3 Burst results for "Lucia Revolution"

"lucia revolution" Discussed on CCC Talks

CCC Talks

14:01 min | 1 year ago

"lucia revolution" Discussed on CCC Talks

"It's cold the experience deficit I mean it's the term that's behaviorally recognized as as again as it is a downside of bringing so much technology as it turns out as humans for us to process something we do need time we do need reflection. We do need Social Interaction if certain changes need to occur in by Creating shortcuts through immediate delivery through technology which seems to be more efficient on the size of speed and acceleration where actually creating deficits on the behavioral side and psychologically which of the downsides of which we do not yet exactly now but we already seen it in education significantly one we're bringing students in who are digital natives people coming in who've been educated in already digital age and there are some significant again deficits in what we would consider the full human experience so. I think we are learning to be living with technology because it's not an option anymore. And but we're learning also the downsides and we need to be more proactively addressing these types of deficits in understanding the impact. That technology will have long term nauseous short-term efficiencies that the business might be looking at. I think that's very important for listeners. Think about human deficit. It grows mortgage technology to try and solve their stop. Deficit probably grows because you've unequal balance now too much technology not enough of the human the human element and a common theme that relates to this. That we've out on a lot of these These sessions he's talks is no recognition that we've gone from highly manufacturing industries into service industries which are now being or moving into the knowledge industry. That seems to be where we are in a completely different thing to say may moving from manufacturing to services required people to do differently act differently be differently and be educated differently and have different technologies. I think that's happening from the services in the street into this knowledge industry and it's not a direct shift that you immediately stop one on. Start the other one of those questions. I have for you while businesses might be recognizing vest with the work. Say That you do and and what you're teaching is. Do you think the individuals the humans themselves individuals in jobs. You think they recognize any of this. How significant this might be on them or are they unaware of it. I mean it depends you know humans a different right So it really depends. Most most of us are reactive to these types of changes. That's what creates it's creating a lot of stress because people are unprepared. It happens to them only. Then to your point they become aware I think what we need to be doing in this is where I think. A lot of focus in a mine field right. Now is trying to be predictive That area that's growing really fast. And we'll also teach on in. Our Program is workforce planning understanding of the rate of obsolescence of skills in the jobs level. We're not talking about jobs with talking. Where breaking down jobs into skills because every job can there's no I mean the category of jobs is going your way We need to understand what's involved. People a much bigger than jobs right watson all kinds of skills both soft and hard skills are needed in an we in. What's interesting about what's happening now? It's not all skills at once. Go Away we only notice how we talk about. It's kind of mechanically. They were jobs now their jobs but it's much more subtle. These in these changes that occur. Not only at the job level again. That's too that's too big. An happens overnight in nets edits reactive. But it's a gradual transition. Parts of jobs are being automated and so their environment we're going to be living in Is GonNA BE AMENDED? You know? Every job is going to be melted with technology so pretty much no one is going to be immune to these types of transitions and so where we are now because again I like to. I like my role of being on the solution side of these types of issues that are so central to the future of our society is to figure out how we can be more predictive about these types of changes happening And how we could be more proactive in creating educational pathways in learning pathways Have necessarily education with capital E. Win that they're learning in the flow work. Reskilling all of these types of things that it technology again is helping us be more efficient in acquiring a new skills entrance thing but the trick here to what you meet. Just ask is to go from reactive to proactive in. Where in asks where you know Again Smart Technologies I- analytics helping us to to make that shift if we're predict if we have predictive about it in prescriptive around educational pathways in put resources behind it a knowledge. I think we're going to eliminate a lot of pain in a lot of disruption that we're experiencing now because now and now it's happening because again we are kind of waiting until it happens in too late. It's always too late so is too late. You mentioned something that I think He said I saw about it. And we're bigger jobs. We do when I think one of the challenges that has been found. Is that a lot of people self identify with the jobs that they do. They attach a lot of. I think self worth to that job and the job that they do a now that we're in this world of absolute change. It is happening quicker faster than change of has ever happened before I think. That's impacting these in the conversations. I've been having with organizations as well. I can see that having an impact on everybody in the organization from decision makers right down to the the the lower levels in an organization that even the people that say empower are actually struggling to get to grips with. What's changing. How's it going to affect me? Never mind the rest of the staff here. So there's a bit of Cell Survival. I think For people because of the way they attach that everybody but some people will attack sell for us to the job that they do based on the role and position that the half. I think that being challenged as well at the moments That's what we might response to. This will be He. Full are attached to work. You know people are the work. Is You know oxygen food for humans. So in that's different from jobs in for as long as we understand that and how new in create opportunities for people to be engaged socially and work. That is going to be you know. That's how we need to be a reframing the whole conversation about jobs because it's not about jobs jobs are gonNA come and go We've seen in the past. Yeah Yeah So. We are hard wired to work just VIP productive to be socially connected with people in achieve outcomes. We we are you know somewhat. You know maybe competitive At some level different degrees of competitive but a lot of the whole range of human emotion is associated with work. And we talk about the dignity he'll work in and I think what's happening is if people have been trained in such a lenient way in their associated with a job that's where the that's where the fragility of this type of concept house. That's where it breaks down. You know if I'm only thinking on myself as a coal mine you know I see. I see the shelf life of that profession as very narrow very shore. Yes so and that's what you know. The politicians obviously take advantage of it. They're gonNA save you know if I want to win this population i. I'm going to put the coal miners back into the coalmine. And that's not how these types of issues need to be resolved. What you need is to give people opportunity to work. You have to find what they would be good at how they the skills this is. Where again the Union of measures skill? What other Equivalent skills that we could be. You know Draining amend of that will be relevant to the next economy and it turns out there are quite a few A few skills out there and again if you develop the ability with helpless technology etc to identify you know the kind of the strengths of people etc in develop those skills in them create work environments for them where they can be deployed. This is why when when people lose jobs we always tell them volunteer. Don't don't just isolate yourself For that job when you volunteer you actually are continuing to develop yourself in in in your participating in the flow or can you participating in society. So that's the way we need to be thinking about it. That's fantastic. That's really good. One of the things. We did a recent survey report from the CCC the Global Digital Skills Survey one of the critical findings that we got from that survey was that today are requiring are acquiring sorry requiring people are looking for people to have the ability to acquire skills acquired him quickly unusual skills as opposed to looking for people who have degrees and other types of You know career spanning knowledge or experience that seems to be moving along this trajectory in the fourth Lucia Revolution. That one of the key things are looking for is an ability for people to learn and relearn. Quickly on reapply regardless of you. You know what they've had in the past always reminds me of this phrase walk got us here will not keep us here and I think that is so relevant. Today that you're not going to get a forty year career from the degree you had twenty years ago in today's you just won't exist because the jobs are changing skill requirement. Everything's changing so fast as you said. We see a lot on these talks. A lot of 'em automation coming. True technology automating half of. Somebody's job so you've got to be able to acquire new skills and transition on change trout your career. What you think is the scale in itself that people need to have some people say it's more difficult for the older cohorts Sunday younger. I'm not convinced out. I think it's probably a human trait. Are you able to learn and relearn as opposed to how old are you on? Should younger people learn better? I don't think that that's how it works. What am I think that's part of a what's happening on that phrase what got us here will not keep us here. I think ever is ever so relevant as part of that on it you talk about this new world of work. Which is what we're in today spoken about. I'll just quote here. What we need most is a practical guide to brave. New World of work. Talent CONNECTS A to employment wherever and whenever it finds the best fit. Can you elaborate? I think that that's a fantastic phrase. We're GONNA write about that in the blog but can you explain that in a little bit more detail where we're coming from You know I. I wanted to respond to your your first question about education in learning race Because I think it's really.

Again Smart Technologies CCC Lucia Revolution
"lucia revolution" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

07:37 min | 2 years ago

"lucia revolution" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Studio. That was the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Major General. My next guest is resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, where he, we started era politics, the Gulf corporation council, Iran, Iraq, the Kurds, terrorism and Turkey. Former Pentagon official in the George W Bush administration written several books, including eternal Iran continuity, in chaos. He has a PHD in masters history from Yale, where you also a BS degree in biology. Please welcome to the program Michael Rubin. Michael, thank you very much for taking the time. I really appreciate it. Thanks for having me, Larry, Michael. Is there any question that this drone was, in fact shot down over international airspace? You know, I don't think the United States would lie on this one. I don't think there's any mistake, we keep careful records of where drones are and Iran. I think so their true hand when they posted a picture which turned out to be posted a picture of a drone being sought down. But it turned out actually that picture have been taken in Yemen three years before. So it seems that the United States is absolutely right on this one in Michael a few days earlier, as you know, Iran, apparently attacked two oil tankers, although they're denying responsibility for that as well. Well, increasingly it seems to evidence is overwhelmingly, that Iran is doing this, this, that you're on the pattern of seeking plausible. Deniability where they're politicians and diplomats will say one thing these logic revolutionary guard corps. We'll do another. Sometimes this is interpreted as the revolutionary guard going rogue. Although in reality, it seems that Iran, they're simply. Trying to have it both ways Michael Rubin. Did you support pulling out of the Iran deal? I did. I would have preferred actually we'll put it this way. I wasn't a fan of Iran. Deal put for President Trump do is hold Iran. So tightly to it that Iran would have withdrawn from it. For example, insisting on inspections by international. Inspectors of military sites that has never happened, the Ronnie and had one major inspection. And they decided to take the soil samples themselves, if we had held that you're writing feet to the fire. I do think it would have been a better result. Mike, let's go back, a few years when they had the so-called, Arab spring, Iran, my impression is that Obama did virtually nothing head Obama, taking stronger action would be having a different conversation right now. i'm not sure that we would have looked a lot of people talk about the reformers in iran political context you have hardliners ever formers it's one of embarrassing things after how many ever tens of billions of dollars we spend on intelligence forty years after the islamic revolution we still don't have a good sense of the factual breakdown within islam revolution guard corps and the reason why this is important is it doesn't matter what ninety percent of the running people think it doesn't matter what the reformer state you're never gonna have muddle through reform be successful in less you're able to topple the islam revolution guard corps to serve as the pictorial guard to the supreme leader and they're not gonna hesitate to fire on the crowds in the street ultimately that becomes the not that prevents any iranian reformers that were democrats in being successful michael rubin is my guest he's a research scholar at the american enterprise institute michael what about the sanctions we're putting on a rant i hear that their economy is almost toppling Is that true? Well as we've seen with North Korea, if the regime, what's the hold on long enough. It wants to deprive it's people, it's not going to necessarily fall that said, what ordinary Iranian steward. I used to live in Iran is considered Iran. It's a country around eighty million people consider Turkey is also a country around eighty million people Iran is floating on a C gas oil Turkey has none. And yet, Iran has been heading hit stream headfirst into third world for the past forty years Turkey has an economy that, that is booming and ins. Running government tries to blame their deprivations on the United States for forty years running, people basically said, look, the real problem is corruption. Now recently, the sanctions have added a lot of pain to this. That said, I'm not sure that sanctions alone will be enough to topple the regime. Honestly. I don't think it's going to be anything that we do that will end the regime. I rather think that it's going to be the transition and leadership with the supreme leader who is ill and was seventy eight years old. It's not clear. There's going to be a smooth. Succession, right. Michael rubin. We're often surprised. I remember a living in the Middle East in the in the seventies early seventies. And there was an article in the new Republic called the Shah's. Well, run kingdom and within a matter of months, and it fallen, and I remember very positive reviews of the Soviet Union. I mean Bernie Sanders was nineteen Eighty-eight having his having honeymoon and came back and talked about how wonderful the country was wonderful. The chandeliers worth it, three years later, and look, I'm a historic. On to predict the past admittedly. I get that, right. About half the time. But I do remember that the New York Times nineteen Seventy-nine called Clemente the leader of the Islamic revolution of force for human rights in the region. Right. And Khomeini himself. It said too credulous journalists he had no interest in personal power forty years later, where we are Jimmy Carter, and he exchanged warm letters, one religious leader to another religious leader in the hopes was that he was going to be that kind of person obviously he wasn't the, the regime is very unpopular as you write in a recent article ran coast close to collapse. If they took a poll there, how popular with the government be well, actually we have taken polls, there in the first thing to understand, is that culturally, Iranians are much more cosmopolitan than any peoples around them when you do calling it's not stake oil. And when you wanna look at robust, especially in Iran, it takes a look at the Iranian economic newspapers. There's a newspaper called, for example. the side which means economic financial world it's their equipment of the wall street journal and when you actually talk about economic issues with iran ins and you do polling you take every telephone exchange in theron randomize last four digits so you get a good cross section of society what you find is ten percents of iran in truly believe that islam credit lucia revolution with the great thing another fifteen percent think that i had vision but it's been misapplied and other seventy five percent have completely given up on the system don't think can be repaired but they're not revolutionary their epithets because last time they had a revolution they ended up with the war that killed a million people the iraq war michael rubin you have five more minutes for us of course michael please don't go away michael rubin is my guest he's resident scholar at the american enterprise institute we come back i wanna ask him what are the goal right now iran has i'm assuming it's to put a wit between us and our allies so that the sanctions are lessened and i also To play for him something that James Clapper once said about Iran and nuclear weapon, and I would have thought that it would have been quite a reaction to what he said. But nobody seems to be reacting to it. Want to get Michael Ruben's reaction to come back. The only town Larry elder, all true. Stuck in traffic?.

Iran Michael Rubin Michael Iranian Revolutionary Guard Ma American Enterprise Institute United States Turkey resident scholar Larry elder Iraq Michael Ruben Yale George W Bush Yemen Pentagon Obama Middle East North Korea Bernie Sanders
"lucia revolution" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

06:24 min | 2 years ago

"lucia revolution" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Lucia revolution today. What are we revolt against John every I'm revolting every heightened for you. Are you as old as you think you are? I it occurred to me this morning. I said I can't believe I'm as old as I am. Well, you know, it's the bones and all. It's your muscles. And all that stuff in your eyeballs. I feel I feel great. It's just that. I can't believe that number is likewise. But I'm starting to feel it. I I will admit. I was told that I tell you I need to have a hip replacement. They said the other day they said, it's the original factory equipment wasn't bone on bone. They said, I don't know how that happens. He said, it's hereditary. But I don't know. Maybe it was a little football injury, gone bad. I don't know. I think I think I got hit so many times. Crappy. I was a quarterback. Online crappy line in highschool crappy line in junior college crappy line and senior college. And then when I read shirt over at San Diego State. Yeah, I had the third string line. You really? I would go back to every one of those guys and take up a collection. Absolutely. Anyway, let's talk about what Dr Milewski had to say. As brilliant stuff, by the way, he's starts or she starts. What happens when a sixty five year old baby boomer discovers their biologically, a forty five year old gen xer. This may be you, John maybe you may be thirty five not. Years old. I'm fifty five I don't mind saying that it doesn't bother me at all the tantalizing notion they go on of biological age is the focus of York University. Finance professors motion Malev skis new book titled longevity insurance for a biological age. Why your retirement plan should be based on the number of times, you circled the sun? He's clever guy clever. Yeah. That's the actual age. But it's of course, the question of how old you really are internally biologically scientific advances in testing they go on have shown that the number of years. You've lived in your biological age are not the same one way of measuring physiological ages by the length of your telomeres, which we discussed before which are found at the end of your chromosomes. What are you looking for the length of your? Yes. Those are the things that keep your cells. Exactly I read about those several years ago, and they're talking about ways to get them longer. Yeah. Exactly. As biomarkers of aging longer as opposed to shorter telomeres suggests a longer life expectancy. Another method is called DNA methylated. Which looks at the cells themselves the tissues and the cells. So he goes on to get quite scientific, but this article it's very fascinating, by the way in the former scenario Milewski points out an individual's biological age and therefore longer life expectancy would set the stage for a change in asset allocation probably a greater proportion of equities possibly the purchase of an annuity. So again, we've talked about these target date funds, which get it wrong post retirement. Maybe they're getting it right up to retirement, but post retirement, they're getting it wrong for a number of different reasons. Not the least of which is something you, and I both talked about and written about which is the potential veterans with a rising equity glide path, but Milewski is focusing on is the whole idea. Of life expectancy, and one of the other things that I'm gonna talk about later on is this risk assessment. How much risk should you be willing to take retirement? And a lot of the pundits have gotten that one wrong to rather than focusing on the risk of the portfolio, one might consider focusing on the risk to your loss of income user too. I know now I know to your word of whatever your ears music to my ears. Yeah. Sense that I like guarantees you like to look at your investments from how much income can I reasonably expect to take for the rest of my life as opposed to how much return I'm gonna get relative to the risk that I'm taking I always tend to look at worst case scenario because when I know what I'm up against that gives you a better defense, and if I can raise that worst case scenario make it better through guarantees it's easier to solve so for those that don't know who Dr Milewski is. I mean, the guy. Has been all over the place. He's written fourteen books thousand keynote addresses sixty peer reviewed scholarly papers, hundreds of consumer newspaper and magazine articles. I mean, the guy is a prolific writer. I've actually spent an hour or two of them breakfast one morning years ago when he happened to be in San Diego. He's just a terrific guy and very very, very smart. So here's what most Milewski had to say to think advisor, quote, if you send some blood and saliva to a research firm, South Korea, they'll send you a report saying that maybe your spleen is age sixty to your lungs age seventy nine your liver ninety seven than the average that out they give you some combined number this. Juxtapose to many of the websites that, you know, look at a five question questionnaire and say you're gonna make dating five you're going to make it the eighty one this is a lot more scientific nonetheless. I think it's it's fascinating stuff. They go on. How far away is the question. How far away are we from people identifying themselves by biological age instead of chronological age. In other words, how long before we're going to be able to actually know scientifically how old are bodies. Are. He says within five years, quote, I think people will start to associate themselves with their biological.

Dr Milewski John San Diego State York University South Korea football Malev San Diego advisor writer forty five year sixty five year five years