20 Episode results for "Luchino"

Bonus 01: The Jewish Connection

Mafia

27:53 min | 2 years ago

Bonus 01: The Jewish Connection

"From the early days of street thugs to the far reaching arms of the commission. The American mafia has always been believed to be a largely Italian affair. But there had always been a strong Jewish connection, especially in the early part of the twentieth century. Though there were moms and gangs of varying groups, the Jewish shore Yeesh mafia where some of the most influential and the most ruthless. Known as the kosher, no straw or own sesssion. They were prolific in bootlegging, founded Las Vegas and were an integral part of the mafia's group of Sassoon's murder Inc. This is mafia. The Jewish connection. In the early twentieth century, hundreds of thousands of immigrants settled a New York City among them were at talion 's mostly from the south of Italy and Jews from eastern Europe, author, Eric dozen. All the history of organized crime in America is basically the history of immigration. The Jewish influx came basically before the Italian influx, which is why did Jewish rackets were bigger before the Italian rackets got big. And so it was all function of timing. If you look back in the mid eighteen hundreds, you have Irish people who got here before that. So they predominated. So when people talk about the religions and races that are involved with organized crime, you can really just trace it back to when they got here. The man largely considered the father of modern organized crime was Arnold Rothstein the Jewish gambler from New York City. Rothstein was the son of a wealthy businessman who could have become a successful banker or a stockbroker. Instead, he chose to make money through high stakes, gambling. Rackets his biggest racket. He claimed to a fixed the nineteen nineteen World Series crime, author, Selwyn ram, it hard that some Chicago White Sox plays. We're on the happy with their own Charles Comiskey and Comiskey was known for being cheapskate, not paying them what they were worth and uneven skimping on giving them bonuses for being the best team in the American League, and obviously the best best bet to win the World Series. So what happened was rusting heard somebody. He knew had a connection to White Sox players, and he sent to worry that could be big dough to the players. If they double cross, Kaminsky took a bribe and. Blew the World Series. And some of these players thought this was a way of revenge retaliation for Comiskey on the pain. And that was the way Rothstein to intermediaries got to the White Sox players. Nicknamed the brain Rothstein was the man who taught the mob to think like a Business Act like a business and look like a business. He became a mentor to rough street thugs who would become notorious and powerful mobsters themselves journalist, Doug Valentine. The original mafia bosses in New York probably emerged at the very end of the nineteenth century at a time when. Immigration was booming in New York City. What they call the the mustache Pete's. They were in power through the nineteen twenties and at the particular time because of their prohibition on their subordinates from actually getting involved in in our Connex in industrial way. Nor Kati trafficking in the unite in in the United States more out of New York, put an every other city as well fell under the auspices of Arnold Rothstein who was a very powerful Jewish gangster. He was the premier American gangster of the nineteen twenties involved in labor racketeering in bookmaking bootlegging, and and he he also had a a monopoly on the importation and distribution of narcotics in the United States. People like lucky Luciano, Frank, Kostenko, they, they were apprentices of Arnold Rothstein. They saw the fantastic amounts of money that were that could be made crime. Author, Selwyn ram, rose, dean, sewer, prohibition, who's big bucks. And what he did was you had. Turn people from thugs into mob executives. You had to learn how to one manufacturer, booze and beer to hunter deliver it three hundred marketed and four, how to safeguard your supply because they were rivals. Bootleggers were hijack each other's quantities. Rothstein was a gangster unlike any other. He didn't have a gang. He didn't do violence, and he worked with the people who suited him at a particular time in the pursuit of his business ventures. What he did was of different projects, different operations. He used different people, whoever was valuable. Oh, he thought fit in now when it came to prohibition, the monsters didn't as gangsters those times mainly street thugs. What they did was they prayed Jewish gangsters preyed on Jewish neighborhoods, Irish, Irish neighborhoods, talion Taya neighborhoods. A lot of it was just robberies. Extortion from shopkeepers. The gangster norm was to stick to your own group. Most gangs were primarily of one ethnic bearing mobsters were especially suspicious of anyone who might be different and therefore untrustworthy. But things were starting to change and Rothstein wasn't the only one shaking it up. In Chicago in the nineteen twenties famous Bank robber and cocaine, kingpin Al Capone was known for his love of publicity, but he was also known for bringing gangsters together. Crime author, Lawrence burglary that may Capone unique was the fact that he built in criminal coalition across ethnic lines almost all other gangsters at that time, it Chicago and the organ other cities lead gangs that ran strictly across ethnic lines, certain kinds of Italians or Jews or poles or Irish or even Welsh. Capone was a coalition builder. He would have been very successful politician because he put together a coalition of these gangsters of they often hated each other mistrusted each other ever. The last he got to work together for their economic advantage. He was particularly close with Jewish gangsters. He learned so he could speak with them. Back in New York. However, many of the old school gangsters were stuck in their old ways. The different groups wouldn't even mix. Let alone collaborate with others. This was especially true of old Italian mafia bosses gangsters like Genovese family boss, Joe Mezeray a- only trusted their own people. But some of the younger talion like Charles lucky Luchino, and Frank Castillo who had come to the US as young children were different. They were friends with Jewish kids like Meyer Lansky and Bugsy. Siegel crime author, Ernest Volkmann when one of one of the major reasons why there was a falling out between people like Luchino Costello and the other younger generation of mafia also. And the old Mustang speeches, they were contemporaries. Contemptuously described was anti-semitism Macerata Jews. And to his shock, I found Lucina was palling around with this guy named Maya Lansky and other Jews. As a matter of fact, one day was shocked. Discover Lucina was having dinner in Ratner's, which is a very famous Jewish restaurant and lower Manhattan and developed real fun is Jewish food. Meyer Lansky had been a street thug for most of his life as a teenager. He had partnered up with his friend, Ben Bugsy Siegel to form what they called the bugs Meyer mob together. They made good money by roughing up pushcart drivers and bootlegging crime, author, Ernest Volkmann. The books Meyer mall was percolating along prohibition health because now suddenly this gang of petty thieves, which is what they were fundamentally Sunday could stop making real money. My running Berens by hijacking trucks. And things really started when a young Lansky met Luchino author, Eric dozen whole famously Jonah try to shake him down and Meyer told him in no uncertain terms in very colorful language where he could get off. You think that because I'm Jewish, I'm just going to fork over money that's not going to happen buddy. The partnership of Luchino and Lansky set the wheels in motion for organized crime to really become a business. Lansky was the idea, man and Luchino had the charisma and the connections, Ernest Volkmann the Jews, no lot about overnight grind. We know a lot about organized crime. They have operations, we have operations, and if we go operate role, make a lot of money. I'm really excited to tell you about the sponsor for today's show. It's a fantastic new novel by New York Times, bestselling author, Andrew gross, get this description, but man brings to life the birth of organized crime in nineteen thirties, New York City through the story of one family. Now, you know why, I'm excited. You're going to love this book, but man is part historical thriller part family saga. You've got great descriptions of immigrant life in New York's Lower East Side in the twenties and thirties, and the family part is partly based on grosses owned family, which is pretty cool. And then he weaves in real history. It's got appearances by mobsters Lewis limpkey boo, Cultor Dutch Schultz and also special prosecutor Thomas Dewey. If you've been listening to this show, you already know all these guys. Here's what bestselling author. Linda fairstein says about it, but. But man is a riveting piece of historical fiction, exposing the Jewish mob of the nineteen thirties who preyed on the garment industry and the brave few who stood up against them. This book is a heart-stopping and number one, New York Times bestselling author, Kristin Hannah calls, but man, a compelling fast paced historical thriller fans of boardwalk empire and densely Hain will love it. Forget Denizli, Hain fans of mafia will love it, but man by Andrew grosses available. Now in hardcover e book and audio from mentor books go to the audio version if you can. It's really good. But man by Andrew gross. The pair of Luchino and Lansky thrived even more under the mentorship of Arnold Rothstein Selwyn RAB. So he turns. Mobsters into business executives, mob mob as used their brains, not just a Braun. So he saw the money. He made millions out of prohibition by working with different people. He worked with Jewish gangsters Maya Lansky Bugsy Siegel, he worked with Tommy Lucchessi work Luciano. He worked with Scholtz. He work with Irish gangsters. Anybody who could fit into him was fine. Luchino and Lansky, and their friends would listen and learn as Arnold. Rusting taught them how to do business. The American way. The key was an organizing crime operations from top to bottom and ensure everybody was making money along the way. Prime author. Thomas Repetto the Rosny taught the young gangsters or moving up. If you want to be successful breasts, like a successful man don't dress like a gangster, no white ads. You know, that sort of thing. The used to be a diamond American city when the police saw two guys way to drive by the arrest because that was the uniform of the the rusty was mentor old generation, whatever you say about a lot of those gangsters. They realize the Roz dean was up the special far above them. They wanna make money and have a connection to stay out of trouble with the law. Ross team was the guy journalist, Doug Valentine. So I'll say a student of arresting Luchino saw the practicality and the possibilities in the sorts of in the way that Ross tainted business. He he saw. Things that that roasting did that nobody else were doing such as a statute front companies for his bootlegging and narcotics trafficking organizations. There were there were things that that rough scene was doing. Nobody else was doing in Luchino, saw the possibility of this and and he he also teamed up with a person who was had all the same thoughts Meyer landscape and through that partnership and the association's the they, each brought to this partnership. Modern organized crime was born internationally in all sorts of different activities of their money into Lucia was, was one of the first people to see the with with Meyer Lansky, the beauty of forming casinos to launder the money the they made in other rack. So they're, they're really quite far far thinking. And although, of course there efforts were in crime and and hard to forgive them for that. But nevertheless, that's he was a criminal genius little. The old mustache. Pete's like, Jim, as a rea- knows that lucky Luchino and his friends had practically become the proteges of Arnold Rothstein crime author, Ernest Volkmann with the greatest shock was to come. He discovered one day that Frank Costello had married a Jewish girl. And Lasky was the best man at the wedding. I to ASEAN mine like about three. This was absolutely unthinkable. And he said to who channel. We don't do business with the heeds as he called. I want them around. I don't want any contact with Lucianovic Nord him because John was in the business of building empires and coalitions. And he said, what's the difference? Crime author, Eric doesn't hall bigotry doesn't make money. It stagnating. If you wanna make money, a true capitalist doesn't care about race or religion and Luchino recognized that if you keep the rackets just to Attala NHS, you cut out a lot of great earners and the Jewish guys in those days were amazing earners Mezeray and the gangsters like him. We're only standing in the way of the business like criminal organization that Luchino and Lansky imagined for the future together, they employed both Jewish and talion killers. To get rid of two street. Gang bosses Johm as a rea- and Salvatore Marranzino and they used the by sees against them to their advantage. Author, Eric design home. One of the stereotypes of the Jewish rackets the Jewish guys handled the money and the Italian guys were tough guys. Not true. Interestingly enough when Luchino took over the Italian rackets, it was the Jewish muscle that played a big role. One of the guy's name was red LeVine who was known for being docs, chew who would not kill on the Sabbath. But Marivan was so bigoted that he felt if some Jewish bean counter IRS guys came to his office, they couldn't do any harm. Not only did they do harm, they killed them. With the other bosses out of the way Lucina was able to call a meeting of major crime bosses from around the country. He called for the end of wars among gangs, no more segregation between ethnic groups. It was all about making money and everybody could get a cut crime, author, Ernest Volkmann. Vagner do and lay CD meeting was between Jewish and Italian criminals have and it was unprecedented the up to that point. You had very strict divisions between the various ethnic gangs Jews. Jews didn't even go into talion awards. Atanas didn't even go into Jewish Nate, which much less cooperate on crime. And here was Lucia housing, what a cooperate. I don't care. He's Jewish. He doesn't give a diet. Guess what? C. does dollar Bill here. Okay. Zelic Josiah talion to you, be neutral, right? That was his point. If you, if you organize and you put it on a business basis, who the hell cares, what what ethnic you are doesn't make any different. That whole distinction doesn't make any sense anymore. Lansky and Siegel were both present at the commission meeting and after the national crime syndicate was formed Lansky and Siegel created an organization. That would help enforce its rules, murder Inc in the Italian rackets. It was about the Italian mob hierarchy Luchino had to pay attention to that, but people like Meyer Lansky and Ben Siegel and let key Buckhalter were very important in that broader syndication. Because if you were trying to make money, you didn't care if you a real capitalist, what color race or religion you were, you care that you could do the job and Ben Siegel and Meyer Lansky could do the job and they were very much in those days equal partners before the Italian hierarchy became what it was soon after murder Inc was led by Albert anesthesia and Louis lip Gabe Coulter. In fact, murder Inc was a multi-ethnic group of professional killers made up mostly of. Italians and Jews Selwyn ramp, and that was one of and stays his best gifts to the mafia. He decided we need to poop of professional hitmen who could carry out whatever killings had to be done, but we didn't want them all the time to be talian. And he knew lefty actually lived on neighboring communities in Brooklyn and left. Key head is own Jewish gang of hired hoods and killers. So there was into changeable, murdering, corporated existed and consisted both of talian and Jewish murderers who went out on the Simon's. And the theory by using Jewish killers often was this is that somebody would finger whoever had to be marked for death and they would send over a Jewish hitman. And the idea was, if the suspect or the victim was talion, he wouldn't suspect somebody didn't look at talion. It. Crime, author, Bernie Waylon. If you saw Burkhalter he was a thin guy. Nothing to really think of as a bad guy. But he apparently really was there was also a special kind of way of talking at murdering it became well known Muffin talk. Here's Ernest Volkmann again, the new vocabulary. Full Mary arose among the Jewish killers assigned to very cover. Most of them came from an area broken, Brownsville, and they would sit there and it was a phone both that it would ring and they got a job. Okay. Now, one of them would not do any burdens on Yom Kippur because he was very devoutly religious. They didn't like to use words like killing murder, slaughter. They wanted to use business terms. So to kill somebody was a contract. Business. I have contract. I'm not gonna take somebody and and kill them and dump them. They're going to go from right. They take Verein good. Good. I don't wanna say, I'm the guy who goes, I cut the body up a little pieces and buried someplace or burn it, or I dump it any ocean in fifty gallon drunk. Now. On a vapid. I make the bodies disappear UC. So you had all these. Very neutral sounding kind of business terms. We've had a whole different meaning and their business. We're businessmen. After the formation of murder, Inc Bugsy Siegel was sent west to take over the Los Angeles mafia for the syndicate. Author, Ernest of open of the gambling activities in California, which is really what everybody was after tickly. Los Angeles was nominally under Dragnes control with dragon was weak and everybody doing. And so when Chicago New York made it clear that he dragged was now no longer in charge, but would be regarded as helpful assistant. Now he got the basic and the understood happily welcome bed. All Ben, however, wonderful baba. Siegel was the pity me of gangster tough, handsome and brutal. He made a name for himself not only among gangsters, but among Hollywood's elite, but the traits that made him a good mobster got him into trouble and once ousted. From high society. He decided to make his own journalist, Diana bless Bugsy. Siegel is an American mob legend. He's the guy who dreamt up Las Vegas. He put the glitz and glamour into sin city. Very few people outside of Meyer Lansky and Siegel shared history. I mean, it seemed incredible, especially there in the middle of no place, but Siegel point, wait a minute. It's on the main highway from California at the time, Nevada did not have speed limit. So he said, people could drive your miles and it could be here in a couple of hours away. And guess what? We've made a wonderful discovery about it barricades they love to gamble guy, help us. They loved to Gable Seagal opened the glamorous Flamingo hotel and casino the very found Dacians of Las Vegas. Unfortunately, he never lived to see the gambling paradise, but his influence remains. In the later twentieth century, the lines have blurred between the Jewish connection and the Italian American mafia both parties working side by side to do business. But the prevalence of the Jewish mobsters only helped fuel public anti-semitism and the presence of Jewish American gangsters mostly faded after World War Two, but their influence still remains as characters in popular culture books and film. In the next bonus episode for decades, the mob had influence in every aspect of society, and there was nothing the law could do, but there was an idealist few who decided to make a stand Rinco the Rico statute of Nike congressman early seventies the weapon that was developed by wrong goal stock and Bob Linke who wrote actually wrote the statue was put in place for us in oil force to me better control on the Nys crime and investigate the new laws, new technology and informants that ultimately worked together to bring down the mob won't. Needless to say, the convictions of many of the Donald family members, including Joe Messina, was very satisfied to many law enforcement people next week, mafia bonus to the crackdown. This has been an audio, boom and world. Meteorites co-production hosted by me fleet Cooper, it is produced by audio booms, Ben Hasley, and Rachel Jacobs and Bettina Vasquez for world media rights. We had editing help from David Markowitz with additional production from world media rights by Gerald's Benguet. David McNabb is the series creative director and the executive producers for audio. Boom are Brendan Regan and Stewart last. Thanks to Saint Martin's press for sponsoring this episode. Follow Mufleh on Spotify or subscribe on apple podcasts, Stitcher, or wherever you find your favorite shows. And if you've got some time, give us a review.

Meyer Lansky Charles lucky Luchino Ben Bugsy Siegel Arnold Rothstein New York City Ernest Volkmann Eric dozen talion Luchino Costello Siegel Chicago White Sox Luchino Maya Lansky Las Vegas New York Times Charles Comiskey Selwyn ram Andrew gross United States
Charlie Lucky Luciano

Killer Knowledge

06:45 min | 1 year ago

Charlie Lucky Luciano

"In September Nineteen Thirty One New York Gangster Charlie Lucky Luchino made the bold and dangerous move of having the quote boss of bosses murdered. which gave him the power to reshape Modern Day organized crime? But. Do you know what famous singer helped? Get Luchino deported back to Italy. Welcome to killer knowledge the daily true crime. Trivia, show I'm Carter, Roy. It's time to play along with your friends, family or fellow true crime fans. You'll have the chance to answer five Trivia questions. Six seconds to make your guests. Let's play killer knowledge. Born in Sicily, but raised in Manhattan. Charlie Luchino started his life in crime at age ten and never looked back. There are different stories as to. How lucky earned his nickname. Including people mispronouncing his last name and one about gambling. Question Number One! What game was Charlie lucky at winning? A craps. Be Poker see billiards. Correct answer is a craps. Though a third story was about him being lucky enough to survive a brutal attack with an ice pick where his throat was slit, and he was left to die on the beach in nineteen, twenty, eight, two of New York's top crime families were in a feud and Luchino having worked his way up. The ranks saw an opportunity. He. I took out his own boss. Joe Joma area before having the boss of bosses killed. Question, number two. which other crime boss did Luchino have murdered to make room for his takeover. A Meyer Lansky. Be Salvator Merrin Zano. See! Bugsy, Siegel. The correct answer is B. Salvator Marin Zano. Luchino had learned that Manzano had planned to have him killed, so he took out the boss. I making Luchino the top leader of the New York Mafia. As the top crime boss in the city Luchino wanted equal distribution of power between all the families, so he formed a national crime syndicate to help organize in maintaining peace between them. All question number three. What was the name of the group Luchino ran that included leaders from the crime family's. A. The agency. B The commission. See the delegation. The correct answer is b the Commission. It not only included the five families of New, York, but also criminal organizations such as Al Capone's. Now, being the head of all organized crime in New, York came with a lifestyle to match lucky Luchino even kept a suite at a famed a luxury hotel in the city. Question Number Four. In what famous hotel, Charlie Luchino live in New York. A the knickerbocker hotel. The, the Plaza Hotel. See the Waldorf Astoria. Correct answer is C. Luchino had a suite in the Waldorf towers at the Waldorf Astoria. The hotel played a role in special prosecutor. Thomas e Dewey Getting Luchino, arrested in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty, six for facilitating prostitution, and Luchino was eventually deported back to Italy. However in October, Nineteen forty-six Luchino secretly moved to Havana Cuba where he hoped to keep control of the American mafia, and a meeting was called with all the crime. Bosses called the Havana Conference. Question number five to end this road. What famous singers performance was used as a reason. The bosses were going to Havana. A. Dean Martin. Be, Sammy Davis Junior. C Frank Sinatra. Own. The correct answer is c Frank Sinatra. The US government learned of Luchino being in Cuba, and pressured the country to send him back to Italy. In January nineteen, sixty two Charlie lucky Luciano died of a heart attack, he was able to be returned and buried in New York. To everyone listening, thank you for playing killer knowledge with us. Don't forget to check us out on facebook. INSTAGRAM AT CAST and on twitter at podcast network, and you can listen to more episodes of killer, knowledge and other park cast originals on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts, I'm corduroy. Join US again to find out if you can call yourself a true crime, expert killer knowledge was created by Max, Cutler and his a podcast studios original. It is executive produced by Max Cutler produced by Kristen. Osservato Giancarlo key to MIRA and Jonathan ratliff sound design by Paul Liba skin killer knowledge stars Carter Roy.

Charlie Lucky Luchino B. Salvator Marin Zano New York Italy Plaza Hotel Carter Roy Waldorf Astoria knickerbocker hotel Salvator Merrin Zano New York Mafia Frank Sinatra Meyer Lansky York Cuba Sicily US facebook Joe Joma spotify Havana Conference
Kingpins Daily: Lucky Luciano

Kingpins

05:35 min | 1 year ago

Kingpins Daily: Lucky Luciano

"This kingpins a podcast original. I'm Alistair and I'm kate every day in May we're featuring a quote by an iconic crime figure teaching us in their own words what it takes to survive in the underworld. Today's quote comes from Charles Lucky Luciano. The father of the American Mafia after prohibition and Bloody Gang War that turned New York City into the wild west Luchino seized control of the underworld he established the structure of the Mafia. That still in place today and he did it all in the service of one thing money as he himself once put it. There's no such thing as good money. Bad money is just money for almost all gangsters. Money is the driving factor in entering the underworld more often than not they see. Illegitimate trades like racketeering or drug trafficking as a way to make a quick and easy buck that seems to be the mindset. Lucia no had from early childhood after he emigrated to the United States in the early nineteen hundreds his first business endeavour took place in the school yard offering protection services to bullied students for ten cents a week within a few years. He graduated to muggings and burglary and gained a reputation as a master pickpocket. Her he earned himself a spot in the five points gang. By the time he was eighteen it was around this time as a teenager. The Lucci on was first introduced to heroin. Although Lucia admits to using heroin as a teen he didn't become an inadequate instead he sold drug as a potential money-making bonanza but at the time heroin was a tough drug to sell. Many gangsters wanted to stay away from it on account of the harsh punishments for getting caught selling it. So instead when prohibition hit Luchino turned to another illicit product alcohol during prohibition Luciano Cam under the tutelage of another infamous gangster ona-led Rothstein Rothstein gave him a crash course on how to build an alcohol empire and how to run it as an actual business by nineteen twenty. Five Lucina was bringing in an estimated four million dollars a year that cash allowed him to invest in other businesses. Such as legal gambling and prostitution after Rothstein was killed in Nineteen Twenty eight. Luchino fell in with another gangster named Joe Mazorra but Mozzarella's Italians only business model. Didn't work for Luchino. Who'd found success working with Jewish gangsters like Rothstein? He was beginning to envision a national syndicate that crossed ethnic lines an alliance for the greater good when a civil war broke out between Mazuria and one of his rivals in the early nineteen thirties. Luchino seized the moment to take control for himself. He eliminated Mosser area and Mazari is rival instead of letting New York descend further into bloodshed and her prophets. Lucina cold meeting with all the top gangsters in the country and from that meeting came the mafia structure that still in place today. A nationwide commission ruled by a Board of Seven family bosses Lucia. No of course was made the chairman as one of the most powerful men in the underworld Luchino had his hand in illegal businesses. All over New York including loansharking labor union organizing prostitution and even Luchino is white whale narcotics but Lucia Luchino. Time wouldn't last long in one thousand nine hundred thirty six. He was arrested and convicted on sixty two counts in connection with a prostitution ring originally sentenced to thirty years his cooperation with the US government during World War Two earned him upon and in one thousand nine hundred forty six but there was a caveat he had to leave the United States forever. The forced exile didn't stop Luchino from criminal activities. He moved to Sicily where he spent the last fifteen years of his life. Establishing an international drug smuggling ring in one thousand nine hundred sixty to Italian authorities were prepared to arrest the Chino in a drug smuggling warrant. However before they could arrest him Luchino died from a heart attack at a Naples airport. Ironically he had just come from a meeting with a Hollywood producer about turning his life story into a feature film or hops. The only legitimate business venture Luciano disgust of course for Lucky Lucia. No there was no such thing as a legitimate or illegitimate business whether it came from booze drugs prostitution all film rights. Money was money. Thanks for listening. We'll be back tomorrow with another quote. You can find more episodes of kingpins for free spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Lucia Luchino Luchino Rothstein Rothstein prostitution Charles Lucky Luciano New York City Lucky Lucia American Mafia United States heroin Alistair spotify Lucina Luciano Cam racketeering burglary Lucci Chino Joe Mazorra
Ron Howard on Luciano Pavarotti's Operatic Life

Kickass News

38:47 min | 2 years ago

Ron Howard on Luciano Pavarotti's Operatic Life

"This is kick ass news. I'm Ben Mathis. Sound trap for storytellers is a brand new one. Stop shop for high quality podcast creation, this cloud based podcast creation, tool comes with a wide range of features to allow for a smooth recording and production process so you can focus on the art of storytelling, visit sound, trap dot com slash storytellers to learn more and use the promo code kick ass news when you subscribe to get the first three months free that sound, trap dot com slash storytellers promo code kick. Ass news. Support for today's show comes from the life is good ping, podcast, joined the co founders of life is good Bert and John Jacobs as they talked to influential musicians athletes, business leaders, and everyday people about the role of optimism in their lives. They'll also end each episode with a ping pong charity challenge where the winner gets to donate to their charity of choice. The life is good ping podcast kicks off. Thursday, June thirteenth with the legendary Ringo Starr subscribe now on Stitcher Spotify, or I tunes and adds some good vibes to your day. And now on with the show. I'm Ben Mathis, welcome to kick ass news. That was the incomparable voice of the man, considered by many to be the greatest singer, that ever lived opera star Luchino poverty, the legendary tenor blew away. Opera lovers with his astounding ability to hit nine high, a row and later, confounded critics when he took opera out of the concert hall, and into stadiums, but offstage he lived in equally. Operatic life as seen in a new documentary by director, Ron Howard is film, poverty opens in theaters Friday, June seventh and today, the Academy Award winning filmmaker behind Apollo thirteen and A Beautiful Mind joins me on the podcast to discuss his newfound love of opera, and of the man who brought opera to the masses, and how he's hoping to carry on that legacy by bringing poverty to movie goers, Ron Howard talks about the art of filmmaking and storytelling, how the director approaches a documentary versus a narrative film, and how he. Decided to tell poverty story as an opera with all the love heartbreak in drama that audiences of come to expect then we get into poverty, the romantic h-how Ron got the various ladies of poverties life to participate in the film, and why poverty often compared his famous voice to attempt pest ewast lover, he tells the story of how the three tenors were formed, and how opera got the rock star treatment when poverty started collaborating with everyone from Stevie Wonder to sting often to the consternation of stuffy opera critics last we talk about poverty is enormous appetite is even bigger heart and Ron's own chance. Encounter with this. Opera legend coming up with Oscar winning filmmaker, Ron Howard in just a moment. Today. I'm delighted to sit down with my fellow USC cinema school, alum. Ron Howard Ron took his film degree and went on to direct twenty-five movies and winning Academy Award and me. Well, I started a podcast runs latest film is an emotional documentary about the man that many people consider to have been the greatest singer that ever lived Luchino, poverty, Ron Howard, welcome. You did get one thing wrong. Oh, did I. Well, I didn't graduate from USO. You didn't graduate. Oh, no, no. They claim me. And they, they don't mind that, they, they don't mind if I donate a little money once in a while. And I really appreciate what I learned there. But I, I didn't I didn't make it through USC. I happy days came along and I went ahead and try job. And for a while I was trying to do both trying to get the glasses and still do the show and one thing led to another. And Finally, I parlayed happy. As into getting an opportunity to direct professionally. And so then it sort of did make sense to go back to film school, that makes me feel even worse because now I'm just thinking, what might have been if only I hadn't graduate. Run. I was not exaggerating. When I said that this was an emotional documentary. I saw in a screening full of critics, which as you know, tend to be a pretty cynical bunch. There wasn't a dry in the house. So if any critic doesn't give you an absolute rave for variety, I'm going to be the guy to call them out and say you were blubbering, right? Well, thank you. I'm thrilled by that. And the reaction has been has just been great to the movie, and I and I you know, I'm proud of the work that we did. It's the same team that, that who all came together to do the Beatles eight days a week a couple of years ago, and we have a really I think a good creative chemistry going in terms of delving into the research exploring it, Paul Crowder, the editors great storyteller in his own, right? Nigel Sinclair, the producer Markman Rosa writer producer on. And but I think it's all a real testament to, to poverty, and those who we interviewed because to an individual, they were defining the spirit of our film. We're talking about over fifty interviews. They didn't all make it into the final, but they all suggested a complicated individual, you know, I mean he had regrets later in his life, the way some of his relationships had ended in and, and so forth. But all that said the overriding feeling was that this was an extraordinary guy who lived with joy lived with integrity, and the world, the art form and all of them as individuals. Whether they were family members of loved ones, friends, or, or, or colleagues just they just. Appreciated him. And that came through interview after interview after interview. And while we wanted a words at all look at the man, the balance the ratio is kind of defined by the interviews that we were getting. Yeah, I was going to ask about that because when you're directing narrative, film director starts out with vision that sort of guides the whole production when you're doing documentary like this. And I think that this is probably your fourth documentary. Now, do you let the research process guide you wear it leads or disown your vision, work in there from the beginning, is that baked in the late great director, Jonathan Demme friend of mine. We were on the board of great organization called the Jacob burns film center, in, in Westchester county, New York, and he made ten tastic. Documentaries music documentaries and, and political documentaries as well as as being an Academy Award winning directory, I think he won the award for silence of the lambs, but so many great movies. I asked him about it originally. And he really encouraged me to throw myself into it, and he said and he was so wise about it. He said, you go into a documentary with an idea. Of the story. Think exists there that you wanna tell, but you have to be in listening mode. You have to be responding to what you get back. Whether you're going out into the field and trying to cover a story or an event or you're doing, you know, movie built around archives and interviews. And, and that's certainly what I found to be the case. It's very different than than scripted in that ultimately scripted. You make the decision it's more like writing biography. Roar like Michael Moore makes documentary. And he's, you know, he tells you what he thinks he says it right. This is something else, where you're really observing, and sharing. And but the but, but you, you know, you need to have the quotes, you need to have sort of evidence for the points that you're that you're making, and I think it's a great addition to my creative life and sort of my exploration of. Medium? So it's a very different process, even than when you're doing a narrative, film, about true events like Apollo thirteen Cinderella man. Beautiful mind. What's similar is the post production part. And that's where I found, I was really able to carry over into the documentary world sort of the same mindset that I ply to the editing of any film, whether it's fact based, or not, which is our, here's the material. We have what, what's, you know, what is this story, really urine Ubi where what, what, what is it? What can it really mean to audiences? I always when I'm directing I I worked very hard on the script with the writers. Sometimes I contribute in the writing in some way, and the producers, but I- disconnect from it emotionally when it comes time to direct. Like I take might my attitude is, you know, I don't know who wrote that. But I don't care. We have this scene with these actors, let's how do we maximize this? Then once I get to the editing room, my attitude about what was shot was. You know, these dumb asses what were they doing of can is really be? Let's take a look at this footage and really make it into a great story. And so that's that, that, that, that phase is something where I can really take the experiences of my rear and apply it to documentaries, and I definitely think that I see your touch or your vision here in the way that you tell the story of poverty, because for me it felt like watching an opera you have the story structure of an opera with the build up to a big crescendo at the end of the emotion. The romance, the tragedy, redemption, that we associate with an opera was that a deliberate choice of yours to tell that story as an opera, it was an initial instinct, and well, not very initial. But soon as I began I understand how operatic in fact, his life was. And hey, look, maybe all our lives are operating operas about, you know, their dramas about people and basic emotive basic emotions. So, but so what I began to see when Paul Crowder, the editor started showing me great performances. They were often there were multiple performances of the same Arias the same songs, and, but it became clear that at certain points in his life where he was about the age of the event that we were, you know, revealing to the audience, talking about in the in the film, by choosing those performances, you'd get an even greater sense that he was at certain times. His life singing about himself, so Sinatra dead. Yeah. Yes. Young and getting started or older and having regrets or feeling triumphant or in love and. So that became a kind of a guiding principle. So I'm glad I'm glad I'm glad that landed with you because it was it was a goal. And there's a great moment in this film, when Bano makes an interesting observation along those lines, a later in poverties life, he decides to return to fully staged operas and the opera critics say, well, he was better in his prime voices. What used to be and Bono says something interesting, he said he was better than he was before that because he had been through all of those emotions. So when he was on stage really felt it he's bringing his whole life to bear. And of course, he was performing Tosca, which is this story of this in an element in the character that he's playing is is at a certain point news, an artist who's ultimately doomed ultimately, he knows he's coming to his end and, you know, they're on his sort of. Final tour. It was quite appropriate audiences sensed it. I mean, there's this standing ovation moment that we have from this performance on that tour that I find very, very moving the audience, they just, you know, they're, they're applauding the performance. It's a great performance, but they're also applauding the man now before we get to the voice of the man, I wanna talk about his performances in the emotion that went into them that were just discussing you've directed, God, some of the greatest actors of our time from Tom Hanks to Russell Crowe. How did poverty rank is? I mean he look when news when he was trying to act in some of those TV commercials and things like that, not so good. But, but when he was. When he was performing. And you just you look in those eyes, I just really felt like he was pouring himself into it. I mean I felt like it is like like one of the actors you name Russell Crowe totally connecting with a moment. Tom Hanks, deeply understanding what it is. He's playing in feeling it and, and other great actors that I've worked with. So I recognize that I felt like. You know there's pug Liatti the sad clown moment, and he was performing it they happen to be kind of special within where he's really he's on camera there onstage with him. It's almost shot like a movie, and we were able to take that that performance, and it's, you know, and it's about your heart's breaking and yet you have to perform, that's what that's what the song's about, and we placed it, and at that age, he was really going through a midlife crisis kind of an identity crisis, and very appropriate. I so I believe that when he was there were times in his life when the Ari is really, really resonated with him on a personal level. You mentioned Sinatra. I do think there are times when the greatest performer, just feels a little something more with speech, as a joke or a song, and we tried to find those performances where we felt. That was the case you had mentioned that you had done to music, documentaries before about Jay Z's music festival, and the Beatles. And of course, named your company imagine, so I know what a big Beatles fan. You are. But I didn't take you for an opera goer. Have you always been a closet opera buff? Prime. No, not a buff. Now. Okay. Arrested development was never nudes. Probably never buff. No, no. It's just the story. I mean I, I know more about opera than I knew about Formula one before I did, rush, for example. But this was this was really more. I mean, what I could relate to was the journey of the of the performer of the who wants to please, an audience wants to live up to the possibilities of the art form and what it means to people, and what it meant means to him. And so, you know, the life's journey of somebody who's dedicated to a creative career is something that I related to. But I think that mostly I was fascinated. And also as a director, just felt man, it's a little bit like the Beatles documentary, you, you could never make a movie. You could never afford to make a movie with that much. Great music in it. And when you when you when you start reading the lyrics of these are is, and understanding what it all means and what it can mean dramatically. It's just a fantastic creative. Opportunity. It's a it's a it's a it's a tool to try to let audiences be entertained be transported in, in a very unexpected for many people, very unexpected way for lovers understand. And, and I hope they recognize all the research that went into making the movie and the respect for the opera as an art form. But I think the non opera lovers are probably the audience that I was really aiming for them. And that's the audience that poverty was aiming for he, he wanted to bring opera to the masses by making this film. Do you feel like you're sort of carrying on that legacy a little bit? I felt that it that it was a goal certainly and I think the family was supportive for the very for that same reason we're gonna take a quick break, and then we'll be back with more with filmmaker Ron Howard when we come back in just a minute. Heaping pace with the many changes in technology is critical, stay up to date and master, the tech skills that companies want with a you Dasan Nanno degree, you Dasan Nanno degree programs. Use the most effective online methods to teach technology subjects from foundational computer programming to artificial intelligence and even how to program, a self driving car you DASS ity works with industry experts to design programs that include real world projects, providing you with true hands on learning with experienced reviewers to grade your work. You'll develop a job, ready portfolio that showcases the right tech skills, you daddy's flexible, pay as you learn monthly program lets you learn at your own pace and the work with you to create a custom learning plan that fits your schedule. In addition, you'll get personal one on one support from technical mentors who can answer your questions and keep you on track. You DASS ity provides a full suite of career services including coaching and resume review to help you land the job. Want start your future today and be in demand? Go to you DASS ity dot com slash kick. Ten and use code kick ten to save ten percent. That's you DASS dot com slash kick. Ten code kick ten to save ten percent today. And now back to the podcast. The critics and some of the more diehard opera fans often criticized him for going and taking it out of the opera house into just live concerts. And then concerts, the three tenors heaven forbid performing with Rockstars. Do you think he cared much about that? Did he seek their approval? Did it matter? I think it's that paradox. I think he did care. And some of these interviews you sort of see him the Ehlers a little anger because I mentioned, I was always criticized. So of course, it hurt, of course, hurt, of course you. He wanted to be better understood than that and respected at all times. But. If what he had to weigh was follow the conventions, and expectations of select group of guardians of, of, of, of the, the medium as it's been understood for years or venture out, take some risks, take some chances. Stretch myself in that way, perhaps have some fun and, and, and get out there into the world. And I think he was willing to take the, the, the, the bad with the with the good scales for him tilted toward this other kind of experience, which, by the way was also invigorating for him. It, it, it fueled his philanthropic efforts, right? Expanded that and creatively, he was getting to hang out, Bano getting, you know, to hang out with. Mariah Carey, and people, you know, I mean it was I'm sure stimulating for him in a blast. Now we have to talk about that, incredible voice, the more, and I also want to applaud the sound design at this film, and I have to confess that, I'm that guy who asked can't you send me a screener link for the movie and the studio said you have to see the with Dolby sound otherwise. You're just not going to do them Justice, and they were absolutely right. I was so glad I did. Because I've heard many of these songs probably fifty or more times over the years on my home stereo or in the car. But when I was in the theater, I don't know what kind of magic you worked here, but it felt like I was in a concert coup stickler. Well that was that was the goal and it's the same mixer who have worked with many times before he's an Oscar winner, Kris Jenkins. Hollywood composers love it. When you get Kris Jenkins as the Knicks or he's great. We can addition to everything else, it sound design. When when he heard I was doing this. He reached out. We'd had a great experience on, on the Beatles eight days a week. It was almost out of superstition that he wanted to mix the movie at Abbey Road again. So we did. Wow. But there was a kind of a stroke of good fortune there because we were mixing and he he went into the big recordings today stage at Abbey Road. And there were set up with Mike, all of the room and he found out that the London Symphony Orchestra was going to be recording there the next day, and he lightbulb went off for him. And he he that night he was able to go in and use their mic setup. And he re recorded some of the tracks of poverty singing, and some of the tracks of the of the orchestra playing stripping amount and separating him as best and, and then. Sort of remastered all of that, so that it would have an even more symphonic. Yeah. Defect. It had a room tone. You know, mom. And so it was a lot less about digital and a lot more about really careful re-recording and using, you know, real Mike relationships and spatial relationships to the to the sound to, to help help with that. And then certain moments. You know, triumphant moments climactic moments in, in the music, you know, we certainly used everything in the old adobe tricks to, to try to get the hair to raise up on your neck. Yeah, it sounded just fantastic. And it really I think did him Justice and one thing about poverty, that I found interesting is in one moment in the film. He describes his voice as a woman, or in terms that one would describe a female. He says, you know, I have to be careful with her. Sometimes, sometimes I have to coax her out sometimes. She loves me. Sometimes she's very stubborn as a man who loved passionately and had two wives and lovers and two daughters with whom he had somewhat strained relationship. At some point have to imagine that he understood as well as anyone the double edged sword of that in. No, I look, I'm sure I'm sure that he did. He's very romantic guy, but romantic about life. Whether you're talking about, you know, law, then romance or kind of romance for going to China of romance for singing in the rain to Princess Diana, and, and two hundred thousand people. You know, I think that I think that he lived a big life if I could meet him and talk to him. I think the question, I'd, I'd want to ask would be how we use shaped by opera, not just as an art form in disciplined, but by the narratives of opera big sweeping storylines. Rama and lows, you think that influenced you at all? Or do you think it's just a natural organic fit? Yeah. That'd be an interesting question. And you play on this idea in the film of that voice being something of a blessing and occurs, because of everything that comes with that particular talent, the celebrity the entourage, and all that to me, it almost seemed like a cruel cosmic joke to give this incredible voice to a simple talion peasant as he would describe himself, who was completely unequipped to deal with modern celebrity and sort of left to navigate all that on his own, don't you think? Well, it's, it's there's so many. Stories in the entertainment world of individuals who come from hardscrabble lives and hit his was a small village in, in postwar, Italy. You've got, you know, kids coming out of the ghetto, whether they're athletes, or they become great music stars, or actors, you got people coming off of, you know, dirt farms who suddenly had these careers. And so it is art that ability to express an idea to audiences in ways that reach the more deeply than than most people. There is something about that that and, and those people coming from less advantaged circumstances it that is that sort of paradox because suddenly, the, they're earning people's respect, their love, and with it, you know, a lot of money often. And by the same time we're just not very well equipped. So it was another one of. Those stories made very particular, because, you know, it's all happening in the in the area dot world of opera and even opera wasn't supposed to afford that kind of wealth. But because he, he did have this charisma, and he did have this ability to take it to the people and broaden the reach of the genre. Made vast sums. So, you know, there's real irony in that. But again, there's, you know, there are a lot of twists and turns in poverty life. And I suppose that's one of the reasons we were attracted to it, and it also created sort of a Gulf between poverty and his first wife and his two daughters, because here, he was traveling all over the world performing to audiences of tens of thousands. Meanwhile, the family is staying back in Modina Italy as a director, you might be on location for several months at a time. Can you relate to that a little bit? Well, yes. And no I mean, I can relate to being to being lonely and isolated way from your family. But. You know we just handled it very differently. My Cheryl, and my family, went with me everywhere. And I mean, but I wasn't on these kind of road trips where one night here in two nights there, that's, that's, that's a different thing. Athletes baseball basketball players in anybody with a long season, rock and roll acts, musicians marriage is tough under any circumstance, and I think their relationship fell prey to that same kind of division. However, make this point Catholics in Italy, and a famous Catholic at that divorce was. You know, not really a very realistic option for many of those years. And even when he did finally divorce, take the lead, it was extremely embarrassing for everybody and painful. So, you know, the specific culture that he came from only intensified the drama of that of those challenges, and as a result of that, when he remarried, he couldn't of course. Mary in the Catholic church. So ended up marrying in an opera house, which was yeah another another little another. Little twist in term. He was. You know, interestingly by all accounts, he didn't live kind of rock and roll life. Yes, he had relationships. He had romances and things like that. But it seemed to be he, he was more cereal romantic than than anything else, and yeah, he ate. And but drank some not a lot. You know he. You know, he didn't live a rock and roll life. He was protecting that voice. And so it's, you know, it's interesting, there's some parallels to any great rockstar musician and in some ways he just had to live very differently and speaking of that enormous appetite. One of the fun moments in the movie is you see all of the food he would take from his village along with him on the door. You bring pounds in pounds of pasta parmesan. One of the things I've always wondered about him as did that weight, which I think, at one point balloon to, like, almost four hundred pounds. Did that affect the voice is this trope of the that opera singer true? Does that? I you know, I we didn't delve into it, and we never got anybody really would talk about it. We have one great clip where this one woman, says, you know, those that do those Huckabee extra inches. Give that, that deep voice, then he's, I think, so as a joke gets a huge laugh, but, you know, I think not I think he could have weighed hundred pounds us and still been the king of the high seas and Ziff. He wasn't the biggest star already he then joins forces with two other great men of opera Jose careerist and Placido Domingo to form the three tenors, which at their height. They were like the Rolling Stones the Beatles. How did that whole collaboration even begin? Well, it began in a very noble collegial way Jose career had come back from a near fatal disease about with leukemia. I think it was and sort of wanted to get back into performing, but needed to just do it cautiously. And slowly somebody brought the idea to Placido Domingo and Luchino poverty. Maybe they could do a concert, you know, or something with Jose, Carreira, and everybody just agreed to do at one night, as a kind of a welcome back, and they just so rocked the place and rocked the world that they became an act. It was it was sort of an outlier moment. Where who would have guessed that the world would awaken to the power of opera. And yet, you know, these three geniuses performing together generated kind of sensation. Not just a marketing sensation, but a sound sensation that was unique and just reminded people all over again. How powerful opera can be an opera singers can be notorious divas, I have to wonder you interviewed plaza, and Jose careerists in this film did either of them indicate that there were any egos, or any kind of competitiveness between them. I mean they both just said, no, it just was. It was it came so easily. You know, one thing we didn't get into the film, was that there was some later, some sort of business fallout is to, you know, deal splits, and stuff like that. But that was not. You know, that was didn't have much to do with poverty, the, the man or the music. So we didn't delve into it. But, but of course, that's you know, that kind of thing, always, always happens. They had such affection for him. They were they were they both unbelievably busy guys and they made time. Mm to sit down and talk about it. They wanted to be a part of just like Bano. We tried to get him to work with us in talk about the Beatles. We adores and loves we never could schedule the time. Yeah. Available for poverty, because that's when you he loved him, they all again, all recognize that he could he could do things that would bug them. He could do things that would even dramatically to support them, and in some instances, really heartbreaking, you know, relationship schisms and things like that. But what's the headline in every instance, it's you know what a remarkable individual and the world's better off, for him having been here. And then he was a good man. Ultimately, a good man with a good a good, you know, maybe made some mistakes, but he was a giver, not a taker the last chapter in this film, really drives that home when he just throws himself into charity. And you see just this essential humanity of this person, and he just loved people. Not just rich people or famous people, not just opera-goers, but fans service workers secretaries kids, he was a big kid himself. He just had this, inau. Ormuz enormous heart. You met him. I believe at one point in your life while regretful of that. No, I mean, even so care. I it was in a huge mob scene situation, Golden Globe party. He was clearly like the event that he was there. He wasn't even performing. He just sort of walked around and his scarf, and his fidora and said hi, you could sense, the charisma, but, but he was one of these people by all accounts that just would knew how to make people feel at ease knew how to connect wanted to connect, that's not a manipulation that something that you choose to do because it's better for you. It's easier for you to really make eye contact make people feel comfortable because you wanna feel comfortable, you know, and so I don't think he was faking or wearing a mask or disingenuous. I think he wanted to feel good. He he wanted to make the people feel good, and then that would rebound to him. And I think that's the way he lived his life. Yeah. Well before we go. Many have called poverty the greatest singer that ever lived. What do you think? Do you think that's true? I'm not. I don't know enough about music to say I, I really, I really don't I you know, others are saying it. I bet they're right. Or close to right? He certainly gives me goosebumps, when I listened to me, too, but so that's, that's not the reason I was making the movie I, I wanted to tell the story because I thought it would offer insight in a few fresh original ways. And I thought I thought it could it could remind people or inform. People just what great art form. Opera really is. And how, how misunderstood it can be and also to take a moment to celebrate because it is a celebration. Ultimately, when people talked about, you know, disappointments so whether we included that in the movie, but ultimately, the, the upshot is, it's real celebration of somebody who lived life really with gusto, and I think that there's a lesson in that and that would have been my takeaway, I'd say, is that when you live your life, constantly trying to kind of. What maximize the experience share the joy bring joy to others and feel the benefits of that? That's, that's going to wind up being a rich fulfilling life while lift. Absolutely. Well, congratulations on such a beautiful film. I really highly recommend that everyone. See it poverty opens in theaters Friday, June. Seventh Ron Howard, thanks for talking with. Thank you. Pleasure. Thanks again. To Ron Howard for coming on the podcast. Don't miss his documentary feature poverty opening in theaters Friday, June seven. Master the tech skills that companies want in today's landscape with a you Dasan Nanno degree you Dati's flexible, pay as you learn Nanno degree programs include expertly designed real world projects that fit your busy schedule. You'll also get one on one support from technical mentors and a full suite of career coaching services in your programme start your future today and be in demand. Go to you DASS ity dot com slash kick ten and use code kick ten to save ten percent. That's you DASS ity dot com slash kick. Ten code kick. Ten be sure to subscribe to kick ass news on apple podcasts, if you haven't already. And if you like what you're hearing, then Rayton review us, while you're there, five star reviews, are the easiest way for new listeners to find us. Don't forget to like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter at at kick. Ass news, pot and feel free to Email me with your thoughts questions and suggestions at comments at. Kick ass news dot com until next time. I'm Ben Mathis, and thanks for listening to kick ass news.

Ron Howard director Academy Award Ben Mathis Ron Howard Ron Beatles Oscar Paul Crowder Luchino Sinatra USC Jose careerists Bano Ringo Starr USO Italy Tom Hanks Stevie Wonder
Disciplina: Cafena 05 - Comunicao/tica

CafeínaCompilada

07:14 min | Last month

Disciplina: Cafena 05 - Comunicao/tica

"Yes follow followed airland. Yes l. caffeine To think about this geico come mortar. Miserly caffeine the issue father students producing since courses using the confessional an orchestra cammisa oyston was a camp surgery hopped but a follow be do as metavsky painting was as my still articles. Lucas norman of commuters resources mice. You've of the sent resumes. Kissel norris in your company kosonen which was bombs funding komo's kinloss extra level educate but might as well and his focus to marseille's financial miserable crab. Louis decisions calmness. And that is out domain bombing helmich mba each alcatraz aquino thomas program muscle. Name is magical save of muscle other juice iky so my schools all listeners. Mischievous palace that they batching solid gel. Look play to eat a meal jeep. Sending that for subs philip suspicions. Also reaching hitching lookers since my spatchcock may start laws these but they're gonna give us his Matatus komo the foot. Total yoga Alleged komeito but isis choosing seem. I've got a phone. Somebody who's maslow's recombinant. Linguistic of damage was evaporating the asuka mika appropriate each mice and with my specific use that i want to dodge missing mortgage persia was yard. She goose By last night. Why does this cheat. While i cool. Eight acquaintance maintains groups linguists chemo luna luchino supposedly utilize won't take educate hoppy them each gaza kate until parts puzzle anisimov surveyor. Dan cloud unversity daij. Ida's jesus giza old apartment. Kabbalah partisan is in drawings environments for custom so jealous allowed always keep. This gives the cyanide. Participation is cheap in his cell supervision loose puck. Kosovo was yesterday course Calculus catches it. Same thing accuse started using wing cmo. That's on our father dome twitter scripted. You see my status was a thing is. He's made the argument that so basically take cuba arguing cuba because Zone recordings question pitcher for shebang won't to order to say not what your message burkey nice pet other people's cya that's been san well door dead efforts coming g. e. perceiver don't book louis century major coal. The does fittings Fill-ins lugar circa procam disney movie restarting nestle quiz. But i guess assume but soclean the main simplest by executive. Sit on kwazulu. Hello so now does acapulco some. Don't participate coma. Manila s parking tacoma loop saint timothy itis keep fossil staging this misogyny mobile squeeze means keeping almost these of course credit kelly jehovah's using Resumes h. egos. He wants his good friday good aged happening. They follow my specific major improvement humidity for political symbol comments at the lubbock accommodate the magical moon vessel civic history eastern by other key but expert up confessing cina fighter for me. A somebody educative row originally is up. We'll stepping son so tip analysis japan anonymous i ask a haggis. Yes does professional. Nice magazine is historical puzzle Maya sociale you have this conversa- orgy cage me to the dot com. The he pledged by their bussing idea. It will be lovers technologies. Africa sowings lease qazi scuffles. Samosas you replace your muscles versus sitting Being cuomo who gets if you're not going to imola don't want him as the semester inch but his infamous Jamila could elect hedge at large. Could each coverage was at. Sabina will mean to this keep them web as technologists invited me lucy demos mode ice yech oppressive demand i cut in possessing Recipients komis possibly being So safe was you protecting swell mementos any mitch quite crucial now it to be like technica hebrew i mean coups fish died because this fraction folk mice buddha crash keys once we should arguing painter of course about running in south mogadishu but as sin if backup professor just as a matter of his own experience also faces komeda does just don't do needs my to more hit don't qazi several told us Equal wish less shovels was permitted solution. Method is a key. Most cups wasn't Meissnitzer not got the Question about could you hear the victim. Advocate told the militia for this set of a hitchike. Mccaffrey and for me Komis due to the caffeine includes you can enjoy the king. James who buys incites somebody Surveys does seemless becomes. He was fed. Will laugh sloan.

cammisa oyston Lucas norman Kissel norris kosonen alcatraz aquino thomas Mischievous palace luna luchino Dan cloud jesus giza komo geico louis century major coal lugar circa soclean marseille cuba maslow kelly jehovah philip Nice magazine
Government Poisoned Alcohol Pt. 1

Conspiracy Theories

47:33 min | 1 year ago

Government Poisoned Alcohol Pt. 1

"New York nineteen twenty only a few months. After prohibition in had gone into effect the city was awash in illegal booze speakeasy all across Manhattan offered the thirsty place to drink. And let off off some steam. All you needed to know was a secret password. The guard at the door opened the people to a short round man and in a suit by the name of izzy Einstein when he asked Izzy what he wanted is he responded a drink once he was inside Hyde is he saw a sea of men and women drinking and dancing. He knew he was in the right place so he made his way to the bar and sat down on the bar. Tender asked busy what he was having. Is he responded. Would you like to sell a pint of whiskey. To a deserving prohibition agent. The bartender looked at easy for a second before bursting into laughter. He pulled out a bottle and poured izzy shot. Whiskey in hand is he turned back to the bar. Tender told him he was under arrest for violating the ball stead act and slapped a pair of handcuffs on him. The bartender had just sold alcohol to one of the most successful prohibition agents of the Early Nineteen Twenties during prohibition is he Weinstein and hundreds like him scoured American cities to prosecute the illegal selling and distribution of alcohol after arresting. The bartender are tender is he. took a sniff of the glass in front of him and turned his nose up in disgust. He was smelling moonshine. One Gulp and his belly would be full of poison. And if the Moonshine was made using denatured industrial alcohol it meant only one thing. The government offerman was the supplier. Welcome to conspiracy theories apar- cast original. I'm Carter Roy and I'm Molly Brandenburg. Every Wednesday we dig into the complicated stories. He's behind the world's most controversial events and search for the truth. Neither of US are conspiracy theorists but we are open minded skeptical and curious. Don't get US wrong sometimes. The official version is the truth. But sometimes it's not you can find episodes sewed of conspiracy theories and all other podcast originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream conspiracy theories for free on spotify. Just open the APP and type conspiracy theories in the search bar at par cast. We are grateful for you our listeners nurse. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at par cast network. And if you enjoyed today's episode the best way to help us is to leave a five star review. Wherever you're listening? It really does help. This is our first episode. So on prohibition the Thirteen Year period between nineteen twenty and nineteen thirty three when it was illegal to make sale or transport alcohol alcohol in the United States for nearly a century the temperance movement had tried to get alcohol. Banned it finally culminated in the passing of the Eighteenth Amendment in Nineteen nineteen in order to enforce the law. The government created new agency in Nineteen twenty. The Bureau of of Prohibition these prohibition agents or pro he's were tasked to take down those violating the bolstered act they performed raids on home distilleries and arrested thousands once in cavs. Violators hand to square off the Department of Justice but in the decade that and followed men and women across the country quickly realized that prohibition but joke the reality was only a small fraction of the people wanted prohibition the average American never wanted to put down their bottle bootleggers in Rome runners. Funded by gangsters flooded. The United States with with alcohol and many of the prosecutors felt the same. This week will discuss the official story. The rise of the bootlegger and rum runner and how the government only used prohibition agents fines and jail time to discourage drinking next week will explore our conspiracy theories about the prohibition era that on two separate occasions the government knowingly poison denatured industrial alcohol in an attempt to stop people from making Moonshine and by the time prohibition ended in Nineteen thirty-three roughly ten thousand people died lied from drinking the tainted government regulated alcohol. Since the nation's founding alcohol has been an integral part of American culture after touring America British naval captain. Frederick Mariot famously wrote in eighteen eighteen thirty nine. I am sure the Americans can fix nothing without drink. They drink because it is hot. They drink because it is called. They begin again to drink in the early morning. They leave off late at night. Captain Mary. It's words were as true in eighteen thirty nine as they were eighty years later. But in Nineteen nineteen the United States passed the Eighteenth Amendment and the bolstered act making the production transportation and and sale of alcohol illegal in every state as early as the eighteen twenties. Women and men had organized for temperance. The end of alcohol alcohol consumption in America with an increase in immigration came the rise of the whisky distillery and the saloon more and more men found themselves becoming coming increasingly drunk and violent the temperance movement aimed to put an end to their sins by eliminating the source alcohol. The first victory for temperance came in eighteen fifty one with the passing of the main law. This was the first. US government attempt to ban alcohol. Unfortunately public outcry proved to be the bills undoing by the end of the decade alcohol was once again legal all in Maine for decades the temperance movement pressured the government to ban alcohol about the government wasn't interested mainly because as many congressmen and senators consumed alcohol themselves but more importantly one of the federal government's main sources of revenue was brewery and whiskey tariffs. It wasn't until the turn of the century. That prohibitions seemed attainable Wayne Wheeler and his anti Saloon League were able to make alcohol a wedge issue. You were either for alcohol or you were not. There was no middle ground by doing this wheeler in the the Anti Saloon League made short a rally against any so-called wet candidate who wasn't for prohibition and the results were astonishingly in the anti Di Saloon Leagues Favor Cities and states began. Passing prohibition laws but enforcement was not working if alcohol was banned in one city people would just traveled to the next if it was illegal in one stayed they would just cross state lines. It appeared that the only path to total little crow ambition was through a constitutional amendment which would outlaw alcohol federally and after the passing of the Sixteenth Amendment in nineteen thirteen which made it legal for the federal government to tax. A person's income prohibition was incite with a new revenue stream dream. The government no longer needed to rely so heavily on alcohol sales taxes Wayne Wheeler and his anti Saloon League pounced after four years of hard lobbying. They finally achieved a centuries long goal in December nineteen seventeen a resolution banning alcohol. Alcohol overwhelmingly passed both House and Senate and was sent to the states for ratification. It took thirteen months for the necessary. Thirty six states dates to approve it. On January Sixteenth Nineteen nineteen the eighteenth amendment which prohibited any manufacturing sales and transportation. Tation of intoxicating liquors became law. America was now a dry country but interestingly enough off the eighteenth amendment never actually distinguished what an intoxicating liquor was enter the bolstered act the bill that outlined line how the government could enforce prohibition drafted by Wayne Wheeler but introduced into Congress by Representative Andrew Vol- stead the full stead act defined the rules of the new amendment. Anything including food and candy. That was point. Five percent alcohol or more was illegal legal as such wine beer and spirits were officially no more however alcohol for Medicinal Sacramento and and industrial I e cosmetics automotive or home cleaning purposes was still legal. Medicine became the only legal way for the average man to purchase whiskey however volts did did grant Americans various rights. People were technically allowed to drink in the privacy privacy of their own homes the contradiction of course being that they couldn't buy it. Anyone caught buying alcohol could be fined up to one thousand dollars. There's and sentenced to jail time at midnight on January seventeenth. Nineteen Twenty prohibition officially went into effect the production election sale and transportation of alcohol was over or so the dries had hoped. Most Americans gave the experiment try. It was now part of the constitution and so the average person was scared of the legal repercussions of wine liquor. They didn't want to wind up in jail or face. A A hefty penalty but though the immediate effects of prohibition size steady drop in alcohol related deaths and arrests Americans still wanted a stiff drink. And when someone wants something they can't have the desire only increases. It was actually easier to get alcohol now now than it was. Before prohibition many Americans had stockpiled alcohol for their own private consumption others however stockpile to you turn a profit. The era of the bootlegger and rum runner had begun When prohibition went into Effect Arnold Rothstein was a household name thanks to his involvement with the nineteen nineteen world series scandal a prolific gambler? He was said to have been the one to bankroll members of the Chicago. White Sox to throw the series for the Cincinnati Reds Rothstein. Steen wasn't the kind of man to let a good opportunity passing. By when prohibition went into effect he knew he could tap into the market smuggling quickly became his way into the bootlegging industry and he knew the perfect country to get his alcohol from Canada using using the Great Lakes and the Hudson River Rothstein was able to submerge New York City and the rest of the East Coast in alcohol with the help of Beyon- up and coming gangsters Charles. Luchino Meyer Lansky and Dutch Schultz Rothstein was able to rake in millions without ever transporting illegal alcohol himself at the height of his operation in nineteen twenty five. It's believed he was worth the modern equivalent of more than one hundred and forty million dollars. In addition to Canada the Caribbean proved valuable bootlegging ground for the United States whether it was whiskey from Great Britain and Ireland or locally distilled rum from Nassau. The southern Atlantic proved an excellent entry. Point for booze and Ashley Aptly became known as rum row and no man shipped more alcohol from rum. Row Than William Bill McCoy though he abstained stained from alcohol himself. Bill McCoy's saw that there was money to be made but unlike Rothstein who paid other people to smuggle in alcohol McCoy had the means to traffic in the illegal substance himself. He had his own boat. In nineteen twenty. One McCoy was offered fifteen fifteen thousand dollars to load up his schooner the Henry l Marshall with five hundred cases of British liquor and sale from Nassau in the Bahamas Hamas to Savannah. Georgia McCoy knew it was risky that he couldn't turn down the money. It's unclear how long the trip took but he did it. Without any trouble and afterward McCoy became hooked on smuggling alcohol he began making deliveries raise up and down the east coast. He purchased a much larger boat. The ARIZA added a machine gun in case does any trouble and a high powered motor so that he could make more runs throughout the year as well as outrun the Coast Guard. He was considered trustworthy by his clients. He offered fair prices and none of his alcohol was cheap knockoffs like some of his competitors. When you bought from bill you bought Johnnie Walker? We're we're doers. Some legends call this the origin of the phrase the real McCoy the advantage of rum running compared to trucking in alcohol all from Canada was the open sea. The coastguard wasn't equipped to cover the entire coast. So with the motor. Still running McCoy would would drop anchor. Three miles from land and buyers would sail up to the side of his boat to make their purchase for two years. Bill McCoy was is the King of the seas but in November nineteen twenty-three his luck caught up to him. While in the midst of making shipment McCoy's schooner it was suddenly spotted by a coastguard vessel because they were miles from shore and thus out of US jurisdiction McCoy thought he could sail away. Hey what he hadn't expected. was that the coastguard. Would Open. Fire McCoy knew that he would be outgunned. `and by their cannons and decided it was best to surrender. The coastguard discovered two hundred cases of whiskey in the hall. Though according to McCoy coy there were originally forty. Two hundred McCoy pleaded guilty to smuggling answer nine months in jail. When he was released east he retired and moved to Florida once there he and his brother opened a shipbuilding company is running days? Were over bill. McCoy boy may have been one of the most famous rum runners. During this time but only one man earned the title of King of the bootleggers. George Reema's Seamus Chicago. Lawyer originally from Berlin Ramos noticed within months prohibition going into a fact that he was was representing bolstered act violators. But what struck Reema's was that the many represented had more cash in their pockets than he did and he was a lawyer. Reema's was both impressed and dumbfounded especially given the fact that many of them were as he put it without any brains at all. He decided that he would make a career change. And enter the bootlegging business himself. Why should his clients dance reap all the benefits and he was smart? He knew a loophole in the full. Stead Act medicinal alcohol. It was possible possible to get a prescription for whiskey. But it wasn't easy and the ghosted act. Restricted all prescriptions. To just one pint every ten days as Ramos Move to Cincinnati where organized crime held little sway. So there was an opening he could move in on. He purchased defunct distilleries and began distilling alcohol to sell pharmacies for medicinal purposes in essence. Remiss created his own drug company and as as the prophets began to roll in. Made sure to buy up distilleries. In and around Ohio Ramos would sell the alcohol but is trucks were often mysteriously robbed by gangsters who in turn sold it themselves. Of course remus was actually selling alcohol to the gangsters banksters and managing to turn a tidy profit times too. He was charging the pharmacies and the gangsters for the same alcohol in order to keep the feds off his sent. He'd cooked the books and when the time came he made sure to pay off government officials to keep away away from his operation. Though his total words has been possible to calculate it said that during the first quarter of nineteen twenty one remiss personally deposited the modern equivalent of over thirty three million dollars in the bank. On taxed. As prohibition reached its fifth year ear he was by far one of the richest men in the bootlegging game. Prohibition was supposed to put an end to America's drinking problem. Ironically it made it worse. Alcohol was more popular an easier to get than when it was legal by the late. Nineteen Twenty S. There were over thirty thousand speakeasies in the US all of which were serving alcohol supplied by bootleggers. The government knew that it needed to regain control troll in order for their experimental work. It would need to enforce the bolstered. ACT The problem of course was that was easier said Ed. Then done coming up prohibition agent scour the country looking for bootleggers to bust need more to binge over the holiday break. We've got you covered. You can unwrap wrap the entire back catalogue of conspiracy theories episodes right now. That's more incredible episodes of conspiracy theories available. Able to listen to whenever you want be sure to check out some of my favorite stories like the controversial circumstances leading up to Princess Diana's death breath or the mystery and secrecy surrounding the luminosity for over two hundred years whether you're living some of your favorite episodes or we're hearing them for the first time. These captivating stories are available right now in your conspiracy theories feed and don't forget new episodes premiere the mirror every Wednesday checkout more podcast choose on spotify by searching for podcast in the spotify search bar or go to spotify dot dot com slash podcast. Now back to the story not everyone. In America GEICO was ready to give up their alcohol. When prohibition went into effect in January nineteen twenty well many Americans did attempt to obey the law? The majority wanted their whiskey and beer fix it became all too obvious that enforcing the volts did act was going to be more difficult than expected. Luckily the government had a new plan the Vaal Stead Act didn't just define. What an intoxicating liquor was it also established the official? Sean means by which the law would be enforced under the control of the Treasury Department. The Bureau of Prohibition which was established in Nineteen Twenty became a separate separate branch of law enforcement and their sole purpose was to investigate and apprehend those violating the Vol Stock Act but the agency appeared to be doomed from the start when it was initially created. The budget allotted for only fifteen hundred agents to cover all forty eight states. Many of whom had little to no training in law enforcement though that didn't prevent the government from giving them Tommy guns and badges. The agents were often referred to as pro. He's and soon the pro he's were making headlines alongside the same man they were attempting to apprehend two of the most famous pro. He's were the duo of izzy and MOE and in the early years of prohibition no one racked up more arrests S. than them is it or is he. Einstein was an Austrian Jewish immigrant known for his affable personality and his way with language which he spoke Russian German Spanish French Italian and Chinese and he had an uncanny ability to perform various accents in English though he hadn't exactly abstained from alcohol. Prior to prohibition is he respected the law when it went into effect when is he signed up to be a pro he nineteen twenty. He was officially prohibition as the number one because of is as vibrant personality few bartenders servers believed him when he outwardly told them he was a pro. He lied laugh as they continue to pour the agent a shot but when the handcuffs went on the joke was no longer funny but is he didn't just rely on accents affability. He loved us. Wild disguises prices to winter speakeasy. He dressed up as women football players or a southern colonel at Texas cattleman a fisherman a grave digger even a delegate from the Democratic National Convention anything and everything and people fell for it not long into his career is Z.. Recruited his friend most Smith a cigar shop owner to be his partner in doling out justice together. The pair went undercover in New York. Los Angeles Listener Orleans Saint Louis in Cleveland. The press love their adventures. They reported on stories in which easy and Mo- busted rabbi's selling Sacramento wine. Rabbis with last names like Kelly. Maguire and o'malley or how the two busted a Hollywood speakeasy he wearing medieval costumes from film. Said their exploits were something ripped out of a dime novel. Despite their wild antics the pair of pro. He's were successful in five years izzy and MOE arrested over four thousand nine hundred violators and confiscated about five million bottles battles of booze. However by November nineteen twenty five their superiors had grown tired of the theatrics izzy and MOE along with over over thirty other? Pro He's were fired because they did not measure up to the standards of efficiency given their success. The decision didn't seem fair but the two weren't down on their luck for long after their firing they went into selling life insurance and apparently many of the people people is he sold life insurance to where some of the bootleggers he busted years earlier. This was a lucrative business. Prohibition had become a dangerous dangerous time. The ban on alcohol actually led to an upswing in gangland violence and death the concrete jungle turned into the wild the west and that's sometimes meant some members of law enforcement had to shoot first and ask questions later. Is he in. Mo- may have preferred tactics like humor in disguise to take down bolstered act. Violators but other pro. He's chose violence and no pro- he's liked violence. More than William Harvey Thomson also known as Kinky Thomson for his tight curly hair. It's unclear exactly how old kinky was was when he became an agent but all signs point to young a likely his early twenties the first mention of his name in the press was in nineteen. Twenty five five win during a raid. He shot a stiller in the stomach. Because not much is fully known about Thomson. There's a lot of mystery surrounding him. What we do know was that he wasn't known to follow prohibition himself despite being charged with enforcing it? It's been reported that he often got drunk. I think even if he wasn't undercover and it has been said that he frequently associated with sex workers but the reason why history remembers members Kinky Thomson was his reputation for violence. And the bureau seemed okay with it as long as he was busting bootleggers Who cared how it was done? Thompsons weapon of choice was a blackjack or a baton. He got so good good at twirling his stick around and beating bootleggers with it that he was said to be something of a blackjack artist. One famous incident got Thomson in hot water with a local judge. Has the story goes Thompson. Got Too rough during a raid at a backwoods distillery. According to Thompson report the owner of the distillery resisted arrest so force was necessary but during the trial. The jury saw Thomson's actions as a step too far. The judge at the trial called Thomson Supervisors at the Bureau to warn them about his behavior. But Thompson supervisors sided with Tomson. Awesome their response. No bootlegger gets rough treatment unless he deserves it sometime later Thompson and his partner rated a pool. We'll hall when the owner denied that there was any alcohol on premises Thompson proceeded to break bottle over the owners head. Then take take an axe to the pool tables the bar the cash registers the paintings on the wall from what we can gather. It is unclear if any alcohol L. was ever discovered. In nineteen twenty seven Tacoma. Police were called about drunken fight between the young couple in a parking lot. During the fight the man involved was said to have reached in his pocket for something leaving. The man was going for a weapon. A police officer fired. The police quickly discovered that they had shot and killed Kinky Thompson. The prohibition bureau heated him as a martyr despite a death if it had nothing to do with his work they sugarcoated his violent reputation as zeal. Thomson's legacies shows the violent lengths. The government men would go to to enforce prohibition and if they would turn a blind eye to such violence who can say what else they would have allowed violent or or not these tactics worked. It didn't seem like they needed to try anything else. Whether it was through the clever tricks of easy and Mo- or the violence silence doled out by Kinky Thomson these pro. He's managed to arrest thousands and once they were arrested. It was up to the Department of Justice us to prosecute them to the fullest extent of the law and no criminal prosecutor was more successful than us. Assistant Attorney General Mabel Walker will a brand in nineteen twenty one thirty two year old maple willow brand was given the difficult task of prosecuting bootleggers. eggers and rum runners job no one else. In the Justice Department wanted like is the Einstein. Mabel willow brand wasn't a stranger to alcohol hall but she understood duties and took the law seriously a progressive Republican will a brand rose up the ranks as a public defender specifically typically. She made a name for herself. Representing sex workers in Los Angeles enforce their customers to shamefully appear in court themselves it. It didn't take long for her name to be brought up as a potential assistant attorney general and when it did she received near unanimous support among California judges his when Willa brand I became Assistant Attorney General in Nineteen Twenty one. Her team consisted of only three members but in a few short years she had an army of one hundred including forty lawyers during the majority of her term. She made sure sure any violator of the bolstered act paid dearly there would be no leniency. Even if the bootlegger had political connections but will brands this department also oversaw Federal Income Tax Litigation. This would prove to be a major tool in bringing down the nation's worst bootleggers in Nineteen nineteen twenty seven one of the forty cases. She argued before the Supreme Court was that taxes should be taken out of illegal income. The Supreme Court court agreed so thanks to will brand the I. R. S. was allowed to go after bootleggers for tax evasion. Or fraud famously. It's how they took down Al Capone and another perfectly legal example of the government enforcing prohibition from Nineteen Twenty one into nineteen twenty nine. No woman was more famous in America than Willa brand. She was dubbed the First Lady of the law. By the time prohibition Asian ended will a brand and her department notched a six hundred thousand federal prosecutions. One of the earliest was none other than George. Reema's the millionaire bootlegger hiding behind a pharmaceutical drug. Business is he. In Mo- Kinky Thomson and Mabel Willa brand are just three. Three examples of the government's official enforcement of the ball stacked while some of their methods were questionable. The fact remains they did their job. Unfortunately they seem to be more of the exception than the rule. Many within law enforcement didn't care for the bolstered act. Was it really worth going to such great lengths to prevent people from enjoying a glass of whisky. Some people thought there was no point in putting themselves sales in danger for a law. They didn't support. Why not turn a blind eye or better yet take a few bribes? Almost from from the get-go corruption spread through all levels of law enforcement and with it the rise of organized crime coming up the darker side of enforcing the volts dead. Act Now back to the story. When Congress passed the bolstered act in nineteen nineteen it helped create a new department to bring down those who broke the law the Prohibition Bureau bootleggers and rum runners all had to hide their work from the agents or pro? He's men like is Einstein and most Smith or Kinky Thomson and if they got caught it was. US Assistant District Attorney Mabel Willa brand and her team of prosecutors who made sure the criminals were locked away but not all government officials believed in the law. Many thought prohibition was so ridiculous enforcing it was a waste of time. This quickly bred corruption. The language within the Eighteenth Amendment stipulates that the federal government would work with states to enforce the law. This immediately immediately created a problem. The federal government assumed that the states would enforce prohibition themselves but the states believed that since it was a federal law it was up to the federal government to enforce and the federal government did not want to spend that kind of money. During Prohibition Republicans controlled trolled Washington both Congress and the White House and didn't want to spend government funds on something like prohibition when the Bureau of Prohibition was was established its initial budget was four point. Four million dollars today that would be around sixty five million salaries for prohibition agents varied between one thousand two hundred to three thousand dollars a year so it was more profitable to receive kickbacks from bootleggers than actually bring them in just one year into prohibition more than one hundred New York agents were fired for bribery however the government tried to sweep the problem under the rug in nineteen twenty five the head of the bureau. Roy Haynes claim that because only only forty-three pro. He's were convicted for crimes. Between one thousand. Nine hundred thousand. Nine hundred and twenty-five it meant that the force was ninety. Nine percent honest except those numbers are completely wrong or fabricated as journalist. Edward Bear Notes Between Nineteen Twenty and nineteen thirty thirty. Some eleven thousand nine hundred twenty six agents out of a force of seventeen thousand eight hundred sixteen were separated without prejudice noticed because they're criminal involvement couldn't be proved and another one thousand five hundred. Eighty seven were dismissed for 'cause that is for for offenses that could be proved but might not warrant sentencing or that could involve costly publicized trials. It seems like the government was was aware of the corruption but instead of taking action simply tried to cover it up with misleading numbers. They may have known they were fighting a losing battle but I kept fighting anyway in fact as bear later notes. Roy Haynes ahead of the bureau was notorious for laying blame on others Haines. He said there are large communities where the entire machinery of Government Municipal County and state is such that federal enforcement officials can get get little if any cooperation. Whatever to some extent hanes wasn't wrong? Corruption was worse at the local level. Many any sheriffs and police officers turned a blind. I'd small town bootlegging operations or speak easies since most of the bootleggers were heavily armed armed. It was often too dangerous. There was no value in fighting. One famous bootlegger actually started his career as a cop Roy. Olmstead Dad was a lieutenant in the Seattle Police Department. When prohibition began however olmstead began a small bootleg operation to make money on the side after getting busted Olmstead was fired from the police force in charge define afterward olmstead dove headfirst into alcohol and went on to become the most successful bootlegger in the Pacific northwest? As the nineteen twenties roared on it had become obvious. That prohibition wasn't working as intended more people were drinking during prohibition than before and corruption among those responsible to enforce the law. Aw made it impossible for anyone to have faith that the government was adequately equipped to tackle it adding to all of the government's problems was was the unprecedented spike in violence. And much of that had to do with the rise of the gangster. Win Prohibition started bootleggers like Arnold Rothstein and George Remiss figured out a way to peacefully stakeout their territory with little violence more often than not what they employed smalltime street gangs to help them carry out their operations. But as prohibition continued in these operations brought in more money they could have imagined the smalltime street gangs began to grow and the alliances and peace agreements among rival gangs turned violent Chicago. FAMOUSLY HAD AL capone. When prohibition started capone worked for Johnny Torio when Torio ran the Chicago outfit there was relative peace with the rival Irish gang but when an assassination attempt on Torio in January nineteen twenty five five forced him to retire his young protege took over and Chicago ran red with blood? The Chicago beer wars is between capone and his Irish Polish rivals. Dean o'bannon Bugs Moran and Hymie Weiss sent four hundred gangsters to their graves saves over one hundred and fifty of those deaths. Were by the police in the span of about five years in the middle of the twenties the streets of Chicago Chicago were a war zone culminating in the nineteen twenty nine Saint Valentine's Day massacre. Everyone knew who was responsible for the massacre but capone was able to get away with it because he had the police on his payroll. It is said that for years. He paid them five five hundred thousand dollars a month to let him run his bootlegging operation without trouble in New York. Charles Lucky Luciano quickly quickly rose in the underground and proved that he was not only one of the most ruthless gangsters in town but the smartest he quickly aligned himself ourselves with such gangsters as Frank Castillo and Vito genovese and was close. Friends with Meyer Lansky. And Bugsy Siegel with a bankroll from Arnold Rothstein. These men would go on to create a successful bootlegging operation in New York and by the mid nineteen twenties. Wendy's Luchino had become a multi millionaire when Arnold Rothstein was murdered in nineteen twenty eight Luchino went to work for big big Joe Nasiriyah whom he had worked for prior to his time with Rothstein. Nasiriyah was of the generation the so-called Mustache Pete Pete's and by the time Luchino rejoined with Nasiriyah. Tensions were heightening between some of the mustache. Pete's known as the Castilla Stella Merisi War Mass Horea and rival gangster Salvatori. Marin Zano made New York into a war zone in Luchino John was right in the middle of it. At one point however through Chano seeing that mass arena was losing decided to switch sides and and in nineteen thirty one he arranged for mass arenas assassination Nasiriyah dead. Marin Zano was now the boss of all all bosses five months later Luchino heard whispers. Marin Zano was going to kill him Luchino had helped make Marzano Sano King and in return Marin Sano was going to betray him. Sell Luchino decided to get to Monsanto I with Marin Zano Dead Luchino became new. York's number one bootlegger but instead of crowning himself the king he decided to completely lately reshape the American mafia an organization that remains to this day a lot of people had to die for Luchino to become a boss and it was all funded through bootlegged. Alcohol prohibition was supposed to end America's love of alcohol and the Violence Islands that came with it and although there was a decline in homicide during prohibition first year the twelve years after nineteen twenty saw a dramatic spike back in nineteen twenty one. The homicide rate jumped from around six per one hundred thousand to eight point one per one hundred thousand and by the time prohibition ended in nineteen thirty three the rate was just south of ten per one hundred thousand prisons also saw a rise in incarceration to by nineteen thirty to the federal prison. Population had increased three hundred thirty six percent from before prohibition was enacted acted and there was a five hundred sixty one percent increase in federal convictions. The common reason violation of the Vaal Stat Act it while the intentions may have been good. The reality is more people became criminals or died because of the wool stead act. It seems teams the. US government couldn't police liquor without causing violence and death. Perhaps this was something that required drastic measures to gain control rollover or perhaps death in violence was part of the plan. There are some numbers that we haven't mentioned yet. Numbers here's the United States government didn't want released murder wasn't the only major cause of death during the nineteen twenties. People whole were getting poisoned. Not everyone was able to afford the name brand alcohol. That Bill McCoy and Arnold Rothstein smuggled mogul into the United States many bootleggers had to rely on home. DISTILLED ALCOHOL TO GET THEIR FIX AKA. Moonshine when prohibition went into effect moonshine became the drink of choice for those without the connections to Johnny Walker or Canadian club and with the rise in Moonshine. Consumption came the rise of alcohol poisoning. Unlike these so-called Moonshine you see today in stores Moonshine. In the nineteen twenties was highly dangerous and made using whatever was available. If a moon Scheiner was lucky he he was able to buy corn mash from the grocery store or medicinal alcohol from the likes of George Ramos. If a moon Scheiner was unlucky he had to distill his liquor from wood or government regulated industrial alcohol and when a moonshine or made bottles of booze using industrial alcohol death seemed to follow between nineteen twenty. Six and nineteen thirty-three. An estimated ten thousand people died from alcohol related poisoning. It wasn't because they were drinking commercial. Alcohol like doers or Canadian Club. It was because they were drinking moonshine. Moonshine and a popular late prohibition drink called Ginger Jake. Nineteen twenty. Six is an interesting year to consider as a starting point because it was during the summer of twenty six that rumors began circulating throughout New York. City government regulated alcohol. One of the many sources for Moonshine was going to become more poisonous than before. Was it possible that. The Bureau of Prohibition wasn't wasn't the only trick the government used to enforce prohibition did they know that Moonshine is used industrial alcohol as an ingredient and and wanted to stop it even if it meant a death toll and was this a coordinated effort at population control. The vast majority of those who died from alcohol poisoning didn't have the means to afford top shelf alcohol. These men and women were only able to buy cheap dangerous. Moonshine was the government aware of this. And purposely targeting. The poor next week will explore to conspiracy theories which claimed the US government on two separate occasions purposely poisoned industrial alcohol. One theory claims they did it in nineteen twenty six and another in nineteen. Thirty New Yorkers died in rapid succession at the end of Nineteen Twenty six. Was it because of government poisoned alcohol or was it something. We'll find out next time. Thanks for tuning in to conspiracy theories. We'll be back on Wednesday with a new episode. You can find all episodes of conspiracy theories and all other par- cast originals for free on spotify. Why not only the spotify already have all of your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast originals like conspiracy theories for free from your phone desktop or smart speaker to stream conspiracy theories on spotify? Just open the APP tap browse and type conspiracy theories in the search bar until then remember. The truth isn't always the best story. And and the official story isn't always the truth. Conspiracy theories was created by Max Cutler and his par cast studios original L. Executive Producers Include Maximum Ron Cutler sound design by Anthony Bounceback with production assistance by Ron Shapiro and Carleen Madden this episode Soda. Conspiracy theories was written by Joe Garra with writing assistance by Meggitt. Meyer and stars Molly. Brandenburg and Carter Roy.

US Bureau of Prohibition New York City izzy Einstein William Bill McCoy official spotify America Kinky Thomson Early Nineteen Twenties Arnold Rothstein federal government Luchino Meyer Lansky Chicago Kinky Thompson Al Capone George Reema Berlin Ramos Department of Justice
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46:58 min | 1 year ago

S4: Roaring 20s: Government Poisoned Alcohol Pt. 1

"If you enjoy these episodes on booze brutal eggers possible poisoning. Then you'll want to check. Count some of history's wildest speculations. In our intriguing podcast conspiracy theories new episodes premiere every Wednesday. Follow conspiracy conspiracy theories free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts in New York. Nineteen twenty only a few months. After prohibition had gone into effect act the city was awash in illegal booze. speakeasy is all across Manhattan. offered the thirsty place to drink and let off some steam. All you needed to know was a secret password. The guard the door opened the people to a short round man in a suit by the name of izzy Einstein when he asked Izzy what he wanted. He responded a drink once he was inside is Z.. saw a sea of men and women drinking and dancing. He knew he was in the right place so he made his way to the bar and sat down the bartender tender asked Izzy what he was having. Is he responded. Would you like to sell a pint of whiskey. To a deserving prohibition agent the bar tender looked looked at his e for a second before bursting into laughter. He pulled out a bottle and poured is a shot. Whiskey in hand is he turned back back to the bar. Tender told him he was under arrest for violating the ball stead act and slapped a pair of handcuffs on him. The bartender are had just sold alcohol to one of the most successful prohibition agents of the Early Nineteen Twenty s during prohibition is he Einstein and hundreds like him scoured American cities to prosecute the illegal selling and distribution of alcohol after arresting. The bartender is is. He took a sniff of the glass in front of him and turned his nose up in disgust. He was smelling moonshine. One Gulp and his belly would be full all of poison and if the moonshine was made using denatured industrial alcohol it meant only one thing the government was. What's the supplier? Welcome to conspiracy theories agrees apar- cast original. I'm Carter Roy and I'm only Brandenburg. Every Wednesday we dig into the complicated stories behind the world's most most controversial events and search for the truth. Neither of US are conspiracy theorists but we are open minded skeptical and curious. Don't get US wrong sometimes. The official version is the truth. But sometimes it's not you can find episodes of conspiracy see theories and all other podcast originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream conspiracy theories for free on spotify spotify. Just open the APP and type of conspiracy theories in the search bar at podcast. We are grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love and let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and instagram at par cast and twitter at podcast network and if you enjoy. Today's episode sowed the best way to help us is to leave a five star review. Wherever you're listening? It really does help. This is our first episode on prohibition edition the Thirteen Year period between nineteen twenty and nineteen thirty three when it was illegal to make sale or transport alcohol in the United United States for nearly a century. The temperance movement had tried to get alcohol. Banned it finally culminated in the passing of the Eighteenth Amendment in one thousand nine hundred nineteen in order to enforce the law. The government created a new agency in Nineteen Twenty the bureau of Prohibition these prohibition agents or pro he's were tasked to take down those violating the bolstered act they performed raids on home distilleries interested thousands once in cavs. Violators had to square off against the Department of Justice but in the decade that followed men and women across the country quickly realized that prohibition was joke. The reality was only a small fraction of the people. Wanted prohibition the average American never wanted to put down their bottle bootleggers in rum. Runners funded by gangsters flooded. The United States with alcohol and many of the prosecutors felt the same this week. We'll discuss the official story. The rise of the bootlegger and rum runner and and how the government only used prohibition agents fines and jail time to discourage drinking next week will explore our conspiracy theories about the prohibition era that on two separate occasions the government knowingly poison denatured industrial alcohol in an attempt them to stop people from making Moonshine and by the time prohibition ended in Nineteen thirty-three roughly ten thousand people died from drinking tainted government regulated alcohol. Since the nation's founding alcohol has has been an integral part of American culture after touring America British naval captain. Frederick Mariot famously wrote in eighteen thirty nine I am sure the Americans can fix nothing without drink. They drink because it is hot. They drink because it is called. They began to drink in the early morning morning. They leave off late at night. Captain Mary. It's words were as true and eighteen. Thirty nine is they were eighty years later but in nineteen eighteen nineteen the United States passed the Eighteenth Amendment and the Bulls did act making the production transportation and sale of alcohol all illegal in every state as early as the eighteen twenties. Women and men had organized for temperance. The end of alcohol consumption in America America with an increase in immigration came the rise of the whisky distillery and the saloon more and more men found themselves becoming increasingly really drunk and violent. The temperance movement aimed to put an end to their sins by eliminating the source alcohol. The first the big story for temperance came in eighteen. Fifty one with the passing of the main law. This was the first. US government attempt to ban alcohol hall. Unfortunately public outcry proved to be the bills undoing by the end of the decade alcohol was once again legal in Maine for decades. The temperance movement pressured the government to ban alcohol about the government wasn't interested mainly because many congressmen and senators consumed alcohol themselves but more importantly one of the federal government's main sources of revenue was brewery and whiskey tariffs. It wasn't until the turn of the century that prohibition seemed attainable Wayne Wheeler and his anti Saloon League were able to make alcohol all alleged issue. You were either for alcohol or you were not. There was no middle ground by doing this wheeler in the Anti Saloon. League league made sure to rally against any so-called wet candidate who wasn't for prohibition and the results were astonishingly in the Anti Saloon Leagues Favor Favor Cities and states began. Passing prohibition laws but enforcement was not working if alcohol was banned in one city people people were just traveled to the next if it was illegal in one state they would just cross state lines. It appeared that the only path to total prohibition was through a constitutional amendment which would outlaw alcohol federally and after the passing of the sixteen th amendment in nineteen thirteen eighteen which made it legal for the federal government to tax. A person's income prohibition was in sight with a new revenue stream the government. It no longer needed to rely so heavily on alcohol sales taxes Wayne Wheeler and his anti Saloon League pounced after four for years of hard lobbying. They finally achieved a centuries long goal in December nineteen seventeen a resolution banning alcohol overwhelmingly welcoming Lee passed both House and Senate and was sent to the states for ratification. It took thirteen months for the necessary. Thirty six states to approve it. On January Sixteenth Nineteen nineteen the eighteenth amendment which prohibited any manufacturing sales and transportation of intoxicating intoxicating liquors became law. America was now a dry country but interestingly enough the Eighteenth Amendment Amendment never actually distinguished what an intoxicating liquor was enter. The volts did act the bill that outlined how the Government Women could enforce prohibition drafted by Wayne Wheeler but introduced into Congress by Representative Andrew Vol- stead the voest. Act define the rules of the new amendment anything including food and candy that was point. Five percent alcohol or more was illegal as such wine beer and spirits were officially no more however alcohol for medicinal Sacramento and industrial L. I. E. Cosmetics automotive or home cleaning purposes was still legal. Medicine became the only legal way for the average man to the purchase. Whiskey however volts did did grant Americans various rights. People were technically allowed to drink in the privacy of their own in homes the contradiction of course being that they couldn't buy it. Anyone caught buying. Alcohol could be fined up to one thousand dollars and sentenced to jail time at midnight on January seventeenth. Nineteen Twenty prohibition officially went into effect the Production Sale N.. Transportation of alcohol was over or so the dries had hoped. Most Americans gave the experiment to try. It was now part of the constitution and so the average person was scared of the legal repercussions of wine liquor. They didn't want to wind up in jail or face a hefty penalty eh but though the immediate effects of prohibition saw steady drop in alcohol related deaths and arrests Americans still wanted a stiff drink drink and when someone wants something they can't have the desire only increases. It was actually easier to get alcohol now than it was before. Four prohibition many Americans had stockpiled alcohol for their own private consumption others however stockpile to turn a profit. The era of the bootlegger and rum runner had begun. When prohibition Shen went into Effect Arnold Rothstein was a household name thanks to his involvement with the nineteen nineteen world series scandal a prolific the gambler? He was said to have been the one to bankroll members of the Chicago. White Sox to throw the series for the Cincinnati Reds Rothstein. Wasn't the kind kind of man to let a good opportunity passing by. When prohibition went into effect he knew he could tap into the market smuggling quickly quickly became his way into the bootlegging industry and he knew the perfect country to get his alcohol from Canada using the Great Lakes? The Hudson River Rothstein was able to submerge New York City and the rest of the East Coast in alcohol with the help of young up and coming mean gangsters like Charles. Luchino Meyer Lansky and Dutch Schultz Rothstein was able to rake in millions without ever transporting and you legal alcohol himself at the height of his operation in nineteen twenty five. It's believed he was worth the modern equivalent of more than one hundred forty million billion dollars. In addition to Canada the Caribbean proved valuable bootlegging ground for the United States whether it was whiskey from Great Britain and Ireland or locally distilled rum from Nassau. The southern Atlantic proved an excellent entry. Point for Booze and Adly became known own as rum row and no man shipped more alcohol from rum. Row Than William Bill McCoy though he abstained from alcohol all himself bill McCoy saw that there was money to be made but unlike Rothstein who paid other people to smuggle in alcohol McCoy they had the means to traffic in the illegal substance himself. He had his own boat in nineteen twenty. One McCoy was offered fifteen thousand dollars dollars to load up his schooner the Henry l Marshall with five hundred cases of British liquor and sale from Nassau in the Bahamas to Savannah. Van Georgia McCoy knew. It was risky but he couldn't turn down the money. It's unclear how long the trip took but he did it without Out Any trouble and afterward McCoy became hooked on smuggling alcohol he began making deliveries up and down the east coast. He purchased a much larger boat. The era th ouza added a machine gun in case does any trouble and a high powered motor sure so that he could make more runs throughout the year as well as outrun the Coast Guard. He was considered trustworthy by his clients. He offered fair prices and none of his alcohol was cheap knockoffs like some of his competitors. When you bought from bill you bought Johnny Walker? We're doers some legends. Call this the origin of the phrase. The Real McCoy the advantage of rum running compared to trucking in alcohol from Canada was was the open sea. The coastguard wasn't equipped to cover the entire coast. So with the motor. Still running McCoy would drop anchor. Three three miles from land and buyers would sail up to the side of his boat to make their purchase for two years. Bill McCoy was the king of the sees but in November nineteen twenty-three. His luck caught up to him. While in the midst of making shipment McCoy's schooner was suddenly spotted headed by a coastguard vessel because they were miles from shore and thus out of US jurisdiction McCoy thought he could sail away. What what he hadn't expected was that the coastguard would open? Fire McCoy knew that he would be outgunned by their cannons wins and decided it was best to surrender. The coastguard discovered two hundred cases of whiskey in the hall. Though according to McCoy there were originally forty. Two hundred McCoy pleaded guilty to smuggling and served nine months in jail. When he was released he retired tired and moved to Florida once there he and his brother opened a shipbuilding company? Is Rum running days. Were over bill. McCoy may have been one of the most famous rum runners during this time. But only one man earned the title of King of the bootleggers. Jorge Ramos Chicago lawyer originally from Berlin. rimas noticed within months of prohibition going into a fact that he was representing Holstead Holstead Act. Violators but what struck Ramos was that the mini represented had more cash in their pockets than he did and he was as a lawyer. Ramos was both impressed and dumbfounded especially given the fact that many of them were as he put it without any brains Raines At all he decided that he would make a career change and enter the bootlegging business himself. Why should clients reap all the benefits benefits and he was smart? He knew a loophole in the false. That act medicinal alcohol. It was possible to get a prescription description for whiskey. But it wasn't easy and the ghosted act. Restricted all prescriptions. To just one pint. Every ten days Rimas move to Cincinnati where organized crime held little sway. So there was an opening he could move in on. He purchased defunct distilleries and began to stealing alcohol to sell two pharmacies. For medicinal purposes in essence Ramos created his own drug company and as the profits began role in it was made sure to buy distilleries in and around Ohio Ramos would sell the alcohol but is trucks were often mysteriously recently robbed by gangsters who in turn sold it themselves. Off Course. Ramos was actually selling alcohol to the gangsters and and managing to turn a tidy profit. I'm too. He was charging the pharmacies and the gangsters for the same alcohol. In order order to keep the feds off his sent. He'd cooked the books and when the time came he made sure to pay off government officials to keep away from his operation Shen. Though his total words has been impossible to calculate it is said that during the first quarter of nineteen twenty one remiss personally personally deposited the modern equivalent of over thirty three million dollars in the bank. Untaxed as prohibition reached its fifth year he was was by far. One of the richest men. In The bootlegging game prohibition was supposed to put an end to America's drinking problem. Ironically it made it worse alcohol was more popular and easier to get then when it was legal by the late. Nineteen Twenty S. There were over thirty thousand and speakeasies in the US all of which were serving alcohol supplied by bootleggers. The government knew that it needed to regain control in in order for their experimental work. It would need to enforce the bolstered. ACT The problem of course was that was easier said than done then. Coming up prohibition agents scour the country looking for bootleggers to bust now now back to the story. Not everyone in America was ready to give up their alcohol. When prohibition went into effect in January you worry nineteen twenty well? Many Americans did attempt to obey the law. The majority wanted their whiskey and beer fix it became all too obvious. The is that enforcing the Vol- stock act was going to be more difficult than expected. Luckily the government had a new plan the Vaal Stead Act didn't didn't just define what an intoxicating liquor was. It also established the official means by which the law would be enforced under the control of the Treasury Department Department. The Bureau of Prohibition which was established in Nineteen Twenty became a separate branch of law enforcement and their sole purpose was to investigate and apprehend those violating the allstate act but the agency appeared to be doomed from the start when it was initially created. The budget budget allotted for only fifteen hundred agents to cover all forty eight states. Many of whom had little to no training in law enforcement. Though they didn't prevent the government from giving them Tommy guns and badges the agents who are often referred to as pro. He's and soon the pro. He's he's were making headlines alongside the same man. They were attempting to apprehend two of the most famous pro. He's were the duo of izzy and Mo and in the early years of prohibition no one racked up more arrests than them is it or is he. Einstein was was an Austrian Jewish immigrant known for his affable personality and his way with language he spoke Russian German Spanish French Italian and Chinese Chinese and he had an uncanny ability to perform various accents in English though he hadn't exactly abstained from alcohol. Prior here too prohibition is he respected the law when it went into effect when izzy signed up to be a pro he in Nineteen Twenty he was officially prohibition Agent Number One because of is vibrant personality few bartenders are servers believed him when he outwardly told them he was is a pro. He lied laugh as they continued to pour the agent shot but when the handcuffs went on the joke was no longer funny but is he. He didn't just rely on accents affability. He loved US wild disguises to interspecies he dressed up as women football players Aura. Southern Colonel A- Texas cattleman a fisherman a grave digger even a delegate from the Democratic National Convention anything and everything everything and people fell for it not long into his career. izzy recruited his friend. Most Smith a cigar shop owner to be his partner in building Out Justice together. The pair went undercover in New York. Los Angeles New Orleans Saint Louis Cleveland. The press love love their adventures. They reported on stories. In which is e in Mo- busted rabbis selling Sacramento wine. Rabbis with last names like Kelly. Allie McGuire and o'malley or how the two busted a Hollywood speakeasy wearing medieval costumes from film said their exploits were something nothing ripped out of a dime novel. Despite their wild antics the pair of pro. He's were successful in five years izzy and MOE arrested over four four thousand nine hundred violators and confiscated about five million bottles of booze. However by November nineteen twenty five? Their superiors had grown. Tired of the theatrics izzy and MOE along with over thirty other pro. He's were fired because they did not measure up to the standards of efficiency given their success. The decision didn't seem fair but the two weren't down on their luck for long. After their firing ring they went into selling life insurance and apparently many of the people is he sold life insurance to were some of the bootleggers. He busted years earlier. This was a lucrative business. Prohibition had become a dangerous time. The ban on alcohol actually led to an upswing in gangland violence and death concrete jungle turned into the wild west. And that's sometimes meant some members of law enforcement had to shoot first first and ask questions later is he in. Mo- may have preferred tactics like humor in disguise to take down bolstered act violators but other. You're pro. He's chose violence and no pro- he's liked violence. More than William Harvey Thomson also known as Kinky Thomson for his tight curly hair. It's unclear exactly how old kinky was when he became an agent but all signs point to young a likely his early twenty s the first mention of his name in the press was in nineteen twenty five when during a raid. He shot a distiller in the stomach. Because not much is fully known about Thomson. There's a lot of mystery surrounding him. What we do know was that he wasn't known to follow prohibition himself despite despite being charged with enforcing it? It's been reported that he often got drunk even if he wasn't undercover and it has been said that he frequently associated with sex workers but the reason why history remembers Kinky Thomson was his reputation for violence and Dan that the bureau seemed okay with it as long as he was busting bootleggers. Who cared how it was done? Thompsons Sen's weapon of choice was a blackjack or a baton. He got so good at twirling his stick around and beating bootleggers with it that he was said to be something the thing of blackjack artist one famous incident got Thompson in hot water with a local judge. Has the story goes Thompson. Got Too rough during a raid at a backwoods distillery according to Thomson report the owner of the distillery resisted arrest so force was necessary but during the trial. The jury saw Thomson's actions as a step too far. The judge at the trial called Thomson Supervisors at the Bureau to warn him about his behavior. But Thompson supervisors sided with Thomson. Their response no bootlegger gets rough treatment unless he deserves deserves it sometime later. Thompson and his partner rated a pool hall when the owner denied that there was any alcohol on premises Thompson proceeded to break a bottle over the owners head then taken acts to the pool tables the bar the cash registers the paintings on the wall from what we can gather. It is unclear if any alcohol was ever discovered. In nineteen twenty seven Tacoma. Police were called about a drunken fight between the young couple in a parking lot. During the fight the man involved was said to have reached in his pocket for something. I believe the man was going for a weapon. A police officer fired. The police quickly discovered that they had shot and killed Kinky Thompson. The prohibition bureau heated him as a martyr despite a death that had nothing to do with his work. They sugarcoated his violent reputation. Shen as zeal. Thomson's legacy shows the violent lengths. The government would go to to enforce prohibition and if they would turn a blind eye hi to such violence who can say what else they would have allowed violent. Turn not these tactics worked. It didn't seem like they needed to try anything. Nothing else whether it was through the clever tricks of easy and Mo- or the violence doled out by Kinky Thomson these pro. He's managed to arrest thousands and once they were arrested. It was up to the Department of Justice to prosecute them to the fullest extent of the law and no criminal prosecutor persecutor was more successful than us. Assistant Attorney General Mabel Walker will a brand in nineteen twenty one thirty two two year old. Mabel Willow brand was given the difficult task of prosecuting bootleggers and rum runners job. No one else. In the Justice Department wanted like is the Stein. Mabel willow brand wasn't a stranger to alcohol but she understood her duties and took the law seriously a progressive progressive Republican will a brand rose up the ranks as a public defender specifically. She made a name for herself. Representing sex workers in Los Angeles and enforce their customers to shamefully appear in court themselves. It didn't take long for her name to be brought up as a potential assistant attorney general and when it did she received near unanimous support among California judges when Willa brand I became Assistant Attorney General in Nineteen Twenty one. Her team consisted of only three members but in a few short years she had an army of one hundred including including forty lawyers during the majority of her term. She made sure any violator of the bolstered act pay dearly there would be no leniency. Even if the bootlegger had political connections but willow brands department also oversaw Federal Income Tax Litigation. This would prove to be a major tool in bringing down the nation's worst bootleggers in nineteen twenty seven one of the forty cases. She argued before the Supreme Court was is that taxes should be taken out of illegal income. The Supreme Court agreed so thanks to willow brand the I. R. S. was allowed to go after bootleggers for tax evasion. Or fraud famously. It's how they took down at the phone. And another perfectly legal example sample of the government enforcing prohibition from Nineteen Twenty one to nineteen twenty nine. No woman was more famous in America than Willa brand and she was dubbed the First Lady of the law by the time prohibition ended willow brand in her department notched a six hundred thousand federal prosecutions one of the earliest was none other than George. Reema's the millionaire bootlegger hiding behind a pharmaceutical drug business. Business is he in Mo- Kinky Thomson and Mabel Willa brand are just three examples of the government's official enforcement of the ball stacked while some some of their methods were questionable. The fact remains they did their job. Unfortunately they seem to be more of the exception than the rule. Many within law enforcement didn't care for the bolstered act. Was it really worth going to such great lengths to prevent people from enjoying a glass of whisky. Isky some people thought there was new point in putting themselves in danger for a law. They didn't support. Why not turn a blind nine or better yet take a few bribes? Almost from the get-go corruption spread through all levels of law enforcement and with it the rise of organized crime coming up the darker side of enforcing the volts dead. Act Now back to the story. When Congress passed the bolstered act in nineteen nineteen it helped create a new department to bring down those who broke the law the Prohibition Bureau bootleggers and rum runners all had to hide their work from the agents or pro? He's men like Izzy Stein and most Smith or Kinky Thomson and if they got caught it was. US Assistant District Attorney Mabel Willow brand and her team of prosecutors who made sure the criminals were locked away but not all government officials believed in the law. Many thought prohibition and was so ridiculous enforcing it was a waste of time. This quickly bred corruption. The language within the Eighteenth Amendment stipulates dictates that the federal government would work with states to enforce the law. This immediately created a problem. The federal government assumed that the states would would enforce prohibition themselves but the states believed that since it was a federal law it was up to the federal government to enforce in the federal government. Did Not not one to spend that kind of money. During Prohibition Republicans controlled Washington both Congress and the White House and didn't want to spend in government funds on something like prohibition when the Bureau of Prohibition was established its initial budget was four point. Four million dollars today that would be around sixty five million salaries for prohibition agents varied between one thousand two hundred hundred to three thousand dollars a year so it was more profitable to receive kickbacks from bootleggers than actually bring them in just one year. Into into prohibition more than a hundred New York agents were fired for bribery however the government tried to sweep the problem under the rug in nineteen eighteen twenty five the head of the Bureau Roy Haynes claim that because only forty-three pro. He's were convicted for crimes. Between one thousand nine hundred thousand nine hundred and twenty-five five it meant that the force was ninety. Nine percent honest except those numbers are completely wrong or fabricated as journalist Edward Bear notes between nineteen twenty and nineteen thirty. Some eleven thousand nine hundred twenty six agents out of a force of seventeen thousand eight hundred sixteen were separated without prejudice because they're criminal involvement couldn't be proved and another one one thousand five hundred eighty seven were dismissed for 'cause that is for offenses that could be proved but might not warrant sentencing or that could involve volve costly publicized trials. It seems like the government was aware of the corruption but instead of taking action simply tried to cover it up up with misleading numbers. They may have known they were fighting a losing battle but kept fighting anyway in fact as bear later notes Roy Haynes the head of the bureau was notorious for laying blame on others Haines said there are large communities where the entire machinery of Government Municipal County and state is such that federal enforcement officials can get little if any cooperation whatever to some extent. Hanes wasn't wrong. Corruption was worse at the local level. Many sheriffs and police officers turned a blind eye. To Small Town bootlegging operations rations or speak easies since most of the bootleggers were heavily armed. It was often too dangerous. There was no value in fighting one. MM famous bootlegger actually started his career as a cop. Roy Olmstead was a lieutenant in the Seattle Police Department. When prohibition began however olmstead began a small bootleg operation to make money on the side after getting busted Olmstead was fired from the police force in charge define nine afterward olmstead dove headfirst into alcohol and went on to become the most successful bootlegger in the Pacific northwest as the nineteen twenties roared on? It had become obvious. That prohibition wasn't working as intended more people were drinking during prohibition condition than before and corruption among those responsible to enforce the law made it impossible for anyone to have faith that the government was adequately the equipped to tackle it adding to all of the government's problems was the unprecedented spike in violence. And much of that had to do you. The rise of the gangster when prohibition started bootleggers like Arnold Rothstein and George Remiss figured out a way to to peacefully stakeout their territory with little violence more often than not they employed smalltime street gangs to help them carry out their operations. But as prohibition continued in these operations brought in more money than they could have imagined the smalltime street gangs began to grow and the alliances and peace agreements among rival gangs. TURNED VIOLENT CHICAGO FAMOUSLY. Had Al Capone. When in prohibition started capone worked for Johnny Torio when Torio ran the Chicago outfit there was relative peace with the rival Irish gain but when an assassination attempt on Torio in January nineteen twenty five forced him to retire his young protege took over on Chicago ran red with blood? The Chicago beer wars between capone and his Irish Polish rivals Dean o'bannon bugs Moran and Hymie Weiss sent four hundred gangsters to their graves over one hundred and fifty of those deaths. Were by the police in the span of about five years in the middle of the twenties the streets of Chicago were a war zone culminating in the nineteen twenty nine Saint Ballantine's Day massacre. Everyone knew who was responsible for the massacre but capone was able to get away with it because he had the police on his payroll. It is said that for years. He paid them five hundred thousand dollars a month to let him run his bootlegging operation without trouble in New York. Charles Lucky Luciano quickly rose in the underground and proved that he was not only one of the most ruthless list gangsters in town. But the smartest he quickly aligned himself with such gangsters as Frank Castillo and Vito genovese and was close. Friends with Meyer Lansky. And Bugsy Siegel with a bankroll from Arnold Rothstein. These men would go on to create a successful bootlegging operation in New York and by the Mid Nineteen Twenty S. Luchino had become a multi millionaire when Arnold Arnold Rothstein was murdered in nineteen twenty eight Luchino went to work for big Joe Nasiriyah whom he had worked for prior to his time with Rothstein. Mass area was of the generation the so-called Mustache Pete and by the time Luchino rejoined with Nasiriyah tensions. Were we're heightening between some of the mustache. Pete's known as the Stella Merisi War Mass Horea and rival gangster Salvatori Tori. Marin Zano made New York into a war zone in Luchino was right in the middle of it at one point however through Chino. uh-huh seeing that mass arena was losing decided to switch sides and in one thousand nine hundred thirty one he arranged for mass arenas assassination the mass arena dead. Marin Zano was now the boss of all bosses five months later Luchino heard whispers is that Marin Zano was going to kill him Luchino had helped make Marin Zano king and in return Marsano was going to betray him. Sell Luchino decided to get to Monsanto I with Marin Zano Dead Luchino became new. York's number one bootlegger but instead of crowning himself the king he decided to completely reshape. The American Mafia in organization that remains means to this day a lot of people had to die for Luchino to become a boss and it was all funded through bootlegged alcohol. All prohibition was supposed to end America's love of alcohol and the violence that came with it and although there was a decline in homicide during prohibition Bishop First Year The twelve years after nineteen twenty saw a dramatic spike in nineteen twenty one the homicide rate jumped from around and six per one hundred thousand to eight point one per one hundred thousand and by the time prohibition ended in nineteen thirty three the rate was just south of ten per one hundred thousand prisons also saw a rise in incarceration to by nineteen thirty to the federal prison population. Asian had increased three hundred thirty six percent from before prohibition was enacted and there was a five hundred sixty one percent increase in federal. Oh convictions the common reason violation of the Vol Stock Act while the intentions may have been good. The reality is more people became criminals or died because of the bolstered act it seems the. US government couldn't police liquor without causing violence and death. Perhaps this was something that required drastic measures to gain control over or perhaps death in violence was part of the plan and there are some numbers that we haven't mentioned yet numbers. The United States government didn't want released murder there wasn't the only major cause of death during the nineteen twenties. People were getting poisoned. Not everyone was able. Oh to afford the name brand alcohol. That Bill McCoy and Arnold Rothstein smuggled into the United States many bootleggers had to rely on home. DISTILLED DISTILLED ALCOHOL TO GET THEIR FIX AKA. Moonshine when prohibition went into effect moonshine became the drink of choice for those without the connections to Johnny Walker or Canadian club and with the rise in Moonshine. Consumption came the rise of alcohol poisoning. Unlike these so-called Moonshine you see today in stores Moonshine in the nineteen twenties was highly dangerous and made using doing whatever was available. If a moon Scheiner was lucky he was able to buy corn mash from the grocery store or medicinal alcohol. The hall from the likes of George Remus. If a moon Scheiner was unlucky he had to distill his liquor from wood or government regulated industrial Austria's alcohol and when moon shiner made bottles of booze using industrial alcohol. Death seemed to follow between Nineteen Twenty Ninety six and nineteen thirty. Three an estimated. Ten thousand people died from alcohol related poisoning. It wasn't because they were drinking commercial. The alcohol like doers or Canadian Club. It was because they were drinking moonshine and a popular. Late prohibition drink called Ginger sure Jake. Nineteen Twenty six is an interesting year to consider as a starting point because it was during the summer of Twenty Six. That rumors began circulating throughout New York. City government regulated alcohol. One of the many sources for Moonshine was going to become more poisonous this than before. Was it possible that. The Bureau of prohibition wasn't the only trick the government used to enforce prohibition did did they know that moonshine is used industrial alcohol as an ingredient and wanted to stop it even if it meant a death toll and Dan was this a coordinated effort at population control. The vast majority of those who died from alcohol poisoning didn't have the means to afford top-shelf option.if. Alcohol these men and women were only able to buy cheap dangerous. Moonshine was the government aware of this. And purposely targeting. The poor next week will explore to conspiracy theories which claimed the US government on two separate occasions purposely the poison industrial alcohol. One theory claims they did it in one thousand nine hundred eighty six and another in nineteen thirty New Yorkers died in rapid succession at the end of nineteen twenty. Six was it because of government poisoned alcohol or was it something more for. We'll find out next time. Thanks for tuning into conspiracy theories. We'll be back on Wednesday with a new episode. You can find all episodes of conspiracy theories and all other par- cast originals for free on spotify. Not only does spotify already. Have all of your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast originals life conspiracy theories for free from your phone desktop or smart speaker to stream conspiracy theories on spotify. Just open the APP tap browse and type conspiracy theories in the search bar until then remember. The truth isn't always the best story. And the official story isn't always the truth. Conspiracy theories was created by Max Cutler and is a par cast studios original executive producers include Maxon Ron Cutler sound design by Anthony. -fenive bows sick with production. Assistance by Ron Shapiro and Carleen Madden this episode of conspiracy. Theories was written by Joe. Garra with writing assistance by Maggie. Meyer hire and Stars Molly Brandenburg and Carter Roy.

government US Bureau of Prohibition America New York City official William Bill McCoy Early Nineteen Twenty Arnold Arnold Rothstein Izzy Kinky Thomson Luchino Meyer Lansky spotify federal government Nineteen Twenty izzy Einstein Jorge Ramos Chicago Wayne Wheeler Kinky Thompson
Restaurants Reopen Today

Mojo In The Morning

14:09 min | 3 months ago

Restaurants Reopen Today

"The an dot com mom humic subsidy calabrese do the mambo like crazy. Let's celebrate the fact that restaurants are going to be reopening again here in just a second and we are very excited this morning to see people actually going out to breakfast. That hasn't happened in two and a half months. Let's give that little applause here. It is a little plus so my girlfriends. And i went out my both my bubble group the girls that we watch each other's kids and so we've kind of hung out during the pandemic but we did one of the outdoor like igloo things for us to be together and out at a restaurant on friday night. We were so excited our waiter. saddest out. and we're going. We're looking at like we. We were crazy and we're like beer with us. We're so excited to be together. And we have no children and he was like okay. Thank you as scared of us. But it is so great to be back. Hopefully i mean obviously it's twenty five percent capacity and he can still do the outdoor dining thing but let's our restaurant some love. Yeah get out and just stay save. Wear your masks. Were you need to and everything. But it felt great. We wanted to just take a break here to let you shout out the restaurants if you work there if you own one if you are anyway involved in the restaurant industry we'd love free to call us right now and shout out your place and let people know you're open for business. Eight four four mojo live eight four four six six five sixty five forty eight and it's obviously going to be a little different little slower because everybody's getting her groove back and at twenty five percent capacity. There's still a long way from making the money that they were making a year ago. So we have to tread lightly and follow the guidelines in the rules so that we can get these places back to opening regularly the more we follow the the strict rules. The more that we'll be able to give these guys business be kind be patient and let see these places open again because the staff and the owners have been struggling for two and a half minutes obviously with no income so months. I'm sorry two and a half two minutes long so anyway give us a call. Eight four four mo jo live and i wanted to shout out one of my favorites and i asked ellen to call channel and put him on so we can talk to them on the air. Hey luchino good morning. Good morning spike. How are you doing great. And i'm sure you're feeling good this morning i couldn't be more excited i'm I'm thrilled that. At least we get to welcome people indoors restaurant And and continue to you like our patio's talk very excited so luchino own own some of my favorite restaurants and He owns paco town. Restaurants southfield big. Laura could cina if you've ever had the wood-fire pizza it's amazing arbor company Which just opened a new believe. Just opened a new brewing brewery in plymouth. Right in downtown plymouth correct. We have one down there. And then i an ann arbor of course is the mainstay and and i am most excited to finally be able to try casts at paranoid which you guys opened earlier. This year and shannon has not stopped raving about your patio. I already made reservations. Because i'm so excited about it shannon. I think they need to name one of the tables after you. I just want the breadbasket named after me. Exciting breadbasket i've ever seen in my whole entire life. Well that's funny. You mentioned breadbasket shannon because when when you know call times a week we flip a casa cornell i the whole concept behind it was built around that breadbasket because when i was a kid i remember going into restaurants of breadbasket was like how we judge the restaurant. It was the most exciting part. Kinda it kinda went away. Like bread basket kind of left restaurants. They kind of give you a piece of bread on a plate and offer it to so. I really wanted to bring a breadbasket back. Thanks for noticing. Yeah you do such a great job obviously with food and service and the one. I was so excited when i saw the restaurant opening. But the world-class michelin rated food. But the problem for me is that. I don't like wearing suits when i go out to eat. So now you've totally pulled back and made it a more casual feel for birmingham absolutely absolutely and and went right back to my my roots of italian cuisine. I mean that's what i know. It's like the back of my hand. So i'd are going to be open. You can still do. You can still reserve the igloos at big laura and patio at casa is still gonna be open yes okay and patio abaco and yep We have igloos at arbor brewing. The main arbor brewing Corner breweries hips. lampy fantastic. It has eight igloos back in. And they're they're fabulous But absolutely we're gonna keep the outside going as long as we can. I think I think we got another. You know a year of people wanting to dine outside. Not everybody's gonna wanna come back. Yeah yeah yeah and everybody on the show. Here has done the igloos at big allure over the last few months and i can tell you i was surprised. How warm and toasty they were. So this is a good chance. Even if you're not ready to get in a main dining area you can still use the igloos. Patios and the restaurants have done such an amazing job to have to adapt several different times as the as the goalposts kept. Moving in the rules kept changing. Everybody did their best to to put their own money from their business into adapting and getting back on track so this is now the chance for us to get out over the next few weeks and helped to put the money back in their pockets. So luchino can't wait to taste your food and To be disgusted with myself with how much i eat. I can't wait to don't forget if if you're still not comfortable going out or you have some underlying health condition. You really want to stay home by all means every all the restaurants are still doing. Carry out and it's curbside. It's constant contact list. We don't have to get leave your car. We put in your trunk if it's well done so as well awesome. Thank you lucia. Luchino best of luck to you. Thank you bye. Thank you shannon. Nice to talk to you all right. Let's let's go round to some of the phone lines here and have some people shout out their restaurants that are reopening. Because there's so many good ones. I start off with sarah and in dearborn. We had so many great choices for dining begin but sarah. Who do you want to shout out. Luff work very good one. Yeah do you work there. My family owned We have crates and team We've been there for a little in four years and we really kind of took a hit because when all forward and all them please dot going through for lunch rush We have to change our hours excited to finally get some people back in the store. Yeah yeah so. When i go to dearborn of course i getting. There's so many good ethnic choices for good food in the middle. Eastern food is second to none there. but my daughter's as adventure so when i found the fork and the crepes that were there all my gosh. My daughter's it's off the charts. You guys are great. So thanks for checking in thank you. Chris is in clinton township on the east side where we shout out. Good morning can jannine our shouting shouting out. Freddie bar and grill and clinton don't bill clinton down perfect our good friends. Y'all gino and Madonna and Ingraham the waitstaff. Everybody we've been my wife and daughter have been frequent records every year awesome. Awesome block and play music album. Today we'll take what we can get right. We gotta salute slow reopening. But we're gonna get our groove back. And i'll start getting money back in the pockets. Let's go to karen. And karen you have a great shout out that we should mention. Go ahead of hamlin pob. oh yeah. There's a hamlin in every neighborhood. So gotta get craxton. we have richmond. We have rochester. We have shelby twenty two miles. We have salvi twenty five miles and we have the else i i. Can i mention because obviously the beer taps her little rusty. We're gonna have to work those in this week and really give them a good workout. Can i mention to people as they're eating and drinking to be kind of the servers there i. It's amazing to me. The last time the last round we had in the summer when the restaurants reopened all the stories that came in about rude customers and how people were taking all their frustrations of covert out on their servers. Wait staff and it's just amazing to me because you have to understand. The server did not set up the guidelines. The restaurant did not choose the rules. Everybody is just abiding by the state and federal laws so that they can be open and make money so please be kind and patient as they this week trying remember everything they gotta do and inventory might not right and food night not perfect as they get everything back in order and sometimes they have to hire new staff to replace old staff that got jobs elsewhere so be patient this week actually tip well to yes i am involved. everyone's a regular. yeah have been fantastic. They abide by the rules They just wanna dine out because my someone else to cook food for them. Man amen awesome. Thank you caroline. Let's do three more calls and then we're going to next round next you till next hour. We're going to take some more calls from restaurants and also Tell you some of our favorites and support some that. We love our neighborhoods. Let's go to jonathan good morning. Good who do you wanna shout out. So i worked for motto in royal oak. I was gonna grade hard. Yup we're opening up on the fifth. I mean we have a week but same time. We're very excited. The open perfect. Yeah it'd be net i really. I appreciate everything that you say. Just now about the service industry In being patient and being kind I mean i. It's very important especially right now and shannon appreciates your martinis martini person. But i like your winds. What'd you say i can now. We fairview we can't wait to. Debbie is in saint clair shores. Let's go to debbie. What do you want. Who do you wanna shout out over there palmer's It's on Harper and it's just a little restaurant but the owner and all of his waitresses go above and beyond for every one of their customers. They i get a smile. You walk out with them. Bigger smile palmer. Soon is one of those family restaurants wherever you could tell their service and the owner. I mean he's so personally comes out and he walks around and talk. Show every person at every table chat just such a warm and cozy feeling and friday night my husband then i always go on our date night there and you know it's just like i cannot wait till friday right now. I wait till friday. It's the perfect Example of a place that is very small so with twenty five percent capacity. You might be talking about. They might have six tables all night so be patient. If you're trying to get into places the best recommendation is now maybe not palmer's are old school they might just have a facebook page but if a place has a website. There's a good chance. I do online reservations too so you can get ahead now. Start thinking today about. Where do you wanna the next three weekends and put your table in now and telling you valentine's day probably already awash. I wouldn't worry about that but you know what celebrate valentine's day on february twenty seventh. Why not or were you know. We're tiny valentines every day. Exactly thank you debbie. Let's do one last call. Colleen is columnist from grosse pointe with a good recommendation. Go ahead calling to morning morning I'm calling for luck bar and grill. And grosse pointe that's exc- right correct. Yes we're super excited. We're going to have the Indoor open but we also have ten out front. The patio their heated. So which we've been doing for a while but we're excited to be open and people were confused by the new regulation saying why now tensor suddenly allowed wire tens lab while the state's trying to give more real estate to the restaurants and say okay. If you follow the same rules you can now treat your patio like you treat the indoors as long as you're still at twenty five percent We just wanted to give the restaurants a better chance to stay open and the same with the ten pm rule. A lot of people very confused about what cova doesn't you don't catch cova before ten pm. The ideas are trying to let these places serve food served meals and keep their business but they don't wanna do the late night. Drinking inhibition thing where the bars were. The people tend to forget the rules and start shouting loudly in each other's faces and all that stuff. And it's not safe for the for the staff either so we'll take the slow openings and do what we gotta do to make sure everybody's safe but also get this economy rolling again. We got us support. Our small businesses colleen. Thank you so much thank you. We'll do this again in an hour. We'll give other people a chance to shout out. Their local restaurants. Were so excited. You guys reopened today and don't worry mojo in the morning we'll be out. We don't cook. It's just disgusting. Don't eat but we'll be out there soon.

luchino shannon mo jo plymouth arbor brewing calabrese Luchino dearborn Freddie bar hamlin pob craxton sarah ann arbor ellen karen Luff Laura
September 10, 2019: Salvatore Maranzano

Today in True Crime

13:27 min | 1 year ago

September 10, 2019: Salvatore Maranzano

"The today is Tuesday September tenth two thousand nineteen on this day in nineteen thirty one forty five year old Mafia boss Salvatore Maranzano was brutally murdered in his New York Office Marin Zano Zano had recently ascended to the top of the criminal underworld assuming the title of Capo di Tutti copy boss of all bosses else's but five months later his short-lived rain came to a violent and bloody and you're welcome to today and true crime podcast original every day. We flip back the calendar to this date years ago and recount one event from true crime history. I'm Vanessa Richardson today. I'm covering the assassination of the forty five year old Italian mafia kingpin Salvator Maranzano only a few months before his death Maranzano and fellow gangster Charles Lucky Luciano overthrew mafia boss Joe Mazrea the coup allowed Marin Zano uh-huh to assume the position of capo di tutti capi boss of all bosses but lucky. Luciano wasn't content hint being Maranzano second in command. He resolved to get rid of his new boss the same way he had helped get rid of Joe Missouri Ria in a hail of bullets due to the graphic nature of this episode listener discretion is advised. We advise extreme caution for listeners under the age of thirteen before we unpacked the ramifications of Salvatore Maranzano 's murder. Let's go back to the morning of September timber tenths nineteen thirty one just as the workday was about to begin it was on that morning four men wearing long coats and carrying being bulky briefcases took a subway card. New York City's grand central station as they walked outside amongst a throng of commuters. The four men squinted it was a bright and sunny morning. Summer hadn't quite left New York City and the people walking along the street were taking their time to enjoy the good weather while they still could but the men didn't seem to have gotten the memo they pushed their way through the meandering crowd route heading up Park Avenue to the New York Central Building. The Slab cited building was hard to miss it was the tallest structure in the vicinity of Grand Central Station as the four men approached its gilded doors. They craned their necks up towards the pyramid topped roof but but they weren't looking at the ornate coop ally at its peak. They were focused on an unassuming window on the ninth floor from the other side of that same window. Salvator Maranzano looked out over New York City. It was his kingdom and he wasn't going to let some upstart like Lucky Lucia know. Take it from him. Marin Zano chuckled to himself. Luchino thought he was being so clever by plotting to double cross him but Marzano's people were loyal to him. The Minute Lucia knows plan had started deform he had heard about it. He turned around contemplating the Bust of Julius Caesar that sat on his desk. He took a lot out of inspiration from the famous Roman emperor after all Caesar was the original Italian powerbroker Maranzano admired how he had risen through the ranks defying all challengers until he rose to the very top as for what happened to Caesar at the end will nothing lasted forever and Salvator Maranzano known as the Little Caesar of New York wasn't going to make make the same mistakes as his namesake. He reached into his vest and pulled out his pocket. Watch Luchino was late for their appointment Marzano side. What was the fun of murdering. You're underlings if they were late to their own ambush. Marin Zano turned turned back to the window looking out at that view wasn't such a bad way to pass the time down in the lobby the four men in their long coats what's walked through the revolving doors. A receptionist asked them who they were there to see but they walked straight past her towards the elevator. The receptionist shrugged her job was to help people stopping them was up to security meanwhile twenty-three-year-old Vincent and mad dog coll huffed and puffed as he rammed through Central Park. He couldn't believe he had lost track of time salvator. Marin Zano was paying him fifty thousand dollars to kill Lucky Luciano. If he messed this up he knew his life would be on the line mad. dog dashed onto fifth avenue and started running towards the New York Central Building. It was over ten blocks. He just hoped he would make it. In time to put a bullet in Lucia knows brain coming up multiple parties Converge Converge On Salvator Marzano's office and now back to the story on the morning of September tenth nineteen thirty one the guards outside forty-five-year-old Mafia boss Salvatore Marin Zana's office stood at high alert. They knew something was up but they didn't know exactly what all the guards had heard rumours everyone had when the boss told them lucky. Luchino I know was dropping by. They knew it wasn't for anything. Good the elevator at the end of the hall chimed as the doors slid open. The guards tensed hands on their weapons. It was four meek looking men hauling briefcases twice as big as they were the the guards relaxed. These guys must have been accountants or something. Marzano hadn't told them the number crunchers would becoming but there was a lot. He didn't tell tell them the moment. The guards took their hands off of their guns. The four men pulled out their own weapons from under their long coats. The intruders raised their hands to their lips and waved their guns in the universal sign of be quiet and drop your guns or or will blow your brains out the guards. Were all too happy to comply after disarming themselves they braced for what was surely going to happen happen next sure enough. The attackers knocked them out cold. Maranzano side finally lucky Luciano. Chano always did like to arrive fashionably late. He just hoped that mad dog call was in position. Marin Zano wouldn't be able to keep Luciano Johnno talking forever without the other man getting suspicious. He straightened his tie and opened the door. Marin Zano was greeted by a gun shot. He staggered backward into the room looking down at his wound in Disbelief Lucia. No Oh had outmaneuvered him. The four assailants fired shot after shot into Marin Zano body sending him crashing into his desk. Ask with a blood stained hand. He reached for the bust of Ceasar. He tried in vain to swing it at his attackers but he was too who week the sculpture slipped out of his hand and shattered on the ground with Marzano on armed the four men grabbed him and he was as good as dead but Luchino had told them to send a message. The Little Caesar should meet the same fate as his namesake. The attackers pinned Marzano against the wall and stabbed him multiple times in the back when they finally let him go. He slid down the wall and fell to the floor leaving bloody streak. He was dead before he hit the ground. Mad Dog call was running up the stairwell when he heard the gunshots shots mad dog quickened his pace whatever it happened gunshots were never good as mad dog reached a landing he he came face to face with four dishevelled-looking men. They told him the police had raided the building but mad dog knew that was ally why he recognized these guys. They ran with Lucky Luchino. He knew that if he went up to Marzano's office he wouldn't find police combing over it. He'd find a dead body. He started to reach for his gun but stopped. Short Maranzano had already given him half half of the money upfront he could live without the other half. Mad Dog talked his tail and ran a a short while later the four assassins arrived at Lucky. Lucia knows office their presence could only mean one thing he had one on Lucina walked his bark heart and poured them all a drink. He raised his glass to them. The king is dead. They raised their glasses back. Long live the king after Salvator Marzano's murder. Lucky Luciano took his place as boss of all bosses instead of grabbing all the power for himself. Luchino expanded the Italian mafia to include more criminal organizations such as the Jewish mafia he he also brought in groups from Chicago as well as other gangs across the nation but Salvator Marzano's legacy wasn't completely erased aced Luchino retained his concept of dividing New York operations among five different families which allowed disputes to be resolved with negotiation rather than stagnating from constant infighting in violence. Lucia knows leadership allowed the mafia to grow into a sophisticated fisticuffs national operation the next few decades would be known as the Golden Age of the Mafia and Wall Salvator. You're Marin Zano reign as the boss of all bosses was all too short it laid the groundwork for the underworld. He had briefly ruled to thrive. Thanks for listening today day in true crime. I'm Vanessa Richardson for more information on some of the subjects of this episode. Check out our kingpins episode on Vincent Mad Dog Call. Aw Today in true crime is a podcast original. You can find more episodes of today in true crime and all other podcast originals for free on spotify not only does spotify already have all of your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast originals like today today and true crime for free from your phone desktop or smart speaker to stream today and true crime on spotify. Just open the APP and type today in true crime in the search bar at par cast. Were grateful for you our listeners you allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network. We'll be back with a brand new episode tomorrow in True Crime. Today in true crime was created by Max Cutler is a production of cutler media and is part of the podcast network it is produced by Maxon Ron Cutler sound design by Kerry Murphy With Production Assistance by Ron Shapiro Paul Muller Maggie Admire and Carly Madden this episode of today and true crime is written by Alex Benetton. I'm Vanessa Richardson.

Marin Zano Zano Salvator Marzano Lucky Luchino Salvatore Maranzano New York City Lucky Lucia Luciano Johnno Mad Dog New York Central Building Vanessa Richardson Marin Zano Salvator Maranzano Julius Caesar murder Marin Zano Vincent spotify Salvatore Marin Zana Joe Missouri Ria Wall Salvator
7: Don Vito and the Prime Minister (Part 1)

Mafia

33:04 min | 1 year ago

7: Don Vito and the Prime Minister (Part 1)

"In the nineteen thirties. New York's prominent mafia was under the control of Charles Lucky Luciano but when he was out of the picture picture there was one question who would take over power lucky Luciano us. You Know Jenner vs as his intimidate and you also use frank hostile. As his diplomatic Luciano would use intimidation. If he had to. But you preferred Stella's who would use intimidation. No one wanted the job more than genovese but it went to Castello who quickly became a prominent member of society. Frank Costello was unusual as a as a organized crime figure on Mafia figure. Whatever you WANNA call And that's he fashioned himself as a man gangster. He fashioned himself as a businessman Sometimes bordering on aristocracy and the would rather run with the council dukes and earls than they would capos two copies arrested costello styled himself self as the mafia prime minister but when push came to shove could he hold his own when it mattered against the Senate in the early nineteen fifties when a senator from the state of Tennessee was trying to make a mark trying to make get to get publicity Launched hearing his name was estes. Kefauver launched hearings into actually gambled big time gambling in the big cities. This is mafia frank. Castillo was born in Italy. He arrived in East Harlem with his parents. Nineteen hundred eighty four. His father renna grocery shop but Castillo did want to settle title for a life of poverty. His brother Edward got into the life of street crime. And Frankie soon followed suit Selwyn Elwin Rab is the author of five families. Castillo like so many other mobsters started out the young men with the teenager and then people people named Twenty Street gangs predatory free gangs robberies. Knock off a passing pedestrian. We thought had a good watch him or wallet. Wallet Thick Wallet. The shook down merchants a penny ante stuff castilla did well as Petty Crook but at age twenty four. He made one detrimental mistake. He was arrested for carrying a gun and he was sentenced to a year in jail. New York had a very tough gun. Lloyd at the time and still does call the Solan law which meant the long stretch in prison if you got arrested with a gunman so he decided Prudence was the better part heart of courage and avoiding sentences. So whatever he did he didn't do it a gun. He might've batted around people. But for the most part it was more gentlemanly. And the most civilized the jail time may have been short but the event would become important later in life. From that point forward Costello. Oh never carried a gun. Castillo realized that he needed to use his brains not bullets to get ahead of the pack like so many other young offices assist in one thousand nine hundred twenty s. They saw their opportunities when Prohibition came along somehow rather to serve the American public would good booze or bad booze. In fact he was so successful it was pretty slick and how importing booze transport and effectively getting into the clientele So so there was a lot of dough to be made. There were presumably respectable people involved in it and he learned business dealings that way With seven apart from being a goon he would never be Kinda Hitman goon muscle man type. Hayman's the gentleman gangster. He was never going to be Thuc. It was during the prohibition that Castillo teamed up with underworld hotshot Charles Lucky Luciano and his mismatched gang of up and comers and it was there that he met Vito genovese like Castillo Genovese had emigrated to the United States as a child and bidding gangs from a young age H.. Genovese was from Naples. Genoveva came over as a young man. to New York grew up in the slums of New York and and from the beginning he was involved. What then called streaking terrifying street gang violence ruled and he never changed? That was the way he started. That was the way he would end where he was always always believed that the gun of the night was more powerful than persuasion so his early schooling let character for the rest of his life. Genovese had also spent a year in prison for firearms but he still very much favored guns. He was colleagues with Luchino but was employed by the mob. Boss Joe Mess area where he mostly acted as an enforcer and executioner are they don't genovese was never anything but a homicidal maniac. I mean he was from the Really filing school the Mafia killings killing him were just daily business. It was like turning over a page in a book of no concern That was the way he decided he was going to get to the top. He was ruthless. He killed everybody even killed anybody who stood in his way. He came up with the violent element of crack. Skulls shook down merchants anyway to make a buck and he used his fists at gun or a knife hidden care. Nobody stood in his way Over his career Genovese was charged with shooting a man in Queens running down and killing a man in Brooklyn and beating down whoever mess arena asked him to. He always had a loaded revolver tucked into his belt. Thomas Repetto is the author of American Mafia. Well the people folded he worked with the were prone to violence office by definition and he understood that murders were bad for business and so a lot of times you can stop unnecessary murders breaking breaking kneecaps. Violence was his keynote Maria. Who is just a ritual with him of no? No concern had no conscience. Nobody would get in his way. Your daddy bumped you off or you had somebody kill kill you. And he had no compunction about killing anyway one example either romance he was killer he actually fell in love in his first wife died and he fell in love with cousin and he was enamored of her and she wouldn't get a divorce from her husband. What was vetoes? Solution didn't kill. The husband is simple and you marry the wife. And that's what he did so far as he was concerned that was his number one method of getting to the top and it did it. Worked for Genovese was not known for being intelligent but someone Luchino was good at recognizing people's Apple's talents. He soon employed Genovese as his personal hitman. Joke coffee is a former. NYPD officer Reno Geno visual host and a top by intimidation but also by being allowed to rise to the top by intimidation. And the guy hold on him to do that was what you know. Seattle lucky Luciano used Geno vs as intimidated and he knew being close to Luciano. which was he carry? The Seattle may have been looked very cultivated but he he needed hitman and when he needed hitman. We're the first people turn to Vito Genovese. Because he knew genovese evasive would carry it out or head to people. Strong guy people who had no compunction about it so and that's nt moved up in the organization So this is how we got established tablist any organization. Castilla was more adept at using his intelligence rather than violence to establish himself by the nineteen thirties. Frank Costello Stella was known to the underworld as King of the slots his illegal one armed. Bandit machines where grossing five hundred thousand dollars a day in New York. He had thousands of slot. Machines send condom machines you know. See and gambling casinos in America elsewhere. The World you drop a coin now the news card and if you hit the lucky the lucky sequence your enriched so he made millions of course wait to Luciano's pockets pocket to But it established him as a good businessman somebody who was known as earn not a guy who goes out. It has to commit hips or violent crimes so he was pretty powerful in that sense that he can make a lot of dough For what was considered white collar crime and he also went into vending machines. Things like that The main he didn't get his kickbacks from what other people didn't gambling or other Racketeering and he liked labor racketeering too so in that sense he was the more modern gangster Frank Castillo certified it. He was emblematic dressed. Well acted very courteously. No Lau voices. Deborah Verney concentration with the police. He avoided arrest. All he was interested. In was his outward appearance and making money and surviving Costello was the very a picture of the well to do gangster learning from Rothstein like his contemporaries. He wanted nothing more than to rub shoulders. With the upper establishment. The Frank Costello was unusual as a as a organized crime figure on Mafia figure. Whatever you WANNA call in that he fashioned ourselves as a non gangster? He fashioned himself as a businessman sometimes bordering on aristocracy and in. He would rather run with the council dukes and earls than they would capos copies restaurant that like to be remembered embiid as a member of the business community and an odd patron. That was his act. He mixed with politicians congressman journalists authors judges cops and city councillors and soon became known as the Prime Minister of the underworld with his connections. Costello developed a reputation as the boss who could bridge the legitimate world. And the mob. Frank Costello is called a prime minister because he was the title was given to him by the media on the newspapers and television. What have you and the reason for? That is that they'd like him lead. He's Lincoln ten to our English ancestry. In this country where the famous Prime Minister Winston Churchill and they made franchise fellow the American Winston Churchill. Racial Underworld Thomas Peto. That doesn't mean that he was the boss of bosses. There was no such position but he was first among equals and probably a little more equal than all the others He was the one who made the belittle connections for the mob. He was the one who gave the shrewd advice He was a very sharp thinker. The mob said he was the guy who could always figure the angles on every possible problem. So we was a man of great respect and the a Lotta respectable friends us. Both Castello Javale say became more tied in with Luchino during the Castilla Moreso war in nineteen thirty. The war between two different factions actions of the mob family. They all worked under it ultimately ended when Luchino had genovese kill boss Joe Mess area. Luchino soon took over the crime family. Genovese say became his underboss and Costello became his concilliatory his advisor Ronald Gould. Stock is a former mafia investigator. There were two models for mob bosses one of the the traditional that fly below the radar that recognized that they are criminals and they're only going to operate in the underworld there are others who want to move past the underworld be accepted by society. Be viewed as something different than just a thug looking Luciano use geno vs as his intimidate. You also used Frank Stella as his diplomat genevieve's who became the Arrow. Parenthood Luciana was not so shop pop. Loose Jaffe was real thought. Luciana would use intimidation. If he had to but it from peop- you preferred Stella's who would use intimidation for five years. Genovese served by lucky Luciano side doing his dirty work without asking any questions questions until one day an unexpected opportunity arose lucky. Lucina was convicted on prostitution charges and sent to prison for fifty years. We're lucky was convicted and sentenced to a long long prison term. The to- competing characters characters. Were Vito Genovese. and Frank Castillo Costello looked upon in his outward appearance the gentleman gangster and veto eight. Oh he was the homicide gangs the not the maniac. No one would mess with but they were both still profiting from all the rackets to the Luciano family. Had that left the question who would take over the family. Genovese was the underboss so it fell to him. Thomas Repetto General Bays was a ruthless individual not well liked and he. It was not a pleasant man to to work with or for everybody. Preferred Castello But you know business is business and one guy guy fails and the other guy appears to be succeeding because gentleman's was very big and drugs and making a lot of money whereas Estella one nothing to do with drugs. Then something happened. That left the choice obvious genovese had been involved in a murder in nineteen thirty four. The jury had been unable to prosecute but now there was is new evidence but suddenly somebody turned there was a murder in Brooklyn and the DA. At that time in Brooklyn managed to get a squealers who implicated Veto the victim had been one of genovese gangsters who had demanded to biggest share of a crooked card game but only years later just as is he was about to take control of the Luciano family. Did someone come forward veto saw that the game was up for a while New York and he decided the best thing to to do was to scream and go back to Italy where he was a citizen and he did so. He knew he wasn't going to lose any money because what he did was he still had his own. Crows rose working in New York and gambling and labor racketeering and shakedowns so he was doing pretty well in his new life life and he had corey is brought over the money to him in Italy. But what this did. It opened the door a frank. Still 'cause Franken Stella's chief rival. It's now in Italy and he couldn't run it and Castillo could get his information or whatever blessings from lucky Luciano who was imprisoned so Castillo is now in charge. George with genevieve. Say now out of the picture frank. Castillo became an even more powerful man. He was now the head of the Luchino family away. The largest mob family in America with more than four hundred soldiers beneath him costello easily field Lucina shoes shoes and continue to add billions of dollars to the family's fortunes Castelo had an urge to be accepted And he was unwilling just to be mobster like say veto Jennifer and the notion was that he could be in society. He could be viewed it as an intelligent person who participated in All the kinds of things that people who had grown generation generation within the United States were able to do with the added power behind him Castillo was able to seed influence further into the heights of society in in politics and law as far as politicians and judges in the as in tops and the corrupt world that we live in United States. Frank hostile was the man behind all of it. He didn't just know judges and and and politicians politicians he bought and he was the original corrupt. No question about that stock you meant that thousands and a big man was an absolute corrupt. Castillo was a great. Can't showed you how powerful how venomous the mafia could be. He corrupted judges. He corrupted politicians in effect for almost fifteen years in the late. Nineteen Thirties into the nineteen nineteen fifties. He ran the most powerful Democratic Party organization in New York. Something called Tammany Hall which had a headquarters Orman hat for you could run be appointed to convert cleared for Frank. Castillo may potential male candidates. The Democratic Party went to ASEAN hat in hand asking for his blessings because he was so powerful most important political figures that was his bag was it was a mayor who was elected twice as mayor of New York. Bill Dwyer a former. Da Who indebted the custodian that he what happened to ask ask for his endorsement. When the Mafia gets control of your political judicial system might say hey? What are they doing gambling? Who can't even prostitution running a political organization? They're deciding what bills passed deciding. How justices mean it out? Then you endanger and that's why Frank Castillo. Hello really even though we dressed. Well look civilized. Look cultivated was one of the most dangerous mafiosi in American history through through the late thirties and world war two costello continued to flourish as mob boss and build his reputation among mobsters and citizens alike after World War. Two Lucina was deported to Italy and mostly out of the picture now. There was no one who would dispute that. Stella was the real head of the crime family except Genovese came back into the picture and he finally brought back to the United States by an intrepid. TREPELO Army Sergeant. Who Against the advice orders of his superiors arrested Genovese the British army to help him his the Americas? I wouldn't Genovese was brought back to New York to face the murder charge. He had been arrested for but the years in Italy had only strengthened his resolve and and he had no intention of going to prison on January sixteenth. Nineteen forty five the witness against Genovese. Ed Peterloo Tampa complained that he was suffering from a gallstone problem. He was given pills from the guards. But the pills were not painkillers. Painkillers Then the inevitable happened in New York. The witness died in prison. They said he had swallowed wallet. The poison to kill eight horses without the witness there was no case against Genovese. He was acquitted and free to walk the streets of America once again now in the clear he was free to focus on securing his own position. In the Lucia no family the position boss but Castillo was thriving when Veda came back he really for a subtly challenged challenge. The Castillo Costello is in control. 'cause he was so influential in politics and in judicial system blesses his knee. Other families came to him. They wanted a favor and the courts or they went to the political savings so powerful so he was looked upon the most respected and probably probably one of the top leaders. New York veto resent the veto is back veto. Fill that he has lost out then he should get the boss of bucks that have made while he was gone to should come to him. Jennifer was intimidated by Costello's intelligence in. No the costal could get words what he could only get out of a gun and he was jealous of that. The bottom line is the green eyed monster Jellison. Perry Kostelic seemed to have the approval of everyone and was very popular but Genovese say noticed. Something Castillo preferred to deal only with the big guys those at the top but he ignored the little guys Joe. coffey said that this was a mistake. Genovese could readily exploit exploit frank. Hostile neglected the troops. Frank hostile only concern themselves with the couples breath and the Capos Tynan for capita. There were in charge. Should each individual set up like a paramilitary organization the mop the captains were the people who answered to the conceal the area near on the boss the boss and the Cappos as low as has thought it would go. He wouldn't and deal with. It did not like mixing with the peasants genovise. He knew that the people real underlings the Doug stiles thanks. bye-bye donors the thieves rapists. Whatever you WANNA call them when listen to have members of crows have been loyal cruise or these units that work within each family complaint? They've been neglected. That Castillo didn't favor them. So when they were big bucks to make gave him to other cruise Cruzi considerable loyalty. This resentment was Genovese as opportunity to begin. Undermining Castillo's leadership wall Castillo wined and dined with America's elites. He had forgotten to pay the respect deserved to the criminals who enabled his lifestyle. Frank Frank Castillo was starting to believe his own myth. Everybody knew the Genovese wanted Franks job but he could take the job. The other bosses one of allowed that as long as frank was riding high frank was the political fix. Frank had the connections. Genovese did not have the connections. Genovese was known as a drug dealer and he was a target of the federal government home. What does he do yes to buy the little bit of his time? He can't come in and start a massacre so what he does begins to make sure. He strong that his rackets doc and beginning to produce money so he money and he has soldiers and he has hidden in case there's a real showdown not only was Castillo popular. But but his position as a boss and the new mafia structure under Luciano meant that Javale say couldn't just kill Costello he would need permission from other Mombasa's so genovese waited hoping Costello would make a wrong move and he wouldn't have to wait long. The first big exposure that there might be organized crime unit known as the Mafia occurred in the early nineteen fifty s when senator from the state the tendency was trying to make a mark trying to get some not get some publicity Launched hearing his name was estes. Kefauver hearings things impact gambling. Big Time gambling in the big cities. ESTES KIEF of her an ambitious senator decided to look into the world of crime and and launched a series of public hearings. KIEF ever called on more than six hundred gangsters underworld figures politicians and policemen to testify justify before the Senate Steve pomerantz is a former assistant director of the FBI. I remember the Kief over investigations. I was young ver-very young lad and I'm actually watching those and and and it was a real revelation That we began to see that there was this these people among us WHO criminals? Who Very well organized and Very deliberate in what in our activities and controlled a great great deal of the criminal activity in this country. Keefer hearings were We're we're we're actually televised and the American public and our leaders became came aware that we had a problem that existed in this country. Actually for very long time and largely been underground and not not not visible and the key Falvo hearings exposed who they were To some extent what what what they were doing and the magnitude and harm that they were they were causing American society people began to develop a an interest in in in doing something about it. The key of her hearings as they were called were aired on television. It brought a lot of public attention to the underworld and attention to the fact that the law enforcement wasn't doing anything about these he's criminals. Many gangsters were called on as witnesses but refused to say anything. Except Frank Costello You know it's interesting. Seeing that Frank Costello the gangster On television that I think the reaction to Frank Costello the gangster Probably as much like the reaction to John Gotti and I don't think it changed over time. People are clearly concerned about having somebody like that and and and I remember people saying well if he's a gangster like that why isn't he in jail. What's the problem here on the other hand? There's a certain attraction certain Glamour Lamour that was attached to Costello and again Through the years attached itself to many of these organized crime figures kind of Of a Hollywood persona but I think it's fair to say that you know your average responsible. American was more concerned than they were attracted attracted to Frank Costello Costello's still craved credibility from the political world and thought that having friends in high places would mean he would get through. The hearings brings with his pride intact. The event built him as the most influential underworld leader in America and he became the star attraction action. Now all the other mobsters were subpoenaed to testify took the fifth amendment. Said nothing or the flight. The subpoenas hateful at Hickam on the witness stand and come out as a gentleman as a real businessman that he paid his taxes stuff like that and then he had this kind of outlook or outward appearance that he wasn't look like enough blue likelihood Michael and he went before the committee and it was embarrassing. The camera crews were only allowed to feature Costello's hands hands. His testimony became known as the hand ballet. He would only allow hands to be photographed. So you had this picture of his hands jumping around Gravelly gravelly voice appearing on TV without the face made him look terrible also for the spotlight on them and the irs went after him in the Justice Department. Now in the spotlight do something. Whenever the questions about his criminal activities got tough for to near the Knuckle Costello would rub his poems together together? Tighten his fingers grip a glass of water drum on the table in front of him or crumple and tear pieces of paper. What what happened is what he was summoned before the Father Committee of the United States Senate? He assumed that he could get through the hearings successfully partly because because he had political friends partly because charming guy and he was essentially saying. I'm just GAM- gambling. Kind of fool himself toward the end Castillo was asked if he had ever done anything that would make him a good citizen One of the questions. September stick type style. So what have you done for your timeshare paraphrase of course and he said I pay my tax and that was his answer now in his mind he thought that was enough Joining the Marine Corps. I pay my taxes. Everybody pays taxes. They're working on. That was his philosophy. That was frank's right coastal. But he was the original superstar made by television. The questions were more rigorous than he had expected and at some point Costello simply walked out of the hearing refusing to answer any more questions from the public exposure and embarrassing answers and destroyed some of Castillo's public credibility and he left the Kief of her committee hearings as the justice. Department's number one target because a lot of trouble. The federal government at the same time. The mob was Madam. Once once he failed to fall river everybody went after him And he was indicted for tax evasion. He was convicted. He was the data for lying to Congress And as I say when you're the prime minister the man who worked miracles and all of a sudden you fall all of your horse and fallen your face all kinds of difficulties. You are not prime minister anymore. In one move Costello had lost his popularity with the elite with the mob and had gotten himself arrested. But for one monster Costello's failure was good news. Vito Genovese say In the next episode Genoveva began to take the steps he needed to assassinate Costello and it would start with more assassinations SASSA nations to anesthesia. It'd become a problem It was too much heat on because you're in the situation that transpired after that went interference with the Momma activities. He had to go and Castillo's exposure on television was just the beginning. The whole mom was was about to be exposed thanks to genovese blackened was more important not so much the country for the FBI all of a sudden everything that they had been saying that there was no national organization that crime was essentially local and it was the local law enforcement to deal with King obviously incorrect the FBI. I mean there was a moment where there was absolutely patently clear that they had a role to do that they had not performing opposite. This has been an audio boom and world meteorites media rights co-production hosted by me fleet cooper. It is produced by audio booms. Rachel Jacobs Casey Georgie and Karen Bevan and by Pascal's huge huge for world media rights we had additional production help from world meteorites by Gerald's Benguela and James Tindale. David mcnabb is the series as creative director and the executive producers. audio boom are Brendan Regan and Stewart last. Follow Mafia on spotify or subscribe on Apple podcasts. Awesome stitcher or wherever you find your favorite shows.

Castillo Genovese Frank Castillo Costello Frank Frank Castillo Frank Costello Stella New York Charles Lucky Luciano Costello Americas Mafia Italy United States Castello Javale Luchino prime minister Senate murder castilla Luchino East Harlem Thomas Repetto
Dr. Mark Menolascino: ...how important the gut is

Nobody Told Me!

28:47 min | 2 years ago

Dr. Mark Menolascino: ...how important the gut is

"Welcome to nobody told me. I'm Jan black. I'm Laura a wins. Heart disease is the number one killer of women outpacing all types of cancer, diabetes and stroke, and while men and women face the same classic risk factors for heart disease, like high cholesterol and high blood pressure women often manifest heart disease in different ways than men at our guest on this episode. Dr Mark meadow Luchino has been on the frontlines of cardiac research for most of his professional career and believes the institution of medicine hasn't treated women's heart health with the same Karen investment as men's he wants to change that and has written a new book called heart solution for women. Dr. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for having me, your background is extensive tell us a little bit more about it. So we know more about where you're coming from well senior high school on Brassica. I saw Dior is is to toot his heart disease program and he showed that lifestyle. Medicine. How you eat. How you exercise and how you deal with stress worked better than a bypass surgery for part blockages? So I saw early on lifestyle. This was the key. And I wanted to gather all the tools teach in med school and out of med school to bring that toolbox to my clients. What are some common conditions that can indicate heart disease in women? Well, we think it's all about cholesterol. And the reality is half, the heart attacks happen in people who have normal plus roll, the problem for women is that to the three women that are friends of ours will have heart disease. The first warning sign in half of them is sudden death. They don't get a second warning. So it is such a big problem, and you can see signs of inflammation in women. You can see it when they carry that weight around the middle rather than their hips, and if extra by fats to see outside, but the inside by fatty worry about and there's several body types that tend to carry more of that body fat on the. Inside the readiness and the cheek so you can see what they call a buffalo hump in the back of the their shoulders, which is related insulin resistance will skin tags Bill. The is for high cholesterol, the ear crease at forty five degree angle and the ear lobes all of these are signs on the body that something going on inside. And you better take note, how are those signs different from the way heart disease shows up in men? Well, one of the fiscal interestingly are similar for women as they hit menopause hormones do different things to different women and men don't have that burden to deal with. But always see for a lot of men and women is that we don't get these outside signs only. And so everyone really is it risk for heart disease is such a big problem kills more women than all cancers combined. But we just don't treat women the right way. And and I think we need to change it. They differently. They need to be assessed differently that the treatment programs. Were differently for women. So we need to develop a whole new way of thinking about heart disease in women. Why would the screening process be for women? And what should they ask their doctors four? Well, it's unfortunate because the same test. We've been doing in the seventies or what we're doing? Now, we do a very basic cholesterol. We look at the good one. We make ratio until women what the risk is based on a ratio. I treat people not ratios, and I just don't like the idea of regressing you as unique individual to the meat of a population average, it makes it easy for me as a doctor, but not very good for you as an individual. So the basic classroom tests, you have to go. One more step, you fractionation or subdivide the bad cholesterol into the little small sticky parts or the big bouncy basketballs, and there's a particular particle lipoprotein. A it's a small sticky marble inflammatory tail on it. That's the big risk factor for many women and most doctors no not test for they've never even heard of it. So we. I just have to do a better job of our basic screening. So you should you. Ask your doctor to test you for lipoprotein. A I think everyone should get tested particularly women and then there's a series of inflammatory markers. Because as I said heart disease is really not about plus rawal. It's really about inflammation. It's the inflammation in your heart arteries that puts you at risk and not just your classroom. Can you talk to us a little bit about the connection between inflammation and stress? I thought that was really interesting in your book inflammation. I see the root of all health evil. It seems to be tied to so many illnesses, heart disease, diabetes, obesity, or thrice skin, conditions hormone imbalance dementia. So inflammation is that gas on the fire that drives all of these chronic illnesses, and I'm an internal medicine specialist. I use medications I take them, for example, five pneumonia. I'll take an antibiotic, but for the chronic illnesses of heart disease, obesity, diabetes the. Care mile just doesn't work. So we have to think about different ways to approach it and this inflammatory fire that drives the chronic illness. That's really what our mission in functional medicine is defined. What's unique about you that we can tap into and give you some lifestyle techniques to put your fire out. Give us a layman's definition of what inflammation is and what causes it. What's like when you sprain your ankle? And it gets all red and swollen. That's the evolutionary sponsor. That's good. That's the inflammation. That's acute that helps to heal injuries. It's when you fall in scrape your hand, and you keep scraping that day after day after day the skin can just never heal. So inflammation is good in the short term. But it's what drives all these dreaded diseases when it's goes over and over and over, so what can we do to prevent this inflammation? Can we take anti-inflammatories or what would you recommend? Well, you know, unfortunately, the. Kind of flam medications are linked to increase risk of heart disease, heart attack. So it's it's really looking at food as medicine find the food that your body does well with and they tend to be the real foods, the organic foods, clean neat. Clean water. Look at the environmental working group, e w dot org and find the clean fifteen in the dirty dozen. But it's really about eating whole food instead of processed high sugar, high bad, fat, fast, food and processed food. Let food beer medicine so food can cause inflammation in the body. Well, you're the natural doctors they might be a head of all of us in regular medicine because they know about the night shades. The tomato the potato the eggplant peppers that series of vegetables tend to be profoundly inflammatory in some people, and I've had many clients just remove their from their diet and their arthritis. Go away they come off anti-inflammatory medicines. So. There are certain foods, and you can do a food sensitivity test to figure out what your foods and in my book. I show you my test. I actually had sensitivities. And when I eat them, my Nido feel quite as good. I don't sleep as good my skin looks lawyer -tated. So what happens in the food? You put in affects the processes that come up somebody is reading your book and thinking that they need to change their diet. But the thought of giving up carbs and sugar and fats a lot for them. What's the one that you think is the most important to give up? Well, I think it's it's processed fast food if you're eating your car fast food meal when you're all stress on your way to work versus sitting at a table with family and friends, he the Mediterranean type of meal. It's just a big difference. It's not just what you eat. How you eat. If you eat with intention with people you care about that support love you. It's a lot different than eating fast food ourself in a car and along those lines you say, it's important to control. Your emotions in regard to healing, the heart. Explain more about that. We will you mentioned stress and stress is actually a good thing. It gets us out of bed got me to go to medical school. But it's the internalisation of stressful events, it's how you perceive them, and what we find it heart disease. It's the people that are angry at hostile was stress, and that deep anger resentment that seems really to be at the core of why stress can be bad when you combine that anger and hostility resentment with stress that's the time bomb that causes heart attack. And what about the connection between sleep and heart disease? Well, you know, what's the number one selling drugs for sleep? It's an antihistamine. It's gonna take Plymouth story. So we know that sleep really has anti-inflammatory processes and really poor sleep might be a cause of so much exacerbation of chronic illness, like heart disease, diabetes. As obesity people. Just don't sleep. Well, it's not just how long is the. But how deep sleep. Do you dream? Do you wake up refreshed you wake up in the middle of the night wide awake? Like your cortisol is dropping. So a lot of the things that you're sleeping tells. You can give me insights into what's going on with hormones or drill injured flam, Tori processes so what should your sleep goals? Be. We know we talk about functional medicine these clock g's that our bodies are really clocks women have a monthly cycle. There's circadian daily cycles of certain hormones that there's a real pattern that we follow. And it's really important for kids that you fall, retain, it might be the schedule asleep. That's more important to the bodies restoration that it is the amount of sleep. But the old adage of eight hours of good sleep does make sense. And if you can get it on a regular basis go to bed at the same time trying to wake up at the same time keep that schedule. If you can't get that full. Eight hours. Then is it okay to nap or does that not count think would've wife's pleasures restorative nap? But it's when you happen, you don't feel refreshed. So don't be yourself up. If you take a nap and some people will just close your eyes for ten minutes, and they feel completely restored. So naps do help certain people. I'm not a Napper. I just don't do wealth maps. I'm just good when I keep going. So I think for some people they're good other people that they don't tolerate the nap. But don't be yourself up. If you take one if it restores you more about what you ask a woman when she comes into your office as a patient with potential heart disease, or maybe already diagnosed heart disease first questions. I asked him. What did you have for breakfast? And then I asked him how to just leap last night. And then how much water did you drink yesterday? But you mentioned all these physical signs just the woman walks in my office, her body shape is she carrying fat down low in her hip, which is good normal. If you're carrying extra body fat or is it up high in the waist, which is that hot inflammatory fat. How does she carry yourself if she looked joyful 'cause she look happy house the voice, how's the tone? How's it trembling? Our cheeks ruddy does she have that buffalo hump of insulin resistance what's going on with the skin tags. There is how little there's a little blue circle around your iris that may be telltale that your cholesterol is high. So everyone should look in the mirror. If you've got that little blue circle that's called Arkansas newes. It's a sign of high cholesterol in dangerous cholesterol. Most of us think of these heart issues and people that are overweight, and unfit, but you often will hear about people who are slim and in shape, dropping dead of a heart attack while they're in the middle of a run. So why does that happen if they're following? The recommended guidelines for diet and exercise and have been healthy their whole lives. Classic stories Jim fix America runner who wrote a book on running who died with the normal clustering level knowing thought he could and we see these people like you mentioned that they're they're lean. They go to yoga every day. They eat clean, and knowing that they have a heart disease, but you can actually be skinny fat as I mentioned, not the found the outsiders the fat on the inside and some people the way they processed carbohydrates and bad fats. They tend to lay that internal body fat down that visceral fat, and it leads to a thing called fatty liver. That's an epidemic liver disease society. More transplants from fatty liver coming up then from hepatitis, and it's related to how we processed carbohydrates. What should we know about heredity and the role it plays in our ability to to prevent heart disease? Well, you know, this may be the most exciting part about health right now. Is that you're not gonna be your parents? You're not doomed by your genes. So we think that gene slow the gun, but your choices pull the trigger? So there's this concept called epi genetics. And what it means is that based on your lifestyle choices the way you handle abotions. If you exercise how you eat how you do asleep. You can turn on good genes and turn off badging 's. So you have the power in your fork to change how your genes express. You're not doomed to be your parents, very exciting information. And how exactly do you do that? Well, I would have to do with getting the right support. And we, you know, the real basics. Get enough water eat clean food without the refined. Carbohydrates the processed foods the bad saturated fats, get a routine for sleep, fines, and joy and love and social support in your life. Get a dog in a pet have something else that you do. It's really a combination of all of these. You don't have to sit in. You're aware meditate for two hours every day to be healthy. There are simple things that you can do. And when you stack them up two years, not additive one plus one plus one doesn't equal three equals thirty. So they sent her job they all work together. And that's the beautiful part about lifestyle. You've touched on hydration a few times, but tell us a little bit more about how much water we need to drink. It's crazy. How much water we all should drink? I'm looking on my window. There's about ten feet of snow side of it. And we're in Jackson Hole, which is a very dry place to price. People don't realize that. But I tell people that it's in my book, I talked about this hydration level and a half ounce of water propound bodyweight. So if you way one hundred and fifty pounds needs seventy five ounces of water, that's a six pack a water a day. It's a lot a water the other easy way to do. It is when you urinate, it should be clear there's any color to it. Go drink a glass of water. I did not know that what nutritional deficiencies do. You commonly? See we don't even US government publishing guidelines that show over fifty percent or of nutritionally deficient in magnesium. Interestingly is one of the biggest deficiencies, and it's also one of the first things I turn to to help people with health for their heart. So most of the common nutrients are deficient because our soil's are deficient. There's an epidemic of thyroid disease going on women America. And it looks like maybe because of the selenium deficiencies that are in our soil. Now doesn't mean everyone should go by selenium. But it means he needs to be conscious of the food. You're eating the quality the source, and whether you may be nutritionally deficient and most of actually are, and you mentioned bag knees EM, and I always see when I look for magnesium myself. I take it. But there are so many different types that you can buy which one is the best for heart health. Well, there's magnesium three day. Molly. Citrate oxide, glistening, and they all have different roles. The oxide will help. You. Learn the secrets of women constipated, which many women are get some magazine oxide take one at bed. If it doesn't keep you regular go to to help you sleep. Keep you regular, and it's safe for the body and for the heart magnesium glyphosate, if you have palpitations or extra heartbeats tend to work better without the loose stool side effects. Those are two simple things you can do on your own. What about other supplements for heart health, garlic, for example, or or vitamin d three? Well, there is also epidemic vitamin d three deficiency and regular medicine hasn't really keyed it on this. But there are optimal ranges, not just normal ranges and vitamin d for women. Guess what? It's not a vitamin. It's a steroid hormone. So. Yes by indeed, good for your bones. It's way more important for your mood your immune system, your brain. And your heart are women less likely than men to call nine one one if they're experiencing symptoms that might be related to a heart attack. Well, when anyone has the elephant sitting on your chest, which is classic arts. He's part attack side is pretty easy to call nine one one. But for women they present differently. It could be anxiety. It could be nausea. Maybe it's vomiting. Abdominal pain joint pain or just a sense of Malays or or if a teacher slash depression. So women just show up differently. And I can't tell you how many men and women I've seen. That showed up at the ER with different stories, and I tell everyone if you think it's chest pain, that's your heart. And you go to the you're not wrong, if it is your heart, and you don't go you might not get a second chance. So get women just show up differently. And I saw many women might training that came in for Donald Payne were scheduled to get things like the gallbladder taking up and they're actually having a heart attack. What can you tell us as far as smoking and the impacted has on heart disease? Why I just don't see how anyone can smoke and for those of you that are out there find some that can help you quit it just as one of those habits that just doesn't make any sense. And you know, we can scare people by telling them you're going to get lung cancer from smoking. But did you know that the good plastic surgeons and Beverly Hills they will not take a patient if you're smoker. Wow. You're not gonna heal as well. I mean, it makes sense. Yeah. Yeah. So there there's other reasons smoke just besides the fear and guilt. They taught me medical school the motivate you by fear and guilt. I rather empower you information to be more knowledgeable to make healthcare decisions for yourself based on your own belief systems rather than me, try to tell you what to do information. Would you give to a woman who is not currently exercising? But you feel like she should be adding that into her routine, Paula friend, grab your dog and go for a walk. You seem to get just as much benefit of walking than you do running with a much lower injury. We. No that weight bearing exercise for Bill health makes sense. All you need to do is take a walk once a day. That's all you need to do to get started. And if you're if you're way outta shape your overweight, just do five minutes the first time do that for a few days. Then go to six minutes do that for a few days being successful confident. You can do more but start low and go slow. So you're saying you don't need to sign up for an expensive gym membership and plan on going two or three classes a day. We always a personal trainer way for starting health, and I call it motivation by distraction. So if you have a treadmill exercise by put on something to watch put on a book tape, but no you shut the same benefit walking mile as you do running a mile with the with much lower injury risk. So just take a walk go somewhere. Nice to somebody care about have a great social encounter, and you might find that there's added benefits besides just the exercise. So what did you find that people who live somewhat active lifestyle and say their take? Taking your advice and getting up to maybe a thirty minute walk per day. But their weight hasn't really changed are they still at just as high of a risk for having a heart attack. Even though their weight hasn't changed if they're actively level has. Well, you know, there's a great of called body mass index or BMI, that's what the insurance companies use to figure out your risk. They check your height and your weight and calculate, but you can be tall and heavy or sort of heavy or certain thin, and you have the same BMI. So it's about your body fat where on your body, you carry it down low on the hips up high on the waist, and where is your body fat located on the outside of the body or you hiding some of that hot inflammatory visceral fat on the inside. So it really depends where it is. And how distributed it's not just your height and your weight. How can we go about determining our own personal risk for heart disease? I know you have a lot of good questions about that in the book. But what kinds of things could you pass onto our listeners now along those lines all you need is a clothing tape measure, so measure, your hips, where the the leg bones. The stick out the hard part measure that area. Then take the space between the top of your hip bone lowest rip measure. To that area. That's called the waist to hip ratio. In my book, we tell you what that number should be. So that you have much lower risk, and that is an easy way to predict your risk. But you can also just look in the mirror are you carrying your weight down low or you carried it around the midsection. How is your plan of action to prevent heart disease different than the plan to reverse it? Well, the the really the reality is the inflammatory nature drives both of them. And what we have if I do is figure out who have it. And I'm gonna tell you we all are at risk, but who's the canary in the coal mine. And that's where the said Vance testing it's not much more expensive than what you're getting the health fair type of test. But you gotta look at what your individual risk is and just relied on your total cholesterol and taking the class rawal drugs based on that does not make sense to me, you need to know, if you're one of the people that would benefit from it because some people do benefit from cholesterol drugs, but not many it's fairly narrow population and women don't seem to benefit hardly at all. And there's a fifty percent diabetes risk possible in taking the medicine. So you really need a little more information before you expose yourself to the medication. But if you do need, it it does help, but doesn't seem to help and women as much as the dozen men men and women are different. We've gotta respect women's. Help and treat their heart health just differently. And you write that the medical profession has a lot to do to improve its approach to women's heart health. How so well I again, I'm a real doctor a good medicine makes sense when you need it and it acute care setting or medical models. Fantastic. When you cut yourself and your break leg when you have pneumonia when your heart Goso is actually blocked acute care medicine works, but for the chronic illnesses of diabetes or thrive, this of obesity, heart disease, dementia we fail miserably. We're the number one spending country in the world with the thirty seventh best outcomes we can do better, and we can for sure do better for the women our country. So what are your suggestions for doing that? I think we have to really empower people we all need to take a little or ship over our health, but there's so much misinformation. And I hope that my book provides a good basis for people to get the right information. It lets you figure out what you can do and develop a strategy. That's doable. You talked about diet which I don't like diets because the first three letters are die. First nutrition. So should you go Kito paleo intermittent fasting and the Atkins diet, or should you just eat real food? I kinda like the idea of breakfast is the Queen lunch like a Princess dinner as Popper can eat more of your calories in the morning. This concept of finishing your meal by six PM and starting your morning meal at eight or nine AM seems to help many people, but there's one nutrition plan that works for everyone. You have to really develop the patterns and the routines that work for you. But just start with clean whole organic food. When you can if you were giving advice to young woman, a middle aged woman and an older woman with regard to heart health. What would you say with the message the same or what messages would you tailor to each of them? That's a great question. You know, everyone's a little different. So I would tell the message a little differently everyone. But you as women ages. Her needs change, her absorption capacity is reduced or hormones fluctuate. They start to reduce and it brings out a whole new series of challenges. So it's really related to where you are that hormonal cascade. And then I think a woman is a beautiful symphony and her Harvey is dictated by her thyroid heard Riedel her hormones interacting with her gut. So if you get all of those parts of the symphony lined up and doing, well, there's true harmony and true health. So at any age, you need to look at all four of those and get them into bounds are so is called nobody told me, and we always ask our guests. What is your nobody told me lesson? So what lesson do you wish that you'd learned early on in your life? That would have made your life easier in relation to heart health. The first thing. I would tell all women lissi is that if you think you might have a thyroid problem, you probably do there's millions of women out there because the normal range we were taught in medical school is not the right range. It's been changed nine years ago and most labs are using old fashioned rains. So a lot of women are on anti-depressants. They can't lose weight their mood and energy is low. They're just not feeling vitality because they're not out of the so-called normal range yet and no one will support them for tirade health. And it's one of the biggest things I think we're missing and thyroid and heart helter intimately tied together. So what about your personal nobody told me lesson? No, one told me how important the gut was we talk about leaky, gut, this intestinal permeability. How most sir tone is in your gut not in your brain. And this inflammatory fire starts in the gut. If you don't have good gut health, you don't talk Safai absorb and nothing else seems to be good when the gut is. And so many people. Digestive problems. And we kind of dismiss them in medicine. So do you need to go? See your GI doctor or should you be on probiotics or what should you do? Well, a lot of my friends are specialists. The problem is the more specialized you go the more narrow minded you actually get we call them silos that the more regimented different silos and see too many allergists. But when you really need a specialist, they're they're they're very well trained, but most people don't, but you really need to do is find a functional medicine integrative medicine. Doctor someone who's willing to look at nutrition look at lifestyle and walk with you to develop a personal plan. That's precision unique to you and helps you to be healthy, you can be where do we stand now in terms of heart disease with women and men compared to one hundred years ago? Well, you know where we're living longer. But now it's starting to change, and what we say in the current data is one of three maybe one of every two children born today is going to have diabetes. So there's all these chronic illnesses of technology, and of modern men and women that are creeping in. It's this chronic illness burden that's increasing that we didn't have one hundred years ago. How can people learn more about your work and connect with you on social media? Why love to come? Visit us at Meno clinic dot com. M E N O C L. I and I see mental clinic dot com there's a link to the book there's a bunch of free information. I really feel like my job is to provide information and help guide people to make those personal choices that are best for them. Thanks to you. Dr Mark mental Achino author of heart solution for women which is published by Harper one. And it's a fantastic read. It's actually really interesting and really easy. To understand and you can learn more about him at Meno clinic dot com in heart solution for women dot com. I'm Laura Owens. Jan black and you've been listening to nobody told me thanks so much for joining us.

Heart disease inflammation diabetes obesity Laura Owens Jan black menopause liver disease thyroid disease Dr. food sensitivity Dr Mark meadow Luchino America Dior fatty liver pneumonia US
Ep 54: Becoming A REAL FATHER w/ Luciano & Vince Del Monte

The Super Human Life

1:25:53 hr | 4 months ago

Ep 54: Becoming A REAL FATHER w/ Luciano & Vince Del Monte

"Is a picture that energy and passion vision. Is it like what's your vision for your personal life. My mantra is aligning people souls. Roles evolve to that motivates. I can help you align your soul. Your roles goals that got a winning combination. That sounds cute but it steers me. That's my vision. Helped men become mature price articles break rich and this getting checked. It is author with every exit. Hoping we you line by bringing in print every instructor that no racist sipping artist not stupid. Let's go what is going on guys. Welcome back to another amazing episode of the superman life. I'm your host as always frank rich guys. You've heard me say this before. But i am incredibly fired up and just grateful to be sharing. Today's conversation with you. We have two of the most influential men really in my life last four years now Get get detained on them here. Real real quick for you. But you know i wanted to have today's conversation. I wanted to come at it from a very unique angle. So the guests that we have on here is one of my personal mentors in one of my business. Mentors vince del monte. A lot of guys out. There are very familiar with vince. Knowing him from you know perhaps skinny skinny guy. Save your days with no nonsense muscle building. Vince was a staple on the youtube and muscle building industry for a long time. Closer decade in and over the last few years has really grown in evolved into more of a a men's mentor and in in in the work that he does is specifically helping all. Nine fitness coaches grow and scale their their finished businesses to six seven in eight figgers and and beyond. But why wanted to have vince and his father. Luchino del. Monte is because of the unique relationship you know. Vince has been very vocal and and talking about the role that his dad has played in his life. He's his dad. Lose papa lose coach luke as some of us refer to him has played an integral role in in developing the live large brand the tv. Show that vince ad on youtube years back and even plays a even bigger role in the current. Seven figure mastermind. That i'm a part of with vince. So incredibly insightful conversation. I just wanted to have these these two meta faith these these two wise men come on in in talk about some of the lessons. They've learned what are some of the key things that loose passed onto vents. That he's now taken into his life in into his business. Where did you know where did loot learn some of these these principles on life. And and where did he get his wisdom from you know. So we talk about some of his his mentors Loose gets really vulnerable at one point in talks about some of them stakes that he made while raising three boys and we talk about. How can you avoid those mistakes. If you're currently a dad raising boys in the world that we're living in today and then we finish off with just one of the most important parts of any episode that we have and the importance of establishing and building your own personal foundation. Guys this is one of those episodes that you want to make sure you come at it. Prepared to take notes prepared to find value. Prepare to have your life changed and transform but without you guys just incredibly fired up to share. Today's conversation with you the one and only vince del. Monte and his father luchino lucky luke luciano del monte on being powerful and loving father. Hope you guys enjoy and we'll see you next week a that's an good morning and welcome to the super human life art. Shoot that. You're not gonna do that. The whole show. Talk over each other. It'll be alright we we've had. We've had a few of these three way conversation. An all do my best ads as host just kinda navigated nature. We're not speaking out over each other to too much. But something i something. I didn't mention you guys before in recording that i thought it was really relevant to share with the audience. And that's the fact that we are recording this episode at six. Am on saturday morning. It in i think that's relevant is because the last episode you know we've we've done predominantly interviewed based shows but every once in a while. Poppy with kind of an idea or rance in last week's episode was really niece screaming into the microphone for about thirty minutes talking about waking up and stopped hitting us on your life in the reason. Why is because. I was having this consistent conversation with my clients with my students in people just in general that chris party in somebody was asking me like how can we get up in the morning and in my eyes. It's just easy it just when you wanna get up you just get up in you. Just start your day so you know this is not a i. Gotcha moment. But i think it's it's important to show that. Hey we had to move some things around in our schedules past week with a last-minute surgery in august dense is up there. You know running a massive business but we wanted to get this done so we figured out a way. It's literally six. Am on a saturday mornings. I appreciate you guys. I know that this is going to be tremendously valuable to the audience in something just wanted to share You know we're we're willing to do whatever it takes to to make these conversations at. I appreciate both of you Kind of studying the context of rare. Where i really wanna take you guys and i'm gonna give a give you guys a chance this. I think the majority of our audience knows a lot about your story so we can kind of buy ads like. Who is vince del monte But we definitely wanna give get pop blue. Cheer chance to kinda drunk himself really to take. The conversation is all about fathers in the role of the father in the family role. Father perhaps in a business type setting the bid you can have some some unique perspectives to share here before kind of jump into that. You know Start with you lose you kind of just share you know maybe kind of a quick three to five minute bio just you know your background who you are kind of the role that you played in and kind of helping build this massive brain and business and he's got online. Well i'll tell you. I got a against the mastermind. This year is where i'm from. This is my father the original bronx tale guy. That's who vince is named after vince. Delmonte even general del monte as a close up of my pop. I posted that photo. My facebook page if anybody wants to see it an immigrant from italy in that right after the war on the son of immigrants I'm the oldest of three my late brother. Bruno pass away overdraw drug addiction. It was one of his favorite articles. If not favorite. And that's part of our story are paying Grew up in an italian Home luchino. Resilient i may have been so my kids are named after someone in the family Vince took the name to grandfather's resent resented my wife resented. Mary three three agreed. Sons most of the time and My daughter's in love seven grandkids. Those are migrated claim to fame I grew up in toronto. I grew up in toronto where it was mostly jewish people and italians jews. Jewish people were about eighty percent of population and we were twenty percent I grabbed my best friend was was jewish state langer. So we were the jalopy most important in my about. My early life was I struggled i. My parents couldn't speak english They couldn't speak english. Couldn't help me. And i i wasn't one of those natural immigrant. Kids who kind of scared to the top right and was became famous. I struggled Great wine was passed on trial three years in a row and lifelong struggle and teachers didn't know what to do with me until the ninth grade. I went out for track and field. Kind of last ditch effort to survive this life. I didn't know that at the time in iran The mile four laps around the four hundred meter track. And i happen to run it in with those died. Five minutes and seventeen seconds which was weird pretty fast for a fourteen year old. Never put on a pair of shoes. Running local high school coach came by an tight. I'm telling you this story because it shaped my philosophy of coaching as i look back now over sixty seven years. I look back those days. His name was jim. Parker came up to me says. Hey what's your name. I said well they call me lucky. Lucy he said okay. I'll tell you like lucy too so What are you gonna do sports next year. Says i'm gonna play football and soccer says no you're not gonna make tracks star. I never did get my soccer equipment or my football equipment. The day i arrived on high school. Campus there william lying mckenzie. He got me a pair of plastic adidas all us probably fifteen times by other kids running shoes and spikes he says. I'm going to start training cross country. While first year. I finished like a hundred. There was horrible like in the finals in the race. The next year. I finished fourth in the year. After that i was invited to a scholarship. To the university of wyoming. So because of a person. That's what i'm my point is. This wasn't religious guy. He wasn't anything he was just a regular high school teacher. Took an interest in this kid who at long shaggy hair. That guy glasses and said i'm gonna make you something that You're not in. My parents. Didn't know i had this capacity. Everybody in toronto knew me. As a runner i was probably bigger than the legend went out to be. Wasn't that big at all. I was just a little guy But that define me and so i. I ended up going to failed their horribly sponsorship. I lost it. Because i drank too much a party too hard and apple eke out a good racer too but the big one was i got injured and i had to come home with my head between my legs and Ended up. it was the best thing that happened though. I met my wife at the university of went to here in ontario and we met in our town class and next to my salvation in christ. Jesus i mean there's a close between her and god. There's i don't know who really saved me. I know i i can tell you. My wife was part of my salvation. And so that began our journey in nineteen seventy three and then we were staved again. I came to know. Christ and seventy four nine hundred seventy four over the six after a years long battle with will. And god's will i christian were is surrendered. I have my little card here. Ruled out on my car. In nineteen seventy four. God is my witness. I've decided to surrender. Every area area. Every area of my life to jesus christ and i didn't even know what that meant. I twenty three years old twenty two years old. I i make a decision like that. That changed the rest of my life. I don't think i've ever back slid. I made a decision that was so defining. I had i had my ups and downs are sent here and there but i've never had like a five month or six month third year long relapse like from from the get go out of the blocks. I was all all out. For god's so that's kind of define me. My wife and i were at a winery last night. Wanna vincent favorite places in agra falls. This reflected on how hard those years were and how stupid we were at time. We didn't only better. But all out commitment defined as i you make your choices less than number one today then your choices make you in. My first choice was the mary the right girl and start dating the right girl and my second choice. Which was before. That choice was to say jesus christ and opened the door. My heart to him Those were chewed defining choices. Who i married and who. I chose to be the boss of my life. The ceo of me inc That that's that's that's absolutely amazing. I mean holy cow one. Last thing my career. I so i went. I became a schoolteacher thought school Then after a period of time. I went into christian ministry. I was a minute. Vince doesn't biscuits mice details mixed up. I went into christian ministry for a long period of time work primarily with university students and then in for about twenty years of my life. I worked as a pastor in in sizable churches in the last ten years. I've been working as a coach and has been good to give me a lot of his people have come to me to coach be coached and even pay me. Which is like. I've been a nonprofit. Vince came saying that. You've got to go into the prophet business to yet. No that's that's estimate. I mean you know i. I started working with this back in in in two thousand seventeen you know although i came to him berg for business building principals. I need alternate. He has you know him. And obviously you have played a nasty role in in my transformation and really putting together now. How view the world. I mean i i. There's been a handful of times that i had one on one personal conversation about struggles that i've been going through. I seek for guidance. In he's been he's been very humble as. I don't think i have the answers here but i knew my dad does not very very instrumental in passing launched in the lessons that that he's learned so i appreciate you for for for shane. At intro I think that there's a lot that we're going to be reversed extract from that year and as we kind of. Continue on Vince with you. You know. I think where. I'd like to start you know for for you. Something i mentioned before we started recording like in this kind of call. It influence sir. I don't really like that term But you know from from fitness codes to growing evolving into you know the business coaching in really being a mentor to men your entire life. One thing that has really been a staple in your entire journey. I mean you can see you can see the growth events for the last eleven years you kind of grown up online go back eleven years and seize your original youtube videos but one thing has been consistent in your content in your messaging as has been your gat in his influence on your life can you maybe just for a few minutes kinda content share with us. How you know growing up with with lucia. A father and know has has shaped your. Your values has shaped you as a nanny in why. That's been such an integral part of of your business. Yeah will start. So i think just the give people some specific details. You know early on Just i think more pitchers will help people because have a lot of the movies in my mind. So first of all the way to describe my dad Dot is highly engaged to the point where we get a lot of text messages. Probably more text messages. Then you get from anybody Not per week but per day saw. My dad is a people person. You know the way you know. He described by maya late uncle. Bruno is uncle brunel. Didn't know a half toronto. He knew all the toronto. And you know that's the kind of family we grew up in a big italian family but You know my dad did latch onto a few things that he's passed on to us that will pass on to our kids. You know one was the love for running. I don't know if it was. You know as much of a love at the time when it was a very painful sport. I know my brothers and i would all contribute our mental toughness to running. We're not soft guys. were not week. We're all very strong and my dad. Introduces us to the world of running a very probably one of the best gifts he gave us long distance running cross country running fifteen hundreds three thousands sake road races triathlons like those days were formed of looking back now and you see guys write books on mental toughness. And i'm like man. I got this growing up seventy five hard. What a great concept. But like i got this growing up. I didn't have to you know get told to do crazy. This was my. This was just my upbringing. So that's a big staple. Second big staple was Books you know if you go down to my dad's office even you know it. All for homes there was just. You can see right now in the background you can see in my office just books and books we go to the movies and my dad would always bring a bag like what's in the bag and he'd have like six or seven books which is the case that it was a bad movie so we just grew up around. We grew up around running We grew up around family. We grew up around seen his commit to my mom. Like i honestly don't remember like blow ups or anything there was never. Oh my goodness there was always consistency around the house. Mom and dad were always there. There are always there You know mom was always ensuring that you know we weren't we were. We were always taking care of our basic needs. Were always taking care of dad. Always push us. You'd always push us in. Hold us to a very very high standard I think another valuable thing. A you know if i think about my my dad. And my am what he's given me as circle like i remember. His friends were always solid. They're always interesting guys. They were strong christian. Men like they weren't flaky. Like big p cooney. Peter p cooney in the united states started meeting. Hit the guys that he would have breakfast with. Like these are solid men like. They treated me like their son. A would always give me a big hug. They would ask how was doing so i. I had a constant front front row view of what it meant to invest into people. And my dad you know then on with his career it on that. I've shared this quite a bit lately. Seen him you know minister people in small groups and you know i'm up on stage talking about business. What he did the same but helping people with their spiritual lives and obviously teaching principles from a biblical perspective. And and again you see. The impact of that was just around great people. The time has always great people in her home. And i think those all of those things combined made up for some pretty good ingredients to bake pretty solid son if you will and then you know there's a lot of other interesting things but Those will probably be the main the main ingredients and then just like a constant push to pursue a personal relationship with jesus. You know that was. That was always been there. You know christmas gifts were always devotional books. Christmas books were christmas presents. Were always things that were related to personal development. It's what i do not like. I got my son on getting on all books for christmas. It's the only gift that my kids are getting for me. Because i don't know what else to get them five. He's got him a gazillion gifts. I don't know how she remember your what we would always do. Between christmas and new years go away for a couple of days wherever we were and whether they help you guys do lee mom said goals set go and that was a good one. We should talk about that because what is simple concept on the first of every year. We sit down at the kitchen table. My dad would get a white piece of paper. We break it up into four quadrants. So a t and in the top top left. You'd write down your physical goals. And then the top right your intellectual goals and in the bottom left you write your relationship relational slash emotional goals and then the bottom right. You'd write your spiritual goals You remember unbelievable and it would be just like two or three things and we have light we we can go back and read them and they were so simple like some of the things. We'd write down like read my bible every day or go to church on sundays after eight nine Training it was a little longer list. It's like you know run. Run a nine fifteen. Three thousand you know there was there was always a qualify for for you know qualify for officer you know. There was always goals we. I was very as always and it's funny because that's where my life went. I was i became very numbers driven with sales. And what i do now. Growing and hitting certain targets. I'm sure it was all rooted in those foundational year. So i think one thing. I'd say just to kind of say this not a little too good to be true and i think a lot of people wouldn't understand this but you know my parents did set a high bar frank. I think this is important to share. Because you hear like fathers in an example of somebody who proves that you don't have to be a failure like yeah. He has his things yet to get over but like he didn't have to blow through ten marriages right. Didn't after lose everything to get it right like you don't have to like those stories. I get it. Everybody has their own store. I'm just saying like you can go to school on other people's mistakes you can. You can have you know if you put yourself in the right environment and you live a christ center life and your in your decisions or biblically anchored. You can do great things with all the mistakes along the way so Yeah i think what i wanted to say on the flip side was that the bar was set pretty high. The bar was set pretty high so there was never came. It was never direct pressure but there definitely was like a man. This is like this is tough. Like i got lifted this standard all the time like i gotta go to bible studies the rest of my life like it was kind of like something. Y- you know. I got a you know guard. My is also the time i got to watch. What i you know. Say and do all the time because someone might never read the bible. And i'm like the only witness they'll ever be like so there. Was this kind of a bit of pressure. Like i've got to go to small groups all the time with these some of the people in bible studies. They're not doing anything with their life. I wanna go do something. I want to go make a name like. These guys aren't doing anything with themselves. They just wanna talk and read the bible and pray. I'm like i wanna go actually want to go build something. I want to create something. So i think that's where to like You know i started to just see that That's probably my dad. Started getting a little scary. Because i wanted to really like you'll maximize is all this but yeah there was there was some pressure was a cocaine shoot so I had a love for the world as well. I'm not gonna lie like you know. You know i had all the same friends of probably most people did all the italian. Gino guys go to the bar. We line up the shots. We'd you know Invite the girls to have some drinks and we'd have. We chased the good times. So i had a lot of the cata season. Like you know saturday. Night and sunday morning vents. So there was like a conflict of like which vince. who is the real vince. Because when you have when you live under not live under his shadow but maybe that is the term like you can kind of like you kind of have his protection. Like people like oh. Vince is a good guy. But then when you start to live a separate life which and that's that was probably the struggle that somebody like me has to figure out like. Who's the real vents am. I gonna be my own man or my gonna blend. A bit of the stott lake had to figure out. Like what do i really believe. That makes sense that. I all kinds of things. Come to mind on pro. I'm a product like my dad. I got lucky to meeting fayza like she. She gave me a a shock. You know And i think. I kind of saw that opportunity. She didn't wanna know anything about. And i don't have crazy pass or anything but you know my late twenties. We went out more often than not and you know. We went to the bars more often and i ended the bottles and stuff. But i want to say one thing to to brandt to france Franks brand or is focused. I as a father. I failed vince. I try i. I was very much into. My dad was a mechanic so he said john. You never take care of your cars if you always bring the car to me. When it's broken down is to wasted. Take carry a car. One is prevented the other is crisis. You always come to me in a crisis us you more as you wait till it all falls apart. All right and i think with vince. I took the preventive approach with both of my boys. Like if i do all these things. They won't get into pornography. It won't get into drugs. I think fear drove a lot of my parenting because of my background. And because my brother so vince probably had a battle with was less like every guy does but it could have been greater than i did make room for him to breathe like he he really struggled probably in that area to all. My boys probably did but my wife would always tell me. Don't lie to the boys about sexual purity be clear. The honest painfully honest still remember sitting in a car with him once reading a paragraph from the book called the sexual man. Because i really wanted him to understand that masturbation was normal for men. You know and yet in the state as a kid you know as revolving like don't put yourself in the whole of depression. Because but i'm just saying the the secrets that you you develop as a kid right and you start and if your parents are highly committed if your parents are highly committed you can't. You can't breathe. Because i i should have known that i taught in a christian school and the kid who's shouted allowed us that his parents ricardo. There was a private school shouted aloud about porn. All this stuff and yet their son had biggest battle with the kid. The i don't know if the kids alive today you may like i just no. I know a guy who hung himself because he couldn't talk about it in church. He hung himself was he was an older. He was in his thirty s. That's not old. But he was that fearful so i i don't wanna go ahead of our conversation. No no you're you're i think you're right on right on target you. I think this is something that maybe we can kind of even narrowing even even deeper into because you know because of the work that you in their coaching and everything. So i think there's guidance there is a right and wrong way to live life absolutely mostly all. You just gotta live your own truth. No if your truth is stupid you shouldn't live your truth. A lot of people's truth doesn't help so you know. We were raised based on timeless principles of the bible and and where we're getting our wisdom from his aac biblical truth right and you know. I grew up on books. Like this. like every man's battle you'll everyman's guide to winning the war on sexual temptation one victory at a time. So you know my dad equipped us. I don't think he was so much. Maybe was trying to protect dust. But i think what he did a great job of you know in his defense as he prepared us. He truly prepared us. Thank you gave us tools. He put us in environments where i had opportunities to talk to other guys about. You know you'll bouncing your eyes. I was learning these techniques. Like when you see a beautiful woman. The first look is innocent. It's the second look. That's a sin and i'm like okay. That's great. that's a great tool like like. I can't control when i go to the gym. If a girl's gonna wear but then you like what you can control what time you go out and if you know beautiful girl walks right in front of you that you can. You can acknowledge but then it's the second look gets you into trouble so take okay. That's where we have to start to fight and that's when you start having these tools like so it wasn't stuff we just talked about very practical And i think my dad's really kept it real. I mean we've had all sorts of like Like crazy things remember. When did we should put this one on the podcast. Frank when we slow speed. Dial internet and i stole my not still i. I took my parents credit cards and started ordering porn on his credit card. I don't remember how old i was. But i was trying to get your teenager. Young gonna got found elliott on the credit card. I don't know how has shown up on the billing. Stand car so thorough. Look like what are you ordering and then you gotta figure which one of the three boys initially next the story. I was afraid. I wasn't sure if he was gonna share i. I wasn't gonna share it if he didn't bring it up. But i think i had a choice enameled especially sports that you have a choice when your kid fails in his own is your parenting really shows up. When they succeed. It's easy to be a great dad. Cheered them on way to go sign reward them when they fail in their own eyes. And maybe if you've been athletic to in your eyes that's when the being a dad comes through and then the other test of the dad is what do you do when you find out. Your son is struggling with an area that you're struggling with but now it's on your kid while after. I flipped out on him. We went down to the basement. He probably doesn't remember this an awkward we said to him. Why don't we read through psalm. Fifty one and it was a solemn of confession. David saul where he prayed that song after committed adultery with pets sheba. Now this one's an at that level this was a kid's struggling with his just learning about south curious that was not more than that And we prayed. And i don't think he wept but i did and i and i just thought he's gotta get it out of him and this is this. Is the windows. Been open and you know. My wife had a prayer that the kids would be for innocent As long as possible like with the world was like even and i pray for my grandkids that lord cheetham innocent as long as possible is it reads world out there and You can't protect them forever. They can't stay in the garden of eden forever. I think you've been that. I got the job. Jumble video and a jumbo video right so jumbo video you know they. They had an adult section but they had the thriller section and they had the comedy section. So i was the guy who put away the movies. I love his job. Because i got ten free movie. Rentals and i was the guy that made the popcorn and a half to carry these Big bags of kernels over my shoulder and it made my arms look a little bigger. There was an sweep the floor and it was jumble video on thursday friday saturday night it was ray impact. It was the place to be to go. Get your videos but you know it started up that window more to like you know if i could if i was always curious. If people brought back the thriller rental sometimes there were scantily clad women on the covers or the back then. I could get a little peek. And then you know so. It opens up this window of curiosity. And i think i don't know if this is what i knew. I knew what was happening. Was i was like there. Was this massive rush of adrenaline. There was this thrill there was this excitement but there was also this fear. There's also some guilt. And i'm like where's this all coming from. I used to sneak movies out the back of the Of the place. Because you know the back office i would put some of them now. Put them in a bag. And i would. I'd buy comb with them to watch some of these they weren't they. Were just like you know you. Just you know fast forward it just to get a glimpse of a girl may be going into a shower. I with other clothes on. And i would ride home. And my like. My heart rate was probably pumping faster than like one hundred eighty. Beats a minute and there was just this drennan thrill so what i started to see was all this stuff. My dad was warning me about was like it. Could you know it's gonna lead to this. It's going to lead to this. I started to like actually wrestle. I think what my dad when when your parents give you like like. Hey this is right. this is wrong. You actually start to force yourself to fight and wrestle earlier on then when it's too late you know. Imagine being grown up odds normal to do that. Hey just try not to do it too much. Just keep the door closed in. Just it's like non like i'm not. I'm i'm doing something that's wrong so i think i started to address these fights earlier on life before they kind of accumulated to a point where it was like. Oh man i've got this addiction. How do i break it. There was a constant wrestling ever since day. One zero makes sense. Like even then. I wasn't like this is normal like people say. Oh it's okay go you know. My kids are gonna have sex anyways. I might as well. Just tell them the tab wear a condom like that's your parenting well. Let's let's let's take it right there. And and and flip dom story story time within i think will we'll get back to that but you know venture your father to a to a boy to a to a boy that will grow into a teenager will become a young man and then you know. Obviously you don't explain fast exactly so knowing lose shared some of the things that perhaps he didn't do correctly and as far as those conversations with you in in my own a major How if you hadn't stopped sure have thought about this but in preparation for that time comes when when you begin to have these conversations. How are you going to navigate Definitely what advice perhaps can either one of you have to you know men out there that are that her father's with young boys men that are fathers teenagers or even Teenager that is growing up without a father like we speak directly to right now. I like to vince. Let me say once. They just wanna preventative here. I think what my thoughts thought patterns. I was obsessed. I was not got a couple of things for it pulls down from the shelf to two ideas. Like i had a pull my memorized. When the guys were small com. My little boy's dead. And i memorized this this poem here. My little boy's dead at the last stage of says i may never come to glory may never gather goal amendment. Count me as a failure. When my business life is full if my little boy can just grow up godly then. I'll be glad to have been successful as my little boy's debt now whether that's try to wrong. That was my obsession. I didn't have the obsession. Napoleon hill had thick enroll rich. He said his that bottom line of that book is as obsessions become. Tomorrow's realities. More than anything and against probably. Because of an absence. In my life i wanted to have a marriage that was worth That was worth the trouble like that. My marriage matter and and that my my kids would not. I would not be the reason. My kids walked away from god. They walked away from god. It wasn't because dad was an asshole or a bad example but they walked away because it intellectually or morally just said you know what. I'm a dad. It's not your fault. Not mom's fall. I didn't want to be the one who i was the reason for their defection. Now there's a great verse and in tim. Keller who is one of the best bible teachers out there in manhattan. He quotes proverbs. nineteen eighteen. You want to write this down for your people. This plan your son while there is whole and otherwise will ruin their lives and the he says the word discipline there is not punished. It's coach it's the closest where we have today's coach though. I was in the disciplined slash punish not disciplined slash coach. I think and i think midst talked about some tips. I think later on you begin to realize. I need okay. This you're playing the game of life Here's a here's a thought on how to do that better. Or how the tweet like i. i didn't take. I just came in like a ten. Like came in like a tank and tried to force change on them. And i think what i ended up doing was they would retreat and each of my boys is different. This is the one who gives me the biggest past. He forgives me. The most my other two boys are more Analytical like they they You did hurt me. Death like that really did her. And they're vince protects me. I don't know why he has. He's got but i was. We were the hardest on him. Truth be told we were the heart but because he made the first four but discipline your son while there's folks he there's still hope when they're in the house there's hope and you can coach him in god forbid if that's why it's important to spend as much too i mean i just see guys obsessed with their success at work whether it's online or offline brick and mortar and if they could just take a percentage of that an invested in their kids when you see your kids struggling like i did. My dad didn't know better. But i needed help. I needed help. And they didn't know how i suffered in. If your kid is suffering academically for example suffer schoolwise has hard on kids and if they're suffering because you're not there that's even more painful if they're suffering because they've got they got something in their dna that just the struggling. Whatever that's another thing you get help but if they're struggling because you're not present. That's that's that's bad to me. That's wrong so i. I felt that deeply that. I don't want my kids. The suffer because of malpractice is apparent. I wanna do my best. Not just to give them presence but as they say to be present and engaged so i hope that helps them. Understand like yeah. Rules without relationship leaked the rebellion. And so i did invest in the relationship and the other plaque i have is fifty phrases to encourage your children live off like i just. I memorize these little things the this because i needed help i had. I wasn't parented that. Well so i i kinda did my homework. There's no excuse today to be a lousy parent or that. There's no excuse if we're lousy is because we've made other choices. So that's where i'm at on that sawyer to be a bit amped up about that. But that's not passion. Passion is what we're all about here you can't you can't tell Got this this. This is amazing for those able to find my little debt. My little boy stats poems. I'm actually going to leak down there in the show notes for you guys that occurs in in what that has to say. I think you know where where your dad was. Speaking about. you know being being president father. I think this is something that you've really brought in to to your business. I mean I feel i see like my dad is set such a high bar. Like i'm already starting to see my deficiencies like you know. It's it's like. I've got this business and my dad you know he. He was fully immersed in his work. Like you know. He was always in demand he always had small groups. People always wanted to be around him. Like so i get it like his. You know we would look at his success differently because it was through the church compared to how many members you have you know how much you guys bringing in per month But the the drive to be successful within the christian ministry of the christian world is just as absolutely. I'm -tations just it. That's all still there. So i think you know what what i really respect. My parents for like they truly. Did you know shift. Their time like dad came to all of our running races. You know he was the dad. We used to get ice. Used to get mad. I'm not mad by be like dad. You don't have to come to district ten like district. Parents don't come to that one. You can come to quash like come to offs all the dads all. The parents come to offset District ten is just like. It's just don't worry. I'm going to do wealth that one so it'd be behind the bushes like you know you wouldn't even tell us he's common because you know we get nervous or froze coming around the corner midway through the race. And he's in the bushes sake gov come on surge surge. I'm like dad. What are you doing here. Holy cow and it's kind of a joke. You know like vince. You know you you know. You're so lucky. My dad never came to any my races and and i get it. My dad became a father to a lot of the runners on our team like he go to events that i wasn't even racing at any be cheering people on so made it would be great for you to ask my dad's sake it. I don't know if it's a combination of his of his face and being no grown up in an italian foam and just loving people like we love people like my dad knows the reason. I was so close to my uncle. Bruno have a picture of him on my on a little thing with him Doing a shot of espresso together. I think we put a little flavor in that one might have made called a decoder catholic. Rectal you put a little sambuc anna. And i really enjoyed those experiences with other men. I think that my dad took it to another level where he is having these experiences with other men on the most vulnerable topics that men can talk about. You know the stuff we're talking about on this podcast right and talking about like not so much. What you're doing with your life and my dad taught me this you know he said you know how often you talk to your buddies about becoming right a case so so what. Are you guys doing this month. Day so working on projects going. Oh yeah yeah. It would be goals for next year. So you happy who you're becoming as a father like guys don't have these conversations like you know you me frankly for hanging out this will come up actually did come up when you and i were all hanging out. Dan rudy when we're in san diego. We sit down like real man conversation. And i think men want this conversation adad really show me like he helped me help. Probably prompt a lot of these conversations with other men. And i know a lot of guys like even our circle we hang out. They like. Vince is coming over. Is probably going to get us into conversation tonight about something other than just something superficial as so. I think my dad always. That's a gift that i'm definitely gonna pass along. I'll be the guy that prompts. You don't a good conversation out catch myself at a few holiday parties in just events. The past the past. Couple of weeks You know this is just been an incredible years journey that i've been on but being social environments you know years ago i was a guy dead center bar kind of leading party. You know drinks on. Who's drinks on shots. This and that this year now like it was all different like in the corner having a deep conversation. One on one about vision. Goals in legacy. I mean literally like at christmas holiday party with everybody. They're like we're just talking about the next five years what we're trying to create in in the world so with louis like you know were there were there were there man as you were growing and evolving as as a father that were speaking in into you or or wherever you kinda of getting some of your engine and man at some good. I will stay. I woke up about three o'clock. Not knowing where direction was gonna go today. And i was thinking of my favorite movies so right now i am retired but really retiring already. Got a number of instances guys lined up. They want they want to pay while they're already paying me to coach him. But it will wanna do more in the new year. But i was thinking. Who'd been my my movie heroes. Well i'm watching all six rockies again rocky got me through the seventies rock got me through the eighties rocky. Three and four guide me through the nineties. And of course the last two. But i've been i say iraqis been an archetype for me of a man if all man and then I think the patriot mel gibson's character in the patriot. I think of Gladiator of william wallace. Like all the men that i admire in. I'm maybe the odd guy. Out let go are all protectors their fighters there. They all have a team in common on wondering. Why am i drawn. These guys a guy. I must be sick. Like 'cause i see. I think i may be the wrong. I may be living in the wrong era. And i'm sure i'm not i. Just that's what i'm drawn to and my wife. I'm glad i married a woman who wants to be protected and wants to be loved not just in a sexual way but in a intimacy defined as a woman does not just you know like you know sexual intimacy but just emotionally and spiritually. I'm glad my wife doesn't try to be a man. You know like cheese a woman. I'm a man like we don't blur the distinctions over here and having said that why one son has done a couple of flicks on homosexual men in the world. Vince knows about the transgenders story with Yet like near people have grace. I think we are. I have my favorite book that i have. All my books is called. Families were grace's in place. Not we're control is in place but we're families were grace's in place when grace's in place there's room for growth solution I think i've had a lot of disillusionment with mentors. My my main mentor. Guy actually invited me to receive. Christ is on his third wife He's in thailand somewhere with this. He's seventy five and she's like looks like twenty two Some people go bazaars. I get older so i had to fight. I've had one might one of my best mentors can load is from seattle. He passed away. He never he. I mean everybody disappoint you but can stay. True to. His marriage is is sense to this day. All in their forties loved their dad. Dad i wanted to be that guy. My my original mentor kids. Wanting to do with him and yet he brought me to christ. God used him to bring me to christ and his bad example actually has helped me to have a stronger marriage and stronger. Try to be a better father anyways so sometimes it bad example can actually work for you. My best friend is a mantra to me. chad houses. Dad tom house chad probably right. Of course yeah. We had chat on the chat episode. Five or six he. He's one of the originals. Is it not so cool. How chad's that in. My dad are like best buddies and thinner secret tomen. I won't get off the phone without telling me john. We don't need. Kevin is although we went through a season where we both were other tonight. We kelly last album with that is just for listeners. And they rank may know but it's basically online service that you can register foreign. They help you patrol. You're you're what you're what you see. And what other people know that you see. And don't see that you guys you guys know here careless and you guys are familiar with that. We have a partnership with covenant. Is if it's something you're looking at exploring on a leak down there below. We have a coach. Superintendent will give you first month for silent. excellent okay. So but tom and i We tell each other last ten percent. I think as you get older your friends become fewer your real friends. If you start to see some of your friends fall off like their secret lives you start to see. The secret. Lives the description. You'll test what you did. In secret i will reveal publicly like related to david. What he did in secret was made known publicly. so that's that's a bit scary so But anyways tom and i we don't let get off the call you know we. We agreed each other with some vulgar terms and then we know that we still love each other. I won't use those terms here but then we just the next next half hour forty five minutes like just intense in depth in an. Oh by the way where. Where's your of your eyes been sweet. Where's your thought patterns been just just in doing that in just telling the last ten percent i got. I got i to have another good week. I know i'm gonna have a good week. Revealing your feelings is the beginning of healing. He conceals his. Transgression will not prosper. But he confesses in forsakes than will obtain mercy. Mercy comes when you confess forsake you want experience mercy and kill you actually put it out there. And you know the catholics. The orthodox churches that have confession. We're all wrong the like today. protestants say. Well we don't have to confess. We go to god. I said really. When was the last time you went right to god with confession. Like a real. I'm a come from behind the bar. Not guilty and sorry. I was wrong. Forgive me lord like when. When was the last time we were up in arms about are are are not just in our sin affects us. It affects the people around us in erodes. The trust My wife in the early years. When i was younger than vince i had maestros. We didn't have online. We had late night baby blue movies and on occasion. I you know. I'd be so stressed out for work. I might wanna have a peak and i would never she would never come and say what are you watching. She just trusted me. Her trust made me want to be a better person. I we didn't have all these rules like if you do that. I'm going to do this in response. Like when there's rules without relationship lead value. And i just see a lot of people having this fit kind of accountability that results in people hiding rather than revealing so environments of grace where people can tell the last ten percent and then move on. That's the your paradigm no one hundred percent. That is so powerful. I'm looking over events shoulder right here at the words level up and you know i have odyssey things that i you know. I i just coaching calls with you. Know i serve as the accountability to them but hearing needs speak about when you get off the phone with with ken chats dad. It's like the last bit it's like where your eyes been. I'm thinking who who is holding me accountable who had in those conversations with as the coach as a leader like ooh am. I going to for that accountability. To make sure when i show up to my guys that they're getting the ultimate you'll best version of a measly. Just challenge me there to kind of look at my circle. No i have. I have tons of men that that speaking on a consistent basis from dancing. And you guys know josh extremely well you know we talk on a daily basis but just hearing you speak that at at your age at your local success i mean with with the family and the grandkids and and everything that doing that you still have that checked wing in your life is just so incredible to hear it because i think no matter where we get we need to ensure that we always have these which always have some some level of accountability so a man has to talk with other men about his body. We gotta be more. We're gonna talk bodies the temple of the holy spirit and it's easy movement into guilt on that. But i just think we just need to have rock conversations about what's going on with your body. What what are your needs. Like one of the guys actually guys know joel. Marianne joel asked me to coach a friend of his years ago and One of the topics that came up was born. So i asked. My jewish coach didn't share my world view. Necessarily my bible world called me the bible guy the clergy guy. I said ken will help my my buddy. I wanted to know how a non christian would help a christian sorta or he said. Well i can see why you would want to do it this way loose. But why don't you just ask your client this question. So you're using porn what relationship you want to continue to have with porn in the guys that back. I want to have any relationship with porn. Okay so what the fact that you're using it though. What need is it meeting. And so that opened up a whole world of of Opportunity and change for him and actually that guy today still married to the same gal. They both survived the fares early in their thirty s. They went on to have a great marriage now. This guy's an owner of a of a nice franchise like life has gotten better because we took a different approach that didn't cause into high because to open up and reveal and then get some revealing. Your feelings is the beginning of healing as they say. An na products and honest revealing your feel great agreed concept. So i know that's my thought on that. Like ask people go deeper right even the whole idea of lasting like jesus didn't say don't look at a woman that's impossible. Just look deeper outer look at her deep braschi. Someone's daughter she someone's mother maybe she's summer sisters someone's wife like look at don't you can't look at a woman. Jesus didn't say on a woman he said. Don't look on a woman. The less look a woman to dress her down like Defraud yep that's those. Are the things that you start understand. I remember a athletes in action. They taught us to look at a woman through. Jesus is oh. Wow that if i was jesus how jesus like if jesus had my eyes how would he be looking at her and those things like. Oh my gosh it. You can win this battle. I think what's really encouraging people listening with all this stuff. We're talking about all these battles. They've already been one. They've already been one. We just have to. We have to go through our process but It's it's really refreshing to hear. My dad share all this because i think is art kind of think that they think that they're suffering alone They think they're suffering in silence. There's nobody else going through this. And then there's all the shame and guilt than there's embarrassment and then you know deep down people know this isn't right because it's not be silly here and but then you've got society that laughs at these topics like this is normal but no. Nah what's name one thing. That's normal about this your defrauding woman every time you do this You let other people do what you're doing with these women with your wife's yeah really come on what he smoking. So but then yeah but then you have so you have to the messages. A wake him up but then yeah you need the safe spot for them to say okay. So how do i do how do i. How do i get through this because this is a lifelong battle. Even the fact that my dad's talking about this does this this. Go away when you get a little older. Listen can gives intensifies really all. I thought like when i got married. And after i turned forty and my hormones. Drop a bit. it's just like it's an easy one to manage this. I thought this was just something. I have to work on. In my twenties thirties. It gets worse. it doesn't get better. I got an ad. And i've i've i've i've never been married but i would assume you know a intermarriage with most people children responsibilities and stress and things like that. The thought of a release through porn Probably at that point just seems like an even better idea than somebody that single. So yeah. it's it's gonna continue to get harder as as your life continues to get hard. Because you more zeke fizzle. Her needs a woman. Nature needs met in a different way. Right you know. A guy will It'll talk for ten minutes to get you know sex for an our but a woman needs An hour of talking to do ten minutes a sex sick. It's the Dynamic wasn't setup optimally so both parties have to work towards each other but with a different languages. Different love languages. So that's hard especially when you know right now. The stage. I'm in three young kids. You're exhausted Shared this with my dad. And i know. He was really encouraged shared this with all of our mastermind members but this past summer flooding. I both got some coaching. Some therapy around Just the the whole intent of the calls were to figure out our positive desired end states We did them separately as individuals and then we did them as a couple and One of the things that we we want is to build a marriage together. We want to build a relationship together. So that's been like a good anchor to police towards like one year when you're fighting but what typically pushes. The couples apart marriages is fatigue both exhausted. I'm working all day. She's working all day in. There's no room for rest and if there's no room for rest there's no room for intimacy if you're both tired all the time. They just want to go to bed. Sit on the couch. You think you're connecting. But you're just watching season. Four vikings with another bottle of wine. That's not connecting. So you really have to work. I think that's you know maybe to bring it back to a one of the top traits. My dad gave us. He really demonstrated that a relationship requires work like ten times. More work than your even. You can imagine it's hard and it's constant like oh my gosh You have to constantly think of somebody else's needs if you want a marriage that goes beyond surviving and it's possible that's the good news. All this is possible if you make it a priority. I think that's what my dad's a great job of his. His marriage is a priority. His walk with christ is a priority. And you see that through his decisions you see that through his relationships you see that with impact he's had with you know hundreds and thousands of men over the years disciple siping. So you know like you said right at the start. I you make your choices and then choices make you. So all of these battled all these battles can be one. I think what. I respect most about my dad is. He's figured out which battles are worth fighting which battles have to be one. I think frank. That's why you've got your podcast. You're too. I feel like this is the journey. You're on and Where you're feeling really call to your scene which battles actually matter i. Yeah i think you're right. I think you know we're at the end of the year and one of the things that i urge men to do. Every year at this time of year is pick a bible plan. This is so painfully practical. Like whether it's the one year bible blog or the daily walk which is really the daily sprint or Even get you know. I whatever your form. Is you know all these things are scaffolds. You need the scaffolding to get to the essence again. Blanchard women manager talks about before you go into mentoring with stone. Going to make sure you have essence and the essence of an is a relationship with god and the scaffolding. His i gotta read this book. I got a meditate on this book. A gonna hear it read it study. It memorize it meditate on it. Like the group. I have on friday mornings at mark evans runs. He's one of instance clients korbi's in coach. Corby waters is in it coburg. Corby doesn't miss his head. Coach doesn't miss. I've got a bunch of aspiring on millennial online guys like you in there and like you guys and we're going into the word. I got one of the guys. He's working through a a two year. He's going this discipleship essentials. I say let's stop the bullshit. Let's stop skating with your christian life. And let's dig a little deeper. So he's going through discipleship essentials. What is the church. What is justification like. We're doing some work. We're doing some holy sweat equity and just kind of tired of the 'macdonaldisation of discipleship in make mcdonald's versions of disciples. And i mean this painful talked about north painful for his because he actually introduced me to him this summer. Carl lance misfold. Me says dan. I want you to meet somebody. It's not just karl or carl. Carl recover. He's got money to get therapy and help. But the damage is done by your kids. Some in a cage will forgive. The wife will forgive. I hope but you've got not just him. You got that other guy on The guy from liberty university of two nephews go to law school liberty Jerry falwell junior in all his wife. He got his wife involved with the pool. Guy like this is coming from the most conservative not the liberal branches of the christian church but the most conservative places. We have this genius stuff coming out which you couldn't even you couldn't even you couldn't come up with it or whoever these those are something wrong with the way were like. Karl grew up at liberty university. He grew up in the most conservative. Church world you can imagine and and it just shows you when we put competence in charisma ahead of character. Were setting people up for a fall when your biggest thing is seven hundred thousand lights on instagram. And you're showing pictures of yourself with your six pack adds. It's one thing for you. Invinci- do it like you. Guys aren't in the pastoral space. The people even non christians. Joe rogan called him out. Joe rogan said. What is this guy doing. I yeah did you have on your show or jovan. I've heard that. I wish i had you on the show But i episode. We're talking about that. And i was Another friend of ours at that news. Carl very well. Dan dan long. I get to see almost on a daily basis. we're very close very intimate conversations. And this is that east kind of struggle with on a personal level because it is relationship with car when i brought that back up and it's like joe know joe for solvent because i believe that episode job was like a year and a half two years ago like you almost saw the writing on the wall like this guy needs to kind of check. What he's putting out into the world is it really aligned with with what he's saying all into another field or something right like i didn't want to get off on that but i think there's didn't say when he put charisma what else. What are the things you say when you put When you elevate this made that up with your competence charisma before character. Christmas competence before the competent cards. It's charisma great. If you come by them naturally what competent. You gotta develop charisma you. Can you know jabs at up but at the end of the day who you are who you are bits. Bits is taking notes for his monday. Morning social media. We're gonna see that on the iga. Late mrs actually is actually. I mean a good representation of our relationship when my dad talks. Take notes like from as i got a patient happen. I need triple pages of monsters. Nationalist saying much here is i just. I'm just listening. I'm like don't have a whole lot to say here today. I do need to say this to be. Make sure guys. There's a few things i do want to say to finish. Yeah you go there. I know all my boys are are getting help now in their thirties and forties. They're all getting some outside help for their personal life in their marriages. And i have to believe. And i'm proud of them for a year or two ago i would have been like embarrassed that my kids have to seek out help but i can't if you grow up in a family like ours were achievements a big deal. You do some damage. you don't mean to. You don't mean to. You think you're doing you're doing your best. But i'm so glad that they've reached out for help like vincent-flagged with this performance coach therapist My other boys with some some things that they're working through and and you know what. I'm so so proud of them because i wanted to finish. Well i want them to finish his damn race. It's a long race not a sprint. It's one the march wasted. Life is one darn thing after another. And so by the grace of god by some by hunger for god and his word in his presence. There's there's a way forward and some good community intentional community or you had a couple of things you wanted to get wrapped up. I think i think we should also just like inject a bit of the tension in our relationship to be interested in like so. What are you guys so you know. My dad tallies out there. That are so scared. They don't put their kids in swimming lessons. That's not the type of fear of my parents. You know they skydive whitewater raft. We've done all sorts of fun. Adventures ride bikes down. You know hills in collingwood at sixty kilometers an hour. We've maybe even faster so maybe sixty miles an hour anyways letting me go ride for four hours in the middle of nowhere like my parents have given us room to move So i want to be clear like it's the fear. There's this fear though like maybe we. Can you know this is what i was trying to push my dad dad. It's gonna be okay. It's gonna be okay. But he's always kind of monitoring the pace. I don't have the exact language but he's just worried about like how much i put out there. And and actually you know. I remember when. I talk about parenting. I talk marriages. They just been be careful like like like why not. They need to hear this. But i starting to see like maybe i should just focus on getting this right in the house because with social media. You know as a bishop. Td jakes says. A lot of people use language to cover up lifestyle and that really spoke to me. Because i'm guilty of that. I know what to say. Because i have a father like my dad i can. I can put posts up on my social media. The come from the wisdom of sixty seven year old not from the experience of forty one year old and i need to be careful that i'm not projecting stuff out there because it gets a lot of likes his big all mad vince. That's so good. That's so good. So i think one of the things. My dad's kind of aware of an i'm aware of like were. There's tension that we wanna like we want. We have to be careful on his aac. We don't project what we're not living out in the home and my dad always gave us a simple saying if it's not working inside the home don't export it your face. You're filling export don't export. What's not working inside the home. And i think that's probably been the biggest gift my parents have given us. It's like i am proud of my relationship. Like i truly am like i'm like like flyby night like she's a firecracker she's a type one you know personality to take ten years just to start figuring out how to navigate things and we're just starting to find a good stride but i'm like i'm aware that i have to. I have so much work to do inside the home. I've got to figure out. I gotta put all the stuff. I've been told by my therapist and a practice arrests more so i can be more present with the kids so i think when you've got a combination of like the model bar to shoot for and then when you stop freaking projecting stuff that's not actually working in your house and you actually just start to apply the stuff and you commit to doing the work and make it a priority. You can get this right so daddy is that pretty spot on like. I think you're scared still like i'm scared to. I think i always tell but dad. This is the risk of me putting myself out there. I m helping a lot of people. I just have to be careful. That i don't put stuff. That's actually not happening. My personal life because i know what to say. I know what to say. Because i look at his life. And i've got the access to the wisdom of all these guys who are like twenty thirty years down the road So i- risk while vince. You're preaching all this stuff. This look what just happened to you. So that's probably my personal fear to how you phrase that it could get exposed. You're like this guy was a fraud right. There was a couple. I won't name them this past summer. That the big marriage experts and massive massive followings and then they had a big divorce and and like jeeze and they're like the reason they separated a believe what i gather from their social media posts was they were both trying to they were. They both had their own. They're both getting in the way of each other's personal goals. I'm like so the marriage wasn't priority. Mike the marriage wasn't a priority. They both had dreams and ambitions at couldn't achieve because of the other person so they've made sense to separate on like what a relate. So i wanna say to. Frank frank frank. You're doing a is frank right. Of course. I know you've got your good name rank and rich rich too. It be like it wouldn't be the first one either. Yeah no that was going to say. Vince is spot on there. I want to say to you. You're doing good work. Rather like just give give advice to guys like us guys. We're trying to do a good work but we are like we're not. We're not through the mud lake. We're on like mile one of twenty six mile race. Give advice to younger guys who are trying to reach you know and share positive stuff but like what do i know about marriage i know. Just be aware as your your roots and wings roots and wings like you know like bill mixture. Vince often not mocks me. 'cause i say in doesn't mock me because he's put me in front of a lot of groups mastermind stock about personal foundations. But i've never mocked you know not mock me just said dad some people have foundations and they never do anything with that. Was all people hired behind foundation or go to build my founded nation. Never do with them. Saying here's a foundation right issue. He's recycling pain. Like i've heard your story a little bit like your reset your wounded warrior. But you're wounded but you're warrior. You're still in the game. You know light. Life is about mango through four stages. And this is what i want to say to the guys here is. There's the stage of the warriors said. Save trying to figure out what you're fighting for and then you go through the season you guys are in right now. You're kings your leaders of something like you're leading a movement towards holiness and purity in whatever word you use. I don't know what they all are right. But you know. Vince is a king and his domain He's integrating his business in his faith in his family. Trying to put it all together and then you go through the season. I think i'm in is the sage or the mystic. The person who's i'm not. I'm not to compete with you guys. I don't care. But how many likes i have or don't have You know we all are tempted in flirt with that shit but but at the same time. i i wanna be the wise person i wanted to be the person who you guys can all talk over each other but i'm gonna just sit back and when it's done let me i can speak lease. And then the last one is deliver. The season of were when people are with you just feel so loved and safe. And you're there in a harbor with you and i think those are for those come from carl young but but i think is a christian of christendom like figure out what you're fighting's like what are you fighting for. What do you want to be the cause of years. A great question see went how you define that will determine your motivation to live a holy life to live a life that honors. God what do you want to be. The causes And then and then in your king stage this applies to women to element is leading. But we're trying to man you know. What are you leading. what are you the king what. What's your don't mean what it. What has god given you and his worth sacrificing or that like. You guys are both sacrificing like your. You know frank the world at pray for you. Actually because we start talking about men's sexuality you are a target buddy. You are a target of the of the u greatest strength can become your greatest weakness in all and soul man. You're right you need to make sure you have mentors around you or a mentor. The not to be a lot and then and get to the place where you become a sage. A wise man you know. and then Oh lord willing which all evolved to become not evolve of become the the lover the true lover of people souls. You know and see people really them. Yeah that's that's. I appreciate you both in in and lucius. Don't don't think that those those words of you know praise and encouragement like they don't they don't go unnoticed. I really do appreciate You just real quick. I'll share you know you guys. You guys know the version but you just speaking on kind of the the vulnerability in the openness. You know for me for the longest time fitness was started. Yeah wanted to help people fitness. But i truly wanted to inspire people to live a better life to become a better version of themselves and i think one of the the awakening moments for me was looking at the content. That is putting out. When when i came to the realization that was not aligned with how i was living it was one of these moments like i was looking into mere light. You can't continue lying to the world can't continue telling people to become the best version or become a better version or growing evolve into let you were met for when you're living with a secret in that in of itself you know that conversation looking myself in the mere having that talked with me was was truly the genesis of this podcast which is now grown in evolved into completely different direction for y'all nine business and now has become my life's work of coaching men struggling with the same issue that show with for for twenty years. But i would've never gone to point if i if i wasn't hard. Not harsh enough. But if i didn't have a conversation with our is what you're saying to the world truly aligned with how you're live so vince thank you. Thank you for sharing this this this this hour plus has has blown via the guy to ask a single question. It was just a just a flow of conversations. I appreciate you both so much for your time in sharing your wisdom and your thoughts here as we as we wrap it up. i think I think maybe there's there's a chance for squeeze in one last question we talked about. You know what. What can you guys do to prepare themselves. Know for Freddie coming a father or or for marriage you both mentioned setting foundation. Is there something on. Any guys are working together a project. That's that's going to be really unique. Can you share you. Know perhaps a little bit about some of the foundational principles with the program in in course that you are don't want share it all but if there's anything you can share about what we can expect with this no building foundation but you guys are working together. Lower filming something. Some oral actually signed monday morning Yeah we're thinking along the lines of personal disciplines you know what are the personal disciplines to level up in your home life anura your business life you know in all areas of your life so there's a lot of a lot of them that are there. I think we got ten or twelve things. But i think what people can take aways to be intentional. Like my dad said it at the start. Like if you business guys just put five percent into your like a parenting book or reading a relationship book like if you just five percent of the effort you put into your workouts into your business like you'd have you'd have a great relate. Your marriage would be amazing. Your spiritual life would be amazing. What's thing my dad's just said like is just important. Like what is this important. You have to decide like you really have to decide. Are you gonna make this faith your own or is this just going to be cool stuff that you used to get ahead in life by you know you can package this stuff up and monetize it in that but yeah you will get found out and i think that's what i've had an example of seen like you'll get show you will get exposed one day. You have to do the work. So i would just encourage people to keep like make time for like you know everything that we've already said like this is a marathon is a long race so if it's a long race how do you prepare for like yet. It can't just be business. business business. frank we gotta talk more by. We got a set time each week for bible study. We got to have your church every sunday. We have to have you have to build your life with with parameters margins non-negotiables and you've got to focus on those things first sunday so you had to focus on all the big rocks and be intentional because again i think the encouraging word here is that you can learn all this with my dad figured this out. If i've got a few things going you can figure this. Oh i'll give you a give you a little thin bench. That's my final thing. It just go to jail fits in with vince. Them stands for. What is the vision you hold for yourself. Vision is a picture of a preferred future that gives me energy and passion today. So if your vision is in vivid like what's your vision for your personal life like my mantra is aligning people souls roles and goals. See that motivates me by can help you align your soul with your roles in your goals we got. We got a winning combination. That sounds cute but it steers me. That's my vision. Help men become mature in. Christ what's my intention you So vision you gotta have a clear picture. Then you needed attention towards that and then you need a method so i was saying earlier. I think one thing that guys could do. If you don't have the resources reach out the frank like he probably has an old trafford stuff like you start reading scriptures. If you don't know where to start reach out to someone help there's no shortness. No telling where to start that we read proverbs. Tell you know. Pick up your bible today. She no we didn't young guys figure. Men bible study on friday mornings. We went to the proper every week. We did one chapter week. Yes well today's i'll give you guys a simple one that you know. My dad gave me if i fall off. This is how i get back on track. Axel what is it today. Today's december the nineteenth You know in this drops. Probably december twenty first read proverbs. Twenty one today. Tom reade Twenty two edited does. He started the wisest wisest man of all time. Just read what he had to say about wisdom. I don't think there's anybody listening here who doesn't want more wisdom such as read one chapter a day and that's a great place and then pray about what you re. I would encourage everybody to really get into going to give you a passage of scripture. That i want you to read on your own. I creating has chapter nine. Nineteen to twenty seven hall uses the word win about eight times. He wants you to have a winners theology. You know he says. Even though i'm from all men. I've made myself a slave might win the more paul succeed. He wants the win at his task in his vision but he says don't you realize that in a race everyone runs but only one person gets their prize. Run to win. All athletes are disciplined in their training. They knew to win prizes. It will fade away but we do it for an eternal prize. So i run with purpose in every step. I am not just boxing. I discipline my body like an athlete training. Do it whether it should you not what it wants to do. Otherwise i fear that after preaching to others. I myself might be disqualified. That's the foundation. Like you wanna win. Paul says you wanna win. Make sure the core is right. Get the core working and then you can have all kinds of you know. That's the key to me. That's that's my life passage right there. You wanna have. You can have a losers theology which is based on a lot of smoke or you can have a winners theology. That says i can do. All things in christ strengthens me so But i think you gotta do a personal inventory. You gotta do it personal south assessment. Where am i. Where do i wanna go. And how badly do. I want to get there. And who's going to help me get there. It's it's not a quick fix years to three. You know. I think you have to really think deeply about this. How badly do i wanna know. God and experience him and I think that's where he where begins Actually didn't say this. But when it says don't less than a woman the versus before save lesser those who hunger and thirst for righteousness for they shall see god. So you can't the way. The the relative that solution to dealing with our lust issue is a relationship with christ. If you don't hunger thirst for the lord then you are vulnerable. You know what i mean. David was passionate for god when he was also passionate for women he just turned that passion in the right direction. We have what we called book assam's so feel like we could open up a couple more podcasts episodes right now yeah we could week week week. We could continue in. I mean if if there was going to be a perfect place to end this today. I think i think that might drop. Bright area is it had a series of questions. But you know truthfully i know we i. We covered it. We covered it all. I always have one last did. It's what is the definition of superman live. I don't think we really need to cover that. Because in that one corinthians nine thousand nine hundred twenty seven establishing your personal foundation of itself You know what would be the essence of what we were trying to get across so just so appreciative for both of you obviously bench. You know we're gonna we're gonna plug your your idea your youtube anything else for for the audience. Odyssey for you guys. That are curious about some my business up. I mean vince is the guy fits is responsible for getting me on my back in two thousand seventeen and he will be responsible for what we do he he starts when i say responsible but He will play a massive role in help building. What will become what we rebuilt recovery next year in twenty twenty one so for those of you guys. That are curious about the fitness side. Yellen business stuff. Applaud bentsen's information down in the show notes. Loops i know you mentioned Doing opened up. Some coaching is something that. If you're curious can aid can reach you. Contact you reach reach me through events however the events vince finals. People my way. I've got my own network but vince. Since people my way knows the type of person that i find. I won't coach if you're not coaching bull. So vince knows all fire people before they hire me god in god yes so for you guys had her you know that are curious about about what coach coach lou had to say. Here will plug. Vince is information. If you have more question about that rejected. Vincent has team. It'll get you connected but presents you both for making time on a super early saturday morning guys you you heard it all here. I mean questions on building herself as a father. What what you can do with your kids in really molding evolving importance of of love your wife and serving you know serving your partner It was just tremendous guys. Make sure if you didn't listen to it with a pen and paper comeback. Let's do it again. But we for giving us your ear today for vince and loose del monte frank. Rich guys next week thank you.

vince Vince vince del monte toronto Luchino del vince del luchino lucky luke luciano del chris party youtube Monte william lying mckenzie Bruno university of went Wanna vincent agra falls me inc Peter p cooney lee mom
TCF Ep. 469 - Sarah Marie Rooney & Sasha Dylan Bell

The Candid Frame

1:11:34 hr | 2 years ago

TCF Ep. 469 - Sarah Marie Rooney & Sasha Dylan Bell

"I'm Ryan could Santa's from Vancouver Washington. Welcome to the candidate frame. Nelson Mandela said he learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not. He who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear. It's a sentiment that is invaluable not only when you're combating inequality and injustice. It's also true when your personal dreams and aspirated come up against insecurity self down in fear. It was this shared awareness of the role of fear in their creative. Lives that brought together photographers. Sara Marie ruining and session, Dylan bell to collaborate on a series of conceptual portraits. They called fear of dreaming though. The each had achieved success in their respective creative. Careers, Sarah and musical theater and session in film, they each found themselves. Wrestling fear as they strive to express themselves through. Takefuji. I just fiend. I just started a six month job on something. And at the beginning, I had a week long meltdown, just in the company escaping and I was and that's not unusual. And that's that's, that's the plus is knowing that it's not unusual. And even though as sweating it, I was like just get through it just keep your head down just do what you do and trust that. It'll I've learnt that, though that's come over a long period of time when you when you're in a new medium, though, it's amplified social, and that was certainly part of the decision to do it. It was like, all right. Let's just do it. Let's just do it. Like, you know, get in there and, and Feis this stuff. There were culminated, not only in a limited run book, but a pop up interactive exhibition, which invited people to write down their own fears as part of the installation. It resulted in an intimate experience of not only the photographs, but the very feelings that inspired them. Many people wrote about fear of not having enough. If money to survive, really heavy stuff in. Not only it didn't stop there. People actually talked about it people on the night. You know, we're all dressed up in like a hype pipe and people were really talking to me about fear, like what they were afraid of and thinking me and thinking, Sasha for having this opportunity to like express themselves. Somebody said that they had never ever ever said what they were truly afraid of and they did it on the night. We'll talk to soon sash about the unique collaboration and how they survived and thrived after their own worst creative moments this is about necks and welcome back to the candidate for him. So thanks for coming down coming up. Thank you for having us. Your lawn drive from the. All of three months in them. I'm totally local. Now. I don't know if that's the thing actually, maybe. Now the Deena. Here. I don't know if I if it is the L Dana, and we hope is that up in this, and we live in LA LA LA. Please down with the guys because I, I didn't get to go to your opening but I did get to see a presentation in Pasadena, and I'd seen the work, but I was really struck by the presentation, especially because sort of the topic of fear, which is something I've talked about before on, on the show, but it was really kind of interesting for me to hear you guys sort of touch on it, in terms of was sort of the germ of the collaboration between the two of you somehow that sort of come about where did the discussion come begin that you guys thought you wanted to work together, but that you wanted to tackle this idea of fearing of dreaming, and I think that we both have this sense of the same fear, right? As artists and collaborators and working together. There is a sense of being afraid afraid of what's going to happen next to how you're going to move forward with your dreams. And so we sat down to. Either one day and said we want to do something more where we were street shooting at the time, working together having a great time fluidly working together. And we said, let's just we're both afraid of this. Right. I'm afraid of maybe lighting, or I'm afraid of this, like technical photography skills. Right. And we wanted to try something different. We wanted to push boundaries, and we started actually trying to just do something totally different in the class rations. So, so I'm gonna leave it over to you. Honestly. It was just a chance to work together and do something a bit more substantial and the second the idea of fi. Well, we mentioned this at the hope and show, there was this, this feeling as new photographers and a lot of ways, even though we'd been doing a little while for us. So we saw deer of doing something with substance, fit look frauds in a lotta ways, and this is something I can only speak for myself. I'm sure Sarah shares this felt like a fraud throughout my creative career. Do every job. Even now aside from photography every job and I had to keep reminding myself of this. So the idea of doing a project that just puts it out on Front Street texts. It head on and goes, all right? Where fried of this guy's and lock it. Oh, don't like it way. Putting it out there. And I don't think there was a sense that we would necessarily put it out there at the time. But as things as things progressed, you know, that was the natural natural white went and I think that the idea of this fear and facing that fear that was part of it. If I am on making sense. But the find sort of the fear, because one of the things is people think they understand what fear is. Everyone knows what it feels like. But both of you are going to attempt to create something together. So how each of you sort of experience fears, how it manifests in your body. And in your head is can be very, very different. So can you talk about how you sort of each came to understand how the other experience fear creatively? Interesting. That's a really interesting question. I mean, I'm sure about that answer to this. But for me it was a question of searching some of the feelings that I was going through. And finding a way to express that which is where the idea for both of us came through of having a danza having someone who could really express some of emotions physically bald gestures. Violent gestures. Gentle gestures. The idea of fear the idea of creativity and we trusted. I think that's I think that's. I think it's safe to say we just trusted that pre working collaboration up to that point was such that we could just on the day, just give and Tyke if. Yeah. I think that's probably the clearest way, I can think to, to, to give and Tyke and allow each other to explore with the dance kind of translating some of these emotions and then it'd be may shooting and then Sarah shooting, and sometimes we're shooting together, and when we went shooting with supporting each other. But I think for me, I knew when I had the shots that I needed, and I was I let it, it was like you'll ten right? I mean, we, it was a dance for us as photographers dancing together. I think we have a rhythm when we work together, then we have a dancer physically dancing, so it's easy to go around, but in order to communicate that fear, you know individually, but come up with a body of work. I think that's because it's partly a universal theme, right? As artists as people as human beings. We all experience fear this fear of thinking outside the box thinking bigger thinking pushing past going further, you know, taking risks and being afraid to fail. Being afraid to succeed as well. You know it's not just fear of failure. But sometimes it's fear of success. Because now you've got to show up you got to be there and you gotta have your game and you're going to be challenged in a different way. And then it's going to go to the next level, and so that's scary and exciting and exhilarating. So I think the sense of humanity that we all feel this helped us end up with a body of work that makes sense in at the same time. We also worked together on, we both come from film, and in theater backgrounds. Right. So we have a production, I think going on here. You know it's a production it's it's not just shots. We, we worked in movements, actually. So it was very musical. Music was a big part of our shoot dance physicality visceral, emotions were part of it. And we had certain shots that we wanted to take, of course, because we worked as a production, so we had set pieces and props and costume changes and make up changes hair changes. And so we, we each had certain things that we. Really wanted out of that in it was amazing to see how much preparation went into it. But then luck on the day and our, you know, just style fitting together what happened, you know, the magic happen when we started getting into the, the after, you know, looking into our pictures together, the project is a series of sequences, chapters, basically, sort of illustrating navigating through here. So tell me about how you guys came to wanting to Demore the whole process of experiencing moving through moving passion, Pash here. Well, for me, it was a way of putting someone has to weigh giving. It was like it was like getting through my own is by channeling them through. Another character was weived disconnecting a little bit like this character. We can see the birth of fear. And in the project, we, we say that we physically say that. And then we say the violence of fair and we say, you know, the twisted nature of fear, but as the as the project progresses that she kind of transforms more into her creativity and finding this flow. And we're very conscious of that, by the way, we wanted movement to change with, with that change. But the idea is, for me was at the end, it would be, you know, this idea of, yes, you got through. You got through, at least they stage of failing this year. Yeah. I mean, that's that was that was what it was for me. Yeah. I think for me it's a circle in it. Always comes back around fear, always. Is lurking behind my back. You know, there's the next thing, there's always the next thing. So it was a surprise to see in the pictures that we end the book with a picture called the end or the beginning, and it's she's gone through this whole transformation until light and seeing the light. And it's playful enjoy us. And we showed it at the open show in Pasadena couple of weeks ago when we got to the pictures of light. There was this enormous sigh. I don't know if you felt there was just this relief that filled up. I was so grateful to be out of the fear and into the light. But yet it comes around again, you know, so the last picture and in our series, as it stands is, she's got fear on her back. And I think that's something that I don't know that demarcation of movements and chapters. Looking at the at this as very clear points in your life. And it does it could be micro points in your life. You know it doesn't have to be a big project or a big event. It could just be something like your day. You know, you're, you're our your minute, you know that you have all of these stages in. It's a circle, and it comes back around again, and then you pull yourself back up in you shine and you succeed in, then there's the next thing, whether it's because you're choosing things that way or because circumstances, or because it's just how I guess the life cycle works. Maybe. What was interesting for me? One of the reasons that really inspired me to bring your John was that each of you in your in your lives have had successes in your respective to rears you, as a singer, and musical, theatre education and us editor director and writer and it was really interesting that you mentioned earlier about always feeling like a fraud and probably feeling fear throughout. But a lot of people when they look at your careers, they see what you've managed to accomplished and, and for me, the whole idea is kind of interesting that in VAR variety of different ways, you've achieved success that a lot of other people would admire, but that doesn't eliminate the possibility that fear will manifest itself when you get going to some other realm of creativity, and it's kind of interesting that it's like, you know, your credits aren't transferred. Mine, even uneven even the credits that we have are with. Absolutely. I just I just started a six month job on something. And at the beginning I had a week long meltdown. Just in the company, I was Cape ING, and I was and that's not unusual. And that's that's, that's the plus is knowing that it's not unusual. And even though as sweating it was like just get through it. Just keep your head down just do what you do and trust that. It'll, I've learned that, though, that's come over a long period of time when you when you're in a new medium, though, it's amplified for sure. And that was certainly hot of the decision to do it, it was, like, all right. Let's just do it. Let's just do it like, you know, get in there and, and Feis this stuff. It doesn't make a go. Why not for me, not for nothing you either now? I mean I is a singer in education, all of those things that you mentioned. Absolutely. And some I was more confident with in, but my personal singing on stage with a piano, and recitals in languages and concerts, just me. And you know all the audience and it was. Always terrifying and I had meltdowns all the time you know, I mean there was my first first meltdown was before my very first recital. That was producing myself and I really don't tell the story very often, but it is worth sharing. I think while we're being vulnerable about this project. Right. So yet, and I was in Fred Myers. The store in Oregon. And I just saw somebody doing their job at like nine o'clock on Friday night. And I was about to go into my dress rehearsal the next day, and then my very first performance very young, and I literally fell on the ground crying, because I was like I just want a job without although that person, probably had a lot of pressure that I don't know about my perception was, I just want something that I don't have to be so afraid of, you know, because if you mess up if you forget, a lyric, if you drop beat if you. Gosh. Forbid sing off pitch. You know, you're ruined you know, in my mind, it's like. Isn't any tough? Isn't it weird though that the second you stop caring the work? It's I dunno. It's almost like you care, which is which is why you're fried that you're not going to service the end goal. The end end what you really want to kind of get out into the world in our. Absolutely. It's interesting that you both chose the word note down that you had a melt. A better way to say it. Didn't bring it into your respective careers. Now, now it was I start. But still talk talk about that, because that that moment of absolutely being in despair is part of what keeps people from doing it camp. So want what allowed you despite the fact that you felt like you were literally gonna die in those moments and you may not know how you get through it, but you did? But what was it? What variety of things or maybe a singular thing, what was, what were those things that allowed you to sort of move past that absolute despairing panic fear and still do what you needed to do? I think it's passion, you know, I am an artist in my soul. You know creatively, whether I'm singer then or photography now. I love sharing. You know, I love being on stage, so to speak, you know. And you know something? My dad always told me was when I'd go for singing that it was, you know, this the best in this moment in time. Nobody else can do it like you right now. Somebody else might be able to do you know he didn't get into all that. But, you know, my brain process it like that. But it's that I right now have practiced I've practiced a practice the twenty five thousand hours, you know it takes and I know it right now. So I would just kind of come back to that passion. I loved it. It's who I am. It's a chance to be expressive with people and share. And at the same time, just kind of falling back on that sense of, like, you know, I've done this so many times I can do it. I can do it. You know, but it's our to fill out. But yet, you know, joy this something to be said for putting yourself in a position where you can't really pull out the consequences of to, to be the first time I had a meltdown. I'm doing inverted cone quotation marks. Whatever was my. I big facial when I was cutting my first chose working with biggest rallying costs is working with a very famous trailing director, always. So a fish out of water. It was ridiculous. I somehow Lockton Lockton this opportunity. But there was some real technical challenges with that film at the time. No fail film had ever been shot in the world on this particular, technology, and bore. Everyone with post production jogging, but it was beyond the challenge of just telling the story, it was a challenge of, of dealing with the technical, and, you know, the barrel of Daly's dailies paying footage coming through every day and long story short was that first week. I I'm sure I've lost most of my hair, which is where I'm at right now. But I couldn't I couldn't not like I'd put myself in this position where I could not leave. It was to be I'd worked too hard to get to this point, even though I didn't think I was going to get through. It didn't really have a choice. So I just did what I knew how to do at the time, which was just do the work. I know it's crazy crazy and just do the way cut to that film, having all kinds of success and may kind of growing, as a an oddest through that and may having these experiences even to this day, I think, now I consciously or subconsciously or I didn't even really know what I think I put myself in a position where I'm. Where I can't pull up certainly true with this project. It's definitely true with the last thing I mentioned, this project of just come off. I think I'm looking for those opportunities because if I don't I'm not going to grow, and I really wanna grow, I want to grow as an artist. I wanna share. I wanna I wanna get better and that only happens by putting yourself in uncomfortable positions. You know, I've learned that so many so many times, and then kind of resistant to doing something or comfortable that usually they're very thing that I need to be doing because if I just play it safe I'm just retreading, and if I do it for too long, I get incredibly frustrated. Part of your ability to get past those moments how much of it was it that you were relying on your confidence in terms of the technical, you in terms of singing. And you know, you know what you need to do with your voice, your body. And you just the skills that you had practiced in terms of working with film, in terms of telling a story or narrative, how much of it was the fact that you knew that. And how did that compare to your experiences with talkers, where you didn't feel like you may have had all the as much knowledge as you would have liked to have had as compared to what you're doing before? It does that make sense. Definitely. So from senior perspective, you know, if I put myself out of the emotional thought of it, right. I can fall back on my credentials, and I can say, yes, technically I know what I'm doing. And then you push that voice. Creeps in and says, put there's always somebody better, there's always something more, you know, okay? Get away get away. And then I think to the last question as well as risking reward. Right. So the risk is great. But the reward when you succeed is, it's a high, it's an adrenaline, rush. It's the feeling with all these people flooding you in the after the after the show. Congratulations in the feeling of just like your own accomplishment, you know, is wonderful, so that I think can be fueling some of that fire too. You know, in the knife, I finally when we approach for your dreaming, or photography in general. It's also risking reward going out on the street and you don't know what you're gonna run into. But the reward of capturing that picture having somebody, an interaction that you wouldn't have had. Otherwise, those are great rewards. I think. That. Absolutely. We went into this project. I certainly me. I think the two of session degree is that we went into this knowing we did not know, a lot of things we wanted to test out some funny stories we can tell it or if you want, but, like the lighting we want to test out lighting. We wanted to test out some of the back lighting from the sun that was going to come through, which is why we rented the studio with his big window and none of those things happen. And we were you know, but you know we knew we kept saying we're going to just play. We just wanna play. We just want to experiment. We just want to try new things. And at the same time that professionals in us, pulling from our backgrounds needed to have it, super organized and have it super conceptualized and have it very much down to a t in at the same time, we wanted it to just be like throwing cards in the air and seeing what landed. That's true filmmaking. It's that thing of being so prepared that you're allowed to just get on onset. And let things happen. It's like if you prepared you can allow things to happen. That was certainly something like I've made confidence going into dreaming. But I'd, I'd also say that what guide me confidence in fear. Dreaming was knowing that you would. I'm pointing to Sarah, by the way. That was a big thing, because it did gave us permission to plant. We did keep saying that will lack the professional Innis will buy focused when it came to preparations. But we kept on having nice conversations in the late up of, hey, this might be two shots that we really wanna get or this shot this shot. But hi, let's be mindful to still let Bethany are amazing performance of who deserves a up Bethany. Yeah. Letting her play and letting her. Letting show us things that we can discover. And I think the preparation helped in having each other helped my gosh, having each other having Sasha. They're all through the entire process, even up to right now, as we're speaking is wonderful Minna Ginny, isn't it? Mentioned sinking with each other. We discovered that the first time we shall together, which was in your class, actually. Yeah. This straight shooting class week. We just happened to get together and we just found a fluidity. We found a support. Yes, there was there was this idea of I think we both very quickly. So you're saying that how can I help? How do I not get in the way and vice versa? Right. Absolutely. And we went out and shot a couple more times before you realize how this symbiosis kind of works had a we how do we put this into something with mate? Yep. Something a little more planned yet completely spontaneous on the day. What you just mentioned that that was one of the more interesting aspects of the project because you had mentioned that there were certain shots, that you wanted to get into it was great to hear and see that you guys allowed sort of the unexpected. Those welcome surprises, because I think sometimes fear can control the process too much to the point that you create exactly what you intend to create. And I think that's all well and good. But there's something about serendipity unexpected, those surprises that really can elevate any form of art. But in particular photography to a whole new level. I know some people were very exacting in terms of their competitions, and you know, kudos to them, but for me I for me can't work that way. Because I feel like I, I rely on the things beyond what I could have. Formulated anticipated to, to play into it. And that's really sort of important part of, of not letting fear own you in those moments, especially when you're being creative because fear oftentimes is sort of leading up to the moment. Yes. And the only solution for it is to actually just throw yourself full and start making the work those shots. It's true. When you when you directing film, as well, those first shots are the worst, and it was so good. It was so, dear. But when we think Sarah shot, I was this whole who should I, there was this whole awkwardness? And then it was this openness as we both. She composed shots. But as Bethany Saudi to move there was this moment, I felt it. I don't know when it hit you, but I remember going, I say the shot, I want. And then you saw me do that reaction. You say you say what do you see what do you see? And I go this say, it's okay I'll, I'll do it when you finished. I'll do you said you go you go to the show. And then all of a sudden it was on. It was on. It was on an it's an it's true for most things that I've ever worked on. It's getting those first steps as a it's not easy to singing at those first three or four five pass notes, passages phrases whatever it's like, oh my gosh. My heart my heart, my heart breathing thinking of all the technical, and then in the rest of the hour, two hours, it's gone. I don't even know you know, but that was exactly like you just have to click the button, click the button, like x amount of times, and then everything's gonna be fine. You just go into your creative space. Well interview to cheer a moment of failure that you guys experience in your respective careers because that's one of the biggest fears you mentioned this either fear of failure fear of success. So let's talk about failure. This is something I never. Okay. So this is in our past like my thing. Okay. Well, what I hope I saying this allowed because I've never really said it, but I hope saying it level make me forget about it or come to grips with it a little bit better. But I did forget lyric in a recital and it was awful. It was like your worst fear. Like, literally, I've mentioned alluded to earlier worst, fear. It was singing Clara, Schumann piece for only been LeBron song cycle, and I'd sung that cycle for a couple of years. Previously not regularly, but I rested on my laurels, I was like, oh, I've done this before I didn't practice practice it as much as I should have probably should have, you know, I mean I had done it. But for this particular event. Oh, that will haunt me for the rest of my life. You know, missing it in just the piano player. My who is my regular accompanist. We worked together for four or five years. And he just kept starting the song over and over again. And I'm like, get think of what to say can't think what to say in seeing the audiences face. Suddenly realized that there was a problem and panicking and. Yeah, in I've always been very true with my performances that vulnerability in the character of whoever singing portraying. So I just owned it and I said, I'm sorry or something like that. I don't know what I said, but I stopped, which is like a really big no no in the performance world. And I walked over to the peon, and I looked at the music, and I gathered my thoughts I second, which seemed like seven thousand years, and then I came back and we continued, and I had to finish that was in the first half of the performance, and I had to take an intermission and come back for the second act. I couldn't have gotten out of that performance. Faster like that was such a hard thing to have happened to me. And I don't know. Maybe it sounds crazy to the listeners when you came back and he just. They were kind. And nobody, you know, there was I saw one person kind of rolling her eyes. We hit ten thousand people in the room. We find the one. I self therapy. No, no way. A thousand people. There's one guy has his arm frost and sticking his head in fixated on that one guy, even though everybody else thought it was we find that. She was like back all the way back in it. Don't have good sites. So I don't know. She was throwing the tomatoes. But yeah, I mean it was you're probably to your point. It was a wave eager deal in my mind than it was to anybody else that, I'm sure anybody that listens to this. That would have seen that concert would probably not even know what I'm talking about at this point. But, you know, to me, it was like the biggest failure you can have onstage, literally, I mean, I would have rather fallen, you know, you know, I don't even know what. Yeah. That was that was pretty bad. So, but I got up that was early in my career as well. And I got up and I did many more recitals after that going, and going, and I just kept thinking, well, it's only going happen ones in your life. So at least I got it out. At least I did it now I don't have to worry about doing that again. Fingers crossed. I can't I can't think of a specific thing in my creative career. I'm this. There's so many and I think I'm blocking them out right now put on the spot. But one thing I do struggle with and have struggled with and continue to is, is this idea of finally with time? So I have wanted to be a credit since I could walk and for ever for decades, I wasted time voiding that mandate, I voided at, I don't have the money, I unable to do the sunny to do that. All this idea of avoiding this idea of filing. I didn't know it at the time I can identify now until one day, I'll wake up and I was like I need to do this unable to do it right now on constantly battling that I'm constantly battling mating amazing twenty year old to have incredible work. And I'm constantly amazed at, at everyone around me to be honest with you. They saw deer of filed because I've lost twenty years of my life for a foul because of this. It's something that it's something that certainly feels me but it's not known as to deal with or go through it all the time. Seriously, especially when my classes and people, you know, twenty thirty years younger than me, and they just kick ass, and they use amazing stuff. And I just go. Oh, what was I? Yeah. Right. But I think everyone comes to it at a different place. 'cause right now, I think right now is the most confident I've ever felt about myself period, first time and it doesn't mean that those insecurities aren't there. But as just as a human being and is a creative, I've, I'm just I'm happy where I'm at right now, there's some things I would like to have changed, but that's sort of been hard won. And I think it's a hard place to come to. I mean, I get my fear my insecurities that come up all all the time. And sometimes it manifests itself for me in procrastination delaying things like you said, putting things off. But I've been thinking that some of the things that I've procrastinated about, when I think about them where things really didn't want to be doing. But I thought I should be doing. Just hit something. Fear. It's been a good, but just because I wasn't able to differentiate. Yeah, so I want you to sort of talk about that idea about procrastination you know, the fear of the progress fear manifesting itself in procrastination, but differentiating between things you really sort of want to do and, and fear being away of thing, giving you the excuse not to do something, you really don't want to do, like for me. Anything cards accounting. Endlessly, procrastinator about just because I feel very ill equipped to be able to do it. And even when I do it I find myself, just making mistakes now they have dyslexia for words. And I think we have this comes to numbers detail because I'm suppose, I'm going to men's group and I'm the treasurer this year, and every time I go to do the spreadsheet on always finding might numbers off and the money. How many times I I'm doing it right? And it just throws me back to when was a lamentable school in high school junior high school doing man and giving the first formulas or whatever. Right. And then some point I start doing things wrong and just feeling at a complete loss. And that's sort of just extended to my life. Now, that's why I won't let my wife. Do the numbers. And there's this inner model that tells you you're gonna mess it up. And then you. To do the accounting, just to say, okay, I'm comfortable doing this, and I'm just going to try and do it anyway. But normally it was just like, okay, I'll just sort of delay it. There are other things that I feel the fear I procrastinate about I really wanna do, but that fear has me by the throat. So I think there's just too. Yeah, I'm asking you to things but, you know, you can respond to whatever where you will procrastinations think that the catchphrase every out of style I've ever met in some way. And we all have a witnesses mind mush numbers. I think we all share that. I think procrastination is I don't know. I feel like it's, it's a I'm blanking all of a sudden plays. Goes save me said, okay. This is a really hard question even harder than the last one. Whereas like so vulnerable. And I'm like, here's my biggest failure. I find the projects like fear of dreaming, super exhausting. Not not this part of it. This is the fun part. You know, getting to sit down and talk about your work and in the exhibition that we did on the night was, oh my gosh, my favorite night ever. But the getting to that shot. I find it really really exhausting because I just put so much into it. I did another project. It is personal project and it's totally not finished yet in this is to the point. Right. It's called. Everyone loves Luchino my dog Luchino in everyone loves him, and I want to take my camera out and photograph twenty four seven of people interacting with Luciano. I love it. I've started it of million times. And I have about ten pictures to show and maybe one picture. That's good. You know, so that is a fear. I have that I really want to do this project. It's important to me. He's getting he's eight years. Old now. He's got another twenty five years in his life, but realistically not, so I am going to maybe be a back on your show, someday talking about that. Being my biggest failure because I didn't do it. You know, if I don't if I don't take action, and it's so hard for me. And as much as I love people I love talking to people. I'm very extroverted. I find it really, really hard to have my dog and my camera and make in my mind, make good pictures that are worthwhile making an I can hear myself coaching my own self right now saying just take the picture, just don't don't free judge it, you know. But you know this fear of failure. What if I bring my camera out, and I've got Luchino, and I make a bad picture. And it's just it's ridiculous. So that is something that I really want to do. I really need to do this in time is of the essence because he's a subject that's eight years old senior sprightly man, he doesn't jump luck. Bullock, one. The. Yeah, I know he jumps. I know. So that's, that's something for me creatively that the fear of wanting to do it. But the fear at the rap together, you know, it's they're not two separate things like, accounting wrapped together, where I, I want to make these pictures, I want to make this work and I've done it a few times. And it's always been positive again, people clapped and flooded, blah, blah. But. Maybe I'm not happy with the results. Maybe it's just uncomfortable for me to, like, really try to take the time to do it. So, yeah. The explanation of procrastination is, is really a means of stress relief by finding some other thing to do, like watching YouTube videos playing video game washing the dishes, that you're executive builds up to the point that finding and distraction is a way of being able to sort of manage your emotions at that at that time. So I've been looking at it in that way in just so it isn't loaded with so much negativity. Right. Because I think part of when, when I was procrastinating in the past, it would just reinforce all the bad things I thought about myself. And then when I saw the progress when I started thinking about procrastination just being another tool for me just to be able to get through these sort of difficult emotions in different moments. It was like, oh, okay. Maybe. It isn't it isn't evidence of my of defects. Yeah. It's actually your body coping, and managing the stress. Right. That sounds wonderful. Subscribing to that philosophy. Made it a difference for me because I'll recognize I'll recognize when I'm procrastinating. And it gives me gives me a chance to think about is this something that I really to do or not. Exactly. It's something that I really wanna do. How can I break this up into bite size pieces, so that I can not have to look at the entire, thanks writing a book? I mean the way I managed to write my first book in every book, subsequently was to think about each each chapter is a magazine article, which I'd had lots of economists doing because when I first signed that contract first book it was like a couple. Because I was like, oh my God. I gotta write a book. Then it in my casino articles. Why don't you just look at it? Each shift every magazine article was like. It was like oh, yeah. I can do that. I had a track record for doing that. And that's how I got got through it and continue to get through it. That's how I approach all my jobs now even though it's still scary. But to break down just break them down into tiny little nuggets. Yeah. It's, it's, it's great. I why that for everyone loves the Johnno I'm gonna do it and movements, you know first movements like movement. So and so. The only time you really feel is when you don't try at all. Absolutely. As just got just got to do it. Yeah. Really? Because you got to surrender to that, that idea that has to be perfect. Yeah. This this, this thing that's been holding me back, and we explode a little bit inferior dreaming. But this idea of experimenting with lot, which is something that's always wanted me because being surrounded by so many amazing cinematographers, so who the who the element. So it's like I have avoided it even though I've all of the people who I love all the paper, who I'm responding to certainly images that are respond to all very cinematic and lighting plays a big pot. And I learned a lot in your class as well. But. This year to manage this. I've, I've decided Ryan, hi shine no matter what job Amman, and I typically work long hours. I am shooting fifty portraits. That means finding a model, even if it's my wife even doesn't matter. And I'm gonna lie every one of these and so far I'm way ahead of way ahead of schedule. It's about one a week. And what I'm finding is I look at those first couple that I did in January and it's embarrassing to me now and how far of come and I like to think about where I'm going to be in six months time. But the idea of all I have to worry about is one lot in this shot in this in today, shoot. And then maybe in a month time, maybe use to lights, maybe if you know if I'm ready the idea of, of these tiny little bought sized chunks to get you through a project or to grow. Yeah, it helps your portraiture is looking amazing by. Way. No doing I'm enjoying seeing the growth, you know, I really the one you did that you posted. Christina retrea music fan, but was amazing. I experimented a lot with, with that stuff at the moment, and it's, it's rewarding because when I went out on the day that you're talking about it was to shoot an album, cover another, another situation where I'm just throwing myself in the deep end. I have no it I don't know what I'm doing, but it's like okay well, if I did know what I'm doing how the hell would I approach this with simplicity? Without a budget and without the bells and whistles. This was for friends album, cover. It was like a sword as an opportunity to, to do a project that was actually going to be seen by someone even if it was to PayPal. And so I went out with what I did know and what I found was older roles throwing the hell out the window, the second, I'll go to add on location and what I found was as I'm sitting there and I'm trying to problem solve in the tense. This is not going to work the subconscious starts kicking in and he's like a no. This is not going to work, but just try and sure enough. Right. And sure enough something happens. It's like ooh. What like that? But what if I did this? That's that's, that's what I'm trying to embrace it. The moment these idea of, of, of little little shoots with less pressure that, that allow you to grow in a big away. You know that pursuit for constant growth is something that we probably all share in this room. You know. We all wanna grow, we all want to improve and get better and discover and not just sit with our laurels you know, but keep making new things, or, and also that idea of practice right where you've practiced something so many times, so that when you get into the moment that all goes out the window, or there's forces of nature that come through that you didn't expect and you can just respond. Help the candidate frame to continue bring you great conversations with some of the world's best photographers, you can do this by supporting a patriotic effort by committing as little as five dollars or more a month when you do this. You not only help us to meet the cost of production, but provide us the time and resources we need to bring you conversations. You won't hear anywhere else. Sign up today by visiting patriot dot com. Forward slash the candid frame. Thank you. And I love what you just said about that idea of if I knew what I was doing. What would I do? I'm he really that is. Brian kicks in when, when you say that when you ask that question there was someone was watching. I think someone speaking, and they were asking about, and it may have been someone I interviewed or was watching something, and they were talking about, like documentary projects, and they would ask people, what given idea and they said, no, I don't have an idea. I said, well, if you did have an idea what would it be? They said that they would answer the question of that point. And I think it's part of that first initial barrier is thinking about what you don't know and obsessing that I don't know how to do this, so I don't know this. But if you're pressed you go through well with why do know what would do? I think would be the solution, and then the application of it trying to do it that puts you into the process of problem, solving, and then you start getting the gears going. But until you move past that I don't know. And being in that space of I don't know is of space of complete paralysis e can't move forward. There's a lot to be said for momentum. Yes. A lot to be said for momentum and that goes for anything you doing. Yeah, there's a lot to be set the momentum fischel. So did you guys when you guys were kids would did you see yourselves as fearful, kids definitely now? Oh in. Okay. A little at all. I mean, the ham every picture that anybody's in, I'm in the background photo bombing before photo, visiting I was the ham. I mean I was fearless like onstage. Fearless in sports. Fearless in travel. Fearless in school. Completely fearless friends with every different group of people friends with, you know, which is still a lot of those things are today but just fearlessly doing it one hundred percent. Fearless. I was I was introverted in a lot of ways, but I was fearless in a lot of ways, physically feel as my mother thought I was going to grow up to be a stuntman so to my sister do crazy stuff, and I would, I would constantly be just trying things physically and, and, and being out there where I did shutdown was people if I didn't know people, it's still true to a load of degrees. They used is. But I know people I I'm going to be introverted that way, which is interesting that we the center, and I work together, as you know, she so extroverted. I'm quite interested. But there, there's definitely a feeless. So when did you start becoming aware of fear to the point that you realize that it was a hurdle of for me is this idea of the time thing that I was talking about before I think when you decide I don't know when? It was what I but when I decided, all I want, do this thing, 'cause might be all mighty workout that starts piling up. And you said that once and then it says it makes it easier to say that to yourself the next time in Utah. Do something again. Then you don't do something again. And you don't do again run. And then all of a sudden you a wondering why things king out. You don't feel great about yourself. You don't necessarily know why. And then one day you might create something just out of some other form of momentum all, or just out of pulic will, whatever it is maybe just have a good day. And, and you saw to realize, oh, it takes may doing something even if it's just a small thing to, to create over you. I think it started in and around university. I think there's healthy competition in there is very unhealthy competition, and I think right now where I'm at in my life actually for right now. We're I'm sorry. Surrounded by wonderful people. Wonderful photographers, wonderful sense of community. Somebody said to me once the best way that you're going to get work as a photographer is through another photographer. It's not manager. It's not agency. It's through your friends who are photographers who see your work, and they like you and they stand up for you, and they root for you and they support you. You know, and I found that to be very, very true in university. It was not like that. Unfortunately, it was very much like, watch your back. You know, I started with I don't know, don't quote the numbers, but say eighty five. Maybe it was less than sixty musical theater majors. We graduated with about nineteen. It was cut cut cut cut cut cut cut. You know very ruthless. Very rough very break yourself down to build yourself up again. So, you know, I mean I am appreciative of my undergrad education. But I think that, you know, all of my acting friends theater friends from college many, many of them feel the same way about that. You know, situation and unfortunately, I think that's when you started to, like I have I always have these like, you know, adamant you've moments where you suddenly realize you're in the garden make it, you know, and you're exposed and you, you don't have shelter and you don't have cover, you know, that I think that was around the time that has started to my navy started to come off, you know, unfortunately, and it takes a long time to build that back up coach's over to. Yeah. And, you know, and I'm very aware, very aware of I say, at all, like often you know this isn't Adam and eve, moment, this is a moment where I'm in the garden. You know, my native navy is off. I can see like exposure, and maybe some hostility around and it's just like it's uncovering of like it's a loss. Of innocence, you know, which is a shame, you know, because I like to be. Innocent, and like working in a happy bubble, you know, and a happy world. So. You know it just takes time it took time to get back from that. But it's okay I graduated I made it through. And here I am. Yeah. No, it's okay. But it's just it's, it's that was probably the time when I started to become much, more fearful and aware that you had to like there were politics in there was games. And you know it's not just about the work. Because I was fearful from a little kitten. So that's sort of faded so much, especially my relationships with people falling, the last, maybe ten or so, years, that I've got comfortable in my own skin, and feel like I can own my own that I'm sort of up. Okay. But I think that I wasn't as bold as I would like to think I am now. I'm gonna jump out of. A plane. My daughter did a couple of months ago. I just. She's like eighteen inch. Very good for you. I'm here. Yes. Dad is encourage me to do it. And I'm like you should do it. Yeah. Did you have you done it? I've done it. One piece of advice for UN listeners is before that. I also don't just I had the mistake of waking up and going to a nearby airport and just doing it first thing in the morning, so you go from yawning first thing in the morning to you hot. A thousand miles an hour almost. Oh my L mess vomited in the middle of the, it was it took my tandem instructed to say, no, don't do that. It was amazing experience, strange experience, where I suddenly could not stop cursing of nowhere. I just and then I started singing like I just started singing Arias over lake Taupo in New Zealand, and it was like, and then we landed, and then I fell asleep for about twenty four hours. I think it was the adrenaline just it's like a scene out of a move. It was crazy. I mean yeah because you're adrenaline is so amped up. You know what's the boldest? Where people would just go. They can't believe that not just you that anybody would visit I can tell you the stupidest thing of it, but. They went to our. Name. Christina. Christina, a when I was a kid speaking to this idea of everyone thought it was going to be a stop man didn't even know how old was, maybe I was seven my my, my family lived in a high-rise in strategies go, coast and. I'm sure everyone can visualize. You've got the window to a high-rise with no balcony. You've got these tiny little window sale that kind of goes around the building, I jumped out on that thing. And I was running around and this thing must have been a couple of fate. What? And I'm just running around at didn't think of thing if I'd slipped if a gust of wind had blown I would have fallen to my the. Yeah. Yeah. I mean it was just nuts. I mean we can spend an hour in therapy talking about this. What is the I mean, I just I'm just known for traveling, you know, like packing up my bags and moving overseas and. You're in Australia and New Zealand London. Yep. Moved out here across the country by myself with my three animals in my car. Drove all the way across the country. I have to say, I'm very proud of that because I am not a driver. I didn't get one speeding ticket. I didn't have my animals all arrived safely with me. Yeah. So another fear that people have is, is sharing the work. It's one thing to create it. So I know you guys were working hard on that, you know, that pop up show that you did. But tell me about the feelings leading up to that. And how you felt that night. I think it helped that would doing it together Sarah was the main she she was amazing setting that. Yeah. That was that was really something that she had a vision for the show and for me, I just try not to think about it, which is what I tend to do before something that terrifies me these days, anyway. But I think the album for the show, I just wanted to this weeds in place, where I was just like. Oh my God. It's happening. Like people are going to say this, and they're going to have that fight L, a small thing that, oh, that's only it's great what you know, and I'd have to deal with that may bang, quite introverted. I thought, how am I going to deal with this show? I'm gonna shut down and then I realized okay? Well, thank God. I have someone here that if things. We're going together. The backsaw can cry. No, it was. It was a little scary, but it was also encouraging tonigh- that we've done. It wasn't it? It was the Zang that go up. It was so much fun. It was it was so much fun. You know, the, the process of getting there, I think, once you go into execution mode with I go into execution mode. Yes, there's fear, but it's like, okay we're moving forward. You know, once we committed back to Sasha's point about getting into situations that you can't pull out of. So we put the down payment on the pop up space. We bought the books we printed, the books. We sent out invites. I mean, the day that we actually sent out an, you know, you got anyway, sending that Email to you in sending the Email to everybody else. It was like, okay we cannot pull out of this. This is happening. You know, it's, it's the fear to do it to hit the send button is terrifying, because you're literally putting yourself out there all the fears. I mean, the voice in my head, actually my friend JD who was there on the night. He flew in from New York to help us, he's friend from college. He's made me name, this voice. Now that talks to me, the evil one says nobody's gonna turn up, this is going to be variable, you know, they're going to laugh, like, who are you to do? I don't want to use of these people. Too ill hurt. Okay. I love anybody named Victoria. But my name is Victoria, right? It's a Victoria, so JD. It'll be JD is gonna listen to this. I'm sure so Haji. I know. Thanks love. He's like, tell Victoria to shut the heck up, you know. So it's true, so I catch myself now. Like, that's Victoria talking. You know, that's Victoria talking water relief. When we when we when we finally opened the doors. Oh, so, yeah, in terms of getting there, you know, we have some amazing help on the night like hanging, we thought we knew, well, actually we didn't. We knew we didn't know how we were going to hang the show. We were like. So we've got this show people coming in. And we have somebody come in Ellen came in and helped us because she's got a great I for laying things out and having a third party there that was a bit neutral because obviously are tensions were like well, and we, we did food. We did home catering. We've been up on night cooking all this food for everybody. So we've got the team laying out the food, and then we've got to hang the show, and then we put an exhibition as well like an installation, which I would love to talk about if we have time but yeah, the installation was really, really important to the show as well. And so we had all this stuff going on, and we had about what four four hours to do it. And so. Okay. So think so, because of the of the beginning, right fears always at your back. There's always around the corner. Fear is always going to be there. It's part of life. We wanted to have a big the word fear written on the wall. So we did that. And then but we also wanted it to be covered up. Right. So we had this white chiffon material that we hung from the ceilings, and we created this drape around that people had to actually walk through. So fear was not just there in the black and yellow that we've gotten the book but it is covered because sometimes it is. And in than we in the middle of the room, had a volume type vegan bellum type paper that people could write on what their fear was what they were afraid of or how they overcame their fear. And so it started a conversation and a dialogue, and people could walk through this curtain, the, you know, tangled up, you know, beautiful beautiful flowing material, but tangled up in, they could walk through into this private space where they could put their fear and cover up. Here with this more translucent type paper, but yet share their fear with the world. And so that by the end of the night, this black and gold fear. That was so just bold, thank you. Yes, I was looking for the word and to have it at your back, but covered up with this beautiful paper peoples who came to support us in see the show, their fears sphere was still there, but it was once more step removed. It was one step further away from attacking us in that night. It was surprising to see how many people are actually genuine with two absolutely there was. There was this. I mean you go to some of these sorts of interactive things and people don't don't take it seriously. Or they're embarrassed, or whatever it was, but look people actually Doug deepen, and wrote some real fees. Somebody said that, you know, their fear was afraid of them, dying or their kids dying before them. You know, somebody many people wrote about fear of not having enough money to survive. Really, heavy stuff in not only it didn't stop there. People actually talked about it people on the night. You know, we're all dressed up in like a hype pipe and people were really talking to me about fear, like what they were afraid of and thinking me and thinking, Sasha for having this opportunity to like express themselves. Somebody said that they had never ever ever said what they were truly afraid of, and they did it. Yeah. And it's a conversation, you know that it is scary. I mean maybe revealing just now on this podcast like what my biggest failure was like, that's huge. I'm probably going home like that. But you but it's like you have to walk the walk and talk the talk. Right. If you want people to participate in, you want people to engage with you, you have to be I have to be vulnerable back and I found it to be a huge responsibility as well. Because people actually emailed me, one person at emailed, me that their parent, I can't remember if it was, I think it was their father had passed recently in that they were struggling was maybe actually about two different project, but it was very much in the same fashion of being vulnerable in the in the fear of how you deal with these things and just getting it out there. And sometimes it's very cathartic. I think. I guess where else western culture, this of being. Fearless is considered the ideal. She had all the time movies and films these people who, don't feel fear. They just do these amazing things and they just feel it. And it's like well, that's not that's a psychopath. The definition of. Most people have to go through feeling fear and moving through it, how you grow, you know, I mean, artistically as well as just as a human being, you know, like I've been told so many times, you cannot avoid like your feelings. You have to walk through them in order to get to the other side. And so there's all sorts of distractions to avoid, you know, which I do but better when I actually just sit in think and like, you know, absorb and say this is just a feeling this is I'm acknowledging my feeling of fear and eventually that feeling will go away. You know, obviously, there's take take action and there's things you can do to help move past it. But I think if you if I don't acknowledge it, it's I'm not being sick, and there's certainly look to acknowledge when you doing this little someone once said a forest me on repeat in my head all the time. It's fee is good, because it prepares you. And I thought, oh, it's like it's like, yeah, it's if you feeling too comfortable if he'd not failing fear, then, you know, you probably not digging tape. You know, fear has a way of kind of making, you really find that part of yourself that gives and, and does what needs to be done to grow, this really wonderful moment at the show, as well where I, I don't know how to say it out loud vet basically. I'd been to visit my family in Connecticut. A couple of weeks beforehand. See my family hadn't seen them in a while and gave him a copy of the book, you know, is a great, you know, session, I, you know, we had family books to give out. So I'll give my, my dad my step mom and my brother. A copy anyway. Three weeks later, we're at the show. My dad was calling me. He's like, where are you on, like actually he's like, what are your plans for the day, and like well my plans for today? Are, you know, here's the condensed version going to do is show? Get my hair done, and then set up for the show in there we go. Well, he took that is. Was going to go home to get my hair done. So anyway, he surprised me he flew in from Connecticut had about. He missed his flight ended up three different connections and went all over the country, but ended up at LAX went to my place at the time I lived in Manhattan beach thinking, I was there turned up at my door. Of course. I'm not there. I'm in Hollywood and anyway. You know, I am at the tried calling him. He called me, and I'm like dad. I'm getting my hair done. There's a hairdryer of the background, you know, I'm like, call you later and I always try to answer my that's call know it's just like the thing. So anyway, I say a call you later. So he, then he doesn't answer and I call him back. And like we're five minutes from the show starting, we're opening the doors. And so, I think sent a FaceTime picture or something. And anyway, the show's opening and I was like kind of sad like that. My family wasn't able to partake in this well, turns out, I'm talking to somebody, I turn around. And my dad is standing in a suit all dressed up in his stressed. Stressed guy, and I turn around, and there's dad, and I just said. I was so confused. But it was the best it was the best gift it was a lot of support. There was a lot of support to people that show. And it was it was really touching. That's one of those things that makes it all worth it. Like I was saying that the endgame makes so happy, you know, so happy to see so many people pitching in that feeling of exhilaration faction when you balance it up to how you felt with the here you realize this is why you do it. Exactly. Because you have to create those moments for yourself, even if they're relatively small even it's just the satisfaction of just getting out and shooting that day and making a good picture because you need those moments sort of build on each other because the more you the more you don't do the each time you make a choice in that to do something that builds bills, the fear. So it's why it's why the action is absolutely sort of necessary because every day that you, procrastinator, you delay doing something or you choose not to do it or allow, whatever excuse to keep you from doing your building something ally. Let me say in your class like you just need to get out there and click the button in a couple of times before, you know, it's so true. Just just give him the mechanics of. Yep. Well, you guys you know, the last question. Always ask for listening for you to recommend a photographer that you admired that you've recently. Or you recently discovered, then we ask that, again, of and asked him to sing for thirteen years. My last question is asked each of a recommend another dog offer for listeners to discover and explore and it can be anyone someone you've long admired or recently discovered. So who would that one for talk refer being and why you gopher for me? I've discovered a few years ago, a Libya bay a like is in the buzzer. I discovered a few years ago by accident. And I've just been finding myself constantly clicking on it website lightly. And I don't know why specifically other than I just really love the energy that comes through in those fighters. And yeah, that's just something I viscera Lee responded with Alaba Livia bay check her out. Well, I have recently discovered Ellen Freelander I love her extended framework. I think it's amazing. The travel the way she puts that together. I personally never seen extended frame work like that before. So that was a new discovery for me her. I, I love the way she sees. I think she's got a real. I dunno. Finesse to the way, she sees a gentleness. Yeah. She has completely agree. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. She's doing. Yes. We love you. Thank you, very nice you to sing a sound. So. This. Jilin sale fan. Sends a fun. No in Charlie. Don't me he'll. Who she did meal? But. Football. Oh. Kiala more Russo phone. Local. Spun. He fought me. Circle. Better than I would do. Thank you. Thanks to Sasha and Sarah for sharing their time in story with us, you can find out more about them in their work by visiting Sara Marie Rooney dot com and Sancha Dillon bell dot com. The be the voice that introduces the episode like Ryan could sanest at this week. Just send us an audio file recorded on your phone, tablet, or computer, saying something, like this is Chancey Gardner from Washington DC. And this is the candid frame say at least a couple of times, so we have something to choose from and include three to four seconds of silence. With your voice to help us clean up. The audio also make sure to include a link to your website, blog, or Instagram feed when you send it to info at the candidate frame dot com. I have a variety of workshops. I'm leading in the coming months, including one next week in Washington DC at the focus on the story photo festival. A two day workshop in June at the Los Angeles center photography and a week long cultural experience in Tokyo Japan. We've also added a workshop in Vancouver Canada in August, which, I'll be teaching alongside when my favorite photographers Olaf, stop sign up soon as spaces are limited. And if you wanna get a sense of my teaching style and approach to photography, you should check out my YouTube channel where I offer critiques and evaluations of tog Affi submitted by listeners who contribute to the candidate frame, flicker bowl, you can check out the TCI flicker, Paul, and our YouTube channel by clicking on the Lincoln, the show notes, and the website, my recent book, making photographs developing a personal visual. Workflow is available, you can purchase it today and receive forty percents off the list price when you order it from the rocky note website. Use the promo code Perello forty at checkout to take advantage of that discount. And if you want to keep up with all things candid frame, sign up for our mailing list, and you'll receive three copies of my previously published books and if you like what you've been hearing on the show. Please take the time to write a review in the I tunes, Spotify Google podcast or, or wherever you find an listen to podcasts. And if you write a review on a block post, let me know and send Neil because I would really like to thank you on air. You can also support the show by making a monthly contribution through patriotic. Or you can make a one time contribution, the pay pal, you'll find links for both in the show notes and the website, thanks to Timothy Floyd and Sergei shin demand for their recent contributions. And if you want to easily access every episode of the candidate frame download the candidate frame app. It's available for both apple. I o s an Android, and it's free. Download it today. You'll find it where. Everything else is in the show notes or the website, if it can't frame dot com. Also, we have an Alexa app. So if you have one of those smart devices, download the skill and listen to the show that way the Ganda frames audience in areas Martin Taylor, where you can find at the other Martin, Taylor dot com. The show senior producers. The Parker and our music is from Kevin McCloud, whose royalty free music can be found at incompetent dot com and this is about an ex and this is the candidate frame.

Sarah Christina retrea Pasadena Sasha fraud Ryan Wrestling Nelson Mandela director Tyke Sara Marie Dana lake Taupo Luchino LA LA LA Dylan bell Adam Washington Lockton Lockton
The Entrepreneurs - Eureka 233: Little Moons

Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

12:02 min | 2 months ago

The Entrepreneurs - Eureka 233: Little Moons

"Devi and howard wong are the co founders of little muench macci brand. They started in twenty ten after both leaving behind careers in finance. The brother and sister grew up surrounded by talk of business watching their parents run bakery where they also love to eat the traditional japanese macci's ice cream in chewy rice flour. The company started out by selling direct link to london restaurants and worked with the pastry chef at nobu to perfect their recipe there now stocked by all tops supermarkets in the uk. Along with selfridge's and amazon recently. They opened their own london factory where they are always experimenting with new flavors. Here's vivian and howard with the story of little moons parents ryan asian bakery as we're growing up so we've really been around for a whole lives and much guy. Scream is one of those things that we've actually loved since you were kids. He's a big my parents to buy it from the grocery store. And so as we get older i guess we notice that still hasn't really taken off and saw an opportunity. We're we're both. I guess getting a bit bored of corporate jobs and so the idea began to get more and more traction and then we started to think seriously and we cut a cop. Let's do this dr. We saw experimenting with making different recipes in the kitchen. We my parents. Actually company may traditional which is traditionally filled with red bean paste and say actually combining ice cream is very technically challenging so it took us a while to happen player different players but two years. We've got it right and we decided to look. I think my dad was working. Full business outside coporate. Abc actually and my mom was a stay at home. Mom and i guess she got a little bit bored. She wants to start something interesting and she noticed that there was a gap in the market for chinese cakes and things so saw making a kitchen and as the business grew my dad's an in joined they started working together. So how'd i've always grown up to got business like Toys be discussing what things business decisions and things so we'll always surrounded by that sort of environment. I think it's really helped actually with all business. 'cause we always used to work in my parents bakery off to school on weekends and things When you grow up in a family business you'll have to like help out and things so we've been sort of helping out in factory and like making helping parents make more. She cakes and other things that they've been doing so we're kind of familiar with the products attracted me to doing business. I s.'s just seeing the passion that my parents had in in the product and having cooling and just loving creating and doing their own thing. And when i started working in finance i kind of look to seniors and the lives they lived and even though they were probably making far more money than my parents did. I just saw that. The life that my parents lived was better because they will passionate about what they're doing and they're caught having control of their lives. That kind of rate attracted me to that. Manufacturing has a lot of challenges. A lot of people take to run. A factor is very capital intensive. Things can go wrong but when we started off there was no one that can really make. I'll put on say forced into making ourselves and actually that's giving us a huge amount of control instead of the quality of the product. And it's allowed us to sort of do empty very quickly. Say it was a real change. I went from typing away on bloomberg terminals to suddenly calling machine manufacturers and getting spare parts from all around the world and dealing with pilots and an ordering stuff Something that you quickly get familiar with. It's not rocket. Science is a different scene settings restaurants just because these women creating a new product. No one really knows that. And i think that people have restaurants to try new foods to experience new cuisine and so we approached chefs fast to try and build that market so that people became familiar with ice cream. And so we got a couple of big clients like uc. She and some high end restaurants and may fast and so exhausted supplying it to them and just noticed his towel. The market for the slowly growing just moved around. They want you to put onto the menus of new restaurants. They went to two. We sort of build the market slowly. That's why we've been getting for ten years. We've just built everything from scratch. So i think it's tom around scrappy. Business where it was just the two of us really really just everything outline how. It said manufacturing engineering. It like everything we had to and we slowly growing the business into retail. I think when we hit retail it does cost money to do branding and do the packaging and marketing. Great slowly. but i think it's very business is very different now than it did when we first started. We've always had ambitions to go into retail and silence tools. But when we got started we quickly realized that actually people say once you get on the shelf. That's just the step and ashi cell and at that time people didn't really know what the product was say. We seen realize actually selling to food service restaurants is a lot easier day. Need a brand. You just need a good put out and they blind big volumes and really have to work on the sort of branding and marketing side of things. I it really helped us to develop the ability to produce in scale and quality and actually meeting with the was amazing because they really knew where to buy the best quality ingredients and they really helped us to refine the flavors. And of tell us which flavors were really actually. I was actually a blessing in disguise. Because i think it caught to us and gave a scale so that when we did luchino fades we were ready to sort of every else supply chain. Isn't that different roscoe retail the kids. It's frozen products in the life is relatively the same but scaling. The business i think is always a arrested. The an quality of the product. That's been one of strongest saudis to make sure that the of opponent is not compromised by mass production. Emmy still use the same recipes. We still use the same quality of manga pure as that. Use the fruit peres. I think if you try and focus on that and you don't use it as scales the business up sallow heading up kind of preparing brexit. Know that fun tusk. And i would say it's just taken up so many man hours of attention just years and years of kind of planning and meetings just trying to figure out what's going on and i wish that time could have been better spent sort of running a business because time is precious anyway so we were prepared for it but even though we prepared it's just a massive pain in the soviet consulate radio to this day is kind of making processes that was facing before so complicated content delays. Either you prepare for it. It's still a pain in a strange way. Their whole covid crisis kind of us. Because what happened in panic made rethought. We do so much to feed service now shutdown. So you tell us. The factory cash preservation mode and for few weeks are changing every day. But then once the dust sessile you found yourself with a lot more time to think and so they're like moving forward all the time driven by step back and just thought about a brad business where we wanted to take it and that gave us time to sort of focus on kind of while values. Were what we wanted to do with brian. And actually it's moved a long way in the last year are thinking involving. What's pappas and what are we here to do. What sort of direction do you want to get. We've always been really klay growing up. Starting a business together is like an entirely different thing. I think we speak people in. I could never work with my sibling. Would tear each other's hair out. And i guess when we started off the business tiny and we would do everything and so you get all these sort of cliches where you start to get on each other's nez and at the time we hadn't really separated rosette that well say laser things as the things fell down in the middle just things that neither wanted to do and then when they went dodd. Kind of blame each other for doing them so there was a time when we were living and working together where we did get to the point where we probably did what a tear each other's hair out and as tough times really stressful time in business but we ended up taking like a personality test and just working to figure out what our strengths and weaknesses are and what we realized was that we are actually complete opposites in the way we think and say work that out really began to appreciate each other's perspective but actually looking back. We realized that one of those t shirts but you know we found a found that has compete in different ways of thinking to each other. And it's actually been really beneficial for how we make decisions so now it's really good and divided our role say i look after sales and marketing operations and we have a whole senior leadership team around us to sort of stop west. Getting into each other's traces to say is actually working. Well now it's definitely gonna janney. Yeah but we've definitely learned what factors together and just appreciate each other's differences I guess whacking flavors in the summer. We would like to keep things fresh continuing to have new flavors to look forward to so we're working on that. At the moment. I think world looking at direct to consumer channel because the markets give us limited shelf space is like maybe two three flavors maximum but we know lots of fans liked to have some obscure flavors and so. I think that the direct channel would work really well that way. If you want a special limited edition. And i guess that's the benefit of having factory. You can run these smaller lines and keep things fresh some a massive associated level so when we develop the possession flare rose really like trying to make sure it's the best one out there and i'm really proud of that flavor. I am most proud of on you. Tropical vegan which is the mangum passion fruit. I love it because you would never know. It was vegan is really creamy ice cream. I just love the fresh flavor with touch tartness at the end so that definitely my favorite but prior to that it was gay quite easy flavors but then i'm particularly proud of statue as well. It's hard it's like picking your favorite child that he howard and vivian. One co of little moons you can learn more at little moons dot co dot. Uk my thanks to both and to christie evans mixed and edited this show. I'm daniel beach. Thank you so much for listening and goodbye

howard wong little muench macci macci selfridge nobu london devi vivian luchino howard ryan amazon Abc bloomberg uk roscoe Emmy tom pappas dodd
TIP246: Part 2 - Berkshire Hathaway Shareholders Meeting Q&A - Warren Buffett & Charlie Munger (Business Podcast)

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

42:19 min | 2 years ago

TIP246: Part 2 - Berkshire Hathaway Shareholders Meeting Q&A - Warren Buffett & Charlie Munger (Business Podcast)

"You're listening to t IP on today's show. We pick up on the second half of our questions and answers that Warren buffet and Charlie Munger provided from the two thousand nineteen Berkshire Hathaway shareholders meeting. They answer some really interesting topics like why Berkshire continues the suit on so much cash versus investing in the S and P five hundred index. The impact of a I in automation, amongst many other exciting topics. So without further delay. Here's our second part coverage of the Berkshire Hathaway shareholders meeting. You're listening to the investors podcast. While we study the financial markets and read the books that influenced self made billionaires the most, we keep you informed and prepared for the unexpected. This episode of the investors podcast is brought to you by sip recruiter. Finding a new job is a lot of work. What if you had you own personal recruiter to help you find a better job now? Seep recruiters technology can do that for you. Just download the CBA quota jumpsuits app, live know what kind of jobs show, interested in and technology starts doing the work the sleep recruiter app. Finds job you'll like and put your profile in front of employers who may be looking for someone like you, if an employer lecture profile sip recruiter Luchino. So if you're interested in the job, you can apply based on the third potty survey. Seven out of ten people who find the job on seep recorder increase the salaries. These are the results of two thousand seventeen US Surrey of over five hundred sip recruited users who got hired for a job to found on Supra recruiter listeners of the masters podcasts, can download the free soup recruit adjusters app today. And that the power of technology work for you. Don't wait the sooner download the free CPA who to jump sets up the sooner it can help you find a better job. All right back to the show. Hey everyone, welcome to the investors podcast. I'm your host Preston. Impatient is always accompanied by my co host broder Sohn. And we're just going to jump right into this and we're gonna play the first question for you guys. My name is Feroze, and I'm from Mississauga in Canada. And now live in New York. My question is how to best emulate, your success in building your circle of competence, given the environment today, and investing is a lot more competitive than when you started out, what would you do differently if anything at all when building your circle, would you still build a very broad, generalist framework or would you build a much deeper, but narrower focus se on industries markets or even a country, and if so, which ones would interest, you? Thank you. We are riders is much more competitive. Now, when I started I literally could take the Moody's industrial manual, and I could go through page by page at least run my on my eyes over every company end think about which ones. I might think more about I would just do a lot a whole lot of reading I try to learn as much as I could about, as many businesses and I would try to figure out which ones I really had some important knowledge and understanding that was overwhelmingly most of my competitors. I would also try and figure out where which ones I didn't understand, and I would focus on having as big a circle as I could have an also focused on being as realistic as I could about where the parameters of my shirt of competence word, I knew when I met Lorimer Davidson, in January of nineteen fifty one I could get insurance what he said made so much sense to me in the three or four hours. I spent. With them on that Saturday. So I dug into it. I don't understand it. My mind work well, in that respect, I didn't think I could understand retailing all done. We've worked for same grocery stores at Charlie. And neither one of us that much about Ray touting except it was harder work than we liked and. You've got to do the same thing and you've got way more competition now. If you'll get to know even about a relatively smaller more than other people do and you don't feel a little compulsion to act, too often, you just, you wait till the odds are strongly in your favor. It's still a very interesting game is harder than it used to be. Well, I rate strategy early great Bassett humanity is to specialize. Nobody wants to go to a doctor that's half proctology and a half dentist. And the so the ordinary way to sixty eight is narrowly specialized Warren. I really didn't do that. And that and we didn't because we prefer the other type of actively, but I don't think we can hurt the other people, you know, it's response is like the one that Charlie monger, just had that just make you just smile and just love that guy. I mean I don't know how you can get funnier than him. I would just tell you that I think that the most important thing that they said in their response, and I don't know that they really knew how to how to answer the question to be honest with you. But I think that the most important thing that they said was you just have to be a knowledge pig. You have to be trying to improve yourself at any and all times. And if there's an area you don't know. Well, you gotta do things to try to learn it, better that doesn't mean that you become the resident expert in it. But you gotta get better at the things that you're that you're just weak at. And then the things that you have a natural God given talent for maybe you dig into it more to become just that much better than everybody else. I think that that's all they're saying here. But truly my big takeaway is you gotta learn learn learn these guys always had a book in their hand. They were always doing something to improve themselves. And for people that aren't intimately familiar with Charlie Munger, and Warren Buffett, I'd tell you, they study all the time, they're constantly trying to improve themselves, he no, I have a lot of sympathy for the guy asking the question. It makes a lot of sense to ask because the invest universe is so big wish you start and wished you in this, why not ask buffet of old people. If you've got the chance now what Buffett talks about is going one step for the back. We just really the very core of Berkshire Halloway structure. And this is whether we talk about this specific meeting, or say, managing multiple subsidiaries or in buffet and bucks. A Halloway is all about empowering. People. He does not tell this, yo his subsidiaries, what to do knowing telling that new investors should focus their call competent is on say, India or only to buy securities. It does not start there for you as an investor. It really starts with what you have a natural flair for, and whether you have an interest and often, they'll go hand in hand and based on that, you can gain a competitive advantage to your competitors by being more noticeable. And if you don't know where to start a really love. His thoughts about start reading a ton of business and the best thing books, and then see what you naturally gravitate towards because that's probably where you're going to have an inch. No, it's like asking. Mt, jordan. How to be a successful basketball player, if you don't have an natural flair talent and interest, you're probably not be successful anyway. All right. So moving along to the next question. Larry Fink of black rock has predicted that in the near. Future. All investors will be using ES g environmental social governance metrics to help determine the value of a company. I'm worried. We don't score well on everything from climate to diversity. Inclusion. How well do you think Berkshire measures up on those metrics and are they valuable metrics? I think in reality, we measure of well, we don't want to be preparing a lot of reports and asking sixty subsidiaries each to do something with a though setup team. And then mail things two quarters. And then we'll supply them somebody who have our stock goes up some baba going to then. Anyway, we want our managers to the right things. We give them enormous latitude to do that. And I think that our batting average really is quite good. Mentioned this in the annual report. I don't I can't imagine another company like but here we are five hundred billion market capitalization. We do not have a consolidated piano, monthly we don't need it. I can't imagine any other organization doing that. But we don't need it, and we're not going to tie up resources resources doing things we don't need to do, just because it's the sort of standard procedure of in corporate America and corporate America is very worried about in general. They're very worried about whether somebody's going to upset their apple cart, and on with activists and everything. So they want to be very sure that every shareholders is happy on issues like that. And then fortunately, we don't have to worry about that. So we don't have to run up a lot of expenses doing things. That don't actually lows run the business better. I think Berkshire the environmental stuff is done on level down from us. And I think Greg Abel's just terrific at it. And so, I think we scoreboard well, when it gets the so-called best corporate practices, I think that people talk about them, don't really know what the best practices. Are they just know what they think are the best practices, and they determined that based on mobile cell, not all work? And so I like our way of doing things better than theirs. And I hope to God. We never follow their best practices. Yeah. Point out. One thing on independent directors. I mean, I've been on twenty public company corporate boards not counting. Any Berkshire subsidiary? So I've seen a lot of corporate board Jaap rate, and the independent directors in many cases are the are the least independent. I mean, if if the income you receive as a corporate director, which typically maybe around two hundred and fifty thousand a year now, if that's an important part of your income, and you hope that some other corporation, holds the CEO and says house, so and so is a director and they your yo says, always fine now never raises any problems. And then you get on another board at two hundred and fifty thousand and that's an important part how in the world is that independent. I really just an observation. I can't recall particularly any independent director where their income was from the board was important to them. I can't be call them ever doing anything in board meetings, your committee meetings that actually was countered the interest, I'd probably be had the same way in the same position if two hundred and fifty thousand years, important to you. Why the hell would you behave in a way, there's going to cause your CEO to say the next say this guy acts up a little bit too much better? Get somebody else. You don't get invited to be boards if belch too often the dinner. Dams. We had the director said, I don't see why you've got you've got to be so important just because you own all shares, Charlie. Charlie? And I used after cool off after the blue chip stamps means because we, we Rick garren on what percent probably fifty fifty percent. And they pointed all the it came out of a government, settlement or something. And it was not an ideal form of decision making, and they just had a different calculus in their mind. That ended I can understand it, but I'm not going to replicate. It. I absolutely love this discussion, and we wanted to play this to show you how different Warren buffet and Charlie Munger thing about everything in business. And I'm not the one to tell you what they do is right or wrong. But I do want to say that every successful company starts with integrity and abundance and that integrity, whether you agree with the decisions are not is the very foundation of why books Halloway today is a five hundred billion. Mark have company starting from all of this nothing in the sixties whenever buff took over so Stig. You talked a little bit about this, one after the first question about pushing thority in pushing responsibility down to the next level, and you heard a little bit about that in the in the second part of the way they were answering this question, and it really kind of came whenever Charlie Munger was talking when he said, we take care of all, that at the second level, not at the top level. And I think what he's saying is we. Charge. Are we put so much responsibility in our managers, and our operational subsidiary CEOs beneath us that we charge them with that responsibility in order to handle it? And if they're not doing their job. Well, then we will replace that person, and we'll get rid of them. If, if we don't think that they're taking care of things that they need to be taken care of for people that aren't real familiar with Berkshire Hathaway. They'll be blown away that accompany with a five hundred billion market cap would only have a handful of people at the headquarters level, and that's truly. I mean you can literally fit in one picture. You'll see this in the shareholders annual report that comes out once a year they have a picture of their entire staff in Omaha. And it's, it's literally like forty people that and that might be more than what it actually might be in the thirties. I can't remember what the number is. But it's thirty to forty people that are there in the picture. And it's kind of amazing to think that you'd have a company that's where the half a trillion dollars. And those are all the more people that are at the top. Of the business. Everything else is pushed down to the next level for them the manage, and that's their model. That's how they operate. So just some really fascinating points there if for people that aren't real familiar with the, the last part where they're talking about board, members people sitting on the board that are representing the shareholders interests, and what he's talking about is if a person sitting on a board and they're collecting most board members, if it's a large company or collecting around a quarter of a million dollars a year, and they attend for meetings a year and have, you know, a little bit more responsibilities throughout the year but not a lot. And so what he's saying is, if, if that's a person's primary salary like they're bringing in a quarter of a million dollars a year because they sit on one board, and that's basically it that person cannot act on behalf of the shareholders that person's going to act on behalf of the shareholders that are going to keep them on that board so that they can just they're basically buying their vote. They're controlling that person's vote. Because they're reliant on that income of a quarter million dollars to continue to sit on that board. And so that's where Buffett and Munger both are frustrated with that model. They obviously don't have that model on the Berkshire board. But they see this in other companies, and they don't want that to be replicated in their own board structure. So that's what some of that conversation was if you weren't following it all. All right. So let's go ahead to the next question. You're a big advocate of index investing and of not trying to time the market. But by you're having virtual hold such large amount of cash and T-Bills it seems to me don't practice what you preach. I'm thinking that a good alternative would be for you to invest most of the berkshires excess cash in a well, diversified index fund until you find attractive acquisition or by back sock at you done that over the past fifteen years, all the time, keeping the twenty billion dollar cash cushion you want. I estimate that at the end of two thousand eighteen the company's one hundred twelve billion balance had cash cash equivalents in short term investments and TV bills would have instead been worth about one hundred and fifty five billion the difference between the two figures is an opportunity costs, equal to more than twelve percent of Berkshire's, Kurt book value. That's perfectly decent question. I wouldn't quarrel with the numbers, and I would say that, that is an alternative for example, but my successor may wish to employ because I'm balance. I would rather own an index fund, then carry treasury bills, if we'd instituted that policy in two thousand seven or eight. We have been under different position in terms of our ability to move late in two thousand eight or two thousand nine it has certain certain execution problems with hundreds of billions of dollars than it, does, if you were having a similar policy with a billion or two billion, or something perfectly rational, observation, and certainly looking back on ten years of a bull market. It really jumps out at you. But I would argue that if you're working smaller numbers that it would make a lot of sense, and if they're working with large numbers, it might well, make sense it the future, we committed. Ten billion a week ago and their conditions and they're not they're not remote. They're not likely in any given week or month or year. But, but there conditions under which we could spend one hundred billion dollars, very, very quickly, if we did to both conditions existed, the capital, very while deploy them much better than in an index fund. And so we've been we're operating on the basis that we will get chances to deploy capital. They will come and clumps in all likelihood and they will come when other people don't want out. Okay. Kapil charlie. What do you think about it? Well, I played guilty to being a little more conservative with a cash then other people. And but I think that's all right. Role of money into a lot of securities done better than the S and P. The twenty twenty hindsight, remember, we had all that extra cash all that period. If somebody can come along the way of opportunities, and so on, I don't say it's a Santa little strong on cash, when you're as big a company as we are I watched harbored use the last out of their cash, including all prepaid tuition from the parents and plunge it into the Margaret exactly the wrong moment, and make a lot of forward commitments to private equity. They suffered like two or three years. Absolutely agony where am I going to change? We do like having a lot of money to be able to operate, very fast and very big. And we won't get those opportunities frequently you know, in the next twenty or thirty years, Dur, three times when it'll be raining gold and all you have to go outside, but we don't know when they will happen. And we have a lot of money to commit an I would say that you told me I had either carry short-term treasury bills, or have index funds and just let that money be invested in American generally, I would take the index funds, but we still have holes and the one thing you should very definitely understand about. Berkshire is that we run the business in a way that we think is consistent with serving Gerald who have virtually all of their net worth in. Berkshire I happen to be in that position myself. But I would do it that way. Way under any circumstances. We have a lot of people who trust us who really have disproportionate amounts of Berkshire compared to their net worth if you were to follow standard investment procedures, and we want to make money for everybody, but we want to make very, very sure that we don't lose permanently money from anybody for anybody that buys our stock somewhere around intrinsically business value to begin with we have an aversion to having a million plus shareholders, maybe as many as two million and having a lot of them ever really lose money if they're willing to stay with us for a while. And we know how people behave when, when the world, generally is upset, and we have a real disposition toward that group. This was one of my favorite questions asked. You in the meeting if not the very best question buffets de of having plenty of cash aside from the around twenty billion dollar cushion, he would need for his business. And if everything goes south aside, from that is really to be able to pull the trigger if a big buying opportunity comes along, and there's any good capital or he wants to apply the money with best put to use. And where's that was was really what the question was all about now? The ten billion dollar deal. He briefly mentioned that would just sell do right before the meeting that was a ten billion dollar for Oxydental petroleum whip Halloway could collect an eight percent dividend. Preferred she s and the right to buy eighty million chefs at a pre-negotiated price of sixty two point five dollars. Now, this is a great deal. If you're a shareholder in these deals, do not come along as often as we would like and even though the last fifteen years. With what the question was all about has generally been the bull market. I think it's worth a discussion if the maturity cost is so high from having cash that it might even outweigh the potential benefit of forgoing, if you big deals, especially keep in mind that the ten billion dollars could easily be freed up from an index fund if needed somewhat fast and deployed into the deal. And really, I don't like mongers response about how Berkshire Halloway could make more in hindsight. I kind of feel like he's Dutch, the question too much, because this is more question about a conceptual change in how to allocate cash and before too long. The might not be struggling with deploying hundred billion dollars in cash, given the size of Berkshire Halloway it much soon be two hundred billion dollars in cash, whenever it's trillion dollar company. And then you having a significant part of that cash pocket index fund, I think would likely be. At the and I was happy to hear that buffet opened up the possibility for his successor Stig. I'm with you on this. I like this question. Hands down the best out of all the questions from the meeting. I think it's the most pertinent question, because it's the most realistic for me. Keep hearing him go on CNBC and all these different talk shows. And he's saying, yeah, you should be indexing. It's probably the best thing to do for the typical investor out there. And yet, he's sitting on one hundred billion dollars a cash, and it's really hard to see what he's doing on his balance. She and then hear what he's saying and it just does not match up. And I think that him retaining a lot of cash do. Big deals is one thing. So if he wants to sit on sixty billion or fifty billion in excess of the twenty billion dollar buffer. I think that makes sense. I'm just kinda surprised that he's not even allocating a small portion of the hundred billion plus to some maybe the S and P five hundred or the Russell two thousand or whatever. I'm just a little surprise that. He's not allocating some call it ten billion dollars, ten percent of the cash position or whatever. And you rarely see him interrupt the person as they're asking the question. In fact, I don't know that I've ever heard him kind of jump in mid question in start responding to it. And that's kind of what you heard him do here with Carol Lou MRs question he didn't even want her to go any further. He just started saying. Hey, that's a fair question. It was kind of it was an interesting way in which he responded in it, it was not typical of him to respond like that. So I think that, that also demonstrates that it was a very fair question. I think that he answered it reasonably I think he owned up he said, hey, maybe you're right. Maybe I maybe we should have been doing that. And that's that's why like buffet I think that's why most people like Buffett is because he's just so open. And he's open to the opportunity that, hey, maybe I m wrong, maybe I could have done it a little bit better. And I think that's such a great characteristic for people to, to see an absurd. Serve. But anyway, let's go ahead and jump to the next question. Let's take a quick break and hear from today sponsor, the investors podcast is brought to you by swell investing. Did you know most retirement accounts and index funds investor money and big oil fossil fuels and firearms if that makes you cringe, you should check out swell, investing swell created an impact investing platform where you can grow your wealth, without sacrificing your values from companies making medical breakthroughs to improving access to clean drinking water swells portfolios contained companies with both high impact and high growth potential better yet swell fees or fair and transparent at seventy five BPS, plus no trading fees, no price, tiers, no expense ratios in no hidden fees. So if you want to stop fueling the problem and start funding the solution become an impact investor with swell. For a limited time, our listeners get a fifty dollar bonus when they sign up with the promo code TI. Check it out at swell. Investing dot com slash t. IP or download the app on the app store. That's swell investing dot com slash t I p or download the swell investing IOS app on the app store. Swell invest in progress. I Warren, high, Charlie my name is Kerry, and this is my daughter, Chloe. She's eleven weeks. So very first Berkshire meeting. We're from San Francisco, and we have a question on employment for you as both a major employer and a producer of consumer goods. What do you make of the insurgent outlook for good fulltime jobs with the rise of automation and temporary employment? We have that question do one hundred years ago, and somebody said the outlook for development, a farm machinery and tractors and combines and so on, meaning that ninety percent of the people on farms, we're going to be lose their job, it would look terrible, when, but our economy and our people our system has been remarkably ingenious in achieving whatever we have now hundred and sixty million jobs when throughout the period ever since seventeen seventy six, we've been figuring out ways to get rid of jobs. That's what capitalism does, and it produces more and more goods per person. And we never know exactly where they come from. I don't know what occupation. Well, if you're in the passenger train business, I mean, you know, we're going to that was gonna change. We find ways in this economy to employ more and more people we've gotten while now more. People employed than ever in the history of the country, even though company after country and company, and particularly in heavy industry. And that sort of thing has been trying to figure out naturally how they get more productive all the time, which means turning out the same number of goods with fewer people or turning out more goods. But the same number that's that is capitalism. Don't think you need to worry about American, ingenuity, running out when we started with four million people with eighty percent of the labor being employed on farms, so this system works, and it will continue to work. I don't know what the next big thing. We'll be. I do know there will be an expert in thing, Charlie, well, we want to shift Scott worked the robots to the extent. We can. That's what we were doing. And said two hundred years. Nobody wants to back to be a blacksmith or scooping all the street picking up the horse or whatever help, he's you'll use to do. We're glad to have. Aided and allow us worry about the future comes from leftist, SU who where he terribly that the, the people at the bottom of the economic pyramid had little stretch when the people top got ahead faster, that happened by accident because we were in so much trouble. We had to flood the world with money and drive interest rates down zero and of course, drove asset practice up and help the rich, nobody did that because he was suddenly love the rich, it was just an accident. And it will soon pass. I do think that no matter what we're discussing, it's too easy to say. This is what history shows there is something that does work and therefore, we will continue to do so. But the important thing is sue understand why something's happened. And Nick just observe the something has happened. It is live, you, what Buffett and Munger do think though, about another part of it might also be that there are major employers, and it would be hard to say, otherwise, but if we do look at job creation, we can generally divided into two groups with physical and we have cognitive jobs. So for the physical jobs that was what we traditional have seen in agriculture, and as buffet also mentions we've replaced by machines because they have better physical capabilities that we as humans have, and then we started to work in factories now factory jobs can't be automated, because machines can do it better and faster than us. But what happens when a machine learning takes over cognitive jobs. For instance, the job of Dr familiar disease is today already machines could diagnose much better than doctors. And for many feels in law, we already see that machines can do repetitive task Matz. Better than educated lawyers, so it's not a natural law that will create more jobs in humans, there will definitely be new jobs, but not necessarily more than jump destruction. That is less to be seen rally. I would say that, just as the natural law that machines, which replace us for fiscal jobs is just as much a natural law that we as humans will be replaced in most fields, for many cognitive jobs, and even though we don't know this yet. Hopefully, it will be for the better for the most part. This is an interesting discussion. And I think it's a discussion that you hear a lot amongst investors and people trying to understand the impacts of artificial intelligence and all the innovation that's happening in the tech industry. And I hear this argument that. Longer in buffet or talking about, hey, when you look back at the last two hundred years, you would have been able to probably kinda here, this same argument at any point in time, because technology is always revolutionizing, the labor force in how people are going to be employed in the coming years. I also want to say that I'm also familiar with the thing called normalcy bias, which is people having the opinion that because some things never happened or a situations. Never happened to them before that, that, that reason alone is why it won't happen to them in the future. And I think that it's just important to kind of have a balance between having an appreciation did not fall victim to normalcy bias, but also take it face value. What they're saying is, this is something that happens people technology will up route jobs in the labor force, and typically what's happened is people. Find new ways to get implied in the market is continually evolving and changing like them. I have no idea. What, what implications this is going to have. But I do know that. It's going to be quite fascinating in there's going to be like, anything huge opportunities, especially for investors in this area if you stay current try to read is much you can try to understand what it is and understand where the market's going, and there's opportunities there too. So you just can't look at the doom and gloom in the negative side of it. There's absolutely a positive side of every negative piece. That's out there. And I would just challenge people to try to find how you can take advantage of something like that. Alright. So at this point in time, they show we'll play Christian from the audience and this question comes from Kyle high presidents take. My name is Kyle, and I'm from Philadelphia. First off, I want to thank you guys. Both for the incredible information you guys put out the podcast is definitely helped me become a much better investor. So my question is some companies forego profits in the short term in order to expanding grow creating an accounting loss for several years. Think Amazon, would you guys consider by company using this business JiJi and it? So what would you look forward to go about valuing it giving? They have no current earnings. Thank you guys. Great Christian, Kyle and very timely now that we're doing an episode about valium, nesting and a Halloway. We actually have cord you Christian a few times before here on this show about how to value company with no earnings or should I say we talked about it, but not really explained how to do it premiered. Because we don't know as about you, invest us. We discount the future expected cash flows. And if we don't have any or if you can't make meaningful predictions really can use our normal ation approach now the reason why I still wanted to play your question is because we s investors shoot. Not only ask, what is the approach or the equation to how to value, a profitable business versus how value unprofitable business? These are questions that Buffett has been asked multiple times before. So I actually took the liberty to tweak. You question. Just a little into something, I think would be more interesting, perhaps a bit more relevant or all of us. Rather I would like to discuss something I hardly see covered namely, what is in between? So please allow me to elaborate. So everyone basically knows how much profit any public company is producing. You know, it's all in your financial statements successful investors are better at predicting how much money the company will make in the future after all, it's the future and cash flow shoe been tied onto Aston investor now. I said value investor. You're looking for a company that already has a proven track record of being very good of making money and can be expected to make more money Monka talked about this during the annual shareholders, meaning he was not unhappy about not spotting Amazon, because that was not when the historic competence, and as you mentioned is not until recently made money, rather Munger, kicking himself, not investing in Google. So let's take Google s Nick Sambol. Hugh might for good reason, say that so much have been said about Google and this hot to find any. Future cashflows that the Maga has not accounted for. But I think Google serves as a great example, not just because Munger mentioned it, but really understanding of the current Kesslers and projecting future. Cashflows as you might know, the vast majority of Google's Regnier with a come from appetizing actually matzos eighty five percent, and this is primarily through at words and out sense, the industry grew as much as twenty one percent last year with Facebook and Google catching the lying Shah. And also you have Amazon coming to this market. Now, speaking of which now conventional asymmetric would allow for you to determine how much you think the industry will grow. And how much of that growth Google will capture, and you can fail easy, come up with intrinsic value. That is definitely a vital part of the equation. And then you had to figure out if you think that Google curving the trading and little more than twenty one times into price value to earnings before interest and tax is high for company with those growth prospects is really up. To you, but we're really starts to become interesting. Kyle is what you refer to with Amazon this short term pain for the long term profitability for Google us. You pay attention to the division, they refer to as all the bats at first glance is nothing to be impressed about, you know, in the fourth quarter and twenty eighteen for example, these all the baths lost one point three billion dollars. And this wasn't revenue on only one hundred fifty four million dollars. But still, there's a good reason why should pay attention because an other bats, you have Google's long-term investment, you have multiple companies including calico very interesting come when you that as combat aging associated diseases, you have deep mind. The breed is a company founded by the Asab. He's perhaps, the most famous company in the world. And this shows very promising results so far, and perhaps even more famous. You have way MU Google self driving car project, and by most experts, it'd be. The most developed self-driving project on the planet. So constantly thinking terms of hardware, value unprofitable companies and how evalu- profitable companies respectively. I would rather refer to what famous value in master sent you back say called emerging moat, and there was something he talked about whenever we had him here on the show, so with he would do is he what's focus on companies in. It could be company like Google so really good companies. And if you think the trait and a good valuation to ensure that you have a decent March and a safety, then you should really scrutinize the existing business model and also the projects that the company has in the pipeline when making evaluation. And, but doing so you'll also ensure that you have a sizable upside. So Kyle fantastic question. Also, make sure to linked to the pitch that we have here on the mastermind group and q two two thousand eighteen way we specifically talked about Google, if you horn interested in that company, but also to interview. With Sunday Bakshi the concept of emerging mode. That's definitely something that is often overlooked even the value investing community zoo. Kyle. I don't have too much more to add other than what Stig said there. My only addition would be personally. I look a lot at the top line especially now because I think you're seeing extremely large companies call A, Google, call it Amazon, that when you go back to the early days, the Benjamin Graham timeframe, and he's talking about growth companies versus value companies back then you didn't have companies that were the largest market cap businesses on the planet in a growth phase of their life cycle at that size. They weren't growing at the speed that we see today and so my argument for let let me just use a company that's out there right now. Tencent, huge company, massive multibillion dollar size company and yet you look at their top line. And the rate at which that company's growing, and it's growing like crazy. And that's not something that you saw fifty sixty years ago is a growth rate on a company of such that size. So what I would tell you for me. Personally, I am very scared of investing in a growth company. That's very small that I don't really understand it at an intimate level. So publicly traded business that's out there. That's small cap. I don't know it like I know my own business or something that you might own operationally. So that's why I say, I'm a little scared of owning something like that. Because the top line revenues or sales could be dependent on one critical thing that then just poof, it's gone, and the next quarter. And then there goes your there goes your investment, there goes the share price, because it's so heavily reliant on that top line. But when you're dealing with a large cap company, I would argue the disappearance of that revenue. Or that top line is so much more difficult for it to disappear. Because you're dealing with so many assets on that balance sheet that are driving that top line. So I guess what I'm trying to say is I'm more comfortable if it's a large cap company. I'm personally looking at the revenue growth and I'm looking at the rate of that revenue growth. And I'm tracking the change in that rate for me is I'm looking at potentially investing in a quote unquote growth like company. So that's the only thing I want to add to what sticks at. And I think some of his points are just right on target super important for people to understand, but this would be the only thing that I would add in addition to that. So Kyle a token of our appreciation, we want to give you access to our brand new tool that we have on our website called TI finance. We're going to give you an entire year subscription free to this new tool. And what does tool does is it allows you to filter, the value picks for the entire US stock market to find the Warren buffet style picks in? Very quick and efficient way not only does it help you find great value picks. But it also helps you find great momentum picks at the same time this way. You don't fall into the trap of catching a falling knife, or a value trap. It helps you find those companies that are great value. But also have good momentum characteristic. So we really hope you enjoy this tool. And for anybody else out there, if you want to check out this tool on our website, just go to the investors, podcast dot com and in our top level, navigation, just click on the finance tab. It'll take you to this tool. All right. Guys. That was all that Preston, I had for this week's episode of investors podcast. We see each LA again next week. Thanks for listening to TI access the show notes. Go to the investors podcasts dot com to get your questions played on the show. Go to ask the investors dot com and to win a free subscription to any of our courses on academy. This show is for entertainment purposes, only before, making investment decisions consult, a professional, this show is copyrighted by the IP network, written permission must be granted before syndication, or rebroadcasting.

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Episode 314: Opportunistic Omnivores Eat Invasives

Harvesting Nature’s Wild Fish and Game Podcast

1:05:20 hr | Last month

Episode 314: Opportunistic Omnivores Eat Invasives

"Join justin pounds and harvesting nature crew as they explore the world of cooking wild fish and game while sharing recipes tips tricks and lessons learned from their pursuit of wild food. We sure hope you wait. Before the show is your gonna leave. Hungry. lis- ill the wild fish and game. Podcast hey everybody. Welcome back to harvesting. Nature's wild fish and game podcasts. You got your host here. Justin townes in in a. I'm joined by very special guests who i'm going to introduce in just a moment First off i want to give some Some updates about what's going on in the world of harsh nature so real quick. We put the finishing touches on a on our alligator film. If you go back over to our youtube channel enroll back a little bit. You see that. We just started our adventures for food. Film series and released are antelope film and in next up the the block. We have a our alligator hunts from late last year. And we're going to go through that it's gonna be great adventure outside of that. Not real many updates for me doing little flats fishing this week. Coming up in. Try to get out for some redfish in permit. Do a little catching cook. If i can hopefully don't jinx myself but We'll see what happens. We did recently create a facebook community groups so go check that out While fishing game podcast while fishing game community. That's over on facebook Hit join get your info on that and then as always like what we're putting out you can buy a coffee Clicked linked down the show. Notes three bucks helps us out. Helps fuel those long nights. A podcast editing in clashing away on the keyboard so we thank you to all those supporters who have contributed. I won't spend too long on on going on with me because we have an awesome guests said so our guest. Today is the author to cookbooks. He's been featured in numerous publications including california waterfowl magazine south carolina waterfowl associations waterfowl and wetlands in cooking wild magazine. He is the cooking editor for ducks unlimited. Any hosts the show on sportsman channel. Called dead me please. Welcome to the harvest nature while fishing game. Podcast sporting chef scott lace. Welcome sir the debate here us happy to have you everybody's gonna learn real quick Obviously that we're gonna discuss eating invasive species because i looking at some of the work you've done on dead. Meet some of the other things. I've seen Y- you're kind of a a growing expert in this field. So i felt this is the twenty year anniversary of the sporting chef. Tv show what you can find on sportsman channel but you know since we started dead meat seven or eight years ago. That's all anybody wants to talk about. They wanna talk and nobody wants to know the best thing i've ever eaten. They want to know the worst thing but the debt needs show has. It's been really cool because it's not it's not about me. It's about some of the people that we need out there. That actually like possum possum. No reason eight boss. I'm telling you people that. tell me. i really love possum. I don't think they've ever eaten chicken. Yeah i'm trying to think so. Grown up I grew up in oklahoma. And you know you hear stories about all the various things people eat like my grandmother told me growing up that she a various critters. I think i don't know if possum ever made the listener raccoon was in there. She her complaint was. It was always bit too greasy for her taste. So but if you like dark stringy greasy mate. You'll love record. Well that answers that question. So outside of sort of your introduction Can you tell us a little bit about yourself in sort of how you got into cooking wild fishing as you. You've been doing it doing it for a while. I've you know appeal. They're up there one of the greats in my book for sure. Yeah i'm the l l being i think of Of cooking mine is not a well planned career path. I was i've i've always had finished and cooked. And i was getting a degree in psychology and working as a bouncer at the university of arizona. And i got an offer to be a manager in the phoenix story. I was going to school in tucson. I got a two week training course at had. A cook bartender manager sent me to phoenix a few years. Later i was vice president of the thirty three unit chain that i had my own restaurant in sacramento and we would have game on the menu and people would say how mine doesn't taste like yards and i'd say bring it in so people would bring in their fishing game. We started doing game feeds. I had a catering business where we catered forty plus chapters for ducks unlimited and all the different banquets and we do a lot of game and i started on. You know this is the twenty year anniversary of the sporting shift. tv show. It was not a well-planned career path. I feel really really really fortunate that i get to do what i do for a living. I mean i get go places. Cooked stuff meet people. I could have never done that with my degree in psychology. Even meeting people but in different circumstances for sure. Yeah they're not. They're not quite so winding road shooting. Whatever nice So since you brought it up earlier. What is the best thing you've ever eaten. You know what if. I'll tell you lion fish in florida ed and you and i talked before we got started at florida between florida and texas. We could fill several seasons of dead meat because there's so many invasive creatures they're The lion fish was delicious. Believe it or not. I just had a coyote burger in indiana coyote big I know i was anxious to eat. A coyote burger but it tasted great if i was with a tractor. In indiana was an ex-police chief trapper and again. You know we get to make really interesting people in a taste of just like any other burger. I'd cooked at a little bit more than medium rare just because it's coyote It was so much better than the bear lever that i had in minnesota in september. Would you describe a bear liver Mealy gritty meaty sponge And after i ate it. I went to the minnesota. Dnr site and it said do not eat bear liver. It's so high in vitamin b. It's toxic oh so I don't think i remember going to get the corona virus. I've eaten so much stuff and i. It wasn't all good. And i and i did have a few negative reactions here and there along the way but i i think i built up a pretty good immunity. So whenever you're you're presented or preparing to consume any given any given meets bear. Coyote burger whatever You mentally psych yourself up to eat the whole meal or you just like one two bites to taste it or how does that play out. In a rarely. Do i eat a full plate of of armadillo or whatever. I'm i'm gonna eat a bite so you don't have to. I will let people know if i don't like it. I mean the bear liver. There's no way. I'm going to say boy. This bear liber sure is good. Because then you're going to baylor and go what the hell was lace talk about this bear livers thoughts so i don't want to offend people. You know there are people that consider things okay. So we're down in the texas mexico border and these really nice guys said we save this for you it's a motto now. Machiko is goat heart liver and lungs wrapped with goat fat and tied with godin intestines. And it was undercooked so the fat wasn't even textural. It was just kind of soft soft warm fat with a crunchy oregon on the inside. And then you get to the intestine part that holds the whole thing together So it no the people that watch the show regularly. When i look at the camera and i go i just give him a lot. They know scott did not like the machado. But i don't want to offend these. Really nice guys were saying they were saving it for me to them. It's a big deal. Yeah yeah in. Other people like possum. I'm i i don't i don't see any reason to eat it again. I'm definitely not one to to pick it those who like it. Everybody's got their taste. I'm sure i eat things times people think's weird but you know what to each their own juror but i commend you for going out in tasting so others can't as you put it or so don't have to go all the theater by luchino. That's fair so i to enjoy lion fish too. I think The first time. I had lion fish I was down in. Bon air in the in the dutch caribbean. Abc's in a they had it on the menu at a pizza shop and so it was on a pizza so like lion fish pesto pizza right and it was. It was phenomenal. Just nice white flaky really. Isn't you know they. Obviously they can't be lying. God's gotta got to be trapped or spirit or whatever and and they're they're destroying ecosystem there in florida and so we got to get rid of these lion fish in their. They're they're the feral hogs of the see. We've gotta get rid of him. It was. I think it was earlier. Are i guess not really. It was the mid last year. Did they put out. I think it was university of florida. Put out a lot of research. They're doing with different types of paneling or plastics to attract them To try to set up spate hooks in in different things to try to figure out more productive ways to catch him. 'cause you know those people that don't know out there like scott said you have to go out and physically spirit or you knew some or you know there's various tactics to do it but it mostly requires a human body going down underwater in if you're free diving takes a lot of training in a confident person. If you're scuba diving it starts to become a little bit expensive. If you're looking at the commercial side so the university trying to find a better method to commercialize this. I think is a step in the right direction to try to get a handle on on the radicalization if we could just harvest them and get them to dinner tables. I know people would eat the snot out of them because they're really really good like you said it's a white white flaky fish. I mean it's really. It's as i mean it's walleye like it's just really good. Yeah so one of my last restaurant. Gigs i was working as a chef. Here in key west a taco place mellow cafe. And that's what. I searched and searched for months and months to all the the fish purveyors in town trying to score. Deal for lion. fish It soon as it gets here like it's out the door right l. house i if you get it in call me please so And there's there's a good spot up in Midways up the keys in in marathon. It's a sushi joint. I can't think of the name of it But they do a line for sushi. It's like a a tempera. I wanna say but managed phenomenally take the skeleton of it which they've also fried and they put on top of the sushi roll so it's too neat presentation. Yes eat like mouth open looking at you with the the trimmed Fans but on top well at end up in the panhandle. I if i'd had been destined or somewhere around there. They have a lion fish festival every year. And you know they they. People are buying them by the thousands of pounds or whatever and they're getting all bunch fish him. You just need to get a hold of some of those lion fish from the big the big feast up there. that's it. I think that a little more value on the on the coal mary side robot people in like venison diplomacy saying. Hey come try this out. Utah out They do. I know they do the lion fish. Derby kind of throughout the state where you enter you send in your numbers and stuff and you get a t shirt ahead. A friend who placed up. I think he placed in the top of fifty or twenty five as far as the number he cotton on social media is like every day. You'd see him out and he'd be like just catch him and here's like man that's insane so it's a cool thing I've seen out around When we've spear and staffer dive in for lobster and you'll see him. You know. I think the first one i ever saw in the wild was about the size of a half dollar and just kind of stumbled on it and i had to like stare at it. I was like what is that. And i try as they got closer as i'm a little too close still has backed up in. I just ended up. I didn't even think. My spear i think it just hit it and it just i don't know if it dispersed or what but it. It was gone after that So we try and we always carry a pair of shears in on the boat or die bags. We can snip those those Poisonous points off. Which lot of a lot of people don't know once you get rid of that gets you can treat it as a regular fish you can break it down like any other fish. We had a free diver in fort. Lauderdale who can she can free dive down to one hundred which i can't do That oh yeah yeah it was. It was fun watching her. I tell you it's a you know. I'm i'm like a thirty forty foot game like that's my max right but the ability of some people your friends on the west coast even friends up in fort lauderdale miami area that man they go they go so deep and for the of time in their down years like i don't know how she does it she says you just have to slow down your heart rate in blah blah blah. And she'll just sit on the bottom of one hundred i. I'm never going to be able to do that. I don't think. I don't think it's in my There's something about being up super high and being down super-low that there's like this middle ground. That i'm very happy so So talking more about sort of Things living in florida. We're going to cover a lot of florida things. Actually i think almost everything on our list can be found in florida and some some accord but Chicken of the trees the guana No shortage those here. Mel's a fight them off Off my back deck for meeting my gardens almost daily so what was. What was your experience with guana. Well with a guy. George sarah who wrote a cookbook about cooking guavas end his job. I don't know if he's still donor to not he Drives around gasparilla island and shoots guavas with twenty two rat loads and tell it guns and they fired him at one point and then all the guan came back again and then when they hired him back he said he filled the back of his head like a mini up. But it's still a pickup. He filled the back of his pickup with guavas Iguanas have got a bit of a salmonella problem. So you don't wanna you wanna make sure you what we did. Was we boil them. I peeled the skin. We really i mean they were thoroughly cooked and to me. They don't taste like chicken. They tasted a lot like frog legs to me. It's i'd say that's where i met with it. I don't think frog legs tastes like chicken. They taste like frog legs yet bought. That's that's what i got out of the iguana. You can do anything you want to with them. We did tacos in tow sada's in of a standard thing But once you cook the meat you can strip it out and do whatever you want to with it but you do want to make sure that you avoid that whole salmonella thing. But they're fun too hot. We're going to go to puerto rico this year And we're going for barracuda and iguana. I wanna eat some of that. Puerto rican street food and save. I can build up my immunity a little bit more. Good good luck out of puerto rico. It's quite a culinary adventure. A barracuda though i mean not an invasive but Pretty frowned upon in. Us cultures far as consuming it in all over the caribbean i think every island or every central american nation. I've been to. It's like people are all about it right. that's not getting thrown back Which i don't know maybe people put too much merit into the Scared they don't know how to approach it right. And i've i've had barracuda before several times. I had no problem with it. You know i. It's not one of those fish. I'm gonna take home and freeze To me it's gotta be on is bled fast yet cook it that day Or i you know there's some things. Just don't freeze all that. Well one of the things that barracuda's are good for catching Goliath grouper when you stick a big hook and a barracuda headed kinda stays in there for a while by. We get that we did that off the dry tour to goes with a giant barracuda that we caught this goliath grouper kept stealing it and so we finally buried it in the head and we finally got got a group out of the deal. He does goliath groupers. Something else. they are such a is one. I took a trip out to Fort jefferson which is the the big fort that's at marquette s dry tortuga area. A lot of people don't know it. That thing is like it's so large. You can fit yankee stadium inside of it. Which i are when you're standing there. You're like this is insane. And it's it's what a forty five miles or so from key west like just homily ocean out there the park service boat pulls in and where the park service boat pulls in the doctor there and win the park service. Both pools in there is probably a twenty five foot long. Probably not that big. i'm exaggerating. But he pulls he like settles himself underneath the boat and sits in the shadow of the boat in is just massive just massive right right but no telling how old is either. 'cause i mean to get that size you got to win. A lot of battles is far as guan azzoni kinda circle back around. You got me on barracuda But the the guana so we have a coconut mango iguana taco. We kind of do the same thing. You You cook down guana than you shred the me in you. Put it into a put it on talk in sorry in like a coconut coconut milk with semangoh in the air. And then throw it right to you so pretty pretty standard people need to kill and eat more guavas. There's no shortage of iguanas now. So that's something we need to catch people a catch onto and start harvesting guan because they taste fine and there's way too many of them. Yeah and i mean salmonella once you get past that you deal with salmonella in domestic poultry all the time. So it's it's it's not a challenge. We don't know how to overcome so and you know the funding crazy thing is like nobody really knows how guan is sort. Sorta showed up in south florida. It's just like they were here and then then near everywhere. So well and python iguana peacock bass Clown knife fish snakeheads. You know the list goes on and on. It's florida yup. Yup ami we have the pretty pretty unique ecosystem ear inn not to mention. We have the port of entry for all of central and south. America is passing through I forget the exact statistic but it was pretty staggering. Talk about plant species to all kinds of things that come here and introduced bugs and eggs and all these other things. It's like department of agriculture. Has their work cut out for them in south florida. And you know a lot of people. I guess they just would have dumped their aquariums and the canal and see what happens. And there. you go end up with a twenty foot long peacock bass i you know. We were just in florida shooting a show for the upcoming season dead meat and we did. We did wild pigs. Your long onto but a sugarcane field around okeechobee. And i'll tell you i mean. We did the best pig that i've had so far up until last week was on the big island of hawaii and we shot this guy. Every afternoon went. Put out a big pile macadamia nuts for the feral hogs air. Who you know that we hundred eighty pound bore. The fat on it was solid white was off color at all. We actually instead of terminal that fat off we added the fact of the grind in some sauces. It we made which you just don't do while eggs especially old male. Pigs but the sugarcane pigs that we shot last week were crazy. Good we shot about seventy pounds. Sal and about one hundred and sixty eight hundred and seventy pounds four and although the south was better as always will be especially a younger one lighter in color. There was absolutely nothing wrong with that bore. All they eat is sugarcane. The you know the thing about shooting them in sugar cane is you want to shoot him in the head. Because you don't wanna you don't want to chase one. If you've never seen how thick sugarcane as you can't go chase a pig in sugarcane field. It's way way too thick. So we have misused it. In a in a sugarcane sugarcane was only a couple of feet high and so they didn't go into the tall staff and also saw. How you all burn the sugarcane to that was really cool. I had that before sat on fire. You do whatever but these you know people talk about. You are what you eat but think about it. What does a piggy right a pig each anything and why is bacon. So that's kind of pigs are kind of the exception to the rule but when all they're eaten a sugar cane man what a big big difference yep by man. It's almost like you're If he had some salt there. You just be doing brian on them already. And i mean we. We did a little of very simple salt water brine and that's it didn't do a whole lot to it had a guy from alabama. He's got bama grill master. I think is is instagram. Deal but He cooked it and made it very simply wrapped in foil with some oranges. In little whatever after it was grilled that was absolutely delicious man with the florida. Oranges to right. Why you know we had we had to cliche. You're from oklahoma you if you've had them in oklahoma it's a different pig so much different. You know a lot of people. They won't eat them. They won't eat like milk. Turn their nose up announced like well. I think it's an important resource. We need to capitalize on. So we have to kill these pigs. We really do how prolific they are an. But you know you say they won't even need. I've found that a lot of people a lot of the things that people won't eat. They've never eaten agreed. People say oh. I'm not gonna eat that or you know you know. I'm the cooking editor for du magazine. So i talked a lot of people about waterfowl. I live in northern california where we've got under plus day season. We can shoot seven mallards a day. It's really really good here And people go spoon as dodd donates buildings. There's nothing wrong with bones. I serve him spoons. I serve snow geese all the time. I just don't tell them what they are until after they've eaten it but a lot of times we know we're told it's just like the people that say. I don't eat dear because i've heard it's really gaming and livery mudmee well it isn't if you if you treat it right you know and it doesn't mean you don't make it taste like deer. It just means that you it's i mean salt and pepper is all you need. Just don't overcook it right. And at the end of the day the animals gonna take it. Tastes like what it's supposed to. And i think we were talking about this earlier. It's like you don't. It doesn't taste like chicken. It tastes like frog legs like people. I think it's a very common thing to take a wild food and try to associated to domestic food when two different animals is like. Hey here's a here's beef and here's chicken but my beef doesn't taste like chicken. It's like well. It doesn't because it's a cow or skier so at a lot of people try and cook gamy flavors at something and all they're doing is make it taste mortgage You know if you stop cooking that duck breast at one hundred thirty. It's gonna taste a whole lot better than it is at one sixty and people get so freaked out about you know. They read about an e coli outbreak to put layer. Whatever and they think. I've got a cook not of everything or it's not going to be safe and you know if a duck is flown back and forth from canada. Five or six times. That's a pretty healthy animal. You know these are organic free ranging very delicious animals. Just treat treat certain part you cook the next in shoulders and shanks low and slow. You cook the more primal fast than hot in. It's very simple. you just. Don't need to complicate it. Nope i agree with you. One hundred percent. And i i you know. I don't know if it's if it's some people get intimidated and just like get down this weird rabbit hole of. Where do i go. What do i do But yeah i. I don't know sort of our whole lot of people that are to this podcast over the year and all this other stuff or things like we just wanna make it. Everybody comfortable like eat wild game. Be happy like cook. However you want. Make a coyote burger mak- venison burger whatever. Just like just enjoy yourself like this one. It's about the end of the day in my whole inspiration was it was. It would kill me when i would go to a consumer show at. I'm in the sportsman. Channel or outdoor channel. Both on cooking. Whatever and also here would you like visa venison. There was like these dock and they go. Oh no you know. I grew up on overcooked stuffed ducks that my dad would cook for about an hour and a half. They were horrible. And if people you just you give people permission to not cook it quite so long. You come back the next year. They don't get my ducts way anymore It's it's the preconceived notions of people have about their wild game and they just need to give it a chance and my whole inspiration was getting people who said i don't like game whatever it is and give them a piece and they go. Wow that's good. Don't blame the game. I mean there are certain times when it's just not good You know i've had. I've had beautiful mallards and looked fat. Bought in there's just something funky about it. And i tend to not eat stuff that tastes funky. Believe it or not. I know coming for me. That sounds a little odd but You know if something tastes bad. I'm narc anita plate of it. I'll eat a bite. I might eat two bites system. Make sure it's as bad as i thought it was but in general gain tastes really good. You don't pheasant. Turkey doesn't taste like chicken. It tastes like fezzet in turkey. Yes although i will say. I'm i'm i'm not a big turkey fan. I've revealed this on a couple episodes ago and it's probably one of the reasons. I don't hunt there as much but i don't i don't know i like i said tweets their own net. I'll take that and put in my back pocket. Maybe haven't found the the right environment to harvest turkey. I appreciate that. I'll say that. I won't say that i don't like them. I haven't found the one that i like yet. And what is it that you didn't like about turkey because are on the lane side. Obviously be up side. I think that's probably a little too you. Lean for me even compared to other games to our other game meat to I don't find a lot of exciting flavors. They're like naturally. I like to try things out salt and pepper from the beginning and just get the tasted the animal marrano. Turkey didn't stick with me. And it's really i mean if it's not if not tender and juicy and moist like a chicken overriding marinating helps as you know but you know you know how to cook. I'm not gonna. I'm not gonna i'm not gonna change your mind. I'm so you tried a few different times i have. I'll keep it. i'll keep going. I mean i'm not gonna pass on the opportunity to hunt for it or to eat it so it's like i have turkey. Hunting plans this year For small steeler in it. If i get one it's going straight to the dinner table so well on you could always get the breast away and take the carcass in the legs and thighs make stock out of it because that's really a true. I do like that. And i've heard a using the legs to embrace him down in shredded meat and doing Yeah well otherwise you'll never get the made off at you can cook it. Throw it on the grill. You could still beat somebody over the head with it and no gonna fall off. It's not the ones you get at the fair for sure. No let us sort of circle back around I know that you have. we do. Tend to cook a lot of meals in the field whether it be wild fish and game and what we've been using lately is the traeger scout which is a compact version of triggers larger pellet smokers and it allows you to still use that same. Great wood fired taste. You get those big boys but in a compact version and this version in the scout you can use in just about any setting where you can get a little bit of power to. It was perfect to us in the back of the tailgate there on the deck of a boat. Take with you on your next adventure. We don't have to leave that delicious woodfire flavor behind. Most recently i've used it riverside just before our alligator trip where we were hunting alligators. That evening. We made some delicious lobster tacos so enjoyed it worked out great highly recommended go checkout trigger dot com and search for the trigger scout bull wild hog recipes That you prepared. We did a little digging Outside of your most recent experience. What's one of your favorite ways repair wild hog or wild. You know the ones that are the most challenge of the old bores and so to me. It's critical that you trim as much fat off as you can get rid of all the visible fat then. I like to cuba it up. And then i'm gonna put a put it either in a flat top or rondo put it in something in render as much of that fat off as you can. And then i'm gonna pour off that old boy fat again. You know the fifty seven. Five pound sal is not such a big deal but the challenge is the old stinky one. Even you know when you shoot a big a big hug. It doesn't smell good when you go to the back of your truck and when you start breaking down it doesn't really smell all that good either. So why do we things smell bad right like the coyote bergh And by the way the coyote is stinky as it is when you when you're breaking down. The burger itself had none of that. So i like to render as much of that fat down making jelly verdy until they colorado out of older male arts once. She wore all that fat off. That i'm gonna replace it with. Maybe some chicken brought some onions celery garlic. I'm going to slowly cook that. It's not something you wouldn't eat. It's not it's not a fast typer recipe and then there. There's still a little bit of danger. A trick analysis in the wild pigs. So you wanna make sure that it's cooked all the way through so once. It starts getting tender where it starts to break down that. I'm gonna throw in tomatoes and roasted peppers and all those kinds and cilantro and lime in those native flavors and to me. It's not done until it just until you just barely give it some finger pressure in it breaks apart. Then you wrap it in a fresh homemade flour tortilla and whatever else you wanna put on it too. I'm sold it. Sounds great Man that's so good. So why i guess you. We alluded to a little bit. Why why is that your preferred method for the older ones. Well because the older ones they have they get tougher their darker. The meat darker. They're tougher and they can be a bit aromatic. Even when you're cooking a lot of times i like to get it started outdoors Because it can stink of your kitchen. And i know people are listening. Why would you wanna eat something that stinks because we need to kill pigs we we have got to kill pigs. They start breeding at six months. They do not slow down. Shoot as many of them as you can. I mean there's reasons while these states have got no limits. No license can no season. Shoot as many as you want the not supposed to be here anyway. I mean there for whatever reason we got pigs and they're not going away and if you've ever seen the kind of damage that can do tell you the most fun i had. We did a show in texas last year. With a guy jimmy galindo. He's down around college station. And we're shooting pags with a rs and suppressors out of a golf cart on golf courses at night And we go out on ranches and there were so many of them. You'd have your night vision on the helmet and you'd go there's three dozen then you flip to your infrared scope and backed up. We just we there were. There was no shortage of them. But if you could see the kind of damage that they do to these golf courses We would go there before. Sundown golf course was fine. You could see where they repaired the previous day's damage and then within an hour or two after sundown. I looked like somebody took a rototiller. Went across the fairway. No yeah you see. The kind of i. We saw saw this guy's yard. They had done fifty thousand dollars worth of landscape damage to this guy's yard now. Obviously this guy had a nice yard if they're doing fifty thousand dollars. Yeah landscaping it wasn't it wasn't a single wide. I mean it was a giant house on the golf course but if you wanna go if you wanna do something fun go see jimmy galindo in texas he. It's really. it's incredibly inexpensive. I won't quote the current price but it was a lot cheaper than you'd pay to shoot one or two pigs even shoot as many as you want. He provides everything he provides. The the ammo the guns the infrared the night vision and all that and it's a hoot and just to go out and shoot as many pigs as you want. It's a yeah i have. I haven't done the the night vision or infrared eventually. But i've got a ryan emily. They work with us doing videos and stuff and they they're on the game and i'm just like man to stories that i've heard in some of the clips i've seen i'm just like this is crazy but it's one of those things it's like a i think to quotes We had in our first season. We had a guest on a wild pig trapper in. he's got a big octagon traps where he traps. You know twenty thirty at a time. And he's like we're kind of at war With pigs and i was like yeah. It's to be. But i definitely think the value is. There's a food source. I think fine tuning on on the human side needs to be done to figure out how to make that system. Work a little better. We'll end on sportsman channel. The executive chef for a program called a punt fish feed where we feed first responders and homeless folks. And all that. And so we've done one hundred and twenty different events over the last ten years or so where we're feeding three five six seven hundred people at a time and we're doing a lot with wild pigs. Yeah we do it. A lot with venison in virginia. The single largest source of protein for shelters is dear donated by hunters Access oklahoma all of these places where we can get so many pigs We broken down and we'll make a big pot of chili verdy or big pot of whatever And we use it. Feet first responders homeless folks and all that and I'm all for it. We have great program eighteen yet. That's an awesome program. I think we need to see more of it Hope somebody influentials listening to this out there and can can help us. Put that into motion. You know in a normal year. We're feeding your ten or twelve shelters obviously in the last year. We haven't gotten to any of them so we're hoping to get back out later on this year. Get the program going again. Let's good yeah. I i hope that that swift. Hopefully is things progressing. Calmed down that allows you to to to get back into that space for sure. Were you live in florida. Nobody wears masks in florida and key west reduce law. I know oh. I see i thought there was no asked mandate in florida. They'll know key west. There's there's one here in tokyo. Toby now mask. I mean not that i saw. I was travelling back in october in it. It definitely depends on where you were in proximity to different groups of people and stuff on asking who didn't and sometimes you would come into town and you would go into the gas station with your mask on in everybody. Look at you like you had a third set of eyes. And it's just like what's unnamed unnamed town in idaho in december and met a buddy of mine. We were shooting sporting chef. In a buddy of mine was not coming up there and he said let's made at the steakhouse and it's a big country. Western looking steakhouse in. I walked in and i was the only one wearing a mask servers. Bartenders everybody nobody had masked at nerd about any outbreaks in this particular town. Either and You know some of the smaller towns where we we turtle hunted. So i saw you had you had jenny. Whiteley is a is a gas right. Yeah just just just a couple of weeks ago. The episode actually came out today. Is we're recording this elbow. So yeah we. Jenny was on the podcast in her husband. As well right right and they wreck and and jenny introduced me to these turtle hunters in cedar rapids nebraska population. Three hundred thirty six allow. So we did. We had a turtle with these guys and have have you eaten turtle bids turtle. Yeah this you know. The biggest problem with turtle is cleaning them and these were twenty five to thirty pounds snappers. These this was like eight brothers. They take pitchforks. And they go into this really funky swamp and they just go back and forth with pitchforks one side of the other league and then when they when they hit what feels like a turtle shell reach down and gravel and the grandfather has told everyone of those kids. Turtles don't bite when they're in the water and every one of those kids has been bit by turtles when they're underwater was but and turtles. They're just a mess to clean but the makes pretty good. Yeah it's kind the not. It's not a fan of cleaning them. Just as you said though i'd rather have somebody handed me a bag. Turtle meat nafta clayton. Yep i'm a fan of So i went to college in cooked new orleans. Turtle soup is very traditional item on many of the classic restaurants in new orleans in love turtle soup not not cleaning though so and turtles simple little cherry on top. Oh yes absolutely. Yeah yeah no. That's cool. I think i saw some maybe some social media poster footage. When you guys were up there With the turtles. And i think back to when i was a kid and we would we would go out. That was sort of like a hobby. We had in the middle of the year. When you're not hunting or fishing like we would go out and we would find turtles. Box turtles snapping turtles like the radio turtles but i remember it at several points throughout my childhood memories of us being either waist or chest deep wading through. You know ponds of murky water trying to find turtles. Were probably not the best idea of of other things that we would find out there. Yeah we had the saying as far as snapping turtles it was. i can't remember the exact saying now. But it's essentially like once once they get bit they won't let go or once a bite you they won't let go till the lightning strikes like something crazy like that and while you know in cleaning them with these snappers the part that we didn't we didn't want to get too graphic on tv but you grab their head you grab their mouth with a pair of pliers and pull it out and somebody cuts the head off like a hatchet machete right. What have you don't have to show that on tv. I guess. I mean we told the story. That's good people. Get the big so Yeah it interesting stuff but Sort of thinking about back in the world of invasive 's of snakehead Big big problem. Be look like florida area. We've got him coming in now Oddly enough chesapeake bay tributaries in places up in maryland. It's a huge problem. A i was first introduced to a field staff writer that lived up in maryland. He put out a alc- caveat this to say that. I know the dangers of of eating freshwater fish this way but i'm going to say it and then i'll follow it up with what we did or what he did. Different snakeheads severe j. But you'd like a hard multi-day freeze on it. You know getting rid of parasites all the other things creepy crawlies that live in freshwater fish. so is that was the big reaction when we put the recipe up. You're like what are you doing. We're like all right. We we understand. We mitigated it. We're all still alive. No he's got parasites. So i think we're good to go So yes snakeheads v-shape but what was your experience with the with snakehead. Well we caught him closer to you. We caught them off the their canals outside the everglades around fort lauderdale and i. They're great fighters. They're so much fun to catch. Especially on top water. I had a. Who'd catch in these things. They're really hard to kill. I buried a knife in the skull on one of them. I'm trying to put it to sleep and it wouldn't die. I mean almost split his head in half and it still wouldn't die. I ended up sticking sticking it in the freezer and just left it in there And the ones in. Florida aren't quite as big as the ones around the potomac and chesapeake. I've got a buddy up there. That's got him in his backyard bigger. But they're really they're funded. Catch their toothy You know they're kind kinda creepy looking obviously because the teeth and the whole thing But they are just delicious. I thought the snakeheads were really good. Eaten and i've found them in asian markets and in the frozen section of asian markets in california but that's about it You know. I don't know how they got here but And they were saying that they were going to destroy the ecosystem because of their competing with the other. Good fish and all that. I don't know that that's really a problem. I think people are having a good time. Catching them now get. i mean. it doesn't seem have them. In these two areas obviously people talk about the negative impacts of any invasive species. But if you get down to like the microscopic level not much damage like. It's here like a big question for me. it's like at what point do we look at does a invasive species sort of become naturalized or all that we we've got animals that we brought from other continents in the us in in different populations in spots across the us which is like maybe snakehead head. Don't move past florida. Maybe they don't move out of the chesapeake tributaries like maybe they're just there and then it becomes. This is where you go when you want snakehead so right. I think you have to have notre in florida. I have never seen them. I'm trying to think if i've heard of them You know louisiana Obviously present. I i would think but i. I don't know one hundred percent because we there were an oregon. We have been california now. Okay in california you know all the worst things in the united states start new york in california and then they then they just infect the rest of the country so vicious game here won't let us kill nutrient. They won't do it themselves. Which means soon we'll have an explosion of nutrient here. Yep i don't know how they got here in maryland too. You know for people that don't know it's about a twenty pound rat that started louisiana and the twenties mcelhinney tabasco people brought him in for the for trade and nobody wanted. Nobody wanted to wear a rat and so between the tornadoes in human events they escaped and and they are vegetarian so they eat all of the vegetation on the levees in a row. The wetlands in compromise the levees in the wetlands and in louisiana if you're a resonant you sign up for this deal and you bring in. I think it's the last seven inches of tail and they give you five bucks so he would just go out. We were in venice louisiana and just go out and they whack a bunch of cut the tail off. Leave the rest feed the gators but they were and i could. I had a real hard time in venice getting people to eat. So which is interesting because in new orleans in the city. That's who you envision. That's who's eating nutrients people down in venice Very stereotypical thing to say. But it's like that's that's a common dot amongst a lot of people are like oh yeah nutrient people nutrient down there. Like i wanna see nutri. I go to the zoo or over to jefferson parish or wherever like. Yeah they don't they don't eat new. What's there but you know and you see him in the in the canals and you see him in all the little ditches and stuff. It's just big rap. I remember when i was in college. Like the sheriff of jefferson parish which orleans parish in jefferson parish next over still like very highly populated metropolitan area and they were leading this campaign of basically like deputies in people driving around at night shooting nutri out of the levees in populated area. And i was just like. I guess this is a problem is it definitely is a problem. But and and you know you've got the python thing in florida too. And i saw the swamp people or whatever did a big thing that an idea. They did a big round up in the everglades for for python. Yup so I it's funny. Because i was just talking about the story So i guess it was a couple years back Florida the universe. You're somebody brought a bunch of experts over from somewhere in asia south east asia central asia india to like do a roundup on pythons in the everglades and they went out there and got skunked and then they brought the guys down from lack up in the panhandle on over in louisiana. And all that and it's like boom. They cleaned up and just like. Wow okay well how big the everglades are finding a snake in. The everglades is like a needle in a haystack. I mean i'm. I'm surprised that they found as many as they did. We were told man. There's not a dog inside or a deer fawn inside their eaten. Everything and i was you know i was a little. I had mixed feelings about whether i wanted to run into one. When i was looking through the bushes or not but we did you know we we. We had what we cook them. the people there that we were with They had a i one. What we don't do is stick one of the bushes and act like we caught it now. We're not. We're not gonna do that. We don't get one. We don't get one But they're not good eating. It's not like a rattlesnake. Yeah man i. I have so many motions i we were talking about before the show in sort of some recent news articles that came out. Where like the governor commission and We're having conversations about like one. Can we commodities. That's weird yeah anyway. We'll call it. A word tonight is now can we. Can we commercialize a python. Meet in my first instinct is one. You got convince people to buy this Which i don't know how to do that and to there's been a lot of studies out about high mercury levels. They're not sure how the elevated mercury levels are getting their the lead the leading theory being the these snakes aren't used to living in habitats where the mercury is present so they have no way to dispel it so just kind of building up But in the same article i'm referencing. They're talking within a python hunter in cheese raving about this meat though. It's the best thing ever. That's she loves to eat it And cheese she uses the eggs to bake with which that lost me. I was like i. I'm embarrassed supportive. A lot of things in the wild world and eating things. I don't know i don't know how i feel about using python eggs to throw in my raisin muffins and it's not it's not going to be like a chicken egg so they get live birthright so the egg is going to be a little snaking narrow and what i've found is that it's so incredibly tough. I mean i wailed on it with a mallet. Ran it through cuba. And even then you'd start chewing it and it just got bigger in just wasn't it wasn't good. I don't see any reason eight python. i mean. I'm sure if you wanna make some boats out of it that's fine but eating it was a whole different deal. We had a guy Our arab guy guide their made a cheese. A cheese grits and python. So the grits. Were good but you just try to work around. The python. Part needs to grits and Again i cooked some myself. You can actually buy it. It's it's not. it's just not good man. And i i i want i want it to be good so that more people or or a interested in in going out. I mean. It's not an easy task you to go out and find them. Neither you know i. I've hunted around the everglades You know in big cyprus. In some of the other wildlife management areas adjacent to the everglades. It's like never never seen one out the wild Nightmare crossing the road at night. Is you're driving is just. I don't know and that's when when where we were looking for him. As you know the sun goes down they wanna go out and warm up and they'll go out on the roads and health lake retain some heat that way but i mean we. We just never we. Didn't we didn't find one but i did. I held a ten foot python. And it's it's like no other muscle you've ever felt it's crazy. Crazy crazy It's not like a rattlesnake. It does not tender even a little bit now. Big animals to in january. Already be careful if you do decide to eat them like the the whole mercury thing is no joke. Based on some of the i dug into the scientific journals in Went down a couple of rabbit holes on that. But yeah it's It's an interesting stuff but Let's see maybe kinda hit on. I think we hit on a lot of the high notes of of some crime. Invasive species thank the only one that we didn't hit on with carpe asian carp specifically agent carr. Yet we've done. What was your experience with asian carp while we were on the illinois river in peoria illinois. And if you've seen the videos where you go down in a boat and car flying out of the water and hit in the head and all that it's exactly like that And so you're shooting them with. Bows you go down the river. And they see a few of them start to jump up the new hard circles in the boat and it kinda stirs them up in by the way in asia. They don't jump out of the water. They go down for some reason in the us. They fly out of the water. So while you're trying to shoot him while you're trying to shoot a flying object with a bow as you're doing hard circles it's not a very good percentage shot we put in the air and we had about twenty five of them jump in the boat but i think we only shot three of them out of all of the all these fish but the cool thing is we were with the guy from chicago. Who the weird thing is when you open up to claim their filter fears. You know the plankton and so when you open them up all his green liquid. John came out of them. That i've never seen any inside of a fish before as olive drab looking liquid. And i'm assuming it's because they're plankton eaters yet but So they can't be lying caught right. You're shooting them with bows. He took him and he just took the skin off. Some of the bloodline left the bones end and then ground. The whole side ran through a grinder. Did a big plate. Small plate made fish cakes out of it tasted one hundred percent. Just fine They they have a milder flavor than the common carp anyway. So it's a lighter flesh fish it's more like a grass car type of deal and So for the people. So i tried this. We have american shad here in california and in their bigger you know. They're plus long. It's not they're not bait. It's it's a it's a fish but they're really bony so most people don't keep them. I did the same thing with these shad. This yard ran through a grinder. Make fish cakes out of him. It was really good. I mean the bones turned into nothing their calcium but if we can get more people eat those invasive km cart. What's a good thing to. They're gonna get into lake michigan in in chicago and the chicago river. They have electronic barrier electric barrier. That's supposed to keep them from going into lake michigan. But nobody thinks that's going to last forever in once they're there you're not gonna. You're not going to get rid of them. Oh man yeah i. I would like to see more people eating that too. I've heard people pickling the meat. 'cause like the yup the vinegar dissolving the bones and stuff like that kinda the same with pike and things they did in heard people just frying kinda eaten it off the bone scraping off the with your teeth. You go but yeah the grinder the grinder method until you work just fine. I'm i'm a fan of that. Good i like a good fish cake to when a doubt make fish cakes right. That's it so we did that. We in in florida. We shot mudfish a familiar with grennell mudfish. I'm not no super soft. We were both asian for Somewhere around orlando and our guide ed mccormack with bikini. Bow fishing around crystal river. We're we're going to do v show this guy man. We don't do shows with leno over and try and get new people. Every time but head ed keeps putting us on these really cool things so this mudfish and i know there's people listening that have had mudfish before it's the softest fish i've ever seen i. Apparently you're supposed to clean it immediately. I put it on ice for a few hours. What i went. I went to break it down The fillets were like fish pudding. It would have been better off hook right. I saw the expression on your face. It would have been better off cleaning it with a spoon. Took a to a guy in somewhere around tampa and he made fish cakes out of it tasted like fish cakes but by itself. You're thinking there's no way. I'm going to eat this. It's so so very soft was not. I don't need that. I don't need to do that again. reminded me of tickets out on hawaii in. Stop me if you've had this experience but bonefish Like people freezing meat and let it get kind of that mushy consisting scraping it with a spoon and making either fish. Cakes like burger patties. Or like whatever. And i'm just like It's such a. i have lived a life of eating mostly like firm flaky fish not rise much as bones or or fish pudding yeah. I don't think i've ever kept a bonefish. Bonefish other to catch. But i don't think ever get one i mean and that's that's the common thing in some places you can't like you can't keep them riding on be no but The places that you can. I don't know that a lot of people do. But it was an interesting concept. When i heard it i was like So lose cool story but with all people. Eat lots of things that i donate. Well i don't know your list is getting smaller. you know. we're not going to run out of stuff. So this year where we were supposed to go to europe For debt meet international. But were not able to travel. At least we can't count on it work conventionally. We're going to get to norway to beluga whale okay. Excellent defender and they harvest most of it goes to japan but you can go to norway on the menu. You see below whale Then we're going to go to the uk and shoot a bunch of those wild deer that have their you know if you're fortunate enough to own a gun in the uk you can shoot it anywhere And then pigs in spain and a few other things but we just gotta get outta here. We need to. We need to get out of the country. There's a whole world of wild food out there whole world of stuff. People don't wanna eat. Well i think the clock is winding down. So i appreciate you coming in and chatting with us i. I've enjoyed the conversation tonight for sure. Sure what's What's the best way for people to to connect with you if they want to reach out with questions or anything like that. Just go to sporting chef dot com. That's where all the free recipes are there. You consumer our podcast is and and find out all about the shows. Their sportsman channel and outdoor channel has info about shows and You know listen in a normal year. This is what i do so again. I'm very fortunate to be able to get out there and do these kinds of things awesome. Will we always give a give our gas and normally we're joined by others but tonight we just had the one on one Kind of a moment for a last thought to sort of share with the with the listeners. Out there so being guest ed A last thought or anything. Shoot as many pigs as humanly possible There a problem. Catch lion fish shoot pig shooter. Guavas kaman adam And if you can if you can make a you can feed your first responders on your neighborhood with a good pot while big chili verde to me. That's a victory. I echo that. I support this message. One hundred percent. No i echo it too. I think when we sort of connected the dots before the show about the importance of evasive eating invasive species in the opportunity to talk about it. And that's something. We definitely harp on a lot is being opportunistic. Omnivore is many other animals in the natural world are and When the opportunity arises take it. But if you're going out to be strategic about what you're hunting and fishing eating than choosing. A vase is a good way to go about 'cause when you get food to bring home until you feel good that you're doing something to help out the natural world and in the case of pigs and a lot of places you can after when you get all depressed about darren duck season being over you got two thousand lol. Yeah that's true. That is very true. Well outside of that I want to thank everybody for listening. In always a show notes will be available online. And you can go down and scroll through a lot of the great recipes. We talked about tonight and videos. All the links will throw in there and head over social media Make sure you're following the sporting chef in various social media platforms. When you're done there. Make sure you're definitely following us which it should be So you can see all the great things we're doing as well in our whatever podcast platform you listen to punch that five star button tilts. What we're doing wrong. Tell us what we're doing right. Thanks everybody have a good night.

florida Justin townes scott lace oklahoma Machiko luchino jimmy galindo texas guana George sarah gasparilla island phoenix guan azzoni indiana salmonella minnesota
S03 - House Call #14 House Work with Peter Tucker

Arty Farty

05:05 min | 9 months ago

S03 - House Call #14 House Work with Peter Tucker

"It's The. Thanks for calling. Jet. Off. The Please leave your. Voice. I. Welcome to Ati. House. I'm Sean and Ardennes upon some people to help answer your. Questions, and this is a great question. I wonder who has worked at the opera. House for the longest time. Out Sydney Opera, House has been open for more than forty six years. I wonder if anyone's workday at that long. which is still enjoy working somewhere after all that taught. Well, let's go and make today's guest and ask them. Currently employed at the Sydney, Opera House on the building operations branch as. or I paid someone who's running with this question. WHO's worked at the Opera House for the longest time the if he gets paid getting close near forty he. Started here in March nineteen seventy-one as as library. So. You worked longer than the upper house was open because he helped to build it originally started in the drama theatre. Just drilling holes and that was surprisingly because what else drill Many holes. After a year later when they moved over scheduling and the White House, the holes where the Jays get folded into what an amazing feeling it must be the look at the theater now and know that you helped build it. Did you do any other jobs on the construction side I moved to the top of the console? As. A foil watch office because of work of welding up able new frames and there's not as far system so they had to put up. And that assisted me in nineteen, seventy, three to commencing September. For the Upper House I'll stop is the first volume for visit. The? Very Fist Watt. What's it like being? In a portfolio, I'd spend you. So all the horror is coming on. So strain oprah the belly. Or one of us. Special Effects. Candles flesh POPs sniping onstage and as the far off I have to approve it and that was all new to me. They come into the entertainment industry. So when your fun and in a theater you job is to make sure that any candles. Or fires I use safely still while you keeping everyone safe, it must be great to hear over music and see all the plays and dads and operas. Sales backstage ahead candles on the stage. The with the opera and John Sutherland. Was the principle singer and they'll a another singer on near and usually when I'm backstage that really listened to much of the music, just watch the candles and and they're singing away then. This mile sing singing all. Wait listen to this so it went. went the on the the front of the stage they moved around even recognize the singer. So, back to the staging and his. Body. How easy would sing it out of the shine John Sutherland Got Sydney audience said, he'll be in rousing the box office which happened, but I'll will sight. After listening to singing a Chinese views on opera. Fantastic with John, Sutherland and Luchino, have a Rodney in the same show. That make anybody. A fan of opera art paid off. Last question. What is your favorite thing about the Sydney Opera House the? Upper House. Is that everyday something different this here you come to work you don't expect there's a different show there's a live event but it's just the outlook of the place doesn't away you go out saw you see the ocean, you see all the theories going past all the boats and the activity that happens here it's it never changes especially on you walk around the western side of the which is Harvey saw the bill and you say the city of Sydney showing of the water is beautiful. Well they have pay the talker worked to the opera. House for forty nine years, which is longer than the buildings even hyphen for how amazing it must feel to have helped build one of the world's greatest buildings and still be working that day. Enjoyed listening to artie fought house coal. We've got plenty more questions to answer. So I hope one day soon, we'll see you at our house the CPR. By.

Sydney Opera House Opera House Upper House Sydney John Sutherland Upper House White House Ati artie Jays Harvey Rodney Luchino forty nine years forty six years one day
Ep 75: The Makeup Technique Optometrists Don't Recommend

Beauty IQ Uncensored

38:04 min | 2 months ago

Ep 75: The Makeup Technique Optometrists Don't Recommend

"Welcome everybody to the podcast. I'm your host. Joanna fleming an. Im your car. Heist china fast. I did want to say that. Like i was leased at all. The guys i'm chatting to at the yeah. Guess how many potentials there are at the moment Eight oh five. I listen that seeks. Good ole that to you to interpret icon even cape. We've five let eloy like i'm fine challenging and like i don't know what they will do for work like i possibly remember what each person or or how many siblings have gone yet. What suburb daily. And it's too hot. Generally remember north suburbs anyways so sure. That's true now. I did want to do a little shout at least two. She weren't knowing that. I'm shouting out to her because her son sent me. Stay niki. listens. Deputy iq go to sleep very cute way. That boring. yeah well. That's what i was on drinks. So his sons message dying in the nicest way possible. Shay says she can't fall asleep unless she's listening to q. On since she's tried on the podcast and she says they don't work. So i just i. Is that a compliment or is it. I ought to call the moment. I think it is. I feel like i'm going to take that as a compliment that she's comforted by at presence in her is as she falls asleep. I think that it was that it relaxes her. I just feel like cackling lofts would be very jolting if you join us. It's like going to go to sleep to grey's anatomy and then if there was like some big surgery happening where people were screaming it. Would jolt me. Away is to listen to serial killer podcast if my ex-boyfriend was snoring. And i put that in and i'd just go to sleep Serenely think am. I go back. You'll like a sacred talk about like what's going on the find that relaxing but speaking of podcasts that we go to slate to hopefully people warned. Go to sleep to these fun but skincare school. We mentioned a few episodes gar We've just released a limited edition pack. So this is a skin cap hacksaw to you've got the pack on the cosmetic bag easily. It's not live up but it feels like five isn't a hack is valued at six hundred. Seventy one dollars and ninety five cents bought you can buy it for two hundred and forty nine dollars and has got some of our favorite cult classic products in that hannah. Do you want to read the list of things you combine. I was legitimately in those meetings when we were putting together. Like what would bain the pack so it. Ease actually curated. By the adobe tame it's got alpha. Hpd's pab he'll my fe. Full-size isi pays to obey complex full-size. That's one of both skins. Getting day for rule aac ultraviolet supremes grain skinstad sheikh fourteen percent democratic especially cleansing joe aspect perot mosque. That's full-sized to and then it's got the facial headbands and it also has medi bag. And i think the cosmetic bag as much as i love those products because with the pros bag is life worth like just branded adobe and gold foil. It's stunning sinus. So p monday seasonally. Meditation pathway expected to sell out very very quickly. So hearing these day whatever diabetes. You need to go out and buy it because it probably will sell out. And i don't think it's race talked so get your hands on it as soon as you can. It's got some great products. And as hannah sage with phobic cosmetic bag yup hundred percent. So what he's on. Today's episode hannah so on today's episode Way chatting about russia's resident j. Dr lucinda then. We have laura khasan. She's an optometrist to talk about. What products you can and can't eat around your eyes and of course the products. We didn't know we needed sir. How are you actually sent me a slack. can you. can we please do rashes or at if you want to bring back dr luchino. Welcome back to the podcast. We love having you as always thanks. I love being on here. Who is a good laugh. I love talking about rashes. And i was like perfect. That's going to work. Well the reason. I requested these was. I had a rash on my ankole from queensland that losted it did not go away. I think it was still the fatu months. Finally i went to the doctor and she was like sorry i over the counter quotas are in crane. Did nothing she was like. Let's get you a prescription quotas crane and she said if that doesn't work go to a fungal crame and if the fungal crame doesn't go to the quotas aren't i didn't really give a go. I just it's not waking up to the next cream. It's not wacky upset. It definitely wasn't fungal because that didn't work. And then i really stuck with the cortisone cream and it and it has almost gone away now. She said rashes one of the two. We'll work it. Okay i property and another one. It's in big doubt. There is a a best of like kind of cream night there which contains birth while Steroid fungal and bacterial stuff. So if you're really screwing time it's it's required in very few instances but like if you've tried absolutely everything sometimes that wet spot genuinely speaking. It's good to understand with possible cools of the rashes come from and the thing is is that russia's can come in so many different ways like a flat up a red they got scale on them. Is it just a one patch. Has its spread to another unlike travel histories. Really important as well sir. Fungal russia's really common actually incident travel history because of just living conditions basically swimming pools where this looks at these things going around also bacterial infections a super common to. I actually wanted to ask while we're on these topics. Someone deemed me the other day I had ringworm and it looked like a rash on their face. So we're going to have to come back and talk about ringworm separately effing because that's just like a whole 'nother let's do a segment williams with number of that day has definitely do. Can you talk us through the most common rashes. The e say as it often. Yeah sure there's lers rashes that come through. And i also do a skin cancer clinic because well so i see things that people are worried about that as skin cancer back. She just sort of normal rashes as well. Common things like for example. So that's like an inflammatory condition where you've got a week in skin area and it can be sort of triggered spies if things that you might be allergic to or even things like over grossest yeast For example and then things that you're in contact with like even like a metals and things like that can cause Inflammatory reaction so these things are really really common. Another things like acne is super comment as well and then things like infections. We've come from night. Bacteria infections in practice confections factions. Things that we've got to mention that to certify kick at things like sti related hippies syphilis where you're getting these things more into the genital areas companies like chicken. Pox engine goes to the type of viral infection. Even when you get viral illnesses sometimes you can come out in a rash. So that's important today and you probably hit a bit about malicious. Goes well so these sort of like these pity petty populace that can appear on the skin nominee in chelsea children. But they can come later on things also like scabies. That's always fun like typically coming in with Itching between the finger webs even like skin cancer cancers precancerous lesions so miss common thing i see must And that's in the release on exposed areas coming on the face neck and arm areas in lower legs under selectors red patches of skin with the scale on them as well and they're not really responding to anything and that sort of like he thinks guys. If you go any skin things that aren't responding to something then definitely pleased to see a g. p. i don't really get rashes. Except when gari to like really humid gonna sign. Maybe it's because he stay in hostels. And the vince wide been staying in like an apartment for two weeks and i thought it was a hate rash. Felt like a hate rash. Is that possible. It depends on where the route so you mentioned a rush on your ankle. So that for me makes me think less of a heat rash unless it was rubbing on something it's income tax as contacted metastases said or whether or not it was like an insect bite and maybe that got irritated. I thought it was on mosquito. Bites that had become like in my head had become irritated by my lululemon liking. I was going to throw out an alternative diagnosis. Because i noticed that you going for lots of hikes in life dense bushland and i thought maybe some kind of shrub as cool as debate of an alleged reaction on your end. Thanks joe you welcome. Yeah i'm not qualified. Boats pretty good could be the must be really hard for doctors to know what every single rashy a lot of. It's how you could go right batch. I know what that is like. And that's the thing you either have someone who's super interested in rashes just know on your home. Nothing to do with them so you often find one. Gp in the practice ask who is interested in rashes. Who can ac- for this and then just be like coinc- them instead especially if you tried like the simple stuff and the thing is to bear in mind is like sometimes it's great. the over. The counter steroid topical creams a here But sometimes can make some conditions was like. If you've got anything on your face in particular. I would genuinely just sort of go over the counter. Just try and go and see a gp for example things like If you hit if that before kasich leads like a red flashing mash nose cheeks full head shed. Bats made worse by topical steroids back in the day. When i used to go to this alarium. I got these scaly rash on my back and i wondered if that was a common thing is a couple of my friends at the time who also went to therapy. Got the same thing is they're being cold like has delirium rational. It's very naughty. Darn i already feel bad about the data that the thing is would celerion a candle to your skin barrier. And so what you might get. It's like a nova gross. All some some fungus is probably most likely thing coming in the scaly kind of rash or whether or not you're just literally getting a type of the nominee academic titus which is like a like a allergic type of reaction or an inflammatory reaction. It comes with a bit of readiness as well just pure scale or even like overgrowth of fungal will yeasts. Even they can discolor the skin so they can make it paler. Yes on my. That's what it was. It was so that's like pittodrie is the type of condition that that's really really common. When you're having things that can note to skin barry Things going on holiday in using use different showers in samples and things like that contagious. My other question was. I've been watching math slightly and i noticed that a lot of people on their get these really red rash on their chest and it's like they really nervous and i wondered if you can explain why they get that big red rash like it looks really patchy as usually on the neck and chest so as far as i know. This is almost like a histamine type of reaction. Potentially some people get in some people they just sort of flesh and it's almost like his main comes up to skin than causes inflammation and redness to be produced. Almost the site gum when people drink alcohol sometimes This increased histamine. Yes we'd like. Red wine would like the asian flush it a of that citizens like history mania yet we. We actually spoke to a dermatologist. About that. i've got a story to finish. We've i remember one night. I all of a sudden like had ichi legs and all of a sudden. I had lays bruises like my legs were covered in bruises and so i called my parents. They like go to the hospital because they thought it might be meningococcal. So i went to the emergency room and they didn't know what it was and sorry i remember. I ended up back at the hospital to get by. And i was sorry. Like they didn't know what it was. So they had me lying in my undies. And the doctor said demand defoe interns come have a look at your bruises like this show and i swear like twenty interns canaan to look at my bruises on my legs and i was like what the hell is going on in my di. I didn't know what was going on anyway. Eight bio seed every bruce. I think i had twelve punch biopsies on my legs and eventually it was like it's cold air to carry vascular Hives but it's bruises. And i just had to take tell fouls what story because i thought it might be some sort of lie. I'd be worried. yeah. I'm glad you went to the hospital. They thought it could be cat like cancer. Like there was a million possibilities that it could have bain but anyway it was just like a rare form of high so the moral of the story actually center is probably like if you do get a rash of some sort just to the j. dark gurgle it and aren't going by the cortisone cream. Exactly how did i notice. Sounds really bad but like gps. Do you google things. But the thing is we google with with a knowledge base and we know which kind of size to look as well like for example really good websites is something called. The mets at an a new zealand based website ended up by Early carry vascular tissue. You can't get information on the net about it except domnin rada good. Yeah so yeah. That's something bought again. Google with gp. Advice i would say at. It's totally mind. Old security the gp and say. Look i grew. Will i think i'm dying because you know i'd rather you said that i can understand address your concerns although i know many off patients. Have you googled. Something really really worried about something in particular. It's not silly to say it guy so please on his just general Type of thing is civil. An auto patient's skin conditions to look for fragrance free products. and also. don't forget about hair hair because you're washing your hair. That's overseas Washing down onto your skin ulcers this stuff that you obviously use to wash your clothes and linens is really moten and also medications is very important as well. Thank you so much for joining us again. Dr lucinda always fool of facts. Were always happy to have you on the show. So i will have you back on soon. Hopefully to talk about one. That's great was next time. He today's guest joining us. Ease optometrist laura. Carlson from canterbury. I now we've already had an optometrist before but we had more questions about is that we wanted answered so we thought we bring laura on. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you think science and you're actually also snow. Yeah and i was like just inspired to go. I should really little bit more about what type to use around the eyes and then i thought it might be useful to yep it definitely is so when we spoke to damage. Hala gist on past episode about using creams and serums. Shay was staunchly opposed to osteopathic skincare. But you've done some further research around skin cancer the is can you tell us what so important to be careful with what we apply around. Allies is yes so that was a great episode I even let lent a little bit in that one too. Yeah you have to be careful about what products using around your eyes because some actually quite dangerous to the glands around the eyes and if those glance at damage than you can actually have chronic long-term dry which is pretty serious so the main products to really be quite careful about around. The is is any rational based product and. I think it's probably on some of the labels already about putting that too close to those glands than puts you at risk of having that damage down the track and even just irritation of the tea film and yet irritation inside. The i like chritina sonus up sort of thing in the short term which ingredients tend to recommend feeding around the eye area. Yes well lack that other guests that you had on. She said eighty is actually safe to use some products around is even if they're not ice cream formulated and that's still true especially products like vitamin c. That's got lots of really good research around safety around the is at of course you don't bring it to close to the eyelashes themselves. I'm still gave a couple of millimeters of of late way with the crime but yet vitamin c. vitamin a nice day demise hierarchy gasset. The i actually has quite a lot of prescribed that a lot in eyedrops. So that's quite safe around the other. Things like peptides defectors ceremonies all of those a safe to use around the eyes in the rifle mutation. So actually i have. I have a couple more questions on the highway. Saying gotta be really careful with retinal. I have some ice creams that have formulated threaten. Said i must be tested and safe to use around the is a struggled to find specific like prada yet but there has been a fair bit of research that reynolds a dangerous for the glenn end the span quite far below and above the is like a couple of centimeters so perhaps in a certain area. It's okay but i wouldn't be going all the way up to the i was the renell any acids hattie feel about got colic sales like acid. Yeah alpha hydroxy acids though is that there are issues around the is sometimes. I could be quite strong. So you still wanna tested and be careful but full in terms of if you're using the anti aging properties which you might want to on the skin around the eyes 'cause ages the quickest of the skin on the face the neck can be safe to use and i had one more because i've seen easing I've got malaysia onto my eyes. And i have pigment product and they'd like really strong aspect doctor and i don't know if i can take this out to like way the pigment spot Underneath my is depends on the product. Like if you've tested a little bit and it doesn't have a nolan in it. It might be okay. It's been prescribed view. You probably check with Who prescribed them for you. Because i'm not sure if the strength but yet 'cause he can get quite a little pigmentation around the eyes and there are things that you need to do to trade it just being careful and avoiding yet retinal So we often hear of weakness struggling with sunscreen formulas causing the odds to steam. Usually this is because they already have sensitive. Is there any formulas you recommend anyone who gets those stinky sunscreen is. We've all experienced it before yes uneven lack my partner complaints about all the time well again research wise. Just a physical sunscreen is the best. Insensitive is an for the sensitive skin around the eyes and being away you apply it even sometimes ones at our borders assistant. They can help with that too. So it's really a matter of trying different products and saying what's okay with your eyes anytime you get something like that. I'm can flush it out with some saline or with lubricating drops in that can flush out any of that irritation but yet physical sunscreens the best of the skin around the eyes. Yeah i think how on customer says team recommended ultraviolet lane screens anyone. We leave is the similar rush I think as well Yeah i think the. Nfl ceo said they tended to recommend since devised through so we had an optometrist on the show quite a while ago and we spike about makeup mistakes an expired products but we came to know what you think of the biggest mistakes we make with my off that can cause issues. Yes that was not. I went to uni sorry the biggest mistake that i find with that which i think she touched on is if you use eyeliner and you talk line which is lady. Put it on the inside of the eye. Lashes arrived on the island much that touches the surface of the eye. That coming back to those lands at us talking about earlier. That's really dangerous device. Glands it will block them and it will coincide atrophy of them essentially they die nikon regenerate and then you can get really bad dry long-term effects on that as well so it goes Study that said ninety. Six percent of the time when you're applying eyeliner on the inside rim it will irritate the eye whereas it was only about twenty two cents when you applying it underneath the lash line where i i always i m. Oh great but it really is bad. I struggled to get it off. I always find that. It's always underneath my eyes for a couple of days because he can't really getting there and get it off properly are does that contribute to the problem is the econ- remove pro-police seats Really okay yep but also just having something physically blocking a glenn that should always be nice and wider. That's the answer right. What have we have created months monsters. Papal bull listen to these in cape town at you and i will probably continue. I will probably keep doing just but eh okay. All right i'd be interested to know with With the popularity of makeup rising if issues with is have grown as well like our up spezia now than they were fifty years ago because makeup wasn't as popular actually fifty s. It was only the seventeenth so thinking early in two thousand young. Forget tom. It's obviously hub to say that like anecdotally do say even people who realized that is irradiated. I can say just floating around in fillmore. If i look underneath the eyelids it's like the mica is stock. Underneath the i would the safest makeup products us around the is then yes It's as much to do with what's the safest but just what's going to be replaced quite often removed properly so you can use all different products as long as you're using in the right place at appropriately and then you're removing things have high risk of bacterial infections occurring in the product itself a mobile quarterbacks products like the liquid islas whereas like the waterproof mascara has much lower risk of having any bacterial infection developed in the product. If you're using it for too long because it's really quite solvent based so it's not a very good area for bacteria to worry which is scary. About how strong and what it's made out of the around is but yet if you remove it properly with the nice oil-based makeup remove out. It's it's better to come that way. Now you've also done some research into cosmetic procedures all services that can also impact is. Can you talk us through those. I'm assuming it's all access extensions at some point. My gosh. i've seen so many island. She that speak swollen scary eyelids. Yeah obviously they can be good practices around. Just even things like the numbing Around the is to do it is quite dangerous to the is surface itself on its and then the glues formaldehyde-based in most cases which is pretty dangerous hot around jaws to can even traction allocation from them so You know and you can get it from having the eyelashes glued onto natural lashes. That's quite common and even things like lashley can be a little bit dangerous to about whatever products that are used in. I think actually leave recent interview with assange billy hill. She commented on that. And i'm still going to get them in. That case elect just really check with your practitioner actual using the most gentle product that you can around actually really cleaning your eyelashes quite well to sorry. No encouraging any bacterial growth around the area. There's a lot of other research to do with things like some local up. The malicious might more often say is even things like has been reports of a stroke or blood clots from having facial phillies if the throng austrian hit dice. Scary things like having the island lifts. They can also be quite damaging if they're done right. Of course i can be great and there are medical reasons to have them but just being cautious about your practitioner on the methods being used around all of that and looking after your is a new skin around the eyes as much as you can I'd like to get an ophthalmologist on to ask them without boy. Talks under the is okay. Yeah i mean so. Bo talks actually. The first use of by talks was around. The is because straightens. Attend die. And i used to weapon -nology clinic and we actually would use it in patients who lack a hemi facial spasms so the face would twitch or if they had droopy eyelids so of course there are sites uses for it. And it's the right person knows their nationally around the is really well then the risks of affects loa. But it is still something you need to be careful about. What do you recommend for removing stop in a waterproof waterproofing. I make up to work. That daren't damage our is skiing all ashes yes. I looked into some And of a wide range of products that remove may all of them do affect the t. films are africa of minutes afterwards that the one that affected the film. The laced was in oil-based makeup remover. And it does break down. The would appreciate scar as well. So it is probably the best one to use of any and inciting that you know you can still use your other. Makeup remove is on the rest of your effects. But just when it comes to you. I make copies an oil base. Remove we love in oil cleanser. Any good recommendations. I actually really like The democratic capri cleanse. And i just started using the core organic milky mushroom clinton. The mushroom which. I was gonna smell like mushrooms so she was put off initially but i actually really liked it and it sounds really good and quite gentle on the is as well so is zora. Tiktok talk recently. Because i'm in my late twenties. And that's all i do spend time. There's a skill using these audra. She bought off amazon. And i made. The watts is super watch and i wanted to know firstly ago's damaging and secondly is it damaging to use eyedrops for the sake of it because sometimes if my is legitimate like red or doll issues eyedrops. That i have is that bad. I'll start with using address for the sake of so. It depends on the top of drop making shorts indict. If it's a lubricant audra and it's indict. It's totally fine to us. If they have any preservatives in them you want to minimize the amount that you using the that if you find one with that presented so this one. That's highly acid base and has no preservatives lost six months. It's amazing you can use it as much as you need to totally fine. When it comes to the tiktok of. I looked it up. It is so crazy. Answer the active ingredient in. It is actually on that. We use in australia in So in high dosage. Lois i pressure up and i was really surprised to look up. The research. Bat that product because experience what prescribed It's really irritating to the eyes. People died locked to use it but it's quite useful in the lower dosage. That's in this product. It does some research although it's a small sample size and done by the company that released it it does. Show that the a reduction in the retinas for a couple of allah's the i pressure respect is a pretty lar- so i'm anything like that which they have been around for a long time anything to clear up redness. It's fine to useful odile to an event until something i really wouldn't be using them quite regularly and easing the With coaltion often as well Tiktok drop actually saw the someone who abused unlike like a red pimple in. Oh my gosh talk. This is wild during take any medical advice from tc talk. I don't know what the regulations in the us. But it looks like the commotion around that. I dropped from the company On the platform. Interesting do that here. Take trucks the wild wild idiots anything to be very careful. Well thank you so much for joining us today. Laura information was super helpful. If we have any other. I realized christians come through will definitely bring you back on Obviously done a lot of research around inter interesting. Yeah i like dry. Side of things is a little bit of my practice. Interests are elected to a lot of raise at. What's even just for myself to know what i should use around the eyes and kate. My eyes siphoned healthy. If anyone wants to long say laura. She's at canterbury eyecare. Melvin thanks very much guys product. We didn't know in aided hannah. I'll let you take this productivity knowing eight it's kind of like product didn't need it and just like products we love so legitimately today have a legitimate product. I did know. I needed because he one hundred. I didn't even know this existed. And sorry if this is true dawn matches and for christmas. I got this chewed on candle. It's by it's huge. It's the biggest candidate. I've ever seen in your la la di candle but kat fine matches to lot the big candle. We've what teen will because little little matches. Dr benford long enough. So how can you get to old five weeks in one going. Have one of those file files things. I find a lot and is gone long. It ran out first of all and second of all you. Can't you also put on display. Yeah so you have to the draw five meters away. We've really excited version not reliable. Anyone i love that. I do not. They do not want to products you. Daren't nate stare about twenty centimeters long and bist pot. Is there in a beautiful box. You can actually. Despite the lack with your three kilos. Candle st five dollars or something for only twenty nine dollars by the ones that i'm using our freshman ginger tate and tobacco. That's what this the byron matches reach. Oh god i smell good. Those funds are cognac. Seda iris and lead. I mean who doesn't want matches that smell like that on a sleigh but anyway let me say how many do you wanna do yours. While i count okay. I actually thought it already. Don his products. And then i googled lack. When i'm trying to find a productivity donated google podcasts name and then the product name to save it will come up in google because usually i'll put cost night's show up and i couldn't find this if i've already done this. I'm sorry but i just recently started using this again and also pieces the best who have cost. It's zip. Bobby brown crushed oil infused lip gloss in the shade in the buff it. He's they perfect pinky nerd shade and it loss forever. Na like Lip gloss it just lost soy long. And i'm obsessed with the cala. And i put my charlotte Plan around underneath. And i pretty much cover my holy see. Not and then. I put these lip gloss over the top and it's back just stays perfectly. It's my guard who Leap 'cause i just look really like fool and plump and like juicy That's my productivity is now i've countered and how many matches other forty. Oh so twenty. Nine dollars for forty matches that a twenty centimeters long and have hotman smell. I mean seriously. Lemme work out. That he's match in case I actually really really like them. They seventy cents per match. Yeah yeah the hospital. Where because it's such a beautiful box. You can them on display like again. Sorry like a sculpture. It's crowded shapes coach. Honestly if you're a bergey person you won't be questioning these nari as you make sense. Yeah but for people that that aren't wasting money on matches. Well i'm sorry that's probably ninety percent of the audience. Put any just buying the standard ones in the supermarket but nothing wrong with being a little busy. Sometimes so we haven't really done much dating chat today on being very limited considering. But i did send you a text the other day and it was a screen shot from someone who had responded to one of my problems on hinge. Man's oh yeah. I can show you the photo of the guy that makes response a lot funnier but it was my prompt that he is On me if us sunscreen every day and he replied saying. I also wear you bracelet to tell me the radiation given day who soulmates. Maybe a little bit tricky fall. But i do know that these bracelets exist and jewish say have those deacons hot streak as they do and it kind of tells you gives me when the as two high but yeah he's really taking uv exposure. Really seriously. and i very much respect that Good on him. There's i'm chatting to two guys at the moment with the same name. Oh it both from the same country. And i remembered that a girl that i'm friends with was dating this guy with the same name from the same country and i match with this guy. On hinge on my is out the gajate went on a day. We've anyway it wasn't but then i match with the guy that she went on a date. Oh run sorry. i'm chatting to both of them. At the moment i okay. Does that make sense. It would be. Let me just do like an analogy. I don't want to give away but it would be like our lorenzo from easily and sorry. I'm trying to lorenzo from easily from italy. I actually exists. I usually serve from italy. Sorry i'm shutting to him on hinge. And i might all bit my friend. All star data the lorenzo from italy. So i asked my friend. My friend says on our show me a fighter that right. Yeah and then. I can you show me. A photo of your friends are for me too late. And on my own as hot and sorry bay. A few days later. I match with her lorenzo from italy. This is just way too complicated. But i hope that made some sense. So i've actually i only update so boys lorenzo's from italy. They both like equally as good. Do we prefer one lorenzo over the other. I've only met one of them. Sorry to make judgment judgment on which lorenzo from italy. I prefer by the way. He's names not not lorenzo's yeah because it's has previously bena lorenzo cain. Well that's dating chat for the day so dating complicated connett when you try to get people card ninety dollars. Thanks everyone for joining us today. Don't forget to subscribe and and tell your friends. It helps other people to discover us and also we really want to know what he thought about. These podcast view. That would be much appreciated.

Dr lucinda skin cancer Joanna fleming skinstad sheikh joe aspect perot russia hannah sage laura khasan dr luchino hannah bain skin cancer cancers Shay gari adobe eloy
Interview with Elizabeth Bachman

Breakfast Leadership

26:10 min | 7 months ago

Interview with Elizabeth Bachman

"Welcome to the breakfast leadership show where we interview global thought leaders on business leadership in life. Here's your host keynote speaker bestselling author and chief burnout officer of the breakfast leadership network. I go eleven. Welcome back, I've got Elizabeth Bachman on the Line Elizabeth our you. I am fabulous and so excited to be talking to you. Michael Likewise. You've got a diverse career and you know we'll dive into that a little bit but I. Guess. The best question to ask is, what are you doing lately? So give the audience a little bit of background around you, and then you know what you're working on today. Well, I was an international opera director for thirty years directing people like Luchino, Paparazzi, Placido Domingo, and everything from the big big stars down to teenagers going on stage for the first time. Ever I also ran a small opera company internationally and I'm using the skills I learned in thirty years in the performing arts to help business professionals be better presenters. And what I felt by finding is that. I'm working a lot with women helping them be heard of I speak in silicon, valley, and nationally, and internationally I work in Europe a lot. And, I'm really working on these days on how do you present yourself use the presentations feels that you might use to give a speech. To Help yourself be heard within a meeting. So if if there are people who say you're you're. An executive you've gotta seat at the table, but you're still not being listened to it turns out that the same skills you use to help an audience respond to a speech will help your colleagues pay attention to you. and. This is really fun and interesting and exciting and producing really great results. I can imagine and we could probably spend a whole day talking about the opera background and and what it was like to work with those amazing human beings that you know even those that don't pay any attention to opera music You know I love classical music, and so I definitely know who they are but even you know the novice individual knows what's like to work with those people but I think more importantly right now is you know the work that you're doing now in how it pivots to what we're dealing with. This recording goes were in the middle of. I hope it's the middle of a pandemic and. Communication and speaking is such a huge huge issue right now for for people especially when you're communicating with your teams and other people in a virtual way instead of face-to-face many cases. There are there are lots of techniques that can be used to get people to get people to pay attention. And one of the things is you have to work a little bit harder on zoom or. Video call because you drought have people physically in the room. So if they're actually checking their facebook feed on the side, you can't catch them at which means that you have to be interesting. And you have to get people engaged, and that's a big part of what I do. The other piece is that the networking events that we all used to go to where you would meet people and you'd say, Oh, Hey, I know someone you should know let's set up connection. These are happening online now, which means that if you've got fifty seventy, one, hundred people on a call, you better be the speaker or one of the panelists or you won't be noticed. So the other piece of what I'm doing I'm helping corporate women be heard within the company and then part of it is to get them out. They're speaking on panels webinars, information calls it doesn't have to be a folk keynote speech. Even being on a panel is an important piece. Because the more you speak the more you gain credibility and the more you show yourself as a thought leader. Got More your. the more your value to your company rises, and if you're one of the people whose company has folded then or whose job disappeared because. Departments were downsized then being out there speaking is a great strategy for showing how valuable you are and why you should be hired. That's especially as we're going into an economic as we're in the middle of a record high unemployment. The good thing is as long as you can still afford to keep your Internet going, you can be out there showing your value. Promoting your visibility, showing people that you are someone to be to follow someone to hire or if you're within a company somebody to promote. Incredible tips on that because I and I've seen it in my own career. We're speaking and getting out there and talking on panels in front of audiences of small medium and large just share the message and honing your craft and getting comfortable with it because. Heard people are fearful of public speaking and shared the story before a couple episodes where I was in that boat until I was in college and came down with chickenpox at age twenty one which was not lessened. Couch. And I certainly did look pleasant. I. Know that for a fact at the end of the day I was in class and I had to give a presentation I think it was a business writing course if I recall. But Having to miss my week of presentation because Corentin because of the chicken pox. So I get out of quarantine I go back into class in the and I contacted the professor and said, okay, I'll give it next week if that's okay and they made arrangements for so I walk in the class the professor looks at me and then pulls me aside and they said if you want to delay this another week until you look a little bit better. I'm okay with that. And at that point I've been practicing my speech and rehearsing it and all that I was ready to do it even though I despise speaking publicly and I looked at him and I st know what? Let's do it and get it over with. So I did. And afterwards, I got a standing ovation. Now the speech was that good I I'll be completely honest. It wasn't that great but the standing ovation was for me going up there looking the way that I did and being brave to able to face people looking really bad and at that point, I realized if I can speak in front of an audience. With my face completely swollen and looking like a thirteen year old teenager with a really bad acne breakout. Then I can speak. Anywhere. And won't have to worry about us. So that was my breakthrough. Now, I don't wish that upon anybody to have to get shingles or or any type of chicken pox or anything else in order to break through that fear of speaking but. It's one of those things where it gives you a platform and you and you've mentioned it before were established as you as a thought leader in what you're talking about an times like now where the economic situation is not. Pleasant for many. It gives you an advantage to be able to segue into variety of different opportunities if you're open to. Yeah and one of the things that I always feel as if there's something odd about the way you look people do judge, your looks I I it could be chicken pox or an injury or or you might be from a different ethnic background as your listeners You might be from a non dominant culture speaking to a dominant culture than say something and acknowledged its mention it just acknowledged and get it out of the way because if you don't people always going to wonder. Also applies to if you've got if you want to say something controversial or something challenging. mentioned it and think about. Vic about what the yeah but thoughts might be. That's a big part of what I teach is you have your teaching, you have the the point you want to make, and then think about what the automatic pushback is going to be the but and make sure that you have a sentence or true to say. Now you might be thinking neuron with chicken pox I should have waited. But I know but I wanted to do this this and this or. The I want to talk about is so important I'm coming in front of you in my. In my post chickenpox face something like. It was such a powerful moment for me and I remember afterwards. One. I was relieved that I was finished with my talk but secondly. I recognize then even at an early age that you know that will save. Pivotal moment in my life and it gave me the confidence and I don't remember when my next speaking engagement was. I'm sure I gave a presentation at some point. back then but I I know that I, no longer have that apprehension. It's more excitement. Now is nervousness. You know you you WanNa give a a good talk and especially for an audience. You WanNa, make sure that years there and president you know your stuff and thankfully you know I've learned over the years the different ways to engage it I love how you you talk about. Making, sure that you have their arguments already in mind see you can. Properly we discuss them. and. Some different observations rounded not in a confrontational way but acknowledging okay, there's differences of opinion on this matter. Here's the objections. Okay. This is our solution around or through the objections which then entices buying and of course. The. End Result with any talk is to. Impact those individuals lives and get them to take action on something whether it's motivating them to address their burn out or to lose weight or to. Initiate this new project that will grow the business or winning a new client. There's all kinds of different things so Everyone is on stage all the time when they're doing presentation whether it's in a meeting coffee shop discussion on a big stage or zoom call. A whole podcast episode about a dealing with objections and the things. So I should also say I'm the host of the PODCAST speakers who get results and I interview all sorts of experts. About how to use presentation skills to get the result you want, and then I do solo episodes on specific things such as dealing with objections actually did that because the clients were asking him I said, okay, I'll just do a podcast episode about it but one of the points is address the little concerns that are just catching people's attention. So that they go away and then they can listen to the main point that you're trying to make. The mistake that so many speakers make is. They may address concerns, but they may wait until until the very end or if it's a a sales situation and they're doing a speech to. Pitch their company or make a sale get investors. They may wait until the investor objects before saying, we have an answer for that. But. If the objector if the the listener is thinking about the objection, all the way through, they're not necessarily paying attention to the rest of what you want to say. So just smooths the way. I think. Exactly and I I love how you do that because if you don't address the objection early on. Their ears are closed the entire presentation and you can have solution for those people that they desperately looking for for a long time but they won't hear it because they're going to be focused on how they have an objection to what you're saying instead of it being addressed at the end and all everything's done and Unless you have slide deck or presentation with every word. You say there's a lost opportunity there. So when there's an elephant in the room, you bring it out and deal with it because it will make huge huge accomplishments in in your career. In any endeavor you want in life if you address it early on I, love your approach on that. So what are some common mistakes you see with people that do any type of presentations that the you work with to help them correct it to get a better. Footing basically on what they're presenting. The three biggest mistakes I see our. First of all. Not Knowing who you're speaking to in what you want them to do. So if you, you can waste a lot of time by speaking to the wrong audience or you might be speaking to the right audience, but you're not addressing what they want. I have a lot of people say yes but they need they need X. But they're showing up because they want why so you have to make sure that you address that before you tell them what they actually need. The second one is. Too. Much. HOW NOT ENOUGH WHY? And and you know that is that is sales one. Oh, one is the first rule of sales is sell the benefits not the features of Selva sizzle not the steak but that if you are really interested and excited about what it is that you do. Even though you know that it's really easy to get off onto how we're GONNA do this or how I, how I'm going to help you how we do this that and the other which is not. That's really for a one on one conversation. It's not right for a speech a presentation. And the thing that the way I find that helps the most is to focus. On the end you're trying to reach basically build your speech backwards you reverse engineer it from what you're going to ask them to do. And work backwards and if you think of your speech as counting down. To where you're going to end then it's much easier to not go off on a tangent because you know how you know the clock is ticking down and then the third one is either being boring or pushy. In, we've all seen speakers who are. She or boring or bland shall we say and that's the presentation style the delivery style because only seven percent of what people perceive a you comes from your words in the other ninety three percent is how you deliver it how you look how you speak your charisma, your connection, all of that. And chicken pox would be part of that three percent. So that's a that's a very important thing to think of. You know I think to you know going back to and I love the design, your speech. With the end in mind first and then work backwards because then what you're doing just like in any negotiations. You want the client or the audience to be positive and saying, yes in agreeing with what you're saying as you're leading them to. An action item which with every talk there should be an action item other than otherwise it's just gonna be just informational no action great will file it away and never address it again and at that's not the purpose of of any type of presentation that you're doing you want the audience to take action whether it's to do something better on their lives to work with you on something device something for me whatever the case may be so designed that way you build in those yes moments throughout the presentation and then at the end. Psychologically they've been adding and saying, yes, a lot. So when he go for the action item to say, would you like to work for being they've already been saying yes. So much that they're Brian I it's going to be hard shift for their brain quite frankly to go no because they've been saying, yes all along and it's it's sales techniques anybody that. I see this a lot especially with young entrepreneurs and a new business owners where. They said that they don't like sales like you don't WanNa, eat what the way why why do you why do despise it and you know there's connotation that sales is is sleazy in some situations but most cases. Of Zero, selling serving you're serving your audience by wanting something that's best for them. Do. Anything. You do presentation your your interests should be what's In it for the audience, how can this make their lives better or their business better and when you go about it from that approach a success. Is Not. Necessarily guaranteed but it's it's definitely. Going to be a lot easier for you to accomplish what you want with which your talk. Absolutely it's very, it's born and selling is serving if if you're selling speaking to sell then the other thing I think is memorize your beginning and memorize your ask your offer. Because those are the places where you're most likely to be nervous. So as you do that work on it Work on it. To. To if you're aiming for that, you know it's coming. then. You always wanted to make sure that you're leaving time to make your ask and we never know if we're say they tell you you got thirty minutes and then the person in front of you ahead of you runs late or there's a technical problem and they say, Oh, guess what you only have ten minutes always want to make sure that you you have time to do your best point. And your ass? Even. If you have to compress something earlier in your speech. I love that because. I actually had a situation with that, which was the reverse I was giving a presentation at an HR conference a few weeks ago, and originally, it was supposed to be a forty five minute talk with fifteen minute QNA On the subject presenting. And I asked again, it probably should have done this earlier. I said okay. Just confirm you know that we have. Forty five minutes for the presentation and fifteen for Q. and A. Because the original counter invite they sent me was an hour and then they sent a second one which was ninety minutes and I didn't put the two together until you know just before the talk and they said, no, actually we have you this is an expert insight. So we have ninety minutes. So here I am literally five minutes before the talk. I'm going forty five to basically a seventy, five and fifteen A. And I said no problem because I know with my talk, I can do it in eight minutes or I can do it and seventy five minutes. And it's like you said, it's it's the it's the putting in the middle. It's the pieces in the middle those are all. Puzzle pieces, I can put them in. I can take them out I can add stories, I can remove stories I can. Steer. At however, I need to steer it but yeah, the beginning and the end in the ask is important and you have those down and you know the stories the WanNa share with what you're talking about if you know those. yes. You want to rehearse and practicing refreshes especially if you don't do it a lot, but you definitely want to make sure that you have. Beginning in the end rock-solid Kaz the middle stuff. Let and I always tell this to people and they look at me kind of funny but. The audience unless you gave them, your script is not going to be aware if you added something or forgot something. Unless you're giving a less less, she giving a list of like one to ten and you completely skip sixth rate then they're going to be wondering 'cause they're not going to say what about sixty rates so pro tip don't give numbers just say okay here's some tips and you get through all of them. Great. If you miss a few well, you know they they may or may not recognize that. But that's something I learned along the way sometimes end up adding tips I didn't even have on my notes I'm like, where did that come from but that's another story for another day so. Enclosing what are some key? And we've talked about about today. But what are some key points that people should really focus on when you know they're going to do any type of presentation whether it's asking for raise or job promotion or presenting to a client or or speaking on stage? What are some key things that? You feel if people would do this a little bit better than. There'd be more success in their careers. To thoughts. Rule. Number one is making it about them. You WanNa make sure that your chances are. It's you're speaking to people in a way that they hear you This is a so much of the work I do is about women who helping women who have a seat at the table, but still aren't being listened to what we do is we pay attention to. WHO's not listening and how do they need to be heard? How do you need to address them in a way that they're ready to hear it? And that's their many many techniques around that. So it's what what are bay looking for how can you benefit them? How would saying? Yes, to you benefit them put away. And then secondly. The reason why it makes sense it really behooves you to invest in being a good presenter. Is because any presentation you make where you really need to get a IHR need and want a result Is a sales speech. and. Sales is like sex nothing happens until somebody gets excited exactly. That's a great way to wrap up our conversation. So Elizabeth, where can people find out more about you in the sauce Mark Theater doing. Good way to find out if you are going on your presentation skills is to take my free four minute assessment, which is at speak for results. Quiz. Dot. com. That's www dot speak for results, Quinn's, DOT com. Take the quiz, and that's where you can see where you are really rocking your presentation skills and where you might need a little support and if you're interested, you can get a free conversation with me to discuss the results to see. What you're doing well and where you might need to pay some attention. And the other thing is my podcast is called speakers who get results and you could find us on I tunes A. Stitcher anywhere that you listen to podcasts where you can find it on my website, which is Elizabeth Bachman Dot. Definitely have all that information in the show notes. So Elizabeth talking with you today. Thank you for all these awesome tips I've taken notes and I know that the audience is going to be writing down some things you know to make their presentations much stronger than they've been before. So thank you very much for your time. Thank you. Thanks for listening to the breakfast leadership show. Breakfast Leadership Network Visit Breakfast leadership dot com for tips on empowering Your Business and your life.

Elizabeth professor Europe Elizabeth Bachman officer Michael facebook executive Elizabeth Bachman Dot director Placido Domingo WanNa Luchino Corentin president Dot. Quinn engineer Brian Mark Theater
"Post Hawks" Watching Spike's Social Media

Mojo In The Morning

13:42 min | 3 weeks ago

"Post Hawks" Watching Spike's Social Media

"The morning show mojo spike shannon. Megan mike our producer alan. We've got reese our director social impact. Katie our executive audio producer. Good to have you guys with eight for four mojo live eight four four six five six five four eight. The telephone number texas nine five five zero zero by the way. If you text a really good comment be prepared for us to call and get you on the radio because we want to hear your voice and not just sit here and read a bunch of tax because for some reason when i listened to morning shows that read a lot of tax. I figured they don't have a lot of phone callers. i very. There's not a lot of listeners. Listening and i get very temperamental. Sometimes when We don't have phone callers and today we actually have a lot of good phone colors. Today's a good day. People are back from vacations and they're back to listen in the morning which is so nice. Maybe it's the money that we're giving away thousand dollars that you can win to pay your bills or the concert tickets and all the rest of that stuff all right. I've been dreading this topic. Because i have fallen victim to this. Dial yourself a victim. You're you're you're okay. I am the offender of this. You get called out for your behavior spike right now and the topic this morning that we're going to bring up right now. Is the post stocker. Mojo is one of these post hawks. Keeping an eye hawks. I like better than stalker. Peaking keep an eye on every instagram story. And every photo. I post now that i am recently split. And if you've been kind of away from the shows while i went and split well i went through separation seven months ago. I'm living on my own. And a the funny thing is mo jo is one of many people looking for clues of my secret personal life like mojo texts me last monday. Who i took a picture of pizza big laura. I took a picture of the pizza and a beer to shout out our friend. Luchino the chef. Who owns bigger laura. He's an amazing local business owner and a longtime friend of mine and mojo merely taxpayers. Who's eating that other pizza with you. There was one in the distance in the background. That the table dying. No i'm going on dates. And i'm sorry to say was just my brother. Well i was. I know i was. I only did it once to you. It was that one time. I saw it and i thought to myself. I'm like give me. The music can be done. Tonton drama drama dramatic sting. Please hanging out in the studio right. All right genetic dont. It's like a four second thing. Don don don don. Now that's all that's an extra one time to do it right here. Okay get ice. Here's mec- and pizza. Who is he eating pizza with. You're not the only one. I'm using you as the latest example but my dad text means like. Oh who who took the photo you and the brewery national beer day. Who were you with. Like people are literally looking in the reflection on my sunglasses to see if they could tell who's sitting across the table from me yunos. Em efforts so. I just want to say when. I have something to share my personal life status. You guys will be the first to hear about it. In fact you'll get the world explaining lucid news or the listener you while the show will the listeners will through no-one else will have a you mojo in the morning will be the first you'll be you'll beat tmz in this amazingly citing. But i'm taking things slowly. I have to worry about my daughter's feelings and this is all still so new. The paperwork isn't dry yet as they say. And i'm just finding my intact inc. Oh yeah the ink isn't sure there's been thrown in the. Yeah and it's still drying are well. Can i ask you then some questions. Would you mind if i ask them questions lord. I don't know if i want to hear your questions are are like. I'm not out trolling for dates right now. Not signing up for the apps. And i get. Dm's from listeners. Every time i'm out with my friends like my knees my anything. My neighbors people are like I saw you like. I had coffee meetings with photographers working on trips for my travel company explorer spike. And people like so you al. We back on the horse. I'm like no. I got not by the way spikes spikes terminal his the horses. Try yet. go ahead. Well go ahead finish saturday. I was out To brunch with a bunch of people after my workout the gym i met people and and they met listeners at the restaurant. And i wanna shout out. Aaron and leah. I think their names are they They were in are mojo baby contest and swedish couple and the little girl i met. They want our contest and got the ivf treatment. Now they're expecting baby number. Two from dr shamma. So but i saw them. I in china check. Who's in his team over there on so couple couple of things. I bring up. Because i had been itching to ask this question near we. Are you gonna flights. Y- i i was gonna ask you. Are you dating right now are you. I'm assuming that that's no because you're you're when i am ready. Share anything in my personal life that you'll be the first here. Will you go on a dating app because Dating apps weren't around single the last time. Now no i have no interest day. Why are you opposed to that. Jump on their stories and share things with me like friends of ours people in staffan a dating app people in. Oh god no people in this building. Show me a picture on the front. That thing they show me from mojo in the morning your home of the phone scams. Those things are justified to hook up for the night. I know there's a lot of listeners that will say no. I met the love of my life. I got married to someone. I mean the majority of people troll for on there. It's just not my style. I think Maybe it's just my age old fashioned like shannon. I feel like you. You know they'll be the right person you'll know when you meet them old fashioned old smashing. I'm going be. I told chelsea address. I said kelsey Hypothetically speaking if we were single. I would jump on one of those apps. I would seriously i i. Would you absolutely would nine loaning do it just to see how good these apps work. You now excited. I heard meghan allen talk about how horrific it is. It's for women it's horrific for guys. It seems like it's a. It's a guy that would be horrific that the girls would be showing their friends. Go and look at this whole look at this guy takes her in the bathroom mirror. I will say this about the pizza thing. The only reason why and by the way let let me. Just say to your brother. I love your brother to death. He's the one. I actually be honest to the. I think i like your brother more than i like you. Okay but his pizzas a little a little girl. I look like well. You could say you know when you order a pizza. Do you have the pictures. Still show the picture. The pizza in the background. It's a did not order. It looked like a pizza that like my wife would order. Didn't look like judged by that natalie. I thought it was your daughters. Natalie a coal that were there with you and i was just joking and then when you said your brother. I'm likely story. Your brother does pizza. That looks like you know. What's funny too is i will go. Sometimes my daughters and i like just nicole. 'cause natalie's away at college nicole now out now like friday night date night and i'll post but i don't post my daughter's face ever my girls never go my social media and so then people i realized later all god. I got to clarify. Because now i put date nine people like. Oh hey pizza. People go no because people don't know what your daughters look like. Because you never post them you do you think people are gonna see you out with your daughter or daughter and think your dating younger not that young one thousand nine hundred seventeen. So they're not you know we're seventeen next month so i don't think anyone's that would be creepy epstein stuff. That's like not not not that young. Listen i know many guys that are your age. Why nattered better dayton twenty year olds. That are it's pretty crazy but Line number six. I don't know what their name is. But hello good morning. Hello who's this task. What's up what's going on. I think spike would definitely go on a dating site and use a pitcher with taylor swift. So you look fall spikes talking about picture. Jostles referring to when i was backstage taylor swift every time i hang out with taylor swift. We take a picture together. And i look like her child. I look a foot shorter than her. Because she's ready to go on stage. She's already taller than me by inches. And then she has heels on for the stage so the one time. I actually stood on the ottoman backstage to look taller than her. And you know got busted by her. Mom shared the picture with mojo to make sure that everybody knew i was standing on the woman so yeah. I don't know that but you can't put a picture with anybody on on an app dating app pitch. That's like number me taylor on there for sure either. Swear why wouldn't you put it on there. Because i don't have to do a picture. Me holding fish. Do understand. Shirtless mir not if i was trying to get dates. Hey quick Other question this has been coming up a little bit on social media and it's also came up with a couple textures. Why don't you and shannon when you're ready to date my favorite comedy both. Think that you and shannon should should be shallow thinking that people think. Well you're single on the same show should get together. We're siblings. we've been working together for fifteen years now. I mean it's like you know. I've seen interested. I've heard of more than shows matter i've heard of morning shows where the The co host. All of a sudden next thing you know they become an item a workout. A good way randy and oper co-host first and then start. They were yes and he was going through a divorce. Yeah he was going through a divorce at the time he. Oh yeah well. Well the rainy and low per one. He called her. His sister is big sister all the time about really i love it. I think they're just secretly dating. and not. No wait where you the other pizza remember. I was drinking margaritas and having a sword fight with my strokes. I know they'll never date a because mike has a rug with star wars prentup. What's going on. Katie it's mojo in the morning show. Hi so i know. You're talking about apps and i feel very old when i say this but i met my husband three one other phone sex chat line. No relay were you one of the girls that they would call into. Yes i You like was like what live links they still have the like infomercial on at night But i like you call in and the the ladies are free but the guys they only get like so many minute free and they have to pay other pe- you are both customers. Correct you call in and then you d like a little spiel. My name is katie. And this is what i like and then you can listen to their profiles then you can connect the call. Old being tired tyler. Dating what was the number. What was the actual number. I don't remember the number but The they always live links where members always like one eight hundred. Spank to me or something. Like that wasn't misunderstood. There's there wasn't you didn't just calling to talk to one person could different was almost like the a. m. chat groups like blind. It's like it's like the show party lines on saturday version of the of the dating apps. You just couldn't see the pictures right. Wow the first apple phoned. Why is is. I told my mom we met at church.

Megan mike mo jo Luchino shannon Tonton Don don don don laura dr shamma meghan allen reese Katie hawks tmz alan natalie texas leah taylor swift kelsey Aaron