4 Burst results for "Lsu Medical School"

"lsu medical school" Discussed on WazaMedia Podcast

WazaMedia Podcast

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"lsu medical school" Discussed on WazaMedia Podcast

"Welcome back to another episode of the wasn media podcast. My name is jr. I am the ceo of this awesome company. And i'm here today. excited to talk with jean laborde. Gina thank you for being on the show today. Jr thank you and we have a former guest of the show. Daisy daisy shoe To thank for connecting us together. So thank you dr xu thank you daisy For bringing us together. Thank you days so gina for our audience. That doesn't know you We want to with all of our guests. We like to ask our audience To tell a little bit of the story. Because i was immediately we believe in the power of storytelling. Everyone has a great story to tell. And i'm sure you have a great story to tell and also about your organization which will get back We'll get to a little bit later. But i can. We hear a little bit about your story. Sure i'm jean laborde. And i'm originally from louisiana where i happened to be right now and i have a background in design. Did some teaching of design and also worked for lsu medical school where did all the graphics for the whole university in Done some different marketing. Things did a. I worked for a marketing company. That promoted coca cola music festivals things like that grassroots marketing And then lsu moved to the department of biochemistry and former where. I helped develop in photoshop for scientists empowered winter side powerpoint scientists class. Then we had a little hurricane katrina than i was the director in baton rouge Exile baton rouge for low law for two publications two to five magazine which is a lifestyle magazine in the batteries business report so i was in new orleans. I did some work for spotify doing being campus ambassador and influence and also for a restaurant group. That susan spikes earned. We did some social media for food. And she's actually been character. Those based on the hbo series tra may she's the main shaft was based on so then We decided my husband. And i decided to move to washington. Dc after all this time and we move jobs. There absolutely loved the area. And i right now. I m the marketing and communications manager for the american society for investigative at all. You have quite the history gina from from being out in in the area dealing with hurricane. So you probably have a taste in crisis. Communication does marketing. And now you're working out in the dc area here so quite a large range of experience and I am interested about how you enjoyed your time with spotify. That's that's pretty neat. Well it.

Gina washington jean laborde jr. new orleans spotify daisy Jr today two coca cola louisiana gina five katrina two publications Daisy daisy law baton rouge Exile
Bridging the communication gap with Gina LaBorde

WazaMedia Podcast

02:16 min | 1 year ago

Bridging the communication gap with Gina LaBorde

"Welcome back to another episode of the wasn media podcast. My name is jr. I am the ceo of this awesome company. And i'm here today. excited to talk with jean laborde. Gina thank you for being on the show today. Jr thank you and we have a former guest of the show. Daisy daisy shoe To thank for connecting us together. So thank you dr xu thank you daisy For bringing us together. Thank you days so gina for our audience. That doesn't know you We want to with all of our guests. We like to ask our audience To tell a little bit of the story. Because i was immediately we believe in the power of storytelling. Everyone has a great story to tell. And i'm sure you have a great story to tell and also about your organization which will get back We'll get to a little bit later. But i can. We hear a little bit about your story. Sure i'm jean laborde. And i'm originally from louisiana where i happened to be right now and i have a background in design. Did some teaching of design and also worked for lsu medical school where did all the graphics for the whole university in Done some different marketing. Things did a. I worked for a marketing company. That promoted coca cola music festivals things like that grassroots marketing And then lsu moved to the department of biochemistry and former where. I helped develop in photoshop for scientists empowered winter side powerpoint scientists class. Then we had a little hurricane katrina than i was the director in baton rouge Exile baton rouge for low law for two publications two to five magazine which is a lifestyle magazine in the batteries business report so i was in new orleans. I did some work for spotify doing being campus ambassador and influence and also for a restaurant group. That susan spikes earned. We did some social media for food. And she's actually been character. Those based on the hbo series tra may she's the main shaft was based on

Jean Laborde Daisy Daisy Dr Xu Lsu Medical School Gina Baton Rouge Louisiana Department Of Biochemistry Coca LSU Hurricane Katrina Lifestyle Magazine Susan Spikes New Orleans HBO
"lsu medical school" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"lsu medical school" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Out something I come alive that's a very good question you don't realize how great that question once again just like that any body destroys the virus it gives you unity it means that Mary could then go to the grocery store not wear a mask because most likely she would be yeah hasn't been proven yet beyond a shadow of a doubt but that's where scientists think it's going and in Germany Great Britain and Italy there speaking of giving people immunity certificates so that if they've been exposed to have anybody they can now return to life without having to wear a mask by the way it's also important to know if you're not on mute if you're not on you and you have diabetes or high blood pressure you're seventy years old you're really at risk for having complications and so we have to make sure that you do stay protected so that you don't get sick by the way I mentioned earlier I used to teach medical school students with LSU medical school did a lot of public health this is what I did for twenty five years think about these antigens antibodies of viruses etcetera so there is a really good point there and one more thing she said one of the treatments is being considered if the tech antibodies from people like Mary who've been exposed assuming that she has been the kind of concentrating and so when someone comes to the hospital really ill with coronavirus you can put those antibodies from another person into that really sick patient and those antibodies from the other from the other folks will fight the virus in the really sick patient and help prevent them from getting thicker there's a lot to this and so so Congress appropriated hundreds of millions of dollars for the centers for disease control to begin rolling out these testing the testing will be free it'll be widespread and hopefully by the end of the summer we'll be getting almost everybody wants to be tested tested one more thing I will say I will add another tore on the Wall Street journal you can look it up online a week ago Friday I think in which I suggested that we kind of keep track of who's immune and who's not if you're not a meal you need to take real good precautions if you're an older person with underlying heart health problems to make sure you don't get sick if you are viewing your Jan can return to life so the advantage of all this is that we protect those who need to be protected and we let those who are otherwise okay go about their business but I do suggest that we set up something like the immunization registries we do for children now the child is vaccinated within a week of birth and then again at age eleven H. fifteen H. seventeen history it's it's it's it's recorded by the way if you just joined us senator bill Cassidy here his star three if you'd like to ask a question and you'll get your you'll get screen also star three if you'd like to ask a question make a comment but then again the immunization registry when you go into the when the child goes into the military age twenty eight they can look back and see they're vaccinated for measles as a baby and they don't have to re vaccinate him away we can set up an amused registry in which if somebody's been exposed gotten over like merry she didn't know that and so that she can put out a bill help she can say listen that might be M. B. but the red door and by the way I've got a certificate of health I and I am immune to coronavirus you don't have to fear getting it for me but she does not have to fear from getting it from a guest and so she knows that she's protected by naturally occurring immunity so anyway all that to say merry what a great question what a great kind of a whole whole wanted to you know see how this town hall meeting this past Thursday there if you just want a convertible capital it starts three if you'd like to ask the question earlier we asked a question about how worried are you about the corner bars one would be really worried to kind of worried three not worried at all a moderator Shawna can you tell us the results of that or call can you tell us the results of that thank you and so far we're at fifty six percent very worried thirty two percent now that kind of worried and only twelve percent not worried at all okay well that's not bad a bomb was worried about people not socially distant think so hopefully most people based on their worry would be now marriages call from Alexandria let me give that phone number there if you have a problem either to misuse the phone number Alexandria is three one eight.

Mary
"lsu medical school" Discussed on Nourish Your Health at every age

Nourish Your Health at every age

12:27 min | 2 years ago

"lsu medical school" Discussed on Nourish Your Health at every age

"This podcast series will focus on how people of all ages may achieve optimal health and wellness. Our guest. Today is Dr Kelli Cobb. A board certified internal medicine physician and owner of Nourish Med spa in Lafayette Louisiana. Board eligible and geriatrics. Doctor COBB is certified in age management medicine and has extensive experience in treating women's health issues. Her career in medicine has been driven by her interest in the complexities that influence mind body and health a graduate of the School of Medicine. Dr Cobb holds degrees from the University of Texas in Psychology Humanities and Communications Dr Cobb Kelly. Welcome to nourish your health. Thank you yes your background fascinates me and I do want to say. This is our first episode of Nourish. Your health at every age in honestly couldn't think of a better gas to have one because you not only bring health and wellness to people. But it's a holistic approach which I think more and more people are understanding that. That's the key to good health. So if you would tell us your background. I know you're from Lafayette. Can you tell us about your background? Absolutely I grew up here and graduated from as tm in about nineteen eighty. Eight and Back then I was just occasion girl. You know eating Having Fried Fish on Saturdays and hush puppies and homemade ice cream so I grew up. You know surrounded by all the Great Cajun Food and Does Rodney and you know the the culture that we we enjoy And during that time I was exposed to You know illness in my own family So it definitely I think kind of triggered that initial Interest and Set off kind of that that Discovery Process what what happens to people. You know all of a sudden My Grandmother Developed Alzheimer's and So that was really you know hard to watch and And other family members having other illnesses but that one really stuck out to me and really started my quest to kind of understand how the mind and body are connected right and your father was yeah. It's my job. Is this decision. Yeah he was a kind of a pioneer Of sorts in our area. I think he was orthopedist. And always try to develop new techniques. Very open to new techniques. my grandmother was a nurse Since she was an army nurse She was from Oklahoma and so is around All of her health and wisdom she was very much involved in And I guess offering and teaching me a different way of message. We had a greenhouse. She was always telling me. What seven vegetables did you eat today? You know so. It was a total different side His family right. Yeah so you. Did you know you were going to go to med? School does majoring in psychology humanities and communications now I probably not Just took the cat. Yeah I I'm a lifelong learner. I Love I love school. I love learning I was always very interested in science and found found fast but I was very interested in writing and humanities and all the things that influence a person's I guess development and identity and how they interface with the world So that was a big passion As I was going through college just exploring all the different things that influence identity So I studied philosophy in history and economics and all kinds of things Austin was a fabulous place to learn. It was Full of new ideas and at least for me growing growing up here There was a lot of emphasis on healthy eating mayor. A lot of emphasis on alternative type of treatments so I was Very much turned on by what was going on there. I did a lot of neurology. Research probably driven by my interest in In urological disease so I did get exposed to How the brain was very involved in In the body's health right so then you return to Louisiana and went to school. Lsu Medical School in New Orleans. What was that like? Oh it was one of the best times of my life I really enjoyed The intersection of everything going on there. At the time the music the food the science Patients were fabulous. I learned so much from taking care of the people down there and they were so generous with their. You know sharing their illness and what was going on with them. So I think it was a little bit of a shock to my system at the time Of how how ill that was. Probably my real exposure to real serious illness and how community is so important to both the contribution and the origin of the illness but also the solution And how we can turn around health for people with the right Multidisciplinary approach you know. It's it's not just the doctor that's important It's everyone in that person's environment to that makes a difference so as you were training I I remember the charity. Hospital system is that that's how you absolutely day still like that. We don't call it that but you really seeing people. That didn't have much in the way of resources. And probably had very serious by your. We were definitely exposed to you. Know very ill people and You know we had to Integrate their where they were. You have to meet the patient where they are where. What is your understanding of their illness? And what are they capable of doing when they leave the hospital It was definitely an eye opener for me. How much community matters to health? I know you've shared with me that you partner with your patients and as I'm listening to your words thinking about you as a younger physician training Did you know that she wanted to go into internal medicine? Did you feel a connection with that or has this been a journey for you? Yeah I think I I like the idea of being a detective and I think that's why internal medicine Always Kinda stayed my passion. I'm interested in so many other things but that to me is where I can. Maybe make the most impact You know most of us have our own journey with wellness in with illness and when I went to residency That's when I started having my own health issues and of course running into walls like okay. Well there's nothing wrong with you. There's nothing wrong with you. And that's when I found a doctor lamb. He is a pioneer common functional mess in Age Management Medicine. And that's when I started exploring. Well what's really going on behind the scenes? What's what are the root causes of of what was going on? And that was My intro to kind of studying functional medicine. Every year residency at emory was very intense. It was very much about same a continuation of the neurons experience. A lot of people We had two floors of HIV. We're doing very seriously ill. Yes yeah But at the same time There was a lot of public health influence there and a lot of influence on Trying to make a difference in their lives as well So that was kind of when I started exploring the functional medicine world and looking beyond what you know what we were just learning to be like what else. There's gotTa be more to the story. How do you define functional medicine? Could you explain what that is I guess to me it's just kind of root cause medicine If you think about allopathic medicine or you know the medicine that were trained and we're looking at The End Organ Disease Right. So we're studying diabetes. Were studying Stroke we're standing corner or diseases or end Oregon diseases and a times. That's especially in training when we're dealing with very ill people. That's what we're working on. We're working let's reverse this illness. Let's treat these emergencies. Let's get this person You know back on track Functional Medicine is more before you get to that in Oregon illness. What are the imbalance is going on? In a person's energy systems or hormones Their nutrition their psychological issues There's that's kind of. I guess if you look you think of as a tree. The leaves are going to be the end organ. Diagnosis the imbalances are going to be kind of what's going on in the trunk. And then the route which is also kind of the psychosocial influences So you know I think when I approach patients. I'm thinking about the whole. Obviously I'm always thinking about what's the most serious thing. That's what I want to focus on first and get that addressed but at the same time And that's why to me. The relationship is so important because when you get to know the person you really get to understand how they're able to communicate what their what their symptoms are. It's very difficult for a person to walk into a room. They're meeting ME FOR THE FIRST TIME. And they've gotta just barrel and be like okay so it does take a little while to You know I call it autonomy. It's that gap between with a person's trying to say in in language you know that's a very interesting part of medicine because I'm waiting for the patient. Tell me what's what's wrong. Yeah All of medicine especially functional MRI infamous is a lot about listening and a lot about learning about the patient And trying to get out of them. What's what's wrong So it's kind of that detective work and I think looking at it from an Having a as a partner and also about all of the influences really opens up the conversation And I think it helps the patient really open up access to what's wrong with them or maybe a better vocabulary to help the the doctor the practitioner Access you know their inner world Because you can't do it for us. We can present to you but you can't. You can't make our choices. We have to write off and and what maybe some more positive choices that would lead to better health. Yeah enjoy educating people about you know you. What did they enjoy in? How can we modify what they're doing I obviously if there's a danger situation we're going to focus on that right away and get that taken care of But there's so many Especially in our community. I think we've really were opening up all of the other Healing Modalities That are available to people. It's amazing to me Over the course of my life to see the the changes in an understanding of week we can take control of our health not in all cases but I mean in many cases and one of the things that motivated me to do. This podcast was the experience I had in life similar to you where my parents were both diabetic and they experienced just horrific Problems my dad was a double amputee. Lost both legs I don't know that it could have been prevented in the long haul but I know he didn't make choices to monitor his health and by the time things went wrong they really went wrong fast. And My mother had similar things with congestive heart failure and kidney failure and to stand by and watch that it just it was frightening and I know now it was just choices. They made throughout their lives. You know just everyday choices right right. I think it's so important to Teach people as early as we can about the choices in a ballot the options and about Especially about nutrition and what that does Both positive and negative to The organs I spent a lot of time with my patients talking about gut health and Gut Restoration and helping them understand about sugar and the impact. That sugar has Nobody wants to hear. I thought so You know we got eighty twenty rule. Try To be good. Eighty percent of the time But there's been so much Improvement I think in the market in terms of what's available people now that they're definitely opening up to other options and I think with our community you know it's got to be a community effort because we're so social and I think as as people start helping each other and and Learning together then it becomes more fun and then.

Age Management Medicine Dr Kelli Cobb School of Medicine partner Nourish Med Functional Medicine Dr Cobb Kelly Alzheimer Lafayette Oregon Lafayette Louisiana University of Texas Oklahoma Rodney New Orleans Gut Restoration Lsu Medical School Louisiana Austin