30 Burst results for "Loyola University"

"loyola university" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:49 min | Last month

"loyola university" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"With a bachelor in arts and psychology. Thomas George Shoshana Paradise Valley Community College, the Liberal Arts Associates degree. Bonnie Juliana from Concordia Concordia University in Chicago with a B A in psychology. Julius Hama from Lake Forest College with a B A in biology and psychology. We have zero rush Oh, from Coin college with a degree in hating air conditioning and refrigeration OD shuo tissue from northeastern Illinois University with a bachelor of arts in elementary education. David Marr Bina from University of Illinois, Chicago, the bachelor of science and cellular and organizational concentration. Animal Alberti from northeastern Illinois University with a bachelor of arts and applied mathematics. John Lazar from North Park University with a bachelor of arts and biology. Sandra Milk ooh from Northeastern Illinois University, a master's degree in business administration. Monica Amri from North Park University with a bachelor's of health, science and management and a minor in business. Rebel, a Jew from University of Illinois at our banners, champagne with a master of science and accounting with a concentration and taxation and data analytics. If Sarah me who from DePaul University with a master of science and applied mathematics, Helen Sandhu from Sham Berlin College of Nursing with the Masters of nursing. Stephanie WADA from Northeastern Illinois University with a master of arts and counseling specifically school counselling. How to travel from University of Illinois at Chicago with a bachelor of science and integrated health studies, Ophelia or Ah ha from Loyola University of Chicago, Bachelor of science and biology. Sam Iran OD Shoe from DeVry University with a bachelor of science and technical management. Ogre SOMO from University of Illinois, Chicago with a master of science and civil engineering. Edison Johanna University of Illinois, Chicago. Bachelor of Arts in Mechanical Engineering. Alexandra Kochu from DePaul University College of Law, Juris Doctor. Argus Car, Moose University of Illinois, which Chicago bachelor of science and chemical engineering Isabelle Lazar University of Illinois, Chicago, the bachelor science and biological Sciences. Christine Bubala from Loyola University of Chicago with a bachelor of science and biology. Jane Ishaya from Arizona State University with a bachelor of science and marketing. Mary, a missile from University of Illinois, Chicago with a bachelor of science and integrated health studies. Laura Yonan from University of Wisconsin Medicine,.

Yonan John Lazar Monica Amri Helen Sandhu Christine Bubala Jane Ishaya Alexandra Kochu Julius Hama Bonnie Juliana Laura Mary DePaul University Isabelle Lazar North Park University Ophelia DeVry University University of Illinois Sarah Sham Berlin College of Nursing Ogre SOMO
Black voices that make a difference: The Karson Institute’s Karsonya Whitehead

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:11 min | 6 months ago

Black voices that make a difference: The Karson Institute’s Karsonya Whitehead

"Is the first of February And that means it is the first day. Black history month and we're introducing you to a woman who wanted a place where people could go to discuss sensitive social issues. Professor Carson A. Whitehead launched the Carson Institute at Loyola University of Maryland in Baltimore. People can eventually come and study race piece is also justice. We could talk about this. We could do unusual conversations. The answer America's most pressing questions, the D. C native named the institute after her father who was a sin. All rights activist Carson Eugene Wise, who I am named after us, My dad who lit that fire in me. She was motivated to found the institute after the death of Trayvon Martin when I sat down with my two sons, and I had to look them in the face and realized that that you can't outrun What is embedded within society. You can't outrun systemic racism. You actually have to confront it and dismantle it. That's the goal of the institute. I realize that if I could not help to create a world where my boys could get home safe In my work meant nothing.

Professor Carson A. Whitehead Carson Institute Loyola University Of Maryland Carson Eugene Wise Baltimore Trayvon Martin America
"loyola university" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:09 min | 8 months ago

"loyola university" Discussed on WGN Radio

"I'm Steve Bertrand Loyola University announced today that they will begin the school of environmental sustainability Now this builds From their Institute of Environmental Sustainability. But the dean of that will be Nancy Tuckman. She also is leading the eye. Yes, and she joins us now on the team. Hochberg phone line, Nancy, welcome. Good evening. Thank you. Steve. Let me tell you, Dina Soon is the York on hold? I got an alert from The Associated Press that says that world carbon dioxide emissions were down 7% in this 2020 because of the pandemic, So we're not getting there by way we choose, but that's at least some positive news when it comes to the environment. This silver lining to the cova dilemma. We knew there had to be one, right. Tell me about the school of environmental sustainability and how you're building from I E s, which has been up and running for several years now. Right? We we started as the Institute of Environmental Sustainability and 2013 for about seven years old now And as we come in school, we are the board has approved. Um ah, budget for our growth, and we're expecting to double our faculty and staff over the next five years, And with that we're developing some departments or kind of research affinity areas. That really are trained to address some of the big, vexing problems under environmental sustainability like environmental health and environmental toxicology. No pollutants in the environment and how that impacts human health. Another one is around food and sustainable food systems. Another area is climate and energy were also addressing kind of from the social side of things, environment and society, because really a couple of really big drivers to climate change, for example, are Our economic system as well as our governance systems. And so we're looking at those in this environment of society group and then finally, we're we have a group that's looking at biodiversity, the loss of biodiversity and that the collapse of ecosystems, you know, Dean, it sounds like it doesn't sound like a science program. It sounds like a social justice program. Well, I'm glad that you spotted that because that is a really important issue. Social justice, environmental justice in particular. Very, very empty. Shortened, and we do try to run a justice thread through each one of these different areas, So yeah, and that's a Jesuit thing, too. Of course, you know, loyal is a Jesuit university and social justice is a very important part of the mission. And so we integrate that into a across our curriculum, um at the university. I went to Marquette, which is the Jesuit school and I don't know if there's Little competition among them, But I noticed in the first sentence of your press release, you point out that you're the first judge which school to have such a environmental studies school. I don't know what that's about. That's right. And we always compete with have a friendly competition with our neighbors up north at Marquette. They're always beating us in in basketball, but we were way ahead of them on environmental sustainability. So how is this gonna work then? Well, that you will come and major in sustainability, Or will you be, say a business Major with Emphasis in sustainability or how What's the future look like here? Yeah. You know, you can do all of those things because the school of environmental sustainability has several of its own academic programs. For example, we have six different majors. Two of them are bachelor of arts for him. Our bachelor of science. We have master's programs, but we also have minors. So if you were, for example, a student in the school of business that you wanted a minor In environmental science, or we also have a minor in business, sustainable business management. So we do a lot of collaborations across schools because we see that you know, environmental sustainability is pretty relevant to all the different schools and programs. Well, I think that's the point, isn't it that it's It's relevant to all of us in Almost every way. So it's only fitting or, um, obvious that it would go along with an economics. Major business major sci MAJOR or anything like that? Right? Yeah, School is pretty interdisciplinary. We've got faculty that have PhDs and all of those different areas, and that enables us to get to work at these big these big complex problems through many different disciplinary lenses. I think it's pretty rich. You know, too. Don't curricula that way, is it? There are a lot of universities that offer this. I'm sure it's growing, but I'm just wondering where you fit in nationally. You know it is growing and thank goodness because we, you know all schools should really be teaching basic literacy about climate change in the loss of biodiversity in these threats, you know, to really human existence on our planet. Um, but most schools are teaching it through. Ah, strictly science perspective. Which is also very important were a bit different because we are so interdisciplinary and that we really integrate the humanities, social sciences and even you know, many of the the disciplines in our professional schools as well. So in that way, I would say that we're very, very different and unique. But like I said, more and more schools are building programming that necessarily ah, whole school in environmental science or sustainability, But many of them have programs where students can major Or get a graduate degree. And in this field we were talking earlier this week about a study and I'm sorry, Dean. I don't remember where it was from, But it was maybe was a survey on it was about which countries We're most likely to believe that humans have an impact on climate change and number one was South Korea on I believe the number it was maybe in the low eighties. The worst of the countries surveyed was Japan at maybe 58 2% something like that. I'm making these numbers are close. But but then next to Japan, just up from Japan was The U. S. I think it's 63%. So we've got some work to do here. You've got some work to do. We do have work to get to do and it's so annoying because you're slapping us between the eyes. You know, it's painfully obvious but obviously has become very political. It's been politicized, and that's really the problem and it's not a partisan issue. I mean, everybody is going to be affected and we are already are all being affected. S so it's just unfortunate that being bogged down in this political, you know, kind of morass. I don't know. Do you see that changing anytime soon? Oh, yeah, I definitely see it. Changing in the new administration. Well becoming, Yeah. Yeah. I mean, you know, Biden is really committing a lot to the environment..

Institute of Environmental Sus Japan Dean Nancy Tuckman Marquette Steve Bertrand Loyola Universi Steve Jesuit school Hochberg York basketball Jesuit university The Associated Press Biden South Korea
"loyola university" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

02:51 min | 8 months ago

"loyola university" Discussed on The Pulse

"As nine eight eight develops we also develop community resources and supports so that when folks aren't suicidal crises they are genuinely legitimately able to be helped and provided for in their community so working with suicide all folks absolutely has a has an intensity and has a has a real nice. Because you're you're talking about life and death but at the same time most of the focus ends up being about hope because the fundamental experience of being suicidal is ambivalence. Right part of me wants to live party. Wants to die and helping them to see that their life is worth living that ends up being the main focus of the conversation the work the resources so really working with folks who are suicidal is fundamentally about hope. When you tell people what you do what do they say. i mean. it's probably not great for cocktail party banter so my wife is a midwife and we used to joke that we were a great couple to have it parties. Because people would say. Oh what do you do. And i would say. Oh i work with suicidal kids. And they'd go. Oh so then. They turned to my wife and they'd be like what are you doing. She's like i bring babies into the world. They're like so after that you were probably quiet for the rest of the evening. Exactly right i learned to to say I work with kids. And they're like oh that's great but still jonathan's work sounds really intense when you're talking with somebody who's suicidal. There is an immense pressure. There is the sense that every single thing that i say could be right or wrong and one of the things that we know is that you know you can't make somebody suicidal by asking them if they've had thoughts of suicide and so worrying that i'm gonna make somebody suicidal. It's you can't do that in this context but making sure that you're being present and you're listening and you're you're validating the person's experience those things are are are essential and fundamental to working with someone a suicidal crisis. Jonathan singer is an associate professor of social work at loyola university chicago. One of the things that counselors and mental health professionals learn about when they are training for this line of work is risk factors for suicide red flags to look out for.

jonathan Jonathan singer loyola university chicago
"loyola university" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:58 min | 10 months ago

"loyola university" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"And afternoons news 93.1 kfbk on 15 30 A m and your I Heart radio app Now Sacramento weather Under a clear sky early this morning lows between 52 56 later today. Quite warm it, sunshine eyes between 89 93 clear tonight Low 52 to 56 tomorrow. Very warm it sunshine. Eyes between 86 90 in Wednesday plenty of sun Hi 83 to 87 0 Maki with a meteorologist curb of its key news 93.1 kfbk. If you think we're just four wheels in a group think again. Jeep Grand Cherokee redefines freedom. What really makes cheap. It's finding the perfect balance between luxury and adventure without ever compromising, strutting across the country to see your family to make new memories. So what makes Jeep You do cheap. There's only one registered trademark of the USA LLC. Looking to advance your career or start a new one. It's time to gain skills needed to take your career to the next level. Loyola University, Maryland School of Education can help you achieve your goals with our full and part time graduate programs. The offer hybrid and online program options to meet your needs for more information, including Star charms, application deadlines and scholarship. Opportunities top now or visit Loyola dot edu slash forward when you get in it, whether the new bacon bourbon chicken sandwich at Roy Rogers restaurants, it's a hand breaded filet with a sweet savory bourbon sauce, Bacon and pepper Jack cheese down. Was and have.

Roy Rogers Loyola University USA LLC Maryland School of Education
"loyola university" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

Life is Short with Justin Long

07:29 min | 11 months ago

"loyola university" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

"There was a storm that moved through and I. When I was younger and I'm so bad with technology with with computers and things and I I get so frustrated over it. And I haven't had an episode like that and wound I thought. Oh, you know in my arrogance I thought well I guess I'm doing better. I, guess I'm an I right before talking to Tom Before I talked to you so. I'm so angry almost. I I almost through the computer against the wall. In frustration and. And I it's I had one of those moments today where I was. Well, I guess I haven't really I feel like if you really let it go. That's when people who are like unhealthy or have an issue we'll have a heart attack. It's it's. Just like an acting exercise where you're like, oh, this is the feeling you get in a murder. This is. This. Is when you accidentally murder someone yes. You're filled with rage and you control eight. Oh Joel. I was afraid that the neighbors I was making noises that I thought might cause the neighbors to call the cops I'm embarrassed to admit that but it was like. A. fucking primal. Neighbors let us is Justin long me he. Can't figure out his WIFI. I was trying to install the affixing issue with my twelve year olds oculus Rasht. The. You, put it into a PC and this is how I know how bad it's getting because my. Rage meter is through here and Ben when you'll my twelve year old, put his hand on my shoulder and go. Be Okay that. I'm like I know I know it's going to be okay. I want you to play record. Don't placate me. I'm trying to make this work for you. Do you ever think like Oh my kids are going to be so much more because that's the goal right like that. You're you have offspring that are more that are better than you that are more than you and Do you ever think like they're already better than me and they're all twelve they're not ya I mean it. All those cliches are true about it's no you better than anyone and all that. They call me out ten minutes before I'm going to do something. when I walk in and they're like, we know what you're going to say and it's a it's a no and I'm okay. Great. They they can't they. Yes. It's all. It's all. And my one of my sons just like. You're an idiot and I'm like, let me you idiot and you. Say. Okay. Does. It ever get to the point where you're like well, I'm this is legitimately frustrating that their best thing me in. They're matching me in in wits and humor, and are there ever those moments I well, it's a combination of, I, wish I had gotten a better joke in and Mocking me and I like watch community namedrop on Netflix and. I'll get into its community and be like I like the scene except for your acting and they will. They do what I do is just undercut anything that's happening and the A. Does actually fill me with joy and then I realized. Because when I was when Eddie fifteen was first born, my dad was like your in it now. Dan used to call me and my brothers jerk, just all three of us were. Large, jerk he'd be like a jerk get up here and so it made me and all answer to it all run now we would just like. We wouldn't. We just knew we were jerks and. A wonderful sense. It's so funny to imagine now because I obviously I don't know your father and all I know about him is that he was the dean of students at Loyola University Rome Center. My Dad was a professor. My Dad loved roamed was seminarian studied in Rome. My perception of your father is probably somebody who's closer to my dad. But somebody who caused all three of their kids, jerk is not that. What was he liked beyond like did he have a different side when he was an academic when he was an administrator? At the school I imagine he had to be a little bit more. Polished seeming. As was I raised Irish? Catholic. So you know we're. As. You know there there them one hand towards God and on the other hand towards organized. Crime. He saw Roman holiday in a movie theater in high school and pointed at the screen and said, that's where I'm going. And kidding you was in Chicago and found a way to do it through Loyola University, which has their campus right right in Chicago. So it was really just the the he kind of fetish. Rome in that just from that movie Yes keep saw Chicago and he was like wait there's a place that looks like that all the time. And it was always a big traveler and became a much bigger traveler after that 'cause they saw. Once you a jumping off point of Italy then you can go. So, many places that are so different. So close but so that's where you were born where I was born my brothers. Wow. My mom was a student at Loyola. University. How boy. You know it wasn't like he was an older wasn't that much old. He was like, Nah the Ra basically and but as you were saying like many of my dad's friends entered. The seminary and not too many actually became priests but a few did and yes. so He loved that he loved the world of Bossism in Rome out my mom was there and we got born and they my dad wasn't making any money. So we have I think they very much. They had to make a big choice whether they wanted to raise Americans are at talion because we couldn't afford the American or British schools into. Public schools. So they decided to move to a rock in Seattle in nineteen, seventy, six or five, which wild. Yes. Seattle was not a blip. It would literally there was such a downturn in the economy in Seattle that there was billboards around town that set the last person to leave Seattle please turn the lights off. Oh my God what? Why? Because we have been logging industry that we had some industry moved elbowing The oil crisis hit and while every industry took a hit. And logging always was fine A Boeing was a huge that there's really no other game in town. Yelling at that point and my dad worked for warehouse it he worked for the big logging company. That was rob he was able to get, and he told me that.

Seattle Loyola University Rome Chicago murder Loyola University Rome Center Tom Netflix Boeing Joel Justin Ben Eddie Dan administrator professor Italy Bossism
Chicago - Loyola faces a budget deficit, staff furloughs due to COVID-19

Steve Cochran

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Chicago - Loyola faces a budget deficit, staff furloughs due to COVID-19

"A $50 million budget deficit. Loyola University will cut jobs, retirement fund contributions and other costs. Revenue expected to fall this year with a smaller freshman class and fewer students in dorm since most rooms have to be singles because of covert 19 Number of jobs at risk has not been released. Budgets for travel, recruiting supplies and conferences will be slashed in half the school already cut administrators pay and froze hiring and some spending back in May,

Loyola University
"loyola university" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"loyola university" Discussed on 790 KABC

"News and much needed laugh ABC, Los Angeles, Orange County and Klos HD to loss into this Right. ABC News in two o'clock. I'm Sharon Reardon. Governor Newsome is shutting down California again, citing rising positive cases of the Corona virus. As of today, restaurants can no longer allow customers to sit inside all bars. MMA shut down, too, along with wineries, movie theater, zoos and museums. And all of Southern California will have to shut down Jim Salon Smalls and churches. The A U. S. D's superintendent says students will not return to classrooms in the fall after pressure from parents, teachers and the teachers union, the USDA has decided not to have in person classes for the coming fall semester Come August, classes will continue to be taught online only fill Hewlett K. ABC News San Diego Schools will also start their fall semester online. The Orange County Board of Education is set to make a decision. Sometime after tonight's meeting, T. M Z is reporting a body found in Lake Piru, where glee actress Ni Rivera disappeared five days ago is that of Rivera's body. We will get confirmation on that any time now from Ventura County officials President Trump claims he's getting rave reviews for commuting the prison sentence of longtime ally Roger Stone. He had a jury forewoman who hated Roger Stone. And who hated probably me. But she went on a false pretense and he wasn't given a fair trial. Trump tells reporters that Stone's prosecution should have never taken place. Stone had been scheduled to enter prison this week. Stocks ended the day lower. The Dow dropped a point. NASDAQ.

Roger Stone ABC News Orange County ABC Orange County Board of Educati Ni Rivera President Trump Los Angeles Governor Newsome Sharon Reardon Jim Salon Smalls Ventura County Lake Piru Southern California California MMA superintendent teachers union
"loyola university" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"loyola university" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Any great frequency is not all that great so part of it is just the fact that our city is a rather small and therefore have a lower chance of having one of these relatively compact storm go through them but having said that we've had tornadoes I mean that the Oaklawn tornado back in April sixty seven went from oak lawn across there the Dan Ryan and it went out over the lake mile east of the science and industry BC I'm at the net was during rush hour Dr semis up overpasses we had one that I have dictated go look up here at the shore line up by Loyola University that formed right over there the lake shore and went out over the lake and then dissipate so they do occur here there's no question about the last one to get what is now the loop what eighteen seventy six so as if you have to go back quite a ways to get one in manner so you're saying that we got now fifteen hundred more years from that so are forty four years old that now that no I it it just is I guess that the list it looks a lot better the staff that shows you how infrequently these occur but what the playing field I mean you know I know where to go back in the mid eighties and then yeah but nineteen ninety horrendous tornado and those areas have been that pretty active the southwest suburbs and that's continued in the recent years yes it actually hasn't and there we have it in some respects because it yeah specially when you get further southwest almost into that exurban areas Joliet and parts west and south of Joliet they give but they see those things developing I've always been good been there wrote that part of the reason why I think urban dwellers don't take the tornado threat perhaps it's seriously and I'm generalizing here it that shouldn't do that but I I do think there's a a cognisance of tornadoes and severe weather that's driven by what you said what you pointed out right there that that you can see about you know the the horizontal visibility when you drive building took away at all is is magnificent and you see these incredible you know meteorological creatures be they a tornadoes or under had your rainbows and stuff like that so much more clearly in many cases out away from the building yeah so I think there's proof that I was looking ahead to the weekend here is it the right.

Dan Ryan Loyola University lake shore Joliet
What it means to defund police

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:20 min | 1 year ago

What it means to defund police

"Conversation that we're having in this country right now about systemic economic racism. Turns today on three words, De Fund, the police. In Minneapolis where George Floyd was killed by police. A Super Majority of the city council there says it wants to dismantle its police force, and in part because that defined the police has become kind of a catch phrase for a really complicated problem, so marketplace's Kimberly. Adams spent her day today, talking to people about what it might mean, concepts like defunding or dismantling or even abolishing the police are a bit more nuance to then may come across a protest. Chant Christy Lopez is co director of the innovative policing program at Georgetown Law and used to work at the Department of Justice Investigating police departments. She says when people talk about defunding police. It doesn't mean that you route budgets for public safety. It may mean that you decrease. Get rid of the police department per se, but you might still have something like an office of public safety. So, what would it do? Ron Surpass spent thirty years in law. Enforcement Police chief in New Orleans in Nashville, chief of the Washington State Patrol, and in all that time about ninety percent of all the police department calls that I've looked at in my life. have nothing to do with a major uniform crime. Crime has nothing to do right murder robbery burglary assault theft auto, nothing surpass now teaches at Loyola University in New Orleans. He says cop spend most of their time. Responding to auto accidents, noise complaints, lots of calls about people dealing with substance abuse. And when someone is having a mental health crisis, we often are sending out the police. Sue Abdur Holden runs the Minnesota branch of the National Alliance on mental illness she. She says the state has mobile mental health crisis teams that can respond. Unfortunately, they're not fully funded so that they can respond twenty four seven to every call that comes in which means the police legally have to says Jim Birch President of the National Police Foundation. The bottom line is who else would you call on a Saturday afternoon or in the middle of the night on a Friday night to come and respond. Respond to help address a dispute or disagreement. There literally is no one else to

National Police Foundation Enforcement Police Sue Abdur Holden Christy Lopez Georgetown Law Ron Surpass New Orleans De Fund George Floyd Minneapolis Jim Birch Washington State Patrol Department Of Justice Adams Loyola University President Trump Director National Alliance Nashville Murder
"loyola university" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"loyola university" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of life this is the post stories about the people and places at the heart of health and science I'm Mike and Scott it's hard not to freak out right now isn't it I find myself checking the coronavirus infection rates all the time then I get more anxious because it feels like this thing is stalking us so I tell myself don't look at the numbers stop looking at the numbers but then I go back and I check again there's so much to be worried about health your loved ones your friends money jobs you can almost feel everybody's anxiety rising you can feel it you can see it online you can see it in the fact that we've had one of the largest surges of people purchasing fire crews have that's Jonathan singer he is a professor of social work at Loyola University in Chicago of course we've seen people single individuals purchasing like twenty four rolls of toilet paper for themselves which also doesn't really make a lot of sense and some people are are are demonstrating their anxiety their acting out their anxiety through what they buy and what they're doing but also in how their acting online and the kinds of things that they're posting people are talking about feeling isolated worried do you see people posting about losing a family member or friends we hear about health.

Mike Scott Jonathan singer Loyola University Chicago stalking
Eye Opener: Trump pardons disgraced former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Eye Opener: Trump pardons disgraced former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich

"Former Illinois governor rod Blagojevich is waking up at home a day after president trump commuted is fourteen year prison sentence for trying to sell Barack Obama's former Senate seat I can't Mr trump pardon the former junk bond king an X. and Y. P. D. commissioner friend of Rudy Giuliani's and the former owner of the forty Niners Loyola University law professor Jessica Levinson I think this bodes very well for people like man afford stone in full and I think they're looking at the present he's using his partner thorny very broadly he has extremely broad discretion to use that authority he's absolutely exercising it

Governor Rod Blagojevich Barack Obama Rudy Giuliani Professor Partner Illinois President Trump Senate Mr Trump Y. P. D. Commissioner Niners Loyola University Jessica Levinson
"loyola university" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"loyola university" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Is again moving backwards in time but I was just thinking if you have a chapter in the House on Mongo. Street called hips. He's this is about this a moment. Where woman where your body changes in something happens you say one day you wake up and they are. They're ready and waiting like a new Buick with the keys in the ignition. Ready to take you where which is a question mark because that happens to girls but we're not really told what to do with it. Well I think young girls especially WANNA look sexy but they don't realize what that brings and discomfort and the danger and the lack of being seeing for who you are. It's a lot of trouble and I tried to write about it in a way that I could get past the censors when I was writing that chapter. The original title was tits. But I thought by right about that. That's too easy and maybe someone in the school was say. We can't use this book so I changed. It made it a little bit more challenging and I liked that chapter. It was a lot of fun because I was able to include something that girls snow and those are the jump rope songs. The games that we play clapping part of we learn as young women and gets lost and adulthood so as a way of interviewing people and saying what game. Did you play when you were a kid? And how did it go so it was fun to preserve that? So you wrote for the twenty fifth anniversary edition. You wrote this House a house of my own essay which appears in other places but this is kind of preface to the book yet. This is one place where there's a picture of you I don't know. How old are you aware? I'm about twenty seven twenty eight. I'm just fascinated with how you wrote this so I just WanNa talk through said this is how it begins the young woman. This photograph is me when I was writing the House on Mango Street. She's in her office a room. That had probably been a child's bedroom when families lived in this apartment. And then there's a place where suddenly the she turns to an I. It's within a single paragraph. The Young Woman's teaching job leads to the next and now she finds herself a counselor recruiter at her Alma Mater Loyola University on the north side in Rogers Park and then I have health benefits. I don't bring work home anymore. My Work Day ends at five pm now. I have evening spree to do my own work. I feel like a real writer and I'm just so curious about that shift that you made between her and I she and I and what change like what happened in that inside that paragraph. I think a writer has to come into her voice. I think a woman has to come into her voice because everyone speaks for us and for me one. I was asked to write the introduction. I was studying that photograph and I knew you were studying. You're younger than me. I said that's not who I am now right. But that's who I was when I was working on these pieces so I had to talk about her as she in the third person and it seemed to me. I don't really like the cover of House of my own. That's the same age. That's the same period. That's the same. Photographer is the same photo. Shoot as the photograph in right and because when I looked at her I say a kid you know what an idiot I was. I had so much power and I didn't know and I gave it away and you know I just well. I had to make all those stupid mistakes otherwise I wouldn't be who I am now but it breaks my heart when I look at her and I think how. She was used and things that she allowed to happen to her and just explosions. That happened in our life. What I call the exploding cigars of life. You know..

Alma Mater Loyola University writer Rogers Park
Security Guard Fatally Shoots Man At El Taco Nazo Restaurant

The Beat

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Security Guard Fatally Shoots Man At El Taco Nazo Restaurant

"Police are questioning a security guard at a restaurant who shot and killed a man on the northwest side early this morning police say it happened at el taco knows a lot fiesta on west diversity police say the security guard shot the man just before two AM in the seventy one hundred block of west diversity the man who was hit in the neck was pronounced dead at Loyola University Medical Center police say they were covered two guns in

El Taco Loyola University Medical Cent
Mormon Church accused of stockpiling billions, avoiding taxes

Morning Edition

03:26 min | 1 year ago

Mormon Church accused of stockpiling billions, avoiding taxes

"The church of Jesus Christ of latter day saints whose members are known as Mormons is facing allegations of financial fraud a former investment manager for the church has filed a complaint with the IRS he says the institution holds and misuses charitable contributions close to one hundred billion dollars we hail is reporting on the story from member station K. U. E. R. in Salt Lake City come morning Lee the morning before we get into the specific allegations this is a big deal because donations are very important to this church right yeah I mean the church's Chrysler the saints like most churches are a lot of churches I should say as for ten percent of all income of their members be paid in typing the interesting thing is that please most that money for facilities missions vingtaine work what's left over they invest and that's where David Nilsson comes in okay so who is David Nelson and what is he alleging so he's the whistleblower who filed the complaint to the IRS and he's a former employee of the church's nonprofit investment arm it's called ensign peak advisors and he says ensign peak would receive about a billion dollars of excess typing a year and over time and through some clearly successful investment strategy they ended up with a hundred billion dollars the church is not confirm that figure they don't have to by law but Nielsen argues that ensign peak this investment arm there how to complaints their tax exempt status because they receive this tithing money invested they haven't made any charitable donations from that money they have no no charitable contributions and so instead they've used it to bail out for profit companies the church also owns how are Mormons reacting to these allegations about misuse of money that they've donated yet when it comes to like typing members of the church I think most of them will likely agree with church leadership and the official response in the church has been that the vast majority of typing is used for the purpose of helping meeting the needs of the church and the church he's also said that the claim is being circulated are based on their perspective and limited information they need and defended their right to invest the money invoking the parable of the talents things the sound doctrine on financial principle taught by Jesus in the New Testament other members of the church had a different reaction they've referred to this as hoarding and they're really upset that this a hundred billion I'm for investments isn't being used in religious or humanitarian efforts what is the parable of the talents that you mentioned there basically Jesus is instructing these disciples to go and make basically magnify what they've been given you know to kind of grow what they've been given and basically that this is an example of them growing the the money they perceive investing yeah okay listen knows these claims to turn out to be true what are the consequences for the church potentially well I spoke with a law professor Sam Brunson Atleo Loyola University in Chicago who's an expert on this kind of stuff and he said that the whistle blower is correct that no money has gone to charity than this investment arm of the church risks losing its tax exempt status while but importantly he says that the church itself is not risk the church itself it is not at risk why well because they have the separate investment arm which caused the problem but it's also going to shield them from potential fallout Lee hell with member station K. we are thanks so much for your

Unequal Outcomes: Most ICE Detainees Held In Rural Areas Where Deportation Risks Soar

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:26 min | 2 years ago

Unequal Outcomes: Most ICE Detainees Held In Rural Areas Where Deportation Risks Soar

"This message comes from n._p._r. Sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races. Other things are fast like xfinity x. by get get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make wifi simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply u._s. Immigration and customs enforcement needs more space to house undocumented immigrants and increasingly the agency is finding it in rural regions and new analysis by n._p._r. Indicates a majority of detainees are held in rural areas but as n._p._r.'s yuki noguchi reports those detained in far flung places also have a much harder time finding lawyers and are far more likely to be deported. It took ten and a half months for you. L. alonzo to meet with a lawyer alonzo had turned himself over to immigration officials in laredo texas seeking asylum from cuba last october since then he's been detained in two rural facilities i in louisiana and now in adams tmz county mississippi about a two hour drive from baton rouge alonzo's wife. Madonna's rodriguez is a permanent u._s. resident. She lives in southern florida with their two children the n._b._a. N._b._a. leary very far from anything. She says too far to afford hiring. A private attorney. Lack of legal help is one of many challenges for undocumented undocumented immigrants and an even bigger problem for those detained in remote locations yet. Ice is adding detention facilities far from cities over half fifty. The two percent of detainees are held in rural areas according to n._p._r.'s analysis of ice data and that rate is increasing. Liz martinez is a board member of advocacy z. Group freedom for immigrants. It's very concerning trend that immigration detention is moving to rural areas remote areas where it makes it so much harder for a person in detention to get the support that they need detainees in urban areas or at least four times more likely to find attorneys to represent them. According to a two thousand fifteen university of pennsylvania ovadia law review study last year the southern poverty law center sudeiss and its parent agency the department of homeland security the civil rights group alleges the government is deliberately liberally detaining people in rural areas far from legal resources is which currently detains nearly fifty six thousand people declined comment on that case in in an emailed statement an ice spokesman says the agency looks at airports healthcare and legal resources when selecting facilities he also says detainees have access to phones and video teleconferencing and can meet with lawyers during visiting hours but many immigration attorneys complained rural facilities lack necessary resources there aren't enough. The phones are translators. Call connections are poor. Visiting hours are too restrictive and it's simply too far to travel. You'll alonzo's wife has been able to visit him. Only only once alonzo was recently diagnosed with lung cancer which makes the weight more excruciating. He eventually found a lawyer one of the rare detainees with free three representation but his wife says his asylum request and to request for parole have been denied grumpy what more could a wife with a sick husband one other seven to be with him at the very least i want to offer him my support and for my children's offer support one of the key reasons detainees are held in remote regions appears to be the money cheap labor cheap land. Lauren rich eisen is acting director of the brennan center justice program. She says many rural areas viewed prisons as job. Engines hundreds hundreds of new facilities were built in the nineteen ninety. S inmate population peaked then declined leaving lots of empty beds. Ice is now contracting with those rural prisons. It needs those beds as it continues to detain more immigrants. Just last week is arrested. Nearly seven hundred workers at food processing plants in mississippi loyola university law professor andrew armstrong says she sees that happening across louisiana win. The criminal justice reforms were enacted that left empty not beds that were ripe for contracting with ice. Those contracts can be lucrative. The state pays local sheriff's twenty four dollars and thirty nine cents a day to house an inmate eight by comparison ice pays five times that an average daily rate of more than one hundred twenty six dollars is confirmed it recently opened eight new detention and facilities seven of which are in louisiana all but one of them are in sparsely-populated areas. Lisa lehner is director of americans for immigrant justice. She represents detainees in glades county florida about one hundred miles from miami. Glades is the state's fourth least populated county surrounded by acres of sugarcane infield. I've never seen immigration attorney up there. You've never seen one never detainees there. She says are tweeted like hardened. Criminals glades aids has been the subject of a number of complaints and lawsuits they allege everything from misuse of pepper spray and solitary confinement to religious persecution later argues conditions are worse in rural facilities in part because fewer people can observe what's happening by contrast. She says when a brooklyn new york ice facility lost not for a week during a cold snap in january there was an outcry and if there's going in and out you would imagine that the people who are detaining immigrants are going to behave in a more careful way. It's not just that treatment might differ immigration courts in rural areas denied. Many more asylum cases sending detainees back back to their home countries. N._p._r.'s analysis of research from syracuse university found judges in rural immigration courts denied eighty seven percent of asylum cases compared to just over half an urban courts. Romi learner is associate director of the immigration clinic at the university of miami's law school. It is an issue because it means if you got a bad bucks. I think the team isn't a certain facility then you're almost guaranteed to be deported mississippi detainee. You'll alonzo hopes to beat those odds. He's appealing feeling his case for asylum and hopes to reunite with his family. You can gucci n._p._r. News this message comes from n._p._r. Sponsor comcast business gig fueled network solutions that help businesses go beyond the expected to do the extraordinary ordinary comcast business beyond fast learn more at comcast business dot com.

L. Alonzo Louisiana N._P._R. Comcast Attorney Florida Lauren Rich Eisen Glades County Florida Adams Tmz County Mississippi Yuki Noguchi Liz Martinez Leary Mississippi University Of Pennsylvania Texas Mississippi Loyola University Religious Persecution Miami Madonna
"loyola university" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"loyola university" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Has a bachelor's degree in physics from Loyola University, and masters and physics and not gonna get you. Tell me what that is and teacher education for Miami university. And then a PHD in atmosphere science. From Purdue University, which has a very good atmosphere sciences meteorology department her research has focused on low level wind structure in tornadoes. Supercell storm dynamics and quantifying the boundary layer wins in hurricane. So we're talking to someone that knows her stuff. That's why the AMS and various others have placed are unimportant committee. She's been reviewer for those organizations excetera. So I always liked to stab which on whether we're getting people know their thing. So talk a little bit about how you can get into. I like to go there before we really get into the stuff. How you get into this field or get interested in meteorology? Kate, cranston. Some I I've just started been lucky. So as you mentioned started physics, and I actually had no clue what I wanted to do. When I grow up. So physics seem really cool, obviously explains a lot of things that had a lot of different places, I can go with it. But then as I started going through school, I decided I wanted to be outside more and sort of studied the natural world. And when I was in graduate school, I had some fraternities present themselves and tornado research, which I was really interested in forgetting out in the field. But then also really understanding that there's a lot of things that we don't know about severe weather. So there's a lot of things we don't know about tornadoes. There's a lot of things we don't know about hurricanes, and I find it really fascinating that I can get out there and collect data in these and try to move the field forward a little bit. I think one of the most recent examples of that is your work that you've been doing I guess down in Argentina tells little bit about this. Because this is this is something that I mean, you were just recently there, you wrap this up in December of twenty eighteen tell us about this, the remote syncing of electrification lightning and mezro scales slash microscope processes with adaptive ground observations for the screaming for an acronym. Re Lampe go as well. And I worked at NASA for twelve years. So I know all about them at tell us about relent ago..

What does exposure to gun violence mean for our mental health?

The Takeaway

01:46 min | 2 years ago

What does exposure to gun violence mean for our mental health?

"About what exposure to gun violence means for the mental health of young people. We have Marie Richards with us. She's a psychology professor at Loyola University. Chicago who studies the effects of community violence on lessons and Sandra Galilea is the dean of the Boston University school of public health MAURICE. Let's talk about solutions are their best practices to help children who were exposed to gun violence in their communities, particularly talking about black and Brown. Low income children who are facing a variety of stressors not just gun violence. Yeah. So we know that families are very important to kids, obviously. So when the work I've done many others have done is we find that. When families are supportive of kids that they they demonstrate warmth that parents are able to listen and show concern and care about the feelings of kids the kids do better. When kids feel connected with their parents, when they they spend more time with their families, and they feel close to the mothers and fathers the outcomes are better than mental health is is better, even when they're exposed to high levels of community violence, so families are really important, obviously. But the other thing is that we find that neighborhoods when neighborhoods are more cohesive. In other words, neighbors look out for each other. They look out for the kids in the neighborhood. They're safe places for kids to play that helps kids to do better in life. And then there's schools where teachers are understand trauma when teachers and administrators are trauma informed. Kids are more supported within those contexts, and you know, obviously, kids spend lots of time in school.

Marie Richards Chicago Loyola University Boston University School Of Pu Sandra Galilea Brown
The Boiling Water Challenge Is Dangerous, Here's Why

Radio From Hell

00:57 sec | 2 years ago

The Boiling Water Challenge Is Dangerous, Here's Why

"At least eight people in Illinois ended up in the hospital after their attempted performing the boiling water challenge in the frigid weather last week, the Chicago sun times reported that the stunt requires participants to fill a pot or other container with boiling water. And then toss the liquid into the air in subzero temperatures. The challenge is supposed to end with the liquid immediately dispersing into a cloud of frozen, vapor. We strongly warn people not to perform the boiling water challenge loyal, burn surgeon. Dr Arthur Sanford told the Chicago Sun-Times because there's no safe way to do it. Spending spokesman said Wednesday that eight people between the ages of three and fifty three. Were admitted to the burn center at Loyola University Medical Center, the boiling water challenge became a viral

Loyola University Medical Cent Dr Arthur Sanford Chicago Sun-Times Chicago Illinois
The “boiling water challenge” is sending people to the hospital

Rich Stevens

02:14 min | 2 years ago

The “boiling water challenge” is sending people to the hospital

"Things that kids do today. Really just I mean, no thought is put in and they just do things some things for publicity or gone viral on social media. That's that's the big deal. If you could come up with something that goes viral and all of a sudden make you a star. These people were mostly younger people will do anything of everything to do that the latest internet challenge is to fling boiling water into the freezing cold air watch turn into frozen, vapor. Now the burns center at Loyola University Medical Center says they treat an eight people so far who've tried to challenge. I did this. When I lived in Michigan. Because it was below zero you walk outside you walk out with a pot of boiling water, and you throw it away from you. How these people got burned is beyond belief. I don't even understand how they could be Shoigu asked to put it on themselves. The hospital. Spoilsports poked spokesperson says the patients treated where three to fifty three years old. So I guess they're not all young Loyola shirts. And is putting out the warning about the challenge you said, there's no safe way to do it. So don't bother trying the safest way to do. It is you make sure there's not a big win because a wind will blow it back at you. But these eight people actually dumped it over their heads thanking the boiling water would turn immediately to a missed before it hit their head. Unfortunately. I mean, if that's not utter stupidity. I don't know what it's kind of like the the bird box challenge where people driving cars while blindfolded. I mean, you can't get much dumber than that. Sometimes I think our society so dumbed down because of these viral video now granted, you get a viral video and get a million views, you're making money all of a sudden. So that would be one reason why people do these stupid things and fall into these traps to just, you know, make a couple extra bucks. But it's more than a couple extra bucks. When you get a billion views on YouTube

Loyola University Medical Cent Youtube Michigan Shoigu Spoilsports Fifty Three Years
How did Google get so big?—60 Minutes

Politics, Policy, Power and Law

02:11 min | 3 years ago

How did Google get so big?—60 Minutes

"Of a percent at twelve eighty eight ninety and the yen dollar eleven four the euro dollar seventeen seventy two the pound a dollar thirty four twelve president barack obama and former first lady michelle obama have entered into a multi year agreement to produce films and series with net flicks the obamas will produce a diverse mix of content according to net flicks including the potential for scripted series the obamas established higher ground productions is the entity under which they will produce content for netflix netflix is currently up one point seven percent at three twenty nine sixty seven to share that's a bloomberg business flash politics policy power and law continues with june grosso esquire so much greg google was the focus of a sixty minutes segment which highlighted google's powering online searches and claims that the tech giant has a monopoly in search and search advertising margaret vestay or the european union competition commissioner said her staff went through one point seven billion google search queries and found google was manipulating its algorithms to put its own products and services at the top of searches and its competitors lower it is exactly the algorithm that does both promotion of global themselves and the demotion of others so the rigging the game and it is illegal my guest is spencer waller director of the institute for consumer antitrust studies at loyola university in chicago spencer google had ninety percent of the world's internet searches last year does it have a monopoly in search and search advertising hygiene as as the story in sixty minutes got into for both antitrust purposes in the united states and in europe they fulfill the first part of having an unlawful or a monopoly which is monopoly power to things you have to both have the power to exclude competitors and raise price when that's relevant and then you get into a question of whether you've abused power in some way so there was talk about how you know from the founder of yelp that he couldn't start yelp nowadays because of google but is it any different is google's control any different from that of other tech giants.

United States Europe Chicago Spencer Waller European Union Grosso Bloomberg President Trump Yelp Founder Barack Obama Loyola University Director Google Commissioner Margaret Vestay Greg Google Netflix
Pennsylvania man sentenced to life in prison for quadruple murders

Morning Show with Sean and Frank

01:30 min | 3 years ago

Pennsylvania man sentenced to life in prison for quadruple murders

"And the ad council these six eighty wcbs news time three minutes past five o'clock monomers mirror continues to defend former police commissioner darryl desouza even as violence in the city increases and investigators expand their probe of the sousa who've resigned because of federal tax charges brought against him narrow pew says i watched his work and then pleased with where we are in terms of reducing violence pew says national search for his replacement will be undertaken but that she's also open to considering internal candidates meanwhile desouza will make his initial appearance in federal court on monday desouza is looking up to a year in prison and a twenty five thousand dollar fine for each charge a twenty one year old man has pleaded guilty to murder charges involving the gruesome deaths of four young men at his family's farm in pennsylvania blonde of the victims included a student at baltimore's loyola university caused komo denardo faces a sentence of life in prison prosecutors say denardo enlisted his twenty one year old cousin sean cats to participate in the murders cats is also expected to plead guilty in three of the deaths baltimore's saint francis academy is the target of a class action lawsuit involving a former teacher at the school and a sex abuse case the teacher twentysevenyearold ryan panel is also named in the suit the.

Darryl Desouza Sousa Pennsylvania Baltimore Saint Francis Academy Murder Loyola University Denardo Sean Twenty One Year Twenty Five Thousand Dollar Three Minutes
"loyola university" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"loyola university" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Welcome back twelve after the hour thanks very much for hanging up part of my day i'm jim blasingame and you're listening to the small business advocate show and i'm glad you're here i'm very excited about having our good friend in melia dice joining us abo is joining us all the way from from rome italy he's a director of meredith professor of leadership at loyola university he has got so many credentials folks from from so many different governments he's he's won several medals in gold medals and and bronze medals and and that's just for his military service not counting all the other things he's done he's he's worked in the in the in the private workforce he he's received awards and recognition from the united states government and he is the author of many books including a new one when courage was the essence of leadership as his newest wanting to talk about that very topic i'd is welcome back to the show thank you jim the great honor to be here again and i hope you and all of your listeners are well you know amelia one of the problems that you have when you have when you have five pages of of of global world class credentials is people people decide which one to pick out the talk about your such an accomplished person and it's it's good to have you it's an honor to have us a member of our brain trust courage uses is the topic of your new book and when i think of.

jim blasingame rome director meredith professor loyola university united states
"loyola university" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"loyola university" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"On the d h and both leagues and a shot no shots all coming up next makes headlines for his play on the field two run homer for anthony rizzo in for his compassion off the up so grateful to the teachers the coaches and all the first responders he's a model of consistency play by rizzo in a gold glove winner he's come first baseman anthony rizzo and he's back for another year catch him tuesday's on cap in company on espn one thousand brought to you by lakeside bank tito's handmade vodka by mothers woodfield acura and loyola university chicago's graduate programs in the game of golf some rules are meant to be broken a foursome shouldn't be limited by numbers the community shouldn't be defined by clubhouse we are eighteen birdies an app that connects you to the gulf you've always wanted a place that welcomes players of all different strokes people who play with heart play for fun but are always willing to just pray and in eighteen birdies we also believe anyone can win not only will you be able to track your score the distance of your shots and connect with golfers just like you but you'll be automatically entered into eighteen birdies dream games for a chance to win a trip to all four majors next year including tickets to the master's and twenty nineteen download eighteen birdies today eighteen birdies welcome to your game to download the eighteen birdies now text putter to eight hundred eight hundred that's water to eight hundred eight hundred texts putter do eight hundred eight hundred internet providers promise small businesses a lot let's hear who really delivers.

anthony rizzo espn tito loyola university chicago
"loyola university" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"loyola university" Discussed on WGN Radio

"We've heard a lot in the news recently about loyola university and most of it has been extremely positive because of their really just awesome basketball run lola is my alma mater and i was up there in rogers park on the campus a couple of weeks ago just feeling the final four or five it was great bringing back some college memories but earlier this week the union representing the non tenure track faculty at loyola in the arts and sciences and english divisions went on a one day strike and it's a pretty serious issue in with us this morning to talk to us about what's going on with this issue at loyola his alison page warren she is a non tenure track faculty members she is an adjunct english instructor in the english department at loyal and she is on the phone with us today to talk to us all about it page good morning nice to talk to you hi good morning view as well thanks so much for having me you've been at university this is your eleventh year as i understand it and in twenty sixteen the non tenure track instructors are the teachers there voted to be represented by the sei you union and i just want you at the outset here to explain to us why that happened absolutely so i've been with this champion from the beginning and i was working at the time with the up team bring adjunct issues she liked because these issues are nothing new contingent faculty each has has kind of become the dirty little secret all throughout higher education they you know used to be that most college jobs most college professors were either tenure track tender and changing back would be were just that they were they were using a part time basis and and that dynamic has completely changed we are now at the point where.

loyola university rogers park loyola instructor basketball alison one day
Park Ridge, American Soybean Association and China discussed on Bill Leff and Wendy Snyder

Bill Leff and Wendy Snyder

01:55 min | 3 years ago

Park Ridge, American Soybean Association and China discussed on Bill Leff and Wendy Snyder

"Enterprise scrum at park ridge was stabbed in the neck in the four hundred block of north state police have reviewed video footage and we're looking for a homeless person so far no charges have been filed kim gordon wgn news the american soybean association a lobbying group that says it represents twenty one thousand us soybeans producers says china's proposed twentyfive percent tariff on soybeans would be devastating and quote to the us farmers china's the largest consumer of your soybeans and buying about a third of all us soybean production each year some loyola university faculty on strike today they've been trying to work out a contract with the school for two years now they want to start a union instructors in the college of arts and sciences and the english language learning program started picketing and rogers park frank bad bet is one of the representatives sticking point is really the the the the ability for us to have job security and to have greater autonomy with with our teaching workloads they're being supported by students from the not my loyola movement adjuncts haven't seen a raise they say in a decade even as tuition has gone up fifty three percent so mixed signals from the white house on syria the white house says the us military mission to a radical islamic state in syria is coming to a rapid end but offers no timetable for withdrawal president trump yesterday said he wanted to bring troops home to start rebuilding the us today white house spokeswoman sarah huckabee sanders says the us and its partners remain committed to eliminating the small islam estate group presence that continues in syria marches and rallies in memphis today to commemorate the anniversary of dr martin luther king's death wgn's ryan burrow is there people have come to memphis from across the country for various reasons to celebrate fifty years later justice his legacy the racism is still alive.

Park Ridge American Soybean Association China United States Syria White House Donald Trump Sarah Huckabee Sanders Dr Martin Luther King Ryan Burrow Memphis Kim Gordon Rogers Park President Trump Fifty Three Percent Twentyfive Percent Fifty Years Two Years
"loyola university" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"loyola university" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"First responders he's a model of consistency play by rizzo and a gold glove winner he's come first baseman anthony rizzo and he's back for another year catch him tuesday's on cap company on espn one thousand brought to you by lakeside bank tito's vodka by muller accurate and loyola university chicago remodeling your kitchen or bathroom studio forty one can help our home design showroom offers a great selection of kitchen and bath products featuring the bold look of color visit us online at shop studio fortyone dot com to find his showroom near you what you put in your body is what you're going to get out of your body i'm actually on the autistic to the trophy valley and we are proud partners with blue cross and blue shield of illinois i think that blue cross feels very aligned with our mission which of course is wellness at every level mental wellbeing physical wellbeing environmental wellbeing i think that it's important that we refocus how we want to cough tra cells but i think that blue cross to do that as well we both have the same principles of wanting to do good in our communicating to the support so you can actually make a difference the lady shore that people have access to things that they need bid healthcare education or the odds are so many things and i think that's blue cross blue cross and blue shield of illinois.

anthony rizzo espn tito muller loyola university chicago illinois
"loyola university" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"loyola university" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Anybody who's around we couldn't be happier to be doing this with each other it's been it's been a dream come true for us and i don't i don't want to i don't want it to end with him so we're going to do whatever we possibly can do to keep keep playing together he and marcus towns he was raving about marcus that was the best player on the court funny to after he ran away from the lisa buying ten interview he was hugging kentucky players that was nice if then they'd come out to warm up and and they were hugging him too so he got hugs all around it's an amazing feat and to do on that stage after they got down by twelve points early on was fun but to say this too many microphones here i mean you stepped in before i even had to call for you sister gina i feel like this is old hat for you so after delivering her pregame scouting report and letting the players know very cryptic language that she'd be offering their their defensive assignments she had ways of getting them their numbers afterwards she serves as the great ambassador not only for the school but for the city in the world actually i can just imagine how the excitement is on campus because we have watch parties all over today we have them all over the country today because we were so excited about this game so i know the momentum is growing it's a great feat for loyola university for chicago and for the world because we they have respect for little teams that do this well and i don't put the big teams down but they have certain advantages that we don't have and it's just so exciting i can imagine how campuses now but of course we're going to stay here till saturday i just i can't help it i can't get enough for her she's so cute so congratulations to the ramblers and eleven to nine seeds at three seed from the west and the south and one more nerd alert this this actually happening in real time the the nine feeds to.

marcus loyola university chicago kentucky
"loyola university" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"loyola university" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Uh uh against the rice owls weizman to begin his laogai cheat cares go away art listrik chat rooms huge guys will leave uh agai white cooks with with looked like how long white coats loop as do us coming to west coast reductions were yankee of me ain't enough took the steel sales when the native americans lahser white but he causes dictate the because it's still lies white women why is penis and not even necessary he must be rocking in a cocktail winnie oh that's not a race uh was this boban safari news white white west lino fights wife decorate as the is white you're out at least would you want to be the first mother fugger to try it you know what i mean i dennis planes so much it i was gonna say as a lot of confidence but obviously is not it's look to obviously alatas is white news insecurity you know hail athena's must be bother hillwood anyway good luck buddy hey end boynton uh let's see what else happens a man faces charges for allegedly grabbing blitz aratu lane at loyola universities a caps have booked a man on misdemeanor sexual battery charges he allegedly grabbed a number of women uptown in newark in uptown new orleans tasked nagy prison record showed afforded polio kendrick shorts was around sunday malak i bet you won't be wearing shorts around kendrick uh if you doing over demands on you him do it it calls after a series of complaints from women their uptown campuses a to line loyola university about a man on a bicycle allegedly grabbing a bus influenece theme.

newark nagy kendrick loyola university
"loyola university" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:21 min | 4 years ago

"loyola university" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Fair and ballots the ford summer sales event is in full swing it's your chance to get a ford f one fifty frazee roberson financing for sixty months plus an additional thousand dollars on top of your tradein eat summers hottest deal on the awardwinning bill ford saaf f one fifty take on summer right with horde america's bestselling brand and save big on the ford f one fifty get zero percent financing for sixty months was one thousand dollars on top of your tradein hurry into the summer sales event going on now only at your ford dealer thus selling based on 2016 sales not all buyers qualify for ford credit financing sixty months at sixty sixty seven per month for one thousand finance regardless adel payment trade us as half requires trading at ninety five in your vehicle for these terminated thirty days prior to or ninety days after delivery not available in rapture see dealer over to for now com for complete details taking retail delivery kabila saakashvili 2017 wcbm news time fully three i'm rob white fruity into six eighty wcbm maryland news center a busload of police cadets was brought in today to help search a large farm north of philadelphia for four missing men including a baltimore college student believed to be victims of foul play among the missing nineteen year old jimmy tarp patrick a student at loyola university maryland demand fatally shot by police in the not airy area after a van rammed the police vehicle and headed toward officers identified today is 26yearold kotey mitchell of damascus a serious injury in a row house fire in west baltimore this morning baltimore fire officials say crews responded to the twostorey row house on north bend lose three just before 530 officials say firefighters rescued a person they were taken to hospital it listed in serious condition no other occupants were inside these false allstar game tonight miami starting at eight o'clock roy fruit at six eighty wcbm news and he's very based on your effort do you wanna learn how to make money flipping houses right here in baltimore in colombia if so we have an amazing opportunity for you we're looking for a small group of motivated individuals to join our real estate investing team you'll learn in.

america kabila saakashvili philadelphia damascus baltimore north bend miami colombia ford rob white maryland jimmy tarp loyola university maryland real estate sixty months one thousand dollars thousand dollars nineteen year zero percent ninety days thirty days