank of America NA member FDIC good morning. Twenty one percent. That's how much of the world's freshwater lies in the Great Lakes. Thirty four million people live in the Great Lakes basin. Now, a new study finds climate change in the Great Lakes is happening faster than the rest of the US study co author Lucinda Johnson is the associate director at the natural resources research institute at the university of Minnesota Duluth for the US as a whole to average temperatures have increased by one point two degrees Fahrenheit, whereas for the Great Lakes in the states bordering the Great Lakes that is one point four degrees Fahrenheit. And actually if you just look at the base in itself, the increase has been one point six degrees Fahrenheit over that. Period. Of the last century. So the Great Lakes is warming faster than the rest of the United States. It looks like it's also getting wetter. I saw this in the study US annual precipitation increased four percent between nineteen o one and twenty fifteen but the Great Lakes region saw about a ten percent increase with more of this precipitation coming as unusually large events what jumps out at you there in that piece of data. Well, the problem with large events is that they are just so destructive. They are distracted from the standpoint of our infrastructure and just the destruction to people's homes is is heartbreaking. But similarly, we see these large events responsible for moving a lot of the sediment and nutrients from the landscape into nearby water bodies, which has a very detrimental effect on what a quality. And we hear about algae blooms we know that lakes like Erie that are much shallower. Are more prone to those what about lake superior? I know it's a cold lake. We don't get a lot of algae blooms there. But as we wash these nutrients in and as the lake temperatures warm is that's something we might expect more of in the future. Well, one of the things that we are really quite concerned about is the fact that we have been observing algal blooms in lake superior. We've seen three blooms that happen to coincide with these very very large rain events. So just this past summer. There was a bloom around the little town of cornucopia. And although this wasn't the toxic algal bloom that we know of it is a huge concern to us to begin to see elbow. Blooms in water body, like lake superior, which is known to be very pristine. Now, we have a terse base to Konami where people in -ticipant that the water quality is going to be very clear and the thought that we might be. Experiencing algal blooms this very clear and pristine body of water is of huge concern to both the ecologists as well as to society as a whole big picture Lucinda as you look at this study, what changes on lake superior will you be monitoring closely and keeping an eye on in the next ten years or so the most important changes that we think are going to be the surface water temperatures and the number and intensity of these large storm events. So the combination of these warmer temperatures with increase nutrients coming in from the land have the potential to really change the ecosystem along the shoreline. And and we have a lot of concerns about that loosened Johnson associate director at the natural resources research institute at the university of Minnesota Duluth. Thanks for your insight today on climate cast. Well, thank you, Paul. And I. Really appreciate all of the great reporting that you joined climate change that's climate cast. I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul Hefner.

Great Lakes Lake Superior Great Lakes Basin United States Lucinda Johnson University Of Minnesota Duluth Associate Director Bank Of America Fdic Paul Hefner Konami Erie Chief Meteorologist NPR -Ticipant Four Degrees Fahrenheit Six Degrees Fahrenheit