7 Burst results for "Lsu Medical School"

"lsu medical school" Discussed on WazaMedia Podcast

WazaMedia Podcast

05:26 min | Last month

"lsu medical school" Discussed on WazaMedia Podcast

"Welcome back to another episode of the wasn media podcast. My name is jr. I am the ceo of this awesome company. And i'm here today. excited to talk with jean laborde. Gina thank you for being on the show today. Jr thank you and we have a former guest of the show. Daisy daisy shoe To thank for connecting us together. So thank you dr xu thank you daisy For bringing us together. Thank you days so gina for our audience. That doesn't know you We want to with all of our guests. We like to ask our audience To tell a little bit of the story. Because i was immediately we believe in the power of storytelling. Everyone has a great story to tell. And i'm sure you have a great story to tell and also about your organization which will get back We'll get to a little bit later. But i can. We hear a little bit about your story. Sure i'm jean laborde. And i'm originally from louisiana where i happened to be right now and i have a background in design. Did some teaching of design and also worked for lsu medical school where did all the graphics for the whole university in Done some different marketing. Things did a. I worked for a marketing company. That promoted coca cola music festivals things like that grassroots marketing And then lsu moved to the department of biochemistry and former where. I helped develop in photoshop for scientists empowered winter side powerpoint scientists class. Then we had a little hurricane katrina than i was the director in baton rouge Exile baton rouge for low law for two publications two to five magazine which is a lifestyle magazine in the batteries business report so i was in new orleans. I did some work for spotify doing being campus ambassador and influence and also for a restaurant group. That susan spikes earned. We did some social media for food. And she's actually been character. Those based on the hbo series tra may she's the main shaft was based on so then We decided my husband. And i decided to move to washington. Dc after all this time and we move jobs. There absolutely loved the area. And i right now. I m the marketing and communications manager for the american society for investigative at all. You have quite the history gina from from being out in in the area dealing with hurricane. So you probably have a taste in crisis. Communication does marketing. And now you're working out in the dc area here so quite a large range of experience and I am interested about how you enjoyed your time with spotify. That's that's pretty neat. Well it.

Gina washington jean laborde jr. new orleans spotify daisy Jr today two coca cola louisiana gina five katrina two publications Daisy daisy law baton rouge Exile
Bridging the communication gap with Gina LaBorde

WazaMedia Podcast

02:16 min | Last month

Bridging the communication gap with Gina LaBorde

"Welcome back to another episode of the wasn media podcast. My name is jr. I am the ceo of this awesome company. And i'm here today. excited to talk with jean laborde. Gina thank you for being on the show today. Jr thank you and we have a former guest of the show. Daisy daisy shoe To thank for connecting us together. So thank you dr xu thank you daisy For bringing us together. Thank you days so gina for our audience. That doesn't know you We want to with all of our guests. We like to ask our audience To tell a little bit of the story. Because i was immediately we believe in the power of storytelling. Everyone has a great story to tell. And i'm sure you have a great story to tell and also about your organization which will get back We'll get to a little bit later. But i can. We hear a little bit about your story. Sure i'm jean laborde. And i'm originally from louisiana where i happened to be right now and i have a background in design. Did some teaching of design and also worked for lsu medical school where did all the graphics for the whole university in Done some different marketing. Things did a. I worked for a marketing company. That promoted coca cola music festivals things like that grassroots marketing And then lsu moved to the department of biochemistry and former where. I helped develop in photoshop for scientists empowered winter side powerpoint scientists class. Then we had a little hurricane katrina than i was the director in baton rouge Exile baton rouge for low law for two publications two to five magazine which is a lifestyle magazine in the batteries business report so i was in new orleans. I did some work for spotify doing being campus ambassador and influence and also for a restaurant group. That susan spikes earned. We did some social media for food. And she's actually been character. Those based on the hbo series tra may she's the main shaft was based on

Jean Laborde Daisy Daisy Dr Xu Lsu Medical School Gina Baton Rouge Louisiana Department Of Biochemistry Coca LSU Hurricane Katrina Lifestyle Magazine Susan Spikes New Orleans HBO
"lsu medical school" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

13:40 min | 1 year ago

"lsu medical school" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"Welcome to the ticket. I'm Isaac to air so earlier this week. The Senate how the hearing that I think it's fair to say was a bit. Surreal Dr Anthony Fauci Robert Redfield and other members of the White House Coronavirus Task Force testified before the Senate Health Committee they were self quarantining though because a west wing staffer had tested positive so they had to join videoconference everything video conference now and the Senate is no exemption. Got To hear the chairman's dog barking in the background see the strange art and memorabilia. Senator sat in front of and in the hearing room itself. Senators were space six feet apart. Some wearing masks. You might have seen that. Bandanna the Tim came a sporting like he was off to rob train so for today's episode. I'll talk with one of the member committee and someone who's got a unique perspective on the outbreak. Before he was a politician. Louisiana's bill cassidy was a doctor. He worked as a gastroenterologist often with patients with little or no insurance he also ran a mass immunisation drive in his home state. When the corona virus started to hit cassidy was one of the earliest Republicans to raise alarm. Join me by phone this week. Even though we're both in Washington we talk about mandatory. Vaccinations running the government right now. And how he says states should approach reopening. Take a listen. Hey Bill Cassidy here. Hi Senator How are you? It's Isaac Dove Air. Hey let me give a cup of coffee going. That's that's important. So where are we finding you today? in the midst of all this craziness opposite capital. We've been voting today So you can actually productive if you get used to working remotely but we do walk up to the Florida Vote. And then we have a lunch where everybody shares concerns. It must just be so odd being in the capital The Senate is a place that everybody Spends a lot of time together in close quarters lunches and and now it just very different. My assistant went to the Rotunda today. And he said he was doing there by himself in the rotunda where normally there are throngs of people in middle the day coming to see the. You know the kind of memorial to the great folks in our nation's history. He was by himself and he just took a video of being in the Rotunda by himself. And anyone who's been in the Rotunda can just imagine. Wait the middle of the day on a Thursday and you're by yourself so it's kind of experience you're having on a regular basis. I have never walked through the Rotunda without having to dodge at least three or four tourists. Whose EYES ARE DARTING IN DIRECTIONS. That are not looking in front of them so make it very difficult to get around the start in thinking about How you got to where you are before. I got into journalism going all the way back. I thought about being a doctor what my mom wanted me to do. I think she probably would have preferred and honestly but she's gotten over it a little bit. You did all that you went to medical school you were practicing and then you decided to leave Madison politics. Can you just explain that thought process how that transition happened for you? My medical practice always had a great degree Of If you will broader public service so of course I treated patients than you. Serve a patient one at a time but also talked with Lsu medical school so In a very real sense served as the educator for the residents and the medical students and then did multiple public health programs in which for example we vaccinated thirty six thousand children over six years against hepatitis. B. At no cost to the parents or to the school system and I frankly enjoy that tremendously so I can see Leith within my activities this kind of perspective but then you hit your late forties and you love what you do. I was doing research and teaching and lecturing and enjoying it all. But you're just a little bit kind of discontent and I think God sometimes put discontentment into lives just to move you out of a resting place into another part. And that's what happened to me At some point somebody leaned back and ask. Would you like to run for state Senate I I said yes. I had to support my wife Recognized that that I would be happier doing something a little different than what I was doing. And the rest has been as it's been a state Senate into the house and now to the. Us Senate what does that perspective. Continue to inform how you look at this. Do you feel like you come at this these questions especially now with what? We're dealing with public health crisis as doctor or are you coming at it? As a senator more everybody is a product of their life experience. That's true of me. My medical practice was one in which ninety nine percent of my patients were. Either uninsured are poorly insured on Medicaid. And I worked in a public hospital. But that's still informs me and so we have a program I'm thinking how would that affect my patients back home. Would they be able to access this? If we're asking somebody to go and get a drive. Through TESTS FOR CORONA VIRUS. One of my patients who had to take two buses in order to get to her appointment which she'd be able to go to a drive through testing site krona virus. The answer is of course no and so it continues to inform now. The physicians virus my public health experience vaccinating children rapid titus be. I used to give lectures regarding viruses and antibodies and immunologic response. I never thought I would use that again. That's clearly come into force. I'm glad you bring up the vaccines question. Because even though it seems like we are at least a while off from having a vaccine for the virus it's already becoming a fight You can see the fight brewing people saying whether they want to get the vaccine or not whether it'll be mandatory or not. What is your take on that given your experience in how you do come at this stuff so we already see a robust set of laws and kind of all workplace requirements that I think would apply very nicely. To Krona Virus Schools have pre matriculation requirements. Which is to say. The child has to be vaccinated and less as a contra indication against certain vaccine preventable diseases before she or he enrolls including measles mumps rubella hepatitis B. Hepatitis hospitals can commonly require all employees to have the flu shot. Because obviously you don't want the employees communicating infection to other people so I think we already have a pretty robust set of of laws and regulations. That will govern. I think most people are going to want the vaccine. Hard to think they won't But at the same time if you get the vaccine in effective hopefully it does not matter if another does not wish to put. It doesn't make sense to you how this has become a political issue. That people saying now I don't I it's it's infringing on me to say that. I should get vaccinated. I think that politics is just our current form of working out issues as if we're thinking aloud and there's always gonna be somebody with a contrary opinion but as we think out loud we as a society will become reconciled to certain viewpoints. I don't fault. Somebody saying they don't wish to be vaccinated and I don't fault. Somebody wishes to say it should be mandatory. That everybody is is part of the discussion. And I think think we actually do better as a nation if we have that full robust discussion. Because I'd like to think that wisdom prevails and wisdom prevails for you that there would be widespread vaccination right. Yeah but current law one. The uptake of flu vaccine which is a voluntary vaccine continued to increase but where it's required people take it up. A Corona virus has called such problems. I'm sure every employer We'll have some requirement to have it and that apparently is allowed so I think we can allow our communities if you will kind of dictate that doesn't take a federal law. What do you think about face masks de Wear facemask? I do when I'm when it's indicated if I'm outside. The breeze was blowing twenty miles an hour by myself. I don't sure but if I'm walking down the hall and there's ten people come in to me I do face. You can look at the incidents of flu and Hong Kong that when they begin wearing face masks the influenza of virus infection rate decreased. And so I think that there's appear evidence that wearing a face mask decrease respiratory are airborne viruses At this point we know that it's almost capricious most. People who have complications from Corona virus are older with a underlying risk factors. But not everybody right and so you might bring on grandma and she ends up in the ICU. Even though she's otherwise healthy so I I do it. Not only for myself. But for yeah. That's the thing about the face masks is that and again. I'm the one who never got it together. Go to medical school but what we are told us that it is about protecting ourselves and each other. And it's it's about if both people are wearing masks than the risk of infection is so much lower but then it gets filtered into the political process and the and and it has become already again like the vaccine. We don't know when we're going to have a vaccine and how that will work but with famous ready seen people saying no. You can't make me wear face mask. And then it seems like we're running up against this question of people saying what their idea. Personal Liberty is verses. The idea of everybody working together as a society to keep the infection rate low. So how do you reconcile that will again going back to a national dialogue? I think that There's a state representative died in Louisiana fifty four years old And so the state representative in the State. Senators of course are very aware of his death and he died at Corona virus infection. So I'd like to think that knowing somebody who died is going to influence your behavior on the other hand. Let's take the perspective of somebody who lives in a community with very low prevalence am which Chris just not there at best. You can tell. But there'd be an after. Wear a mask now. There has to be some sort of rhyme and reason beyond everybody has to do it. It should be that we know from surveillance. Testing are from some other method of analysis that we're actually having spread of corona virus in this community. I grant you. It can come in surreptitiously. People don't know it's there. Hi Grant you that. But there's other areas in which it seems fairly well documented that there's a very low incidence of infection. So I think it would help if there's some nuance in the recommendations I was texting with my sister-in-law Mobile Alabama and I will probably the incidence of corona viruses different in Huntsville very north of the state and mobile. Which is on the Gulf coast? Should you have a blanket? Rule for the entire Alabama or should there be some kind of recognition that maybe Huntsville something different going on the mobile so that same sort of principle. I think people would be more accepting if they saw the rationale transparency behind the decision making process. I think that that you're talking about another state but just in Louisiana. Obviously they're different rates of incidence of the credit virus in different places New Orleans Hotspot essentially And then there are other parts of the state where there are almost no infections. So how do we sort it out? I think that that's the problem. Here is is at governors who are making the calls. Is that the president. Is You know mayors. What do we do here? Science should make the call epidemiology. Should make the call and we should base it upon micro-communities When I say micro communities think of a school are a workplace or a neighborhood now. It's one thing to say we're going to do the entire state of New York or Louisiana or Florida the entire city of Shreveport or baton rouge or New Orleans. That's just becomes too big. But you can say I'm GonNa look here where the incidence of infection currently is it ten baton rouge but it's not just generally distributed it is uncertain census tracts within Baton Rouge by the way we've looked at this and yesterday the case and it's not just within certain census tracts. There's some areas in which we see even within that census track. There's an issue that's where you target your resources it. You can target your resource there. One you help prevent the spread of infection. The complications of a dust bread. But ideally. You're able to prevent it from spreading. Swear let's imagine this high incidence neighbor somebody who works as a nurse in a nursing home knowing that she won might screener at the nursing home. Follow back to her neighborhood. But then you check. Her contacts is a way to build upon these systems we already have novel. Corona viruses a reportable disease. Where does someone live? Who have it? Let's build out from there for their microsystem. Either the neighborhood or their place of work and you can actually begin a containment strategy. That's what I mean by science guiding what we do all right. Let's take short break. We'll be back with more Senator Bill Cassidy in the moment. This is Jeffrey Goldberg. I'm the editor in chief of the Atlantic this show and all of our journalism here at the Atlantic depends on.

Senator Louisiana bill cassidy Senate The Senate influenza New Orleans Isaac Krona Virus Schools flu vaccine Florida Washington Senator Bill Cassidy chairman Dr Anthony Fauci Robert Redfie Alabama Isaac Dove Air Senate Health Committee state representative
"lsu medical school" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"lsu medical school" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Out something I come alive that's a very good question you don't realize how great that question once again just like that any body destroys the virus it gives you unity it means that Mary could then go to the grocery store not wear a mask because most likely she would be yeah hasn't been proven yet beyond a shadow of a doubt but that's where scientists think it's going and in Germany Great Britain and Italy there speaking of giving people immunity certificates so that if they've been exposed to have anybody they can now return to life without having to wear a mask by the way it's also important to know if you're not on mute if you're not on you and you have diabetes or high blood pressure you're seventy years old you're really at risk for having complications and so we have to make sure that you do stay protected so that you don't get sick by the way I mentioned earlier I used to teach medical school students with LSU medical school did a lot of public health this is what I did for twenty five years think about these antigens antibodies of viruses etcetera so there is a really good point there and one more thing she said one of the treatments is being considered if the tech antibodies from people like Mary who've been exposed assuming that she has been the kind of concentrating and so when someone comes to the hospital really ill with coronavirus you can put those antibodies from another person into that really sick patient and those antibodies from the other from the other folks will fight the virus in the really sick patient and help prevent them from getting thicker there's a lot to this and so so Congress appropriated hundreds of millions of dollars for the centers for disease control to begin rolling out these testing the testing will be free it'll be widespread and hopefully by the end of the summer we'll be getting almost everybody wants to be tested tested one more thing I will say I will add another tore on the Wall Street journal you can look it up online a week ago Friday I think in which I suggested that we kind of keep track of who's immune and who's not if you're not a meal you need to take real good precautions if you're an older person with underlying heart health problems to make sure you don't get sick if you are viewing your Jan can return to life so the advantage of all this is that we protect those who need to be protected and we let those who are otherwise okay go about their business but I do suggest that we set up something like the immunization registries we do for children now the child is vaccinated within a week of birth and then again at age eleven H. fifteen H. seventeen history it's it's it's it's recorded by the way if you just joined us senator bill Cassidy here his star three if you'd like to ask a question and you'll get your you'll get screen also star three if you'd like to ask a question make a comment but then again the immunization registry when you go into the when the child goes into the military age twenty eight they can look back and see they're vaccinated for measles as a baby and they don't have to re vaccinate him away we can set up an amused registry in which if somebody's been exposed gotten over like merry she didn't know that and so that she can put out a bill help she can say listen that might be M. B. but the red door and by the way I've got a certificate of health I and I am immune to coronavirus you don't have to fear getting it for me but she does not have to fear from getting it from a guest and so she knows that she's protected by naturally occurring immunity so anyway all that to say merry what a great question what a great kind of a whole whole wanted to you know see how this town hall meeting this past Thursday there if you just want a convertible capital it starts three if you'd like to ask the question earlier we asked a question about how worried are you about the corner bars one would be really worried to kind of worried three not worried at all a moderator Shawna can you tell us the results of that or call can you tell us the results of that thank you and so far we're at fifty six percent very worried thirty two percent now that kind of worried and only twelve percent not worried at all okay well that's not bad a bomb was worried about people not socially distant think so hopefully most people based on their worry would be now marriages call from Alexandria let me give that phone number there if you have a problem either to misuse the phone number Alexandria is three one eight.

Mary
"lsu medical school" Discussed on Nourish Your Health at every age

Nourish Your Health at every age

12:27 min | 1 year ago

"lsu medical school" Discussed on Nourish Your Health at every age

"This podcast series will focus on how people of all ages may achieve optimal health and wellness. Our guest. Today is Dr Kelli Cobb. A board certified internal medicine physician and owner of Nourish Med spa in Lafayette Louisiana. Board eligible and geriatrics. Doctor COBB is certified in age management medicine and has extensive experience in treating women's health issues. Her career in medicine has been driven by her interest in the complexities that influence mind body and health a graduate of the School of Medicine. Dr Cobb holds degrees from the University of Texas in Psychology Humanities and Communications Dr Cobb Kelly. Welcome to nourish your health. Thank you yes your background fascinates me and I do want to say. This is our first episode of Nourish. Your health at every age in honestly couldn't think of a better gas to have one because you not only bring health and wellness to people. But it's a holistic approach which I think more and more people are understanding that. That's the key to good health. So if you would tell us your background. I know you're from Lafayette. Can you tell us about your background? Absolutely I grew up here and graduated from as tm in about nineteen eighty. Eight and Back then I was just occasion girl. You know eating Having Fried Fish on Saturdays and hush puppies and homemade ice cream so I grew up. You know surrounded by all the Great Cajun Food and Does Rodney and you know the the culture that we we enjoy And during that time I was exposed to You know illness in my own family So it definitely I think kind of triggered that initial Interest and Set off kind of that that Discovery Process what what happens to people. You know all of a sudden My Grandmother Developed Alzheimer's and So that was really you know hard to watch and And other family members having other illnesses but that one really stuck out to me and really started my quest to kind of understand how the mind and body are connected right and your father was yeah. It's my job. Is this decision. Yeah he was a kind of a pioneer Of sorts in our area. I think he was orthopedist. And always try to develop new techniques. Very open to new techniques. my grandmother was a nurse Since she was an army nurse She was from Oklahoma and so is around All of her health and wisdom she was very much involved in And I guess offering and teaching me a different way of message. We had a greenhouse. She was always telling me. What seven vegetables did you eat today? You know so. It was a total different side His family right. Yeah so you. Did you know you were going to go to med? School does majoring in psychology humanities and communications now I probably not Just took the cat. Yeah I I'm a lifelong learner. I Love I love school. I love learning I was always very interested in science and found found fast but I was very interested in writing and humanities and all the things that influence a person's I guess development and identity and how they interface with the world So that was a big passion As I was going through college just exploring all the different things that influence identity So I studied philosophy in history and economics and all kinds of things Austin was a fabulous place to learn. It was Full of new ideas and at least for me growing growing up here There was a lot of emphasis on healthy eating mayor. A lot of emphasis on alternative type of treatments so I was Very much turned on by what was going on there. I did a lot of neurology. Research probably driven by my interest in In urological disease so I did get exposed to How the brain was very involved in In the body's health right so then you return to Louisiana and went to school. Lsu Medical School in New Orleans. What was that like? Oh it was one of the best times of my life I really enjoyed The intersection of everything going on there. At the time the music the food the science Patients were fabulous. I learned so much from taking care of the people down there and they were so generous with their. You know sharing their illness and what was going on with them. So I think it was a little bit of a shock to my system at the time Of how how ill that was. Probably my real exposure to real serious illness and how community is so important to both the contribution and the origin of the illness but also the solution And how we can turn around health for people with the right Multidisciplinary approach you know. It's it's not just the doctor that's important It's everyone in that person's environment to that makes a difference so as you were training I I remember the charity. Hospital system is that that's how you absolutely day still like that. We don't call it that but you really seeing people. That didn't have much in the way of resources. And probably had very serious by your. We were definitely exposed to you. Know very ill people and You know we had to Integrate their where they were. You have to meet the patient where they are where. What is your understanding of their illness? And what are they capable of doing when they leave the hospital It was definitely an eye opener for me. How much community matters to health? I know you've shared with me that you partner with your patients and as I'm listening to your words thinking about you as a younger physician training Did you know that she wanted to go into internal medicine? Did you feel a connection with that or has this been a journey for you? Yeah I think I I like the idea of being a detective and I think that's why internal medicine Always Kinda stayed my passion. I'm interested in so many other things but that to me is where I can. Maybe make the most impact You know most of us have our own journey with wellness in with illness and when I went to residency That's when I started having my own health issues and of course running into walls like okay. Well there's nothing wrong with you. There's nothing wrong with you. And that's when I found a doctor lamb. He is a pioneer common functional mess in Age Management Medicine. And that's when I started exploring. Well what's really going on behind the scenes? What's what are the root causes of of what was going on? And that was My intro to kind of studying functional medicine. Every year residency at emory was very intense. It was very much about same a continuation of the neurons experience. A lot of people We had two floors of HIV. We're doing very seriously ill. Yes yeah But at the same time There was a lot of public health influence there and a lot of influence on Trying to make a difference in their lives as well So that was kind of when I started exploring the functional medicine world and looking beyond what you know what we were just learning to be like what else. There's gotTa be more to the story. How do you define functional medicine? Could you explain what that is I guess to me it's just kind of root cause medicine If you think about allopathic medicine or you know the medicine that were trained and we're looking at The End Organ Disease Right. So we're studying diabetes. Were studying Stroke we're standing corner or diseases or end Oregon diseases and a times. That's especially in training when we're dealing with very ill people. That's what we're working on. We're working let's reverse this illness. Let's treat these emergencies. Let's get this person You know back on track Functional Medicine is more before you get to that in Oregon illness. What are the imbalance is going on? In a person's energy systems or hormones Their nutrition their psychological issues There's that's kind of. I guess if you look you think of as a tree. The leaves are going to be the end organ. Diagnosis the imbalances are going to be kind of what's going on in the trunk. And then the route which is also kind of the psychosocial influences So you know I think when I approach patients. I'm thinking about the whole. Obviously I'm always thinking about what's the most serious thing. That's what I want to focus on first and get that addressed but at the same time And that's why to me. The relationship is so important because when you get to know the person you really get to understand how they're able to communicate what their what their symptoms are. It's very difficult for a person to walk into a room. They're meeting ME FOR THE FIRST TIME. And they've gotta just barrel and be like okay so it does take a little while to You know I call it autonomy. It's that gap between with a person's trying to say in in language you know that's a very interesting part of medicine because I'm waiting for the patient. Tell me what's what's wrong. Yeah All of medicine especially functional MRI infamous is a lot about listening and a lot about learning about the patient And trying to get out of them. What's what's wrong So it's kind of that detective work and I think looking at it from an Having a as a partner and also about all of the influences really opens up the conversation And I think it helps the patient really open up access to what's wrong with them or maybe a better vocabulary to help the the doctor the practitioner Access you know their inner world Because you can't do it for us. We can present to you but you can't. You can't make our choices. We have to write off and and what maybe some more positive choices that would lead to better health. Yeah enjoy educating people about you know you. What did they enjoy in? How can we modify what they're doing I obviously if there's a danger situation we're going to focus on that right away and get that taken care of But there's so many Especially in our community. I think we've really were opening up all of the other Healing Modalities That are available to people. It's amazing to me Over the course of my life to see the the changes in an understanding of week we can take control of our health not in all cases but I mean in many cases and one of the things that motivated me to do. This podcast was the experience I had in life similar to you where my parents were both diabetic and they experienced just horrific Problems my dad was a double amputee. Lost both legs I don't know that it could have been prevented in the long haul but I know he didn't make choices to monitor his health and by the time things went wrong they really went wrong fast. And My mother had similar things with congestive heart failure and kidney failure and to stand by and watch that it just it was frightening and I know now it was just choices. They made throughout their lives. You know just everyday choices right right. I think it's so important to Teach people as early as we can about the choices in a ballot the options and about Especially about nutrition and what that does Both positive and negative to The organs I spent a lot of time with my patients talking about gut health and Gut Restoration and helping them understand about sugar and the impact. That sugar has Nobody wants to hear. I thought so You know we got eighty twenty rule. Try To be good. Eighty percent of the time But there's been so much Improvement I think in the market in terms of what's available people now that they're definitely opening up to other options and I think with our community you know it's got to be a community effort because we're so social and I think as as people start helping each other and and Learning together then it becomes more fun and then.

Age Management Medicine Dr Kelli Cobb School of Medicine partner Nourish Med Functional Medicine Dr Cobb Kelly Alzheimer Lafayette Oregon Lafayette Louisiana University of Texas Oklahoma Rodney New Orleans Gut Restoration Lsu Medical School Louisiana Austin
"lsu medical school" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"lsu medical school" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Elti we have so much to do tonight therefore i'm very excited the dr susan edmunds dr susan edelman susan as soon as i can put on my ear phones which are very complicated i look forward settlement actual says not a psychologist i would never go to a psychologist dr at amman i just want you to note and the reason i wouldn't is because i went to syracuse university and i know the people who became psychologist who went through syracuse university they went to college one year more than me i want i have had only psychiatrists i want people who have suffered through medical school i want people who have peer review are affiliated with a hospital have had something published ed they have a licence so welcome welcome dr of wealth rolling on sunday i have so much respect free by way where did you get your robe a medical degree i feel we were there and i went to lsu medical school uh uh moved to california i'm in california you licensed in california and your license in louisiana which doesn't fell but being licensed in a california is a very big deal doctors out allman says there are three questions that a woman must ask the guy a new guy before she has sex with him would you please tell us what those three questions are because i think i know the three questions would you like to hear my hunch and wacko carrier character parapro do you have black american express card do you bear physical resemblance to any of the cleveland cavaliers a number three what what will i be inheriting those of the three question that i think every woman should should ask before she has sex with a guy and do you have any relation and i think now we have a whole new set of questions do you have any.

dr susan edmunds syracuse university medical degree california louisiana cleveland cavaliers dr susan edelman lsu medical school allman one year
"lsu medical school" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"lsu medical school" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Hello everybody so good to be back with you the sunday afternoon once again we explore all those gray screw she channels inside out ahead the gray matter of the brain i hope you're ready and set for a brainy hour an exploration of the cerebrum not exactly what we're used to normally on radio but i'm really hoping that you feel like you're benefiting from this hour in which we talk about brain health recovery from brain injury and all of the matters from the life span of the youngest child to the oldest of our citizens in society talking about how to retain or how to peak to our best performance in the brain this week i'm going to start right away with our first guest i'm thrilled to have with me dr stephanie cave a pediatrician from baton rouge louisiana stephanie cave is one of those very unusual pediatricians who only on sought it paying close attention to the changes in our country in terms of the incidence of what we are now referring to as the new childhood epidemics conditions that are rising in tremendous frequency and children and that according to many pediatrician like dr cave can be treated and in which they can be a reversal of symptoms as long as you take the right approach talked to cave was born in new orleans louisiana she received bs in medical technology from lsu lsu by the way is a bit of an almatar of mine too so i share that with talk to cave and i know my accent doesn't give that away i grew up in south africa however i did gets a phd uh from the lsu system so off to studying for the bachelors she then went for an ms in clinical chemistry from lsu medical school in 1978 and that is uh an interesting aspect which i'm sure we'll come up in our conversation because some physicians are intimidated if they have to take on complex chemical issues of the brain but that was obviously not the case for dr cave her md was attained from louisiana state universe see medical school in.

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