35 Burst results for "Low-Earth-Orbit"

Breaking Down the Science Behind OneWeb's Planned Constellation

Daily Tech Headlines

01:39 min | 2 weeks ago

Breaking Down the Science Behind OneWeb's Planned Constellation

"On monday we talked about the successful deployment of thirty four internet satellites by uk. Communications company one web bringing their total network to two hundred eighty eight satellites. Their goal is to reach six hundred and forty eight satellites by twenty twenty two. But how in the world does the internet come all the way down from space satellites straight down into your ears right. Now let's take a closer look at some far out satellite science one. Web satellites is a joint venture with airbus. They aim to deploy a constellation of up to nine hundred. Low earth orbit satellites at around one thousand two hundred kilometers altitude to provide high speed internet. These efforts intend to compete with spacex. His starling system which currently has one thousand seven hundred internet satellites orbiting the earth at five hundred fifty kilometers altitude amazon also has plans to launch internet satellites for its project copier constellation. All of these companies are aiming towards providing low latency internet from space. But how does it work rather than sending internet signals through electric cables satellite internet beams information through the vacuum of space or it travels forty seven percent faster than fiber optic cable. This is particularly interesting for remote locations where laying electric cables is complicated in order to transfer a signal. You i need to emit one. So i and internet signal is delivered to a large antenna or earth station on the ground and this station then sends radio waves up into space targeting a specific satellite which is around the size of a large table.

Airbus Spacex UK Amazon
The World's First Wooden Satellite Will Launch This Year

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

01:06 min | 3 months ago

The World's First Wooden Satellite Will Launch This Year

"Check in with Dr Sky Steven Kates. Hey, Stephen. Hello. There Juries we begin with space. Lots of exciting news here would fill an entire show but with space junk George on the rise and too many dead satellites in low Earth orbit. Get set for the world's first wooden satellite, which is seven months later this year, officially known how, ironically, is called would set these are small nano satellites storage, which mother only four inches on a side. And weigh about £2, Each finished company known as Arctic Astronautics, is the prime contractor on these little gems they're made of birch wood, and they're able to carry out small test type payloads. That is. And when complete. Guess what they burn up completely in the atmosphere. No ground surviving components. Aluminum oxide is sprayed over the electronic area to prevent the release that is of gases into space. A charge on a comedic kind of note. Don't you think we need a large version of like a modern Noah's The space would art so that when he does re enter the Amazon, these things will truly burn up. And thus maybe they're solving on a slow but progressive way. Problem of speech jump,

Dr Sky Steven Kates Arctic Astronautics Stephen George Noah Amazon
New President, New FCC, New Net Neutrality Rules?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

01:45 min | 4 months ago

New President, New FCC, New Net Neutrality Rules?

"Throughout the pandemic. we've covered. How the internet is everything this week. We're talking about the policy that affects the internet one policy issue that has haunted every fcc commissioner in the past decade and then some isn't it neutrality. That's the idea that isp's treat all content equally and can't slow down or charge more for certain kinds of content rules have ping pong between administrations obama's fcc put net neutrality rules in place. In two thousand fifteen trump's appointee repealed them twenty seventeen the new acting chairwoman of the fcc jessica rosenworcel supports net neutrality rules. I asked her if it's time for congress to make something permanent you know. I think things are always sturdier when they're written into law but i also think that when the fcc chose in two thousand fifteen to update its rules and make sure that net neutrality was in its policies. That decision was ultimately upheld in the courts. So i think that's the agency can move here to one of the big loopholes in net neutrality rules. Even when they've been in place has been wireless and now. We're sort of on the cusp. Potentially we've been on the cusp for awhile of big five g rollout. Do you think that any future rules need to be sort of a to include all the ways that we get broadband access. Not just fixed. Yeah i mean. I think that technology is changing at a really fast clip. It's very exciting. To see the speeds we might all be able to enjoy. With five g wireless. It's exciting to see what's happening with. Low earth orbiting satellite systems. I think they're going to be many more technologies that can deliver us high speed broadband in the not too distant future and whenever we change our policies. We're going to have to take that into consideration

FCC Jessica Rosenworcel ISP Donald Trump Barack Obama Congress
"low earth orbit" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

05:34 min | 5 months ago

"low earth orbit" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"I is not going to be around forever it could experience in unrecoverable anomaly at any time and so as amazing as it is it's also a reminder that that is our inventors are single toehold to continuous human presence in low earth orbit So it's my job to ensure that we do not have a gap for whenever the iss retires whenever that is and so when. I look back historically Benji event also mentioned it. We started with cargo and then we have crew commercial crew and i think our long term vision is then to have commercials estimations and once we have all three of those in lower orbit primarily driven by private sector Interests you have this self reinforcing Ecosystem i know views that were lot but i really think it applies here self. Sustaining and self reinforcing. And that's what that's what. The commercially of development program is all about We are looking at eventually having multiple space destinations again. The sort of tenuous nature of just having one platform up there as amazing as it is Reinforces that i think we need multiple destinations just like we have multiple commercial cargo capabilities and soon commercial crew capabilities. Having redundancy in having multiple capabilities is going to be key. And i think when we look at destinations when we we've talked about all the different things that we can do in low-earth-orbit not every destination is going to be good for every kind of application. So we could see sort of tailoring of this destination for this particular market. This destination for another different kinds of market. But you look overall and you'd have this sort of a rich tapestry capability redundancy that i think we all wanna take advantage of not just nasa as mike said we are going to have continuous requirements in low-earth-orbit. We're going to be a good anchor. Customer were these capabilities but as we've said many times it's not just a cliche. We want to be one of many customers. So we're hopefully going to enable that capability to be sold to other customers do agree with benji completely. The key is cost right as amazing as the iss is. We've always been conscious of cost with the isis. But it wasn't really developed with that as the primary driver had other things that we were trying to accomplish when you when you partner with the private sector. They have a laser focus on cost and schedule. And then you bring nastase experience with human spaceflight fifty years of human spaceflight and you put those together. It's a very very powerful combination and we saw it with cargo. We saw it with crude. And i want to bring those lessons learned with commercial space destinations. And make sure that they are online whenever the iss retires. I think once that happens. Nasa can then set its sights deeper and really allow the economic activity in low-earth-orbit to really take off phil. I think he said it so nicely. And i'm sorry for for making you the last speaker but but you said that you know we've covered so much man we. We talked about the international space station and some of the great work happening on board with a lot of our commercial Partners we talked about the transportation capabilities and phil you ended so nicely with under giving us understanding of what this framework you know what what is a robust ecosystem understanding sort of what that looks like in low earth orbit so i just like to end their and thank each and every one of your for taking part in today's discussion. What truly enlightening and fascinating discussion we had today. It's been an honor to host such an esteemed panel and chat with y'all today so for those listening and tuning in. Thank you so much. If you wanna know more about nassar's low-earth-orbit commercialization efforts visit nasa dot gov slash leo.

fifty years Nasa mike today one one platform nasa nassar three nasa dot gov each Benji single toehold many customers benji
"low earth orbit" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

07:03 min | 5 months ago

"low earth orbit" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"I think are are definitely important. Bud jeff talked about just the the the infrastructure whether it's the technical infrastructure or just a policy of restructure that's been established and. I agree that. I think that that's going to be This this nasa democratization of space. Where i think. It has intentionally fostered entrepreneur participation. I think that's going to be regarded as one of the stations most important achievements and To me this kind of leadership in technology and enterprise in space seems to be a very american thing to do. Were excited to be a part of it. Rich you've explained so many fascinating types of research. And i think people listening may be surprised to hear just how many different areas there are material science biological science And some of them to get involved as well. Can you kind of draw some lines and to connect with some of our panelists. Today we have representative from us national lab from tex- shot. We have nasa. Can you talk about the relationships with tech with tech shy and with with all of these different that brings together for those. That may also wanna get involved right. So so first of all part of that intention alley that i mentioned which i think is not to be too quickly dismissed. I mean mike's office Mike's involved in in the commercialization station for a long time and he talked about how he seen an evolution of what works. And what a policies that nasa put in place to foster this so we work with mike office. We've got a space act. Agreement established years ago as i know jeff as well and so without without mike's office we couldn't do this We launch on Essentially every spacex cargo dragon and without at resupply capability especially that returning capability. We couldn't do what we wanna do. once we get into more of a production mode with Human tissue which again. I don't wanna give anyone the idea that this is happening Next year but it looks good. It looks promising and we need that return capability to bring those things. We manufacturer for patients a back to earth and christine mentioned the allocation and the fact that we can partner with the us national laboratory to Frankly not only do Manifesting but also we rely on them and and partner with them in just helping potential customers understand the value of microgravity They've got some tremendous resources on staff. That do a far better job than i do about explaining the evaluate benefits of microgravity to mature material science folks to to people in industry and in pharmaceutical companies. And for so many reasons. Re- rely on folks like christine national national lab And then even competitors Jeff and i. We don't compete in in every aspect. Certainly don't launch cubesats or things like that but i do still consider his success my success and success of the industry. This is frankly A small industry compared to so many others. And an i do cheer on the success of nasdaq's space tango a bio serving others Because we want to grow this guy we to we went to rally and and Bill demand For ourselves and right now that also means helping others bill demand for their products and services. So it's definitely an interdependent ecosystem right now. Thank you rich. You can really get a sense of just. All the commercial work happening in lower orbit. I think another really important piece of this puzzle is the transportation to and from lower. We're talking about what's happening on lower orbit. That transportation is another critical piece over the mass over the past many years. cargo has been delivered to station by way of commercial spacecraft. Now we're bringing on the next generation of human rated spacecraft's want shift gears from some of the work on international space station to these transportation capabilities. Benji read a wanna. Pass it i to you. We're not seem far. Removed from a huge milestone crew won the first rule tation flight on a commercial spacecraft. Just arrived at the international space station with four astronauts who will now call the station their home for the next six months first of all. Congratulations what incredible. Achievement for spacex Thank you very much. Thank you for having me on the panel today in in in you know always massive congratulations to space station itself in the program. All the partners involved in making it happen industry partners and nasa partners international partnership. But but yeah no. It's it's it's an amazing. Accomplishment represents the work of thousands of people Spacex and nasa join teams on dedication and sacrifice by them and their families to put off or You know the most exciting part is for those four crew members For victor mike shannon. And so we g and their dedication to to going up and living and working and doing all of the science and commercialization efforts that we have to do always a thank you to them and their families Trusting us in that transportation and bring bringing up there in bringing home safely So yeah you talk a lot about transportation. I think it kind of looking at the big picture And enriches a really good word intention. -ality spacex was founded in in continues to focus our our number. One mission is fundamentally to make life multi planetary And those are just words. That's the real deal. That's what we do so when you look at. That picture is okay. Well what does that mean. Well first of all the nearest planet mars what we have to do to make that happen. We've got to quit thousands of people on mars. We have to put thousands of tons of cargo on march and probably more right. Thousands tens of thousands hundreds thousand ultimately a self sustaining civilization on. Another planet is gonna look light. You know at least a million people and that sounds blowing probably to most people right. But but that's that's the reality is gonna cake. And that's the intention inch inch analogy. And that's the mission of spacex on. I think a lot of us we all really want to see is a future where you know. Humans are a spacefaring species were carrying. You know our our adventure are learning and our exploration of the stars And ended in again. This is exactly what we're seeing low-earth orbit and what we're seeing on the space station. That has benefits back home. You know back on the to a lot of terrestrial applications the how to do that you to his credit kind of a practical set of steps as you think the problem all eventually needed but thousands of people thousands of tons of cargo all the one another planet um and what.

Jeff Mike Spacex Next year mars Today mike Bud jeff Bill victor today mike office mike shannon Thousands tens of thousands jeff four astronauts earth space act tex- shot nasa
"low earth orbit" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

08:16 min | 5 months ago

"low earth orbit" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"And that partnership really has has been is a continuing thing right. What if you seen john in terms of the value just working on the international space station program with nasa From from boeing for so long what is the value that you have really seen with the international space station. I think you know. There's there's lots of of of streams of value. One is the international collaboration. And everything there. But but really what i think. The legacy of the iss is is gonna be is the research in discovery that we've had to date and we promised to to show in the future in just just a couple of examples of of research leads almost getting ready to be filled. It in a cure for duquesne's muscular dystrophy. That was but fundamentally developed because a research on the iss and just you know in the last month or so us. Scientists completed research on a potential cure for kimia so it between those manufacturing space. There's just so much promise everything that that we have done. Species all the discoveries we've made have been made under the influence of gravity. This is the first time that a national laboratories been dedicated to research without the the effects of gravity and we're seeing astounding results and let let solicit explore that a little bit the idea of the space station as a us national lab christine kratz at the top of this panel. I mentioned more than three thousand experiments conducted on the station. Thousands of researchers for more than a hundred different countries many of these experiments were conducted and performed were through the function of the international space station as a us national lab. Can you explain what that means. It's important sure. That's a great gary. Thanks for the question as you know. Congress opened up. The the national lab is it as a way for others around the world but us researchers especially to have access for non nasa research in and. Mike pointed out some of the things that nasa has helped foster but opening up to a broader group of researchers on earth to think about how they may may take that terrific asset that that we have in space and leverage it for their research was important that spans academics universities startup companies might mention the the optical implant that is coming out of lamp division from startup organization as well as working with industry partners merck pfizer. I'm sanofi recently and then others like adidas so so having companies have access to the space station required something that was kind of a non non nasa opportunity that gives us fifty percent of the up mass down mass plus sixty percent of the astronaut time and with more astronauts on board the station right now. That's more astronaut. Time that we're happy to have access to which is a lot partnerships until the partnerships that john mentioned important partnership with nasa foster that with us and help us collaborate together partnerships. With companies like boeing than have us concert the technology in space prize that created the opportunity for lamb division to put their their application into space partnerships with nsf. And and i h you also foster research like tissue chips in space that we work with and then the commercial service provider sa- in In jeffer- here today to talk about their efforts they provide access directly through their operations to go to the space station including stem other kinds of really interesting regenerative medicine. Research is going on and a partner couldn't go directly to their innovations in those commercials service providers access space station through our location. It's important just for the same things that might in. John mentioned previously which is really innovative efforts. That would not be possible without the access. Granted by congress in partnership with nasa access so some of the things mentioned here were muscular dystrophy. Leukemia research the regenerative medicine work. That's going on that may some day 'cause Allow us to have implantable organs. It's sounds far fetched but the direction to us. This is really an amazing innovative platform. And because as the access to these researchers have i guess it's according to say the sky's the limit but in fact it's amazing to see what people come up with. really excited to continue to work with nasa enter partners here to allow that access christine gave them so many fantastic examples of some of the Station have you any mentioned opening it up as a us lab in in two thousand and five or at least the the push from congress to do so have you seen an increase in participation demand from when you first started opening it up as us lab trying to get the word out that there is this orbiting laboratory that companies have access to. Have you seen an increase to where we are now. In twenty twenty absolutely the initial experiments were were fewer and further between because researchers were aware of the access and they we had not yet developed the platforms that the jeff enrich and other of our commercial service providers have created so over time. The words got now research become more and more complex because of the kindest learnings that they've had in again the commercial service provider's implementation partners have built platforms right on the station. And i'm sure that they'll talk about those more that allow people to de risk their research allowing for more and more creativity in more success in addition as we learn more those opportunities become more complex and so they take more astronaut time they take more more capabilities from From our partners and they've all risen to that and made those opportunities available. So i started here only two years ago and the types of things that i've seen from the tissue chips in space which you're gonna be a game changer. To things that ritchie talk about the bff and jeff we'll talk about his platforms. It's just amazing. Even in two years the changes we've seen in what's ahead for us. It's really exciting. I think that's the perfect segue to you jeff. mentioned longstanding relationships with with john mulholland. Not too long ago with boeing. Nanak has also been one of those long standing relationship with nasa with the us national abc. Can you talk about some of these break things. That christine was alluding to that. You've been performing a commercial company operating on the international space station gas. Thanks it's great to be here. Many friends You know when you look back on the international space station. It's not just the hardware that i'll talk about that. In the moment it's also a new system it's new partnerships between the private sector in the government and and and so probably one of the most important legacies at twenty years of the international space station is the public private partnerships in the maturing of. That is no better examples. And let's say the spacex northrop contracts and boeing contracts for cargo and crew with You know companies like manna racks. We've invested considerable money Into our hardware our platforms were ready to go as we record this sound space space x twenty one. Benji make sure that thing gets up there. We got out bishop airlock on there. And and that's a permanent addition to the space station that's privately funded And we worked in partnership with boeing. The on that and so the space station for me is is a lot of things. it's first stability. bipartisan support. You don't have bipartisan support..

john mulholland Congress John Mike adidas fifty percent jeff congress christine kratz sixty percent two years ago twenty twenty merck pfizer five ritchie two years twenty years today christine two thousand
Is the New Space Race for High-Speed Internet Economically Viable?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

00:46 sec | 5 months ago

Is the New Space Race for High-Speed Internet Economically Viable?

"The new space race is for high speed internet from low orbit but do the economics work from american public media. This is marketplace tech. I'm ali would. The white house is two trillion. Dollar infrastructure plan proposes a hundred billion dollars for broadband infrastructure. Right now however it's hard to get broadband two big parts of this country unless that infrastructure is in space low-earth orbit satellite constellations. Could bring high speed internet access to some of these areas. Alon musk's starlink is the best known but there are a few other companies in the mix. Starlink is in beta with about ten thousand

ALI White House Alon Musk
Dennis Muilenburgs Bet on the Future

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

05:40 min | 7 months ago

Dennis Muilenburgs Bet on the Future

"Denis muhlenberg has kept a low public profile since he left his job. Ceo of boeing at the end of twenty nineteen. But that's about to change me. Lemberg has teamed up with air finance founder. kirsten bartok tau and other aviation luminaries to fund a special purpose. Acquisition company called new vista acquisition corp. They're aiming to raise two hundred and forty million dollars through public offerings to acquire businesses focused on transformational technologies in areas. Such a space defense and communications advanced their mobility and logistics. What does that mean well. We'll let you hear directly from denison. Kirsten who have joined today also with us on my side of the table so to speak is aviation weeks. Technology specialists and urban air mobility guru executive editor graham warwick. Just one no we will. Not be talking about boeing past or future. If you're interested in that i'd like to refer you back to our january twenty nine podcast so let's get started a dentist. Tell us what you're up to. And why joe the good morning and thanks for the chance to talk about new vista. We're very excited about this. New endeavor and that excitement starts with a tremendous opportunity that we see right now as you know i had the privilege of being the ceo of boeing back in. We celebrated our centennial in two thousand sixteen and we. We did some work together on the age of aerospace and when we look back on the history of aerospace the opportunity in front of his right. Now i think it's the greatest one in that one hundred plus year history harris face. We're seeing this convergence of technologies in a way that we've never seen before technologies that span artificial intelligence autonomy new manufacturing techniques satellite technologies new types of vehicles and propulsion systems that set of emerging technologies. All at once has never happened before. Combine that with mega-scale changes in the market. You mentioned air mobility new waste. People are moving Logistics e commerce capabilities the revolution in space in the build out of the lower orbit ecosystem and next generation defense systems that combination of technologies and mega skill. Market ships creates an unprecedented opportunity. And that's what we're focused on at new vista kirsten. Let's hear from you. What brought you into team. Up with dennis and How are you approaching this. Thanks joe and as you know. I've been pretty focused on advanced ever ability for the last four or five years Having been based in silicon valley and kind of live through the internet growth and doing venture capital back then realized early that this transition was going to happen and just from the basic technologies with your talk about them. Electrification greeted propulsion which then goes to autonomy and an ad in hydrogen which has come on the radar lately These technologies are going to completely change Aerospace so that the next twenty years is going to look completely different in the last twenty years and even the is you know. The aircraft designs will look entirely different. Lucky enough i been working on this trying to figure out the right vehicle to investment doing a lot of my own personal investing some through our finance and then was Got on the idea of a spec realized that could be the optimal solution to help. These emerging companies crossed the chasm of death valley of death that we call where you got early stage venture capital money but they needed at large amount of growth capital. These are deep company's hardware and software at their capital intensive and then added that they've got the regulatory component of the faa and. they needed some good opportunities. For large amounts of crossover capital groups. Like softbank could have been that or sovereigns but the spac product has really come in to help. These company cost the valley of death and make it to the next level where they're commercialization occurs and their operational so i couldn't be more lucky to partner with such an incredible operators dennis someone who really pushed billing to be more. Entrepreneurial created horizon ex and necks and We put together a great team here. And we're excited to make a positive difference in the landscape. So so what are you thinking. I mean how do you take these technologies that we write about all time. I guess our listeners want to know and apply them to be like a real product. What what is really exciting. Talk about this this change in the next twenty years. What can we see in practical terms. What are we going to see. joe. I think you're gonna see transformation in these four market segments that we're talking about that's way beyond what we've ever seen before i take what's happening in the in. The lower orbits space ecosystem and extraordinary the number of technologies. That we're seeing that are coming into places real applications now. The build out a satellite infrastructure nanno sats micro sats we see a market for fifty thousand plus additional small sets on orbit or the next decade. We see a number of companies who are working on breaking the cost curve for access to space new launch capabilities that are coming to bear and then new applications in terms of how to use those satellite networks to create information at useful data earth observation New kinds of reconnaissance and surveillance capabilities connectivity. In communications i think the low earth orbit ecosystem. Build out that we're seeing now is just one example of the kind of massive transfer transformation that we're gonna see that's going to create economic value. It's gonna create new companies new jobs. it's going to create a new technologies that are on the innovation edge that are now ripple out into other business sectors. So it's an exciting time to be working on this leading edge

Boeing Denis Muhlenberg Lemberg Kirsten Bartok Tau New Vista Acquisition Corp Graham Warwick JOE Denison Kirsten Dennis Harris Silicon Valley Softbank FAA
SPACE FARCE

Ground Zero Media

05:39 min | 8 months ago

SPACE FARCE

"Days ago. We observed the thirty fifth anniversary of the space shuttle. Challenger's bush in the killed seven brave astronauts and a chance to actually get into that. I just thought it kind of bring the room down and it would it. Would basically a habit gets reflect back on the failure that the shuttle program eventually became. I'm man i'm and it's arguable. That the shuttle missions were a failure but it just Conversations before with people who said it's the equivalent of taking a bus out of the garage. Hang around the earth a couple times. That's all it was but you know it was interesting. At least the space program had something going on at the time. And i thought it would. I even met a shuttle astronaut Good guy Just that by the time We had a conversation on a cable channel about moon landing in. I didn't like each other afterwards. And i i didn't. I didn't wanna cause trouble with him. In fact he was just an amazing astronaut. Let's astronaut my god guys space. You know pro. You know again. I look at astronauts. It's like i. I'd look at a veteran. Or i look at a soldier who fights. I mean they got more than i do. I sit studio. And gripe all the time but i just you know. I was amazed by The he was not my first astronaut. I've met a few Never met buzz aldrin or ordeal armstrong. Or anybody like that. A few shuttle astronauts. I've i've met a former nasa. Well no i interviewed chuck cernan but i was never. I interviewed him over the phone. So i i don't know i just have an affinity for space i i i love it because of course i love the topic of aliens. Ufo's avi lopburi more. We come on. Space travels amazing. I mean we'd star trek star wars. These are things. I really like And you know noticing too. I grew up in utah. Where more than fire call was twenty miles away thirty miles away from where i lived and this is where the rings were made for the space shuttle program of course the failed challenger explosion was because of the ordering problems were more than thiokol and only two failures in the whole space shuttle program where people were killed. Astronauts were killed. No real new information though. That was out there and You know and we kept being promised this was just you know the shuttle program was going to be used to not only take the bus out for a dry but it was also going to be used to go to the space station and bring astronauts food and stuff and now well for the longest time we were contracting russia. We're having a deal with russia to send astronauts to the space shuttle to the space station to well actually said food to the space as well and i thought why are we relying on russia in and this whole nonsense about how russia was our enemy and everything. They're our enemy. Why are they helping us with our space program. Just didn't make any sense. But yeah i mean looking back at our field. Space programs is important. Indicate that president. Barack obama crippled dass his efforts to send astronauts beyond low earth orbit. When obama came into office. he didn't want a number of other. Presidents have done to determine their goals for nasa. He formed a presidential commission to study the space agency and then he came up with some recommendations so he you a committee the committee. You basically. you're saying well. I think there are far more important things. We need to invest our money. And so i'm gonna cut your budget. You know basically what area. We're gonna bring you altogether. Cut your budget. So you're going to have to deal with you know whatever that's all it's been cutting budget and budget cutting and and And so that's why you have now space x that's why you have You know these other companies visas and others who want to do space because you know space has been neglected. The budgets have been neglected in our government for some time but we had a lot of conservative presidents like george w bush and of course donald trump. Who said yeah. We're all the speech program. Let's get it going. And the reason why is because there's brooke obama once said and this is one of the reasons why he basically said no to you know exorbitant budgets for space. He says well. You know spaces. In america. First issue. And we should be more universal. We she wore. We wore worldly with our concepts in our conquest of space. We need to do you know we didn't do it all together as a world. It's a it's a world bring people together in a world government or world philosophy. I think reagan kinda hinted to what he said. You know our differences worldwide would vanish. We were facing an alien threat from outside of this world but that was an alien threat. That was the idea that if there were aliens out there wanting to eat us then we would certainly band together as a group. I mean that's what independence day was all about right. See the independence day. Movie or armageddon were nasa saves the day. You know it's time and time again. We get told it. Our space program is amazing. Well yeah they do amazing things. But it's not as amazing as it used to be. I mean lockheed. Martin ceo norm augustine Headed up the augustine commission during the obama administration actually was named after maga sanofi headed up with the. It's called the augustine commission and basically they returned with a set of recommendations after few wants convening during the obama administration so the commission found the program then in existence project constellation was not execute under any reasonable

Russia Chuck Cernan Avi Lopburi Thiokol Nasa Buzz Aldrin Challenger Armstrong Bush Barack Obama Brooke Obama Utah George W Bush Donald Trump Augustine Commission Obama Administration Reagan Martin Ceo Norm Augustine
SpaceX plans Starlink satellites launch Sunday or Monday

Love, Death, and Money

00:19 sec | 8 months ago

SpaceX plans Starlink satellites launch Sunday or Monday

"Space X StarLink satellite launch may happen Sunday or Monday. Lisa Taylor with details Florida today says the company is considering a 702 A M Eastern time launch window tomorrow, but it's also looking at a possible launch early Monday, It will be the 18th deployment of Starling communication satellites into low earth orbit.

Lisa Taylor Florida
Global Gilmour Space completes successful hybrid rocket engine test

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

00:43 sec | 8 months ago

Global Gilmour Space completes successful hybrid rocket engine test

"Doco space rocket competent gilmore's space of caridad a successful engine to spur of the new hybrid rocket. Motor the hot five. Verification tests are what is the world's largest single port hybrid rocket engine lasted ten seconds producing record ninety-one killer newton's nine tonnes force thrust the queensland based companies developing a three stage launch vehicle capable of carrying small satellites into low-earth orbit and the rocket murray. Yes for this test is the same design. That will be pairing. The first and second stages of the company's new aries vehicle engineers now going through the results with plans to undertake duration and higher thrust tests in the next few weeks. This space time.

Gilmore Newton Queensland
NASA Counts Down to Twenty Years of Continuous Human Presence on International Space Station

Innovation Now

01:16 min | 9 months ago

NASA Counts Down to Twenty Years of Continuous Human Presence on International Space Station

"On october thirty first. Two thousand veteran astronaut william shepherd left earth on a journey began two decades of continuous human presence in low earth orbit this is a special series of innovation now celebrating twenty years of continuous human presence on the international space station. Commander shepard's launch. The international space station was an orbiting complex of three small modules. Not the sprawling research complex. That is now today. State of the art laboratory facilities on board help. Nasa increase our understanding of what it will take to expand human exploration beyond low earth orbit and new activities including the flight of commercial crews and scientific investigations will keep the station useful than thriving for years to come for shepherd and the two russian cosmonauts who made up expedition one that first mission marked the beginning of an unprecedented era of peaceful cooperation in space now celebrating twenty years of continuous human presence on the international space station. We continue to see benefits for all humankind and a launchpad to future destinations

William Shepherd International Space Station Commander Shepard Nasa
First commercial space station on the planet to be built in Houston

Charlie Parker

00:33 sec | 9 months ago

First commercial space station on the planet to be built in Houston

"Turner has announced a partnership between the the Houston Houston spaceport spaceport and and the the Axiom Axiom space space that that will will lead lead to to the the first first commercial commercial space space station station being being built built in in Houston. Houston. You You will will be be the the world's world's first first free free flying, flying, internationally available private space station that will serve as humanity's central hub for research, manufacturing and commerce in low Earth orbit. The aerospace company is building a 14 acre campus, where they plan to train private astronauts and begin production on its Axiom Space station. The plan will lead to his many as 1000 jobs. Police are

Houston Turner Axiom Space Station
New method aims to see extreme space weather before it reaches astronauts

Innovation Now

01:17 min | 9 months ago

New method aims to see extreme space weather before it reaches astronauts

"A space weather warning may help protect astronauts in space this is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shaped its magnetic field and atmosphere protect us most space weather the eruptions of light and fast moving energized particles that come from our dynamic son but astronauts in low earth orbit like those on the international space station are more exposed to these solar events scientists observe some space weather events with corona graphs instruments. That used a solid disc to block the sun's bright face revealing the sun's atmosphere or corona space-based corona graphs although not obstructed by cloud cover only return images about every twenty to thirty minutes the solar eruptions seen in one image may have already arrived by the time. Scientists get the next frame by working backwards. A group of scientists from nasa and the national center for atmospheric research have detected an early signature of certain energetic particles if the signatures proof reliable scientists will be able to predict the arrival of these dangerous particles even before they leave the sun's inner atmosphere giving astronauts and space fair warning to prepare

International Space Station SUN National Center For Atmospheri Nasa
Houston Spaceport to be home to world’s first commercially built space station

Sean Hannity

00:34 sec | 9 months ago

Houston Spaceport to be home to world’s first commercially built space station

"Sylvester Turner is announcing a partnership between the Houston spaceport and Axiom space that will lead to the first commercial space station being built right here. It will be the world's first free flying internationally available private space station that will serve as humanity, central hub for research, manufacturing and commerce in low Earth orbit. The aerospace company is building a 14 acre campus, where they plan to train private astronauts and begin production on its Axiom Space station. The plan will lead to as many as 1000 jobs.

Sylvester Turner Houston Axiom Space Station
Elon Musk's SpaceX Launches Four Astronauts into Orbit

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:41 sec | 10 months ago

Elon Musk's SpaceX Launches Four Astronauts into Orbit

"Plans to launch four astronauts to the international space station. This evening the last basics crude flight which caught the world's attention was actually a test flight in today's machine is truly the first in the contract nasa signed with the elon. Musk company having a private company. Handle launches res nasa up for other thinks this will solidify our capabilities with the low earth orbit but we hope to You know sort of continue to focus on this. Keep the space station operating. But then you know work towards The lunar surface and eventually mars veteran astronaut drew faisal stole. We'll be watching as his colleagues launched tonight just before seven thirty eastern from the kennedy space center. Evan brown fox

Nasa International Space Station Musk Drew Faisal Kennedy Space Center Evan Brown Fox
20 Years and Counting on the International Space Station

Innovation Now

01:16 min | 11 months ago

20 Years and Counting on the International Space Station

"On October Thirty First Two thousand veteran astronaut William Shepherd left Earth on a journey began two decades of continuous human presence in low earth orbit. This is a special series of innovation now, celebrating twenty years of continuous human presence on the International Space. Station. Commander Shepard's launch the International Space Station was an orbiting complex of three small modules, not the sprawling research complex that is now today state of the art laboratory facilities on board help NASA increase our understanding of what it will take to expand human exploration beyond low earth orbit and new activities including the flight of commercial crews and scientific investigations will keep the station useful and thriving for years to come for shepherd and the two Russian cosmonauts who made up. One that first mission marked the beginning of an unprecedented. Of peaceful cooperation in space. Now, celebrating twenty years of continuous human presence on the International Space. Station we continue to see benefits for all humankind and a launchpad to future destinations

International Space Station International Space William Shepherd Commander Shepard Nasa
SpaceX launches another 60 Starlink satellites

Techmeme Ride Home

00:10 sec | 11 months ago

SpaceX launches another 60 Starlink satellites

"Space x just announced this week that it has launched sixty more starling satellites for low earth orbit deployment as part of its gearing up for a public Beta of it satellite broadband

The Internet, From Space

Reset

05:42 min | 1 year ago

The Internet, From Space

"The Internet, it's how we work how go to school, how we see friends and family. But not everyone has a good connection and that's where a few tech companies come in with a sort of modest proposal. What have we got our Internet from Outerspace Adam Clark estes deputy editor at recode wrote about this, and is here to talk about Adam. Surprising thing in your story that a lot of people probably don't already know is that a lot of listeners already get through Internet via satellite. That's how we get wi fi on planes for instance. So why hasn't this taken off more broadly satellite Internet has historically been and? Just. A little bit sub par When you compare it to terrestrial Wifi, you're down on planet earth. We have fiber optic cables which basically have limited bandwidth and to do satellite Internet. You're basically beaming connection from address Joe Network up to satellite and back down and technology just hasn't been good enough to to get with to enough people so that it compares to terrestrial broadband. Internet. You might get from a variety inner time Warner A, but that's starting to change with new satellite technology and would call constellations of satellites and has pandemic at all sort of raise the stakes for this work and made it. More, urgent less-urgent. Tell me about that depend epic is. Really accelerated development, and especially investment in the technology. Just after the pandemic started, it became incredibly clear that a lot of people don't have Internet access and they're being left behind young students who aren't able to get online for classes, people who aren't able to to to work remotely. So once it became so clear that solving this problem of Internet access was urgent a lot more investment went into Xilai. Broadband initiatives the number of launches went up quite a bit and I. Think, we're GONNA see that investment continue and more these networks go online in the near future Gotcha. So who exactly is trying to do this? What are the different companies that see a future in? Internet for space, the two companies being talked about both right now our space x and Amazon both of them are launching what are called low earth orbit constellations into space this year, and in addition to them, there are companies that have had satellites These are the companies that. You. Probably. Use to get a connection on a plane or a train and via sat and Hughes two big players in that space and part of the idea is tabby satellites be sort of a low orbit, right? So there are two main types of satellite broadband setups. One is geosynchronous satellites geosynchronous satellite. Okay. So A geosynchronous satellites as above one place on earth and spins with the earth so that it can be connected down to to anywhere on the surface at any given time. The second kind and this is sort of the the newer more exciting type according to some. This is what spacex, Amazon or doing. These are called low earth orbit satellites. Geosynchronous satellites are thousands of miles above the earth surface low orbit satellites. However, as the name implies are much closer, they might be as little as three hundred miles above earth surface. I think it SPACEX, they're going to be about three, hundred and. Forty miles above the surface, and that means that the distance that the signal has to travel is much less, which means you get lower latency that means you won't get a lag on a connection and because there are a lot of different satellites, Elon Musk, and spacex say that you'll have a bandwidth that will be able to compete with terrestrial broadband and even fiber optic networks, Gotcha and SPACEX and Amazon are doing this. I assume just because there's money to be made right I. Mean I got think. There's a bounty at the end Elon. Musk has said that he just wants to get into the business and he wants to disrupt the telecom business and he believes that he can make enough money doing. So to help fund his mission to colonize Mars. Amazon hasn't said that much about why they're doing it It might also be just to get into the telecom business in compete in an industry that is is fairly monopolized. Others have hypothesized at Amazon wants to get into the satellite broadband business because then they could be their own first customer, Amazon web services, of course, offers a lot of cloud computing technology and the ability. To be connected to the Internet anywhere on Earth, could do a number of different great things, aws. Got It. So the answer is a mix of just straight up capitalism money to be made if we don't make it someone else will, and then another incentive is that this could be pretty synergistic with the main business and I'd add a third thing and and everybody mentions this. Bridging the digital divide is not only good for business. It's sort of good for mankind connecting more people to the Internet stands to have great unforeseen benefits space experts didn't says. The connecting people that previously could not get Internet access in parts of the rural United States and southern Canada. Like the Pacific Northwest Region is where they've had Beta, testers and I think that a lot of different companies have really pursued the dream of satellite broadband because it can reach people in areas that no one else can these are areas that aren't served by big telecom companies where there aren't fiber optic cables and in fact, would be expensive to build that infrastructure that no one has ever going to do it.

Amazon Spacex Elon Musk Adam Clark Deputy Editor Warner A Joe Network Pacific Northwest Region Xilai Hughes Canada United States
Human Factors in NASA -An insight into HF on the Orion Programme. - What is orion

1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

01:04 min | 1 year ago

Human Factors in NASA -An insight into HF on the Orion Programme. - What is orion

"We are designing developing a spacecraft that it's capable of taking people Beyond low-earth orbit for the first time since nineteen seventy-two. The last time we landed on the moon as part of the Apollo program or the Iraq program is just one small element of the overall Artemis program through which we're trying to get returned humans to the moon for the first time since those days. So our focus is on the Orion spacecraft will carry the crew we can support for astronauts in space for up to 21 days in the Orion spacecraft. So that's are designed to parameter for that Artemis includes not just a riot includes thoughts. Let's rock. It includes the ground systems that will recover the crew launched the cruise recover the cruise. It also includes the lunar Gateway space station as well the human Landing system wage. So much we will use in future missions for more lunar exploration. So the quite a complex an operation then to have it could be quite motivated to have such a such challenge.

Artemis Orion Iraq
The great broadband divide: Living without high-speed internet access

CBS Weekend News Roundup

03:35 min | 1 year ago

The great broadband divide: Living without high-speed internet access

"Austin, Texas, So many kids weren't online last semester, but the school system had to print and male 40,000 homework packets a week. They resorted to fill in school buses with portable WiFi hot spots and parking them near apartment complexes where a lot of people have no broadband service. Now, you might say Austin shining star of high Tech American cities. According to geese own Austin illustrates the biggest broadband problem of all the vast majority of Americans who don't have broadband Internet access is because they can't afford it because the price is too high. And sure enough, the U. S. Has the third most expensive broadband Internet in the developed world. Mostly because there's not much competition. It's just a money problem and not a problem of putting wires in the ground. We should be complaining about both the lack of actual network infrastructure. In many places, but also the cost. The thing is, we fix problems like this before. In 1930 for only 11% of rural Americans had electricity. President Franklin Roosevelt created the rural Electrification Administration. New lines going up almost everywhere. At the rate of 500 miles a day, and within 20 years, 90% of those homes had cheap, reliable electricity. Now. Over the years, the government has come up with a basket of programs designed to help with Internet affordability and accessibility. Unfortunately, sewn says they haven't always worked as designed. The FCC has now for well over a decade paid out tens of billions of dollars to rule broadband companies to build Internet access. In places where there isn't any And the fact of the matter is is that the government has gotten a very, very poor return on its investment. This FCC and I'll even say you know, the FCC that I work for has not done a very good job of demanding that these companies tell us what they've actually built with the money they've gotten. This is not making the FCC looked too good. I don't think it's incompetence. I think part of it is resource is you know the the FCC staff has shrunk enormously. In the last decade or so, where to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the FCC chairman a Jeep. I declined our request for an interview. But in a written response, the FCC says We ensure efficient cost effective spending on subsidies for rural broadband. Earlier this year, Congress passed a law requiring the FCC to improve the way it measures Internet access. But the FCC says that nothing will happen unless Congress also pays for it. The FCC simply does not have the $65 million we need to start the process and implement that law through its first year. Meanwhile, the agency is promoting new technologies like five g, cellular and low earth orbit satellites that might address our broadband problems someday. But for now, most seem to agree on one thing. Especially these days, the Internet should be considered a necessity.

FCC Austin Congress President Franklin Roosevelt Texas Electrification Administration Chairman
"low earth orbit" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"low earth orbit" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Yeah this is crazy SpaceX has another launch planned for tomorrow night tomorrow night at Cape Canaveral they're gonna watch another of batch of those starlink internet satellites up lunch time the launch window opens at eight fifty five tomorrow night but SpaceX is targeting a nine twenty five PM lunch tomorrow night this is gonna be an uncrewed I don't you guys know this but they don't call it on manta right because the old man woman thing it's not manned or unmanned its crude or uncrewed just thought you'd like to know that the word that they use not manned this will be an uncrewed launch and it's just another one of those sixty internet starlink internet satellites it's gonna litter low earth orbit and be visible from earth which is weird take forty to your listing Orlando's morning news updated weather in traffic for you every six minutes the five day forecast brought to you by pro Teck air conditioning and plumbing services well good morning Tom Terry it is way too early Joe to have three names systems in the Atlantic basin road which just barely started the hurricane season but we're gonna be watching what will be Chris Stovall for the bulk of this week perhaps even into the first for the weekend as I said it's a long way from Florida we don't really have much impact from it today we will see a widely scattered showers mainly this morning that this afternoon partly cloudy only mid eighties little breezy today as we head toward tomorrow some late day rain coming in but more likely the rain will be here for Thursday Friday with likely showers maybe a few heavy downpours as well as we'll be watching Cristobal in the southern Gulf of Mexico finally get pulled more toward the north nothing really brings the Florida directly but indirectly we're gonna be watching the outer circulation for a chance for rain at least three Saturday will keep you posted the extended five day forecast four times an hour I'm Tom Terry Tom now it is hazy sticky it is so muggy this morning how much it now it's it's seventy five degrees now to Landau severe weather station six touch Gerrity triple team traffic he's got is a scuba suit on it so wet up in the air this morning in our helicopter air one it's Eric brown two five four he's about to get a buy things a good shape there that such but I was talking about that it's all cloudy now so forget about the shades you're looking good in the downtown though west.

Cape Canaveral Orlando Tom Terry Chris Stovall Florida Cristobal Mexico Tom Terry Tom Eric brown Joe Atlantic basin Gerrity
"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

Liftoff

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

"The less him and i mission could not escape the curse of the agena okay the one thing the german i could not defeat was a gina the crew dr manually after a rendezvous radar failed and a climb to a higher altitude was cancelled due to a problem discovered in the gene is booster the crew ever was able to tell whether the two craft together while station keeping us again upping the stakes a little bit having a tethered between them in a more dangerous and more complex than just station keeping so they weren't weren't able to having they wanted to do but it also didn't try to kill them so i guess that's a that's a fair balance eugene as the worst i'm just worst a lot of more science took place on the flight including experiments with the effects of low gravity on frog eggs interest in space frogs space frogs and a lot more photography of course many many pictures and they splashdown on november fifteen 1966 ending the run of gem an i missions that's it we're all done november 66 there is interest shown by several parties to use the gym and i platform for future missions advanced jim an i is a collection of proposals by mcdonnell aircraft to use an upgraded version of the capsule to fly assist lunar mission and even achieved accrued landing on the moon with the capsule itself all with less cost than apollo you know i never took advance show i i did intro digestion i i just bailed out manage that i stuck with it interesting idea where they're just saying look hey we built this mcdonnell aircraft i assume built the gym and i kept so i therefore is like now his use this just keep using a this it'll be great and they did not win the apolo contract.

mcdonnell aircraft lunar mission apolo
"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

Liftoff

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

"Good so collins among the things he was tasked with was further testing the handheld maneuvering unit found on earlier missions this is the jet pack basically he traveled to the agena but he couldn't find a place to grab onto the spacecraft the ajc i'm you failed after about thirty nine minutes abuse and therefore that was the end of the eva they had to you he had a tether 54 tether which is great 'cause you don't wanna afloat away in outer space when your age asia mu fales nbc lost forever nice habitat rather unfortunately this fifty tether was a bear to get back in the spacecraft and so they did what no camper should ever do which is they just unhooked it and threw it away and went back inside so there's a fifty for tether out there somewhere it's a with the micro media meteorite collector altogether just hanging out jim an itin included ironically ten science experiments looking at radiation levels eloquence of the use of film cameras and space and more of the capsule carry spektr spectrometers to look at potential radiation doses again because of their height they are further away from the protection of the earth's atmosphere and they wanted to make sure that hey if within this guy's of the movie the not gonna comeback cooked um that i want well jim an itin splashed down after just three days a very busy three days in space just three miles from target at brings us to german i eleven we move on september 1966 these just keep coming fast and furious don't die when it was july and now it's the temper were back this peak konrad who again you will hear about more down the road and richard gordon on board they repeated jim and i 10 sequence of docking with the agena and using its motor to raise up at the apogee went up to eight hundred fifty miles.

collins konrad jim richard gordon three days thirty nine minutes
"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

Liftoff

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

"This season because it's not just a pilot episode they're going up there they bought the whole season so they'll they'll they'll cast it and make it whole season worth and then release it somewhere owned by apple some time so you know just put a book marken net that run rumour is coming back into sciencefiction with a space race all history thing and that could be cool this episode of liftoff is brought to you by square space inner the offer code liftoff at checkout to get 10 percent off your first purchase you should make your next move with square space they let you create a website for your next idea get a unique domain name yet to use awardwinning templates and much more may be to create an online store maybe you're looking to showcase your work in a portfolio or maybe you want to be like jason and write the next big blog square space is an all one platform diligence do just that end there's nothing to install there's no security patches to worry about new upgrades needed you'd have to worry about that stuff because square space they've got it covered they have awardwinning 247 customer support if you need help they allow you to quickly and easily grab a unique domain name and you get access to all those awardwinning templates their beautifully designed for you to show off your great ideas we use square space at relay for our blog and our merchandise store and it makes all of that stuff super easy i'm really busy i didn't want to have to worry about running an ecommerce store and worry about credit card processing and a design that works square space does handles at all so i can go about my business scores base plans start at just twelve dollars a month but you dear listeners can start trial with no credit card required by going to square space dot com and when you do decide to sign up because i know you will you can use the offer code off to get ten percent off your first purchase and to show support for the show we think square space.

apple domain name jason customer support twelve dollars ten percent 10 percent
"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

Liftoff

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

"That'd be pretty cool it would be cool little bonus all right the nfl which point i think it's like peanut and cashew or something that go to another nut in in order to be that's the whole nut theme is about that it's mix nuts out there in the triple a may i think he's going to do it you've got to go all the way right he can't yeah gut gutted all the way pena and cashew and then they'll be another little body and they'll say well that's almond and they're just going to go with it that's i think that i'm i'm in favor of the nut theme for this object but i don't get to just what you vote you can kind of help choose you can help jeez yeah i guess that's true so at one more thing mrs an this is lift off related in a way and so i wanted to mention it it's come the world's colliding here um so apple is launching a video service at some point we assume because they're the hired tv executives and they're buying a lot of shows and we went to at least mention one of their shows that apple has now purchased is from run more who was the guy who did the relaunch of battle stargell acta and currently does out lander on stars and he worked on star trek for a long time in the nineties and he is back with a show who's premise is what if the space race never ended so if you can imagine something that's probably set in something similar to the present day although it's possible that it's that in the future but an alternate history where the soviets slice russians in the us and who knows who else continued to try and one up each other in outer space and end up so presumably this is going to be a world where you know the moon has been explored in other parts of the solar system have been explored and we don't know anything about it other than the base premise but it's intriguing to mention the space race and talk about what if it never ended any way that's all we know they'll presumably cast people in and say more about it at some point and give it how long it takes to make television check back in late 2018 or i don't know probably 2019 when.

apple us solar system nfl pena
"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

Liftoff

02:22 min | 4 years ago

"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

"And it turns out that this is the answer is that there is obviously an upwelling of heat from deep inside the jupiter atmosphere we don't know how deep that is helping drive this now why that upwelling is there and maybe it's just kind of a random part of the process of jupiter what we said adding our last show is that which you know has really taught a lotta people who are a scientist studying jupiter is that there is a whole lot that has not understood about the processes of jupiter and juneau's giving us a lot of data insiders love this right a lot of data that they have to look at and go wwhy does it do it this way like why but now we we have an idea that this great red spot is not just a wide like we already knew but it is deep it is coming from way down inside jupiter um so that's that's pretty cool our friend which is i don't think is a name yet and unlike they fret that up but 2014 in you sixty nine everyone's favourite soon soon to be called peanut probably yeah that's good one is new horizons second target new year's of nine of next year uh yeah new year's twenty nine nineteen while we're still be in the apollo series then we'll still be here they will be so it looks like 2014 immi sixty nine may have a small moon said this is uh looking again at the same sort of thing we're looking at an extra planets looking at at the at the dip in light as an object passes in front of a star to visit these stores are way in the background but there are a images captured over the last year three of them uh that seem to indicate that there is a a small moon uh out here with this object now it may be that this object is actually kind of two there that are uh basically spinning around each other you know in as opposed to like what we think about our moon but uh it it makes this a binary system and we could suggest some things that you could explain some things about its orbit that have been previously unexplained um and it means of that flyby could be uh could be of two two bodies and not just one.

scientist juneau
"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

Liftoff

02:10 min | 4 years ago

"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

"Getting close to being ready to go and they haven't they haven't watched their the next few vehicle yet oh i am i do have some real time follow up a blow away i've i looked it up so so it looks like space x is planning to launch their crude version of the dragon capsule it's currently in set for april and the idea is they're going to fly it and docket with the iss and an undocking and bring it back and do the whole thing with no people on it there are also going to then follow that with an inflight abort test because they wanna they want to shoot it off and then handle at abort so that it it it you the contest the seeming i jesse jackson seat legitimate i would wouldn't it we'll see we'll see how it goes and then boeing is the other player here boeing is also planning sort of in summer to do a star liner flight test and then um and then it sounds like leader in the year spacex and boeing are both hoping to do crude flight tests so you know with space stuff everything slips but it might be the 2018 as the year we get some real commercial crew action going on i hopes emited you will tell us about what's going on gina yeah really who quick one of the great red spot turns out is not just great it is deep at least two hundred miles deep and may be a lot more this is one of those things that we didn't really know before juno which is quite how big and how deep the storm is the huge red spot on jupiter that's just a giant storm bigger than the earth a lot bigger than the earth and we can only see the club tops but now we can we can see deeper with juno and found that it is at least two hundred miles deep but that's as far as you can see it may be deeper this actually solves one of the questions about the great red spot which is that it is warmer then it should be which is probably like hurricanes this is what's powering it is that all that energy all that heat energy.

real time iss boeing spacex juno jesse jackson
"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

Liftoff

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

"Space x went out and hired some young freshfaced people to anchor their broadcast turns out no they are these are young fresh race people who are space x employees in rocket scientists which is great and the other thing i noticed as they've done so many of these that i feel like they keep trying to find new ways of showing their launch so for this launch they stayed on the ground camera and a part of this is the weather cooperating because you know and i know from going to launches at at kennedy space center that in florida there's a lot of moisture and there are a lot of clouds and sometimes they'll be clouds in the area we had a we have overcast layer for the shuttle launch ripe and so it's hard you've got to be lucky to follow a rocket up far in with with it staying in the shot of your camera they got lucky because this launch basically they took a camera angle from the ground following it all the way to stage separation or you could actually see the first stage do the separation and it was sacked burn which is you know we know that it happens and we've seen it from on board but this was the whole way from the ground and then they flipped over to kind of like the internal cameras that was pretty great because that's not something that i i think i've seen before where they just kept that angle um because you know for any weight for variety sake i think is why they did it which is funny that they've done so many of these now that they're doing that but also the clouds cooperated so uh yeah it was great so space x proceeds apace we just got we just got to get the the falcon nine right the dollar though the falconheaded has to has to go which is early in 2018 so that's the next uh stage as it were for space x i guess but these are still progressing and then hopefully i haven't heard any any worried about what's going on in terms of.

kennedy space center florida
"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

Liftoff

02:26 min | 4 years ago

"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

"Yeah and if it gets us toward bars i think that's great because i think that's where we have tried to go but um but the moon has lots of things interesting things about it so we could do that too i moon base alpha me up not personally amok in general the idea of that you've got this jason he can do it so another preflight checklist item what can't google do it's good question this is an interesting story so a google used its machinelearning technology we talk about this when we talk about tech on our other podcasts to analyze data from kepler so kepler as listen to this podcast probably know is the is the satellite that is searching for xl planets and the problem with searching for exa planets is what you're looking for is faint changes in a light from a star because the way kepler works is a planet goes in front of its star and it slightly dims the star by blocking part of the light from the surface and that's how you detect exa planets using this method so what nasa did was trained it's machine learning technology on kepler data with known extra planets confirmed extra planets and then ran it on all the kepler data and it found a couple of extra planets that had not been confirmed to before so there's a new uh in a system it already had seven planets that had been detected there was an eight the planet detected which is keppler ninety i orbits at star every fourteen point four days and that was detected by googles machine learning and i think this is an interesting story that is not i mean it's great for google but it's it's not told as much as it probably is going to be told that using machinelearning like there's so much data from telescopes there's so much data and astronomers already are using techniques to like complicated computer techniques to find signal in the noise but this is like a whole other level on that and there's going to be more awarded right 'cause like that like like so much of of finding objects in deep space it you know like a keiper belt objects and things is looking at is lining up images of the same part of the sky.

jason google nasa kepler googles four days
"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

Liftoff

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

"The mark mars is a big step and if we want to go back to the moon and spent more time there it's a lot easier to get to the moon but it's still not earth orbit and so there's a lot we can learn from there and this time unlike apollo using the moon as a as a lab four also going to mars and thinking about it as a steppingstone is a good way to get to mars so plus the mood is close and with modern technology it's entirely possible that we could do a lot on the moon that we couldn't do in 1974 all the people who say you know we we've receded so much in terms of space ticket we can't go to the moon and we could in the early seventies in late '60s today's technology we could potentially do a whole lot more on the surface and create a base there and a right and and i have a transfer point and have ships go out and use are sort of knowledge that we built up with things like the iss to do that a lunar space which then leads to the doing it march in space but you know you got to start somewhere and you've got to put a stake in the ground and then you did you actually have to stick with that policy so my my hesitation here if i have any is that the nice thing about if this was i really wish that that we had at least a little bit of bipartisanship in terms of space policy only because that's the thing that hurts us the most is that is this jerking back and forth between different governments so we'll see if this one sticks can say better i think i think that's the fundamental frustration i have as well that we scant faris and get on the same page about it so i'm not oppose like a definite opposed to lunar missions i think my complaint islam with aligned with yours i just want a direction that sticks long enough to do something.

iss faris
"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

Liftoff

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

"Then we can practise going out to it and and then a navy use that as the gateway to land on the moon and then once we've done that then we can start talking about going to asteroid or putting one of those around mars and then going to mars and orbiting mars and then then send people down onto the surface of mars right like take those steps and kind of a roll out a a multistep process that can start sooner because once the ball is rolling i feel like uh this all becomes more real and then it's harder to kinda like say no no no no no we're not gonna do it this way we're going to do with is totally different way of course also part of me thinks this is all just rearranging deck shit jack chairs not sorry to use the titanic metaphor here but what i mean by that is it's like we're just every the reason that these things can keep going back and forth right now is that nothing is happening because the the rockets required to take us there are are still in development very slowly like we haven't seen it and so we have to wait for that so we can argue all we want about like where we go next and and we should make a decision and stick with it but the truth is that it's a little bit academic i think when we don't have the ability in the next couple of years to actually do any of it because we just don't have iraq it's to dig were in such early stages to degree it does it doesn't matter.

"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

Liftoff

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

"More or less carry over but there are a lot of things that need to be put in place still like a lunar lander um you know there's questions about uh the deep space gateway what where what its status is in this new plan i've read some conflicting things about that i'm not sure anyone actually has the final say that being a a space station insists lunar space in a beyond low earth orbit absottly question still it's still in his was only signed about a week and a half ago so there's a lot of home was it will be coming out over the coming months of individual pieces needed uh and i'm curious you know what what do you think about as we've been talking about this feel like cents for the last nine or ten months how do you feel now that is finally here i dunno i mean again it feels like this is just restating what we've already heard so it's just another it's just another step in the process i did laugh at the nasa story a that says the policy grew from an an a unanimous recommendation by the national space council that felt a little like a like a a an election in the communist country rate it was unanimous said the people who were all appointed by the same guy to do the same things like all right yeah big shocker my problem with this is what we've talked about before which is every time there is a change of hands of the executive branch of the us government this space policy change changes and so you go from we're going to mars we're going to moon we're going to mars were going to the moon.

national space council nasa executive us ten months
"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

Liftoff

02:12 min | 4 years ago

"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

"German planes coming and taking cover and when they started firing rockets that were faster than the speed of sound the first thing that you would hear is the explosion and even more eery after the explosion you would then hear the sound of the rocket at getting closer to you because of the way that the speed of sound works which is super eerie like everybody would hear the rocket coming after the explosion super i never read a detail i had before was wild snuff so they'll yap will will will dig into that stuff in the new year and will let everybody know what we're going to do that but there's a lot of funds turns out space is best so we got plenty zia and we're gonna talk a little bit about some more recent news than the v2 edits and it's work okay so trump has signed a lunar directive so this has been cummings is not a surprise that the space council run by trump's vice president mike pence has been talking about um a pausing the the mars stuff and going back to the moon uh first maybe only but at least you know hopefully first this is kind of a mixed bag of news because it's really a one hand this this drastically changes yet again which we can talk about what nasa is working on what they are prioritising but on the other hand like there's one sentence in this press release from nasa that says it all work towards the new directive will be reflected in nasser's fiscal year 2019 budget request next year so this isn't something that is changing a bunch of stuff today an end to it agreed that's all right because the sos an orion were already on well as ontrack as they are sites that that conversation today as ontrack as they are they could they're being built to do either and so they don't have like radically change direction with sls to to go to the moon and fuck there were building something that go to mars but not go to the moon because the moon is closer and easier to get to the work they are doing now will.

cummings trump vice president mike pence nasa press release nasser ontrack sls fiscal year one hand
"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

Liftoff

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"low earth orbit" Discussed on Liftoff

"An episode about uh about the soviet space program in the early days and then hopefully maybe another episode about the early draze days of american rocketry lake leading up to those rockets that they put people on and sent him into space so i think some some of that early days kind of stuff maybe will do a little bit of historical stuff on those in the new year because i'm i'm really i finally found a book that gives me what i want in terms of uh it's called space race we can put a lincoln michelle notes at people should read it it's it's really good but we'll go we'll also go into some more detail about that sort of stuff uh saddam and in a sense essentially good i'm excited about about starting this book you sent me a copy of the day so thank you for that yes it's it's a i i got i waited until i was like twenty percent into it is it's like well it could turn that exact ademi i shouldn't send this to steven yet and finally i read through one part and i was like i'm just sitting mr steven now there's also bbc a docudrama on net flicks called space race that is this book was like the companion to that and i haven't watched it yet but i'm gonna i'm gonna watch that too because i'm pretty effort four episodes but it's a it was good find 'cause i don't have any memory of this at all and of and it's just like a cheap kindle book sounds like maybe they did a high prestige version of this when the bbc show aired and then it looks like maybe even the rights went back to the author and that the author could sell it like without any of the photos are anything but she could sell it like just as the text of the book so it's like four dollars or something on amazon it's really good it's really good if people are interested in the history of of rocketry and the quite honestly a lot of its bins out of the german scientists who ended up building the vg rockets during world war two and and i learned some things about like the v2 rockets that i i didn't even know before like how you during the blitz the british got really good at hearing the.

space program saddam world war lincoln michelle mr steven bbc amazon twenty percent four dollars