22 Burst results for "Louisville Curiel"

"louisville courier" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

01:31 min | 3 months ago

"louisville courier" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"This morning. A new partnership was announced between google and ge. Maybe the first time. I've ever mentioned ge on the show but it's ge appliances specifically and this is to build out smart appliance capability. So you can see how that would make sense. Quoting the louisville courier journal. Which i believe is the first time i've ever heard from them. As well. quote continuing on the momentum of recently launched new refrigeration line louisville based ge appliances is partnering with google cloud to focus on bolstering the manufacturers smart appliances capabilities. The two companies announced thursday the multi year deal folds into the louisville based organizations multi cloud strategy said shah chief digital officer of ge appliances a higher company cloud computing provides computer system resources like processing and storage without direct active management by the user shah said in an interview with the career journal that ge appliances currently works with amazon web services and oracle cloud infrastructure. The partnership with google cloudy said we'll leverage the california based platforms data capabilities shazad. Ge appliances plans to be proactive with intelligence collected through google cloud such as learning potential issues with appliances alerting customers and finding potential solutions. Ge appliances is constantly looking for ways to improve consumer experience. Shaw said for example. He mentioned that through cloud computing. The company was able to roll out an update to remotely add air fryer capabilities to two hundred thousand ovens and ranges just this past april and

ge louisville courier journal google ge appliances louisville shah
GE Appliances and Google Announce Partnership

Techmeme Ride Home

01:31 min | 3 months ago

GE Appliances and Google Announce Partnership

"This morning. A new partnership was announced between google and ge. Maybe the first time. I've ever mentioned ge on the show but it's ge appliances specifically and this is to build out smart appliance capability. So you can see how that would make sense. Quoting the louisville courier journal. Which i believe is the first time i've ever heard from them. As well. quote continuing on the momentum of recently launched new refrigeration line louisville based ge appliances is partnering with google cloud to focus on bolstering the manufacturers smart appliances capabilities. The two companies announced thursday the multi year deal folds into the louisville based organizations multi cloud strategy said shah chief digital officer of ge appliances a higher company cloud computing provides computer system resources like processing and storage without direct active management by the user shah said in an interview with the career journal that ge appliances currently works with amazon web services and oracle cloud infrastructure. The partnership with google cloudy said we'll leverage the california based platforms data capabilities shazad. Ge appliances plans to be proactive with intelligence collected through google cloud such as learning potential issues with appliances alerting customers and finding potential solutions. Ge appliances is constantly looking for ways to improve consumer experience. Shaw said for example. He mentioned that through cloud computing. The company was able to roll out an update to remotely add air fryer capabilities to two hundred thousand ovens and ranges just this past april and

Ge Appliances Louisville Courier Journal GE Google Louisville Shah Career Journal Shazad Oracle Amazon California Shaw
"louisville courier" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"louisville courier" Discussed on WTVN

"You're listening to America's first news this weekend with Gordon Deal well, with the Corona virus pandemic raging courthouses across the nation. Have gone to virtual hearings conducted over the Internet, sometimes with hilarious results. Andy Wolfson, reporter at the Louisville Courier Journal is here with examples. Andy, What did you find? I found that especially early on A lot of times lawyers and their clients were not really, um Ready for prime time in terms of their appearance and dress in these zoom court hearings. Good lawyers, not brief the clients in some cases, actually, a couple case seemed like the lawyers didn't even brief themselves. I'm not sure what advice they gave their clients. But one lawyer said her client appeared in a bikini at poolside for her hearing, and the lawyer said that this client is now a former client. Anybody explains some kind of thought processes to why somebody would appear in the beginning poolside for court hearing. Is that like is that a protest of some kind? No, I think it's just because they could. Well, there was another woman who I guess paraded around naked. Perhaps unknowingly. I know that leased to I think they're both defendants or released their litigants. They both appeared naked. Jeez. And then what else did you encounter here? What else Raise your eyebrows is you were hearing these stories. I think I was surprised some of the lawyers We're, um Drinking alcohol during hearings. One of them was smoking a cigar. Although the judge in that case said she thought that was great. The judge thought it was great. Yes, it is. I have no issues with the lawyer lighting up since it wasn't in the courthouse. Oh, my goodness. Speaking with Andy Wolfson, reporter at the Louisville Courier Journal, he's written a funny piece entitled Virtual Court Hearings in 2020 Have it all nudity, beer, bikinis and barking dogs. What about like the headlines suggest that the barking dogs Well, I think we've all experienced that in, uh, remote meetings in hearings. I've had my dog wandering Tonto to several. Yeah, me too. There were some cases, though, where it seemed like the virtual court hearings were were productive. Yeah, one of the judges who Handles mental health hearings, including mental health inquest, said that parties with mental issues where more comfortable appearing remotely s so that they didn't have to go to the courthouse and Appear in front of strangers, and this judge said she might try to continue continue this after the pandemic is over. Well What else stood out as you were pulling all this together. With the first remote hearing I wrote about back in the spring. Judge repeatedly muted criminal defense attorney for a song of seven minutes of the time because she didn't like what he was saying. And, uh, he tried to get a friend out the case by the State Supreme Court and was not successful, but I think criminal defense lawyers say that these remote hearings do not satisfy The Sixth Amendment requirement. Tonto allow defendants to confront witnesses against them. Thanks Andy Andy Wilson, reporter at the Louisville Courier Journal Coming up next saying goodbye to 2020 with flames..

Louisville Courier Journal Andy Andy Wilson Andy Wolfson reporter State Supreme Court Gordon Deal America attorney
"louisville courier" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"louisville courier" Discussed on KOMO

"About £2 of rock and soil collected from an asteroid is ready to head back to Earth, and NASA officials said a sample from the asteroid venue that was collected by the Oh so serious Rex spacecraft has been successfully sealed in a protective reentry capsule, which will return to Earth in 2023. Come on. It's time now. 10 46, a police officer who was wounded in the raid that killed Briana Taylor is suing the 26 year old Auntie's boyfriend. He is the face of law enforcement in this divisive case out of Kentucky when they say her name Briana Taylor, who even the police now agree, should never have been killed in her home. Jonathan Mattingly was the officer leading the charge outside her door. The 47 year old is suing the victim's boyfriend who fired shots through the door. Thinking that the police were thieves. The police officer who was seriously wounded, is now suing Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, accusing him a battery assault and intentional emotional distress. It was in the middle of the night on March, 13th and the officers say they loudly announced themselves before trying to break into the apartment with a no knock warrant. But Walker, who was a legal gun owner, told investigators that he and Taylor asked who was at the door several times and heard no answer and that he only fired a shot when he says All the door break open. In this countersuit. Mattingly says that he nearly died and needed five hours of surgery and that Walker acted recklessly and firing his pistol in the direction of the police officers who were serving a search warrant and that his conduct was outrageous and tolerable and offends all accepted standards of decency and morality He called racist. Are you racist? No. But I mean, I was a victim in this as well. My family has been a victim in this. They have had to go on hiding. They have had death threats. In an exclusive interview with ABC News in the Louisville Courier Journal last week, Mattingly says he believes Walker deserves some of the blame for his girlfriend's death. The impossible situation that Kenneth Walker put her in that hallway. With this narrow hallway shooting from it him diving out. I'm assuming she was trying to follow him in the room. I don't know that for sure. But that's that's what makes sense. He put her in a impossible situation. Do you feel Kenneth Walker is responsible for her death? I think there's a few people responsible. Think he is. Walker filed his lawsuit against police in September. Criminal charges against him were dropped with prejudice, which means he could still be charged again. Charges brought against me were meant to silence me and cover up his murder..

Kenneth Walker officer Briana Taylor Jonathan Mattingly NASA Rex Louisville Courier Journal ABC News Kentucky assault murder
Louisville police sergeant involved in Breonna Taylor raid says she ‘didn’t deserve to die’

Chicago's Afternoon News

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Louisville police sergeant involved in Breonna Taylor raid says she ‘didn’t deserve to die’

"Magically says her death had nothing to do with race, He tells the Louisville Courier Journal. Taylor and her boyfriend knew it was police at the door, he said. Everyone knows a police knock. Mattingly was shot that night and was one of three officers who returned fire. Sonoma County Wine Trade Group is estimating about 30% of this year's wine grape crop was

Sonoma County Wine Trade Group Louisville Courier Journal Mattingly Taylor
Anonymous grand juror in Breonna Taylor case speaks out saying homicide charges weren't offered

This Morning With Gordon Deal

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Anonymous grand juror in Breonna Taylor case speaks out saying homicide charges weren't offered

"A grand juror in the Briana Taylor case, releasing a statement saying the panel was never given a chance to consider homicide charges in their death. Meanwhile, Jonathan Mattingly, one of the officers involved in the police, shooting death, telling ABC News and the Louisville Courier Journal about his frustrations with how he and his fellow officers have been portrayed. This is not relatable to George Floyd. There's nothing like it. It's not a model bury. It's nothing like it. It's not a race thing like people want to try to make it to be Mattingly saying the cops were doing their job during the No knock warrant, he says Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, Open fire is police entered, so they returned

Jonathan Mattingly Briana Taylor George Floyd Louisville Courier Journal Abc News Kenneth Walker
"louisville courier" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"louisville courier" Discussed on KGO 810

"You know, he gave me a message to my uncle. And he says that he loves you and misses you. In the next day, like the next morning after hearing that he best New York's governor, asking people from New Jersey, Connecticut and Pennsylvania to only come to his state, if absolutely necessary. Those bordering states now meet the covert infection criteria to be added to the travel advisory list. A grand juror in the Briana Taylor case, releasing a statement, saying the panel was never given a chance to consider homicide charges in their death. Meanwhile, Jonathan Mattingly, one of the officers involved in the police, shooting death, telling ABC News and the Louisville Courier Journal about his frustrations with how he and his fellow officers have been portrayed. This is not relatable toe. George Floyd, This is nothing like it. It's not a model bury. It's nothing like it. It's not a race thing like people want to try to make it to be Mattingly saying the cops were doing their job during the No knock warrant, he says Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, Open fire is police entered, so they returned fire. You're listening to ABC News. Balance of nature's fruits and vegetables in a capsule changing the world. One life at a time. The product that you've given me here is as far as I'm concerned, sent to me from heaven. I love it a great deal. It's hard to find anything that's really that I days they enjoy it immensely. It's making my life so much better. I feel so much better. And during this pandemic, I have no worries whatsoever. My immune system is gotta be at a top notch level. I don't seem to get Colds or anything. I.

Jonathan Mattingly ABC News Briana Taylor Kenneth Walker George Floyd Louisville Courier Journal Colds New York New Jersey Pennsylvania Connecticut
"louisville courier" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"louisville courier" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Shapiro. Sure got a big hour coming up for you little bit later on in the hour. We'll be joined by Ami Horowitz, who's on the ground live in Louisville, where he can tell us About the latest dangerous place. He has decided to go despite the advice of his wife in just a little while, but we begin, of course, with the unrest in Louisville itself. So last night, two police officers were shot. They were shot after the largely peaceful protest. Reuters called them largely peaceful protest that morphed into violence. Who could have predicted such a thing? I mean, after months of mostly peaceful protest, morphing randomly into tremendously violent events. Who could have predicted such a thing? Apparently one model to cocktail was also once it's been, it's been good times over in Louisville. Now, All of this was perfectly predictable, perfectly predictable. For months. I've been saying on this show. The Briana Taylor officers would not be charged in the death of Briana Taylor, One of the officers was charged for reckless use of a firearm because in firing into reality in his apartment, he also fired into adjoining apartments and such But none of the officers is charged with anything having to do with Brandy Taylor's death, which makes sense, because the fact pattern never back charges ever hate lawyers who've been following this know this. There are articles in the Louisville Courier Journal Going back months talking about how there was no legal case against these police officers. Why had a no knock warrant on the apartment? Apparently not anyway. They apparently not themselves as the police. The man inside with Briana Taylor fired at them. As they came through the door. They returned fire and Rianna Taylor was killed. That is a tragedy. It is not a crime. There's a difference between tragic bad things happening and crime. In order to charge these officers. You would have to say one. They knew that they were not under threat, which clearly is not true, since one of them was actually shot. And two that they bust into the apartment knowing full well that the warrant was no good, so they had no right to be there in the first place. Also not true. Here is the actual story. What happened? Rianna Taylor. See we here at the bench Trapero. Shall we like to examine fact patterns to determine whether they fulfill the requirements of a particular narrative in the media? They don't bother to do this in the media. They're just like, you know what doesn't matter what the fact pattern is. If a narrative Is more important. The facts don't matter. So we'll just say the Briana Taylor was shot in cold blood by the cops for no apparent reason other than her race doesn't matter that not one element of that statement is true. Not one I will say it anyway. So here the actual fact such a good rundown of this over at Evey magazine by broken Conrad Talking about what actually happened with Briana Tow. This goes back to August of 2020. A lengthy internal report shows Briana Taylor's close connection with convicted drug dealer a connection that eventually led to her death. Report, obtained by Louisville Courier Journal, contains phone conversations between several individuals and drug traffickers connected to Taylor and or her former boyfriend, DaMarcus Lover. Americans have heard a very disturbing narrative about the tragic death of Briana Taylor. Blackie Mt was sleeping in her apartment when cops broke into her place thinking it was a different apartment and shot her in her sleep. Activist took to the streets. Social media Exploded with demands for justice for the wrongful killing of yet another black American by racist cops. However, the real story seems to contradict the one that has flooded social media over the last several months, Contrary to initial reports and release the conversations show police had good reason to answer Taylor's apartment on March 13th not loudly before entering the apartment and only began firing after Taylor's most recent boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, fired the first shot. Officer. Stray bullets hit Taylor in the hallway leading to her death. Taylor Association with Glover was initially disputed, according to the Louisville Courier Journal. But according to the report, there association dates back at least a 2016 when the cops asked Taylor about a dead body found in her rental car. She said she didn't know about it, but that Glover often drove her car. The dead man was the brother of an individual with whom Glover had been arrested numerous times. At the time, Taylor told the officers she'd been dating Glover for three or four months. Report also notes that in 2017 Taylor posted bond for Glover on two pending cases. The record also shows that Glover called Taylor 26. Times from jail between January 2016 in January, 2020. On January. 3rd 2020 lover told Taylor he planned to come over for the night. Sure applied when you're around. I stress more because I just always be worried about you not like with you and bleed to me and women be word but just period with the police, like all kinds of leap. They both ended the call saying, I love you. Media reports initially questioned whether police had good reason to answer Taylor's apartment. No illicit cash or drugs were found in her house, then report shows that officer suspected Glover may have used Taylor's address, where he also resided two male narcotics. On one occasion, detective snap pictures of Glover taking a suspected U..

Briana Taylor Louisville Courier Journal Glover Taylor Association Louisville Officer Briana Tow Reuters Ami Horowitz Shapiro. Blackie Mt DaMarcus Lover Conrad Kenneth Walker
Amid claims of 'political favoritism,' FBI is asking questions about former Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin's pardons

Glenn Beck

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

Amid claims of 'political favoritism,' FBI is asking questions about former Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin's pardons

"Controversial parts by outgoing Kentucky governor Matt Bevin reportedly raise the interest of the F. B. I.'s Kentucky state representative Chris Harris told reporters he was contacted last week by an FBI criminal investigator about governor Matt Bevin Spartans Harris a Democrat said he was under the impression and investigation against the former Republican governor was ramping up the FBI has not commented Bevin pardoned or commuted the sentence of more than six hundred and fifty people before leaving office including Patrick Baker who was serving a nineteen year sentence for reckless homicide and robbery the Louisville courier journal reported Baker's brother held a campaign fundraiser for Bevin in

Matt Bevin Chris Harris Investigator FBI Patrick Baker Louisville Courier Journal Kentucky State Representative Matt Bevin Spartans Harris Robbery
Former Kentucky governor Matt Bevin under fire for issuing 660 pardons

NBC Nightly News

00:40 sec | 2 years ago

Former Kentucky governor Matt Bevin under fire for issuing 660 pardons

"Former governor of Kentucky Matt Bavin is facing a fierce backlash tonight for pardoning or commuting. The sentences of hundreds of people including murderers rapists the sister of one murder victim saying Bavin can rot in Hell. Here's Peter Alexander Tonight just days after leaving office former Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin is under fire for issuing four hundred the twenty eighth pardons and commutations. According to the Louisville Courier Journal among those Bevan pardoned a man convicted of raping a nine-year-old child another who hired a Hitman to kill was business partner a man who killed his parents and a man who beheaded a woman before stuffing her in a barrel governor

Matt Bavin Kentucky Matt Bevin Louisville Courier Journal Peter Alexander Murder Bevan Partner Nine-Year
"louisville courier" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

06:10 min | 2 years ago

"louisville courier" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"With a barn would thieves have been stealing Kentucky memory's not what's in them. But to feed a growing desire for the farmhouse shiek popularized by programming on HGTV. The thieves are taking ancient weathered barn wood, and using it to make a new house. Look old. Here's this morning. Jennifer Kushinka, reclaimed wood is having a moment, and that's causing some problems in states, like Kentucky, which has more old barns per square mile than any other state tested Duval of the Louisville courier journal, has taken a look at a growing problem related to this would it's theft and joins us now Tessa, whose stripping old barns of weathered wood. So folks across the state, this has been a problem and more than a dozen counties across Kentucky and it's been going on for several years. So you know what I'm hearing from sheriffs across the Commonwealth is that whether barn would is basically the new copper. So when folks. Come across Barnes, that might be off main roads or look like you know, no one's really keeping an eye on them. You know, fiv see an opportunity to go and take this would and then turn around and sell it for a pretty significant profit in some cases Tessa. Are they targeting abandoned, looking buildings, or kind of is source, so no, people drive through parts of rural America? You know, they do see Barnes falling down on the side of the road. And those aren't really attractive to thieves. You know, if the wood is rotting, there's no resale value in that. And additionally, they don't want to hit Barnes center on main roads because if someone drives by, you know, sees you know, sees lights on at a bar at two in the morning. And you know, that's a pretty good indication that, you know, there may be no good going on at that barn. So really they're kind of on back roads being hit the middle of the night or if they are on a main road. Feazel pull around to the back side. And, you know, hit the back of the barn, where it won't be seen by passersby Tessa. What about this would makes it so popular? So right now, reclaimed wood is a huge design trade that actually has been for several years. I mean if you watch HDTV or you go on Pinterest or at sea. I mean, there's just ideas for what can be done with reclaimed wood and bourbon barrels and barn wood. And, you know, you name it, there's probably a some kind of trendy look that can be put together with reclaimed wood, and people also like the history of it. So, you know, talking to folks who, who work in, you know, wood processing, and interior design, you know, around Kentucky. They say will people like the, the history they like knowing that this is local that it's got a story. And also, you know associated with. Going green. You know, there's no need to cut down new trees. If we've got, you know, old would that also looks really cool that can be reused. We're speaking with Tessa Duval of the Louisville courier journal about people stealing wood from old barns Tessa, if I'm a thief, and I take this stuff. But what do I do with it? Where do I take it? It's not that hard to find folks who will take this one that you found. So there are, you know, lumber processing companies all over the state. You know there are some that operate more legitimately than others. So I've talked to folks who by reclaimed wood who will ask for a W nine from someone who's looking to sell, you know, they know the telltale signs of, you know boards, you know, looking ripped off the side of the barn. It's kind of a distinctive looked when it's a hurried down of a barn. But, you know, unfortunately there are there are still, you know, lumber yards that will take this would without, you know, kind of going through those steps, and checking from legitimacy, but a lot of places because this has been such an an ongoing problem. A lot of places are working with, you know, law enforcement in their communities and we'll post signs and say, you know, we won't buy your soul in water. You've gotta fill out a W nine or what have you because it is just such a problem Tessa are thieves getting caught. It's a hard kind of case to crack, you know, and they, they work in the middle of the night, and in rural communities. And you know it's, it's what? So there's, you know, you still someone die phone, and they can track you down from their computer while you steal their barn wood. And you've made off with part of their barred, there have been a few cases and they've largely been cracked by legit, you know, lumber processors who will let law enforcement know or by most of the, the sheriffs I've spoken to actually solved. Some of these cases are made arrests in these cases, they've been busted, because they're literally be caught in the barn with, you know, a pry bar and a hammer and rusty nails and their truck bed this morning. Jennifer Kushinka with test divall reporter at the Louisville courier journal, thirty minutes now, after the hour on This Morning, America's first news. It's eight thirty at News Radio eight ten one zero three one W G Y, militia Daniels a sobriety checkpoint in Schenectady county takes three drivers off the streets. Your top stories are next after your Memorial Day AccuWeather forecast. WG Y AccuWeather forecast. It will be partly sunny and comfortable today for Memorial.

Tessa Duval Louisville courier journal Kentucky Barnes Jennifer Kushinka HGTV Barnes center America theft Schenectady county Daniels Pinterest reporter eight ten one zero three one W thirty minutes
"louisville courier" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

05:58 min | 2 years ago

"louisville courier" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Are EC and ninety two point one FM. barn would the have been stealing Kentucky memory's not what's in them, but to feed a growing desire for the farmhouse shiek popularized by programming on HGTV. The thieves are taking ancient weathered barn wood, and using it to make a new house. Look old. Here's this morning. Jennifer Kushinka, reclaimed wood is having a moment, and that's causing some problems in states, like Kentucky, which has more old barns per square mile than any other state tested Duval of the Louisville courier journal, has taken a look at a growing problem related to this would it's theft and joins us now Tessa, who stripping old barns of weathered wood. So folks across the state, this has been a problem and more than a dozen counties across Kentucky and it's been going on for several years. So you know what I'm hearing from sheriffs across the Commonwealth is that whether barn would is basically the new copper so. So when folks come across Barnes, that might be off main roads or look like you know, no one's really keeping an eye on them. Fiv see an opportunity to go and take this would and then turn around and sell it for praising profit in some cases Tessa. Are they targeting abandoned, looking buildings, or kind of is source? So when people drive through parts of rural America, you know, they do see Barnes falling down on the side of the road. And those aren't really attractive to thieves. You know, if the wood is rotting, there's no resale value in that. And additionally, they don't want to hit Barnes that are on main roads because if someone drives by, you know, he's, you know, sees lights on at a barn at two in the morning. And you know, that's a pretty good indication that, you know, there may be no good going on at that bar. And so really they're kind of on back roads being hit the middle of the night or if they. Are on a main road will pull around to the back side. And, you know, hit the back of the barn, where it won't be seen by passersby to a what about this would makes it so popular. So right now reclaimed wood is a huge design trend and actually has been for several years. I mean if you watch HDTV or you go on Pinterest or at sea. I mean, there's just ideas for what can be done with reclaimed wood and bourbon barrels and barn wood. And, you know, you name it, there's probably a some kind of trendy look that can be put together with reclaimed wood, and people also like the history of it. So, you know, talking to folks who, who work in, you know what processing and interior design, you know, around Kentucky. They say will people like the, the history they like knowing that this is local that it's got a story. And also, you know, associated with going green, you know, there's no need to cut down new trees. If we've got, you know, old would that also looks really cool that can be reused. We're speaking with. Duval of the Louisville courier journal about people stealing wood from old barns Tessa, if I'm a thief, and I take this stuff. But what do I do with it? Where do I take it? It's not that hard to find folks who will take this one that you found. So there are, you know, lumber processing companies all over the state. You know there are some that operate more legitimately than others. So I've talked to folks who by reclaimed wood who will ask for a W nine from someone who's looking to sell, you know, they know the telltale signs of, you know boards, you know, looking ripped off the side of the barn. It's kind of a distinctive looked when it's a hurried down of a barn. But, you know, unfortunately there are there are still, you know, lumber yards that will take this would without, you know, kind of going through those steps, and checking from legitimacy, but a lot of places because this has been such an an ongoing. King problem, a lot of places are working with, you know, law enforcement in communities, and we'll post signs say, we won't buy your soul and would or you've gotta fill out a W nine or what have you because it is just such a problem Tessa are thieves getting caught. It's a hard kind of case to crack, you know, they, they work in the middle of the night, and in rural communities, and you know it's, it's what? So there's, you know, you still someone's iphone and they can track you down from their computer while you steal their barn wood. And you've made off with part of their barred, there have been a few cases and they've largely been cracked by legit, you know, lumber processors who will let law enforcement know or by most of the, the have spoken to actually solve some of these cases are made arrests in these cases. They've been busted because they're literally be caught in the barn with. You know, a pry bar and a hammer and rusty nails and their truck bed this morning. Jennifer Kushinka with test of all reporter, at the Louisville courier journal, thirty minutes now after the hour on This Morning, America's first news. Eighty six burglars were asked how they broke into home. So they all said they knocked on the door. I that's why you need blink x t to cameras they detect motion, so you'll get an alert and you.

Tessa Louisville courier journal Kentucky Barnes Jennifer Kushinka Duval America HGTV theft Pinterest reporter thirty minutes
"louisville courier" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

05:50 min | 2 years ago

"louisville courier" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Being a would thieves have been stealing Kentucky memory's not what's in them. But to feed a growing desire for the farmhouse shiek popularized by programming on HGTV. The thieves are taking ancient weathered barn wood, and using it to make a new house. Look old. Here's this morning. Jennifer Kushinka, reclaimed wood is having a moment, and that's causing some problems in states, like Kentucky, which has more old barns per square mile than any other state tested Duval of the Louisville courier journal, has taken a look at a growing problem related to this would it's theft and joins us now Tessa, who stripping old barns of weathered wood. So folks across the state, this has been a problem in more than a dozen counties across Kentucky and it's been going on for several years. So you know what I'm hearing from sheriffs across the Commonwealth is that whether barn. Would is basically the new copper. So when folks come across Barnes, that might be off main roads or look like you know, no one's really keeping an eye on them. You know, fiv see an opportunity to go and take this would and then turn around and sell it for a pretty significant profit in some cases Tessa. Are they targeting abandoned, looking buildings, or kind of is sores so when people drive through parts of rural America, you know, they do see Barnes falling down on the side of the road. And those aren't really attractive to thieves. You know, if the what is rotting, there's no resale value in that. And additionally, they don't want to hit Barnes center on main roads because if someone drives by you know, he's, you know, sees lights on a barn at two in the morning. And you know, that's a pretty good indication that, you know, there may be no good going on at that barn. So really they're kind of on back. Crowed being hit the middle of the night, or if they are on a main road diesel pull around to the back side. And, you know, hit the back of the barn, where it won't be seen by concerts by Tessa. What about this? What makes it so popular? So right now, reclaimed wood is a huge design trade and actually has been for several years. I mean if you watch HDTV or you go on Pinterest or at sea. I mean, there's just ideas for what can be done with reclaimed wood and bourbon barrels and barn wood. And, you know, you name it, there's probably a some kind of trendy look that can be put together with reclaimed wood, and people also like the history of it. So, you know, talking to folks who, who work in, you know, wood processing, and interior design, you know around Kentucky, they say will people like the history they like knowing that this is local that it's got a story. And also, you know, associated with going green, you know, there's no need to cut down new trees. If we've got, you know, old would that also looks really cool that can be reused. We're speaking with. Festival of the Louisville courier journal about people stealing wood from old barns Tessa, if I'm a safe and I take this stuff, what do I do with it? Where do I take it? It's not that hard to find folks who will take this would that you found. So there are, you know, lumber processing companies all over the state. You know there are some that operate more legitimately than others. So I've talked to folks who by reclaimed wood who will ask for a W nine from someone who's looking to sell, you know, they know the telltale signs of, you know boards, you know, looking ripped off the side of the barn. It's kind of a distinctive look when it's a hurried down of a barn, but, you know, unfortunately there are there are still, you know, lumber yards that will take this would without, you know, kind of going through those steps, and checking from legitimacy, but a lot of places because this has been such an an ongoing. King problem, a lot of places are working with, you know, law enforcement in their communities and we'll post signs and say, you know, we won't buy your stolen would or events allow a w nine or what have you because it is just such a problem Tessa are thieves getting caught. It's a hard kind of case to crack. You know, they, they work in the middle of the night, and in rural communities, and you know it's, it's what? So there's, you know, you still someone's iphone and they can track you down from their computer while you steal their barn wood. And you've made off with part of their barred, there have been a few cases and they've largely been cracked by legit, you know, lumber professors who will let law enforcement know or by most of the sheriffs have spoken to actually solved. Some of these cases are made arrests in these cases. They've been busted because they're literally being caught in the barn with. With, you know, a pry bar and a hammer and rusty nails and their truck bed this morning. Jennifer Kushinka with test of all reporter, at the Louisville courier journal, thirty minutes now after the hour on This Morning, America's first news. Eighty six burglars were asked, how they broke into homes, and they all said they knocked on the door. I that's why you need blink x t to cameras they detect motion, so you'll get an alert and.

Tessa Louisville courier journal Kentucky Jennifer Kushinka America Barnes HGTV Barnes center theft Duval reporter Pinterest thirty minutes
"louisville courier" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

05:38 min | 2 years ago

"louisville courier" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Thanks for being with us. Barn would thieves have been stealing Kentucky memory's not what's in them. But to feed a growing desire for the farmhouse shiek popularized by programming on HGTV. The thieves are taking ancient weathered barn wood, and using it to make a new house. Look old. Here's this morning. Jennifer Kushinka, reclaimed wood is having a moment, and that's causing some problems in states, like Kentucky, which has more old barns per square mile than any other state tested Duval of the Louisville courier journal, has taken a look at a growing problem related to this would it's theft and joins us now Tessa, whose stripping old barns of weathered wood. So folks across the state, this has been a problem in more than a dozen counties across Kentucky and it's been going on for several years. So you know what I'm hearing from sheriffs across the Commonwealth is that whether barn would is basically the new copper. So when folks come across Barnes, that might be. Off main roads or look like you know, no one's really keeping an eye on them. You know, fiv see an opportunity to go and take this would and then turn around and sell it for praising him profit in some cases Tessa. Are they targeting abandoned, looking buildings, or kind of is source? So when people drive through parts of rural America, you know, they do see Barnes falling down on the side of the road. And those aren't really attractive to thieves. You know, if the wood is rotting, there's no resale value in that. And additionally, they don't want to hit Barnes center on main roads because if someone drives by you know, he's, you know, sees lights on at a barn at two in the morning. And you know, that's a pretty good indication that, you know, there may be no good going on at that barn. So really, they're kind of on back roads being hit the middle of the night, or if they are on a main road diesel pull around to the back side. And, you know, hit the back of the barn, where it won't be seen by passers by Tessa. What about this would makes it so popular? So right now reclaimed wood is a huge design trend and actually has been for several years. I mean if you watch HDTV or you go on Pinterest or at sea. I mean, there's just ideas for what can be done with reclaimed wood and bourbon barrels and barn wood. And, you know, you name it, there's probably some kind of trendy look that can be put together with reclaimed wood, and people also like the history of it. So, you know, talking to folks who, who work in, you know, wood processing, and interior design, you know, around Kentucky. They say will people like the, the history they like knowing that this is local that it's got a story. And also, you know, associated with going green, you know, there's no need to cut down new trees. If we've got, you know, old would that also looks really cool that can be reused. We're speaking with. Festival of the Louisville courier journal about people stealing wood from old barns Tessa, if I'm a safe and I take this stuff. But what do I do with it? Where do I take it? It's not that hard to find folks who will take this one that you found. So there are, you know, lumber processing companies all over the state. You know there are some that operate more legitimately than others. So I've talked to folks who by reclaimed wood who will ask for a W nine from someone who's looking to sell, you know, they know the telltale signs of, you know boards, you know, looking ripped off the side of the barn. It's got kind of a distinctive looked when it's a hurried down of a barn. But, you know, unfortunately there are there are still, you know, lumber yards that will take this would without, you know, kind of going through those steps, and checking from legitimacy, but a lot of places because this has been such an an ongoing. King problem. A lot of places are working with, you know, law enforcement in their communities and we'll post signs and say, you know, we won't buy your soul in water. You've gotta fill out a W nine or what have you because it is just such a problem Tessa are thieves getting caught. It's a hard kind of case to crack, you know, they, they work in the middle of the night, and in rural communities, and you know it's, it's what? So there's, you know, you still someone's iphone and they can track you down from their computer while you steal their barn wood. And you've made off with part of their barred, there have been a few cases and they've largely been cracked by legit, you know, lumber professors who will let law enforcement know or by most of the, the have spoken to actually solved. Some of these cases are made arrests in these cases. They've been busted because they're literally being caught in the barn with. With, you know, a pry bar and a hammer and rusty nails and their truck bed this morning. Jennifer Kushinka with test of all reporter, at the Louisville courier journal, thirty minutes now after the hour on This Morning, America's first news..

Tessa Louisville courier journal Kentucky Barnes Jennifer Kushinka America HGTV Barnes center theft Duval Pinterest reporter thirty minutes
"louisville courier" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:16 min | 2 years ago

"louisville courier" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Thanks for being with us. Barn would thieves have been stealing Kentucky memory's not what's in them. But to feed a growing desire for the farmhouse shiek popularized by programming on HGTV. The thieves are taking ancient weathered barn wood, and using it to make a new house. Look old. Here's this morning. Jennifer Kushinka, reclaimed wood is having a moment, and that's causing some problems in states, like Kentucky, which has more old barns per square mile than any other state tested Duval of the Louisville courier journal, has taken a look at a growing problem related to this would it's theft and joins us now tesla, whose stripping old barns of weathered wood. So folks across the state, this has been a problem and more than a dozen counties across Kentucky and it's been going on for several years. So you know what I'm hearing from sheriffs across the Commonwealth is that whether barn would is basically the new copper. So when folks come across. Barnes, that might be off main roads or look like you know, no one's really keeping an eye on them. You know, fiv see an opportunity to go and take this would and then turn around and sell it for a profit in some cases, just a are. They targeting abandoned looking buildings, or kind of is source. So when people drive through parts of rural America, you know, they do see Barnes falling down on the side of the road. And those aren't really attractive to thieves. You know, if the wood is rotting, there's no resale value in that. And additionally, they don't want to hit Barnes center on main roads because if someone drives by and sees, you know, sees lights on at a bar barn at two in the morning, and, you know, that's a pretty good indication that, you know, there may be no good going on at that bar. And so, really they're kind of on back roads being hit the middle of the night, or if they are on a main road people. Pull around to the back side. And, you know, hit the back of the barn, where it won't be seen by passers by says a what about this would makes it so popular. So right now reclaimed wood is a huge design trend and actually has been for several years. I mean if you watch HDTV or you go on Pinterest or at sea. I mean, there's just ideas for what can be done with reclaimed wood and bourbon barrels and barn wood. And, you know, you name it, there's probably a some kind of trendy look that can be put together with reclaimed wood, and people also like the history of it. So, you know, talking to folks who, who work in, you know, wood processing, and interior design, you know, around Kentucky. They say, well, people like the, the history they like knowing that this is local that it's got a story. And also, you know, associated with going green, you know, there's no need to cut down new trees. If we've got, you know, old would that also looks really cool that can be reused. We're speaking with. Festival of the Louisville courier journal about people stealing wood from old barns Tessa, if I'm a safe and I take this stuff, what do I do with it? Where do I take it? It's not that hard to find folks who will take this would that you found. So there are, you know, lumber processing companies all over the state. You know there are some that operate more legitimately than others. So I've talked to folks who by reclaimed wood who will ask for a W nine from someone who's looking to sell, you know, they know the telltale signs of, you know boards, you know, looking ripped off the side of the barn. It's got kind of a distinctive looked when it's a hurried down of a bar, but, you know, unfortunately there are there are still, you know, lumber yards that will take this would without kind of going through those steps, and checking legitimacy, but a lot of places because this has been such an an ongoing. King problem, a lot of places are working with, you know, law enforcement in their communities and we'll post signs and say, you know, we won't buy your stolen water. You've got to fill out a W nine or what have you because it is just such a problem Tessa are thieves getting caught. It's a hard kind of case to crack, you know, they, they work in the middle of the night, and in rural communities, and you know, it's, it's, it's, so there's, you know, you steal someone's iphone, and they can track you down from their computer while you steal their barn wood. And you've made off with part of their barred, there have been a few cases and they've largely been cracked by legit, you know, lumber processors who will let law enforcement know or by most of the sheriffs have spoken to actually solved. Some of these cases are made arrests in these cases. They've been busted because they're literally being caught in the barn with. With, you know, a pry bar and a hammer and rusty nails and their truck bed this morning. Jennifer Kushinka with test of all reporter, at the Louisville.

Kentucky Tessa Louisville courier journal Barnes Jennifer Kushinka HGTV Barnes center Louisville America theft Duval tesla reporter Pinterest
"louisville courier" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"louisville courier" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"What kind of action is my horse going to get when it gets back to the farm. I'm not sure I think Bob Baffert is in for the winds. I think he is too. But but the real money is what happens after the race. Correct. I mean, I know all I saw I saw I went to a horse breeding thing once it was it was it was interesting. But I mean that was at they, you know, they're they're trying to get their training much Doug monies from this thing. I don't think anybody's considering that. I saw a story where lady lost of the head maximum security in and a race. And she lost the down payment on her house. She may lose their house. Now, happy Gilmore comes along. I'm gonna have on gentry ESTES of the Louisville courier journal in just a moment to talk about the stud values, and whether or not they made the right decision in this thing. It was might have been it might have been technically the right decision, but it might have been bad for horse racing. If you know what I mean, thank you, you know, and how much is instant replay come into effect sports this year. What I want to know is that when the next NASCAR drivers gotta get this qualified for blocking. What like maximum security did in the derby. Block the horse inside you realise side. You realize you block outside you realize race car is not a living object just saying it. It's not blocking doesn't breathe. It doesn't you know? It's about time NASCAR takes up that moniker. Kebbi out of the report this I wanna get gentry Estevan to talk about stood stuffy studs. Talking about Willie. I'm just saying stud fee. I think that's the most important thing in horse racing studs stud fees. Just ask Willie. Okay. Ken Bruin honor of a beautiful Monday. Here. The tristate we leave you with the immortal words of the students, drip, art..

Bob Baffert Willie gentry ESTES gentry Estevan NASCAR Louisville courier journal Ken Bruin Gilmore Doug
"louisville courier" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"louisville courier" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Being with us. Barn would have been stealing Kentucky memory's not for what's in them. But to feed a growing desire for the farmhouse shiek popularized by programming on HGTV. The thieves are taking ancient weathered barn wood. And using it to make a new house look old. Here's this weekend's, Jennifer Kushinka, reclaimed wood is having a moment, and that's causing some problems in states like Kentucky, which has more old barns per square mile than any other state tested. Duval of the Louisville courier journal has taken a look at a growing problem related to this would it's theft and joins us now Tessa who stripping old barns of weathered wood. Yes. So folks across the state, this has been a problem in more than a dozen counties across Kentucky, and it's been going on for several years. So you know, what I'm hearing from sheriffs across the Commonwealth is that weathered barn would is basically the new copper? So when folks come across Barnes that might be off main roads or look like, you know, no one's really keeping an eye on them. Fiv see an opportunity to go and take this would and then turn around and sell it for a pretty significant profit in some cases, just a are they targeting abandoned looking buildings or kind of is source. So when people drive through parts of rural America, you know, they do see Barnes falling down on the side of the road, and those aren't really attractive to thieves. You know, if the wood is rotting there's no resale value in that. And additionally, they don't want to hit Barnes center on main roads because if someone drives by and sees sees lights on at a bar in it to in the morning, and you know, this a pretty good indication that you know, there may be no good going on at that bar. And so really they're kind of on back roads being hit the middle of the night. Or if they are on a main road to the backside, and you know, hit the back of the barn where it won't be seen by passers by Tessa. What about this would makes it so popular? So right now, reclaimed wood is a huge design trend and actually has been for several years. So I mean, if you watch HDTV or you go on Pinterest or at sea. I mean, there's just ideas for what can be done with reclaimed wood, and you know, bourbon barrels and barn wood. And you know, you name it, there's probably a some kind of trendy look that can be put together with reclaimed wood and people also like the history of it. So, you know, talking to folks who who work in, you know, wood processing and interior design. You know around Kentucky, they say will people like the the history they like knowing that this is local that it's got a story. And also, you know associated with going green, you know, there's no need to cut down new trees. If we've got you know, old would that also looks really cool that can be. A used. We're speaking with tested Duval of the Louisville courier journal about people stealing wood from old barns Tessa. If I'm a sif. I take this stuff. What do I do with it? Where do I take it? It's not that hard to find folks who will take this would that you found. So there are, you know, lumber processing companies all over the state. You know, there are some that operate more legitimately than others. So I've talked to folks who by reclaimed wood who will ask for a W nine from someone who's looking to sell, you know, they know the telltale signs of you know, boards, you know, looking ripped off the side of the barn. It's kind of a distinctive looked when it's a hurried down of a barn. But, you know, unfortunately, there are there are still, you know, lumber yards that will take this would without kind of going through those steps and checking some legitimacy, but a lot of places because this has been such an an ongoing problem. A lot of places are working with you know, law enforcement in communities, and we'll post signs and say, you know, we won't. By you're still in water. You've got to fill out of W nine or what have you because it is just such a problem? This weekend's Jennifer Kushinka with test divall at the Louisville courier journal. It's thirty minutes now after the hour on this weekend..

Kentucky Louisville courier journal Tessa Barn Jennifer Kushinka Barnes Duval Barnes center HGTV America theft Pinterest thirty minutes
"louisville courier" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:57 min | 2 years ago

"louisville courier" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Thanks being born would have been stealing Kentucky memory's not for what's in them. But to feed a growing desire for the farmhouse shiek popularized by programming on HGTV. The thieves are taking ancient weathered barn wood. And using it to make a new house look old. Here's this weekend's, Jennifer Kushinka, reclaimed wood is having a moment, and that's causing some problems in states like Kentucky, which has more old barns per square mile than any other state tested. Duval of the Louisville courier journal has taken a look at a growing problem related to this would it's theft and joins us now Tessa who stripping old barns of weathered wood. Yes. So folks across the state, this has been a problem in more than a dozen counties across Kentucky, and it's been going on for several years. So you know, what I'm hearing from sheriffs across the Commonwealth is that. Weathered barn would is basically the new copper. So when folks come across Barnes that might be off main roads or look like, you know, no one's really keeping an eye on them. You know, fiv see an opportunity to go and take this would and then turn around and sell it for praising profit in some cases, Tessa are they targeting abandoned looking buildings or kind of is source. So. People drive through parts of rural America, you know. They do see Barnes falling down on the side of the road. And those aren't really attractive to thieves. You know, if the what is rotting there's no resale value in that. And additionally, they don't want to hit Barnes center on main roads because if someone drives by and sees sees lights on at a barn at two in the morning. And you know, that's a pretty good indication that you know, there may be no good going on at that bar. And so really they're kind of on back roads being hit the middle of the night. Or if they are on a main road diesel pull around to the back side, and you know, hit the back of the barn where it won't be seen bypass by Tessa. What about this? What makes it so popular? So right now, reclaimed wood is a huge design trindon actually has been for several years. I mean, if you watch HDTV or you go on Pinterest or at sea. I mean, there's just ideas for what can be done with reclaimed wood, and you know, bourbon barrels and barn wood and eat. Oh, you name it. There's probably some kind of trendy look that can be put together with reclaimed wood and people also like the history of it. So, you know, talking to folks who who work in, you know, wood processing and interior design. You know around Kentucky. The history they like knowing that this is local that it's got a story. And also, you know associated with going green, you know, there's no need to cut down new trees. If we've got you know old would that? Also looks really cool that can be reused. We're speaking with tested Duval of the Louisville courier journal about people stealing wood from old barns Tessa if I'm a safe, and I take this stuff. What do I do with it? Where do I take it? It's not that hard to find folks who will take this would that you found. So there are, you know, lumber processing companies all over the state. You know, there are some that operate more legitimately than others. So I've talked to folks who by reclaimed wood who will ask for a W nine from someone who's looking to sell, you know, they know the telltale signs of you know, boards, you know, looking ripped off the side of the barn. A distinctive looked when it's a hurried down of a barn. But, you know, unfortunately, there are there are still, you know, lumber yards that will take this would without kind of going through those steps and checking some legitimacy, but a lot of places because this has been such an an ongoing problem. A lot of places are working with you know, law enforcement in communities, and we'll post signs and say, you know, we won't. By you're still in or you've got gotta fill out a W nine or what have you because it is just such a problem this weekends, Jennifer Kushinka with test of all at the Louisville courier journal. It's thirty minutes now after the hour on this weekend..

Louisville courier journal Kentucky Tessa Jennifer Kushinka Barnes Duval Barnes center HGTV America theft Pinterest thirty minutes
"louisville courier" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

05:20 min | 2 years ago

"louisville courier" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Being with us. Foreign would have been stealing Kentucky memory's not for what's in them. But to feed a growing desire for the farmhouse shiek popularized by programming on H, G TV. The thieves are taking ancient weathered barn wood and use it to make a new house look old. Here's this weekend's, Jennifer Kushinka, reclaimed wood is having a moment, and that's causing some problems in states like Kentucky, which has more old barns per square mile than any other state tested. Duval of the Louisville courier journal has taken a look at a growing problem related to this would it's theft and joins us now Tessa who stripping old barns of weathered wood gas. So folks across the state, this is a problem in more than a dozen counties across Kentucky, and it's been going on for several years. So you know, what I'm hearing from sheriff across the Commonwealth is that weathered barn would in space. The new copper. So when folks come across Barnes that might be off main roads or look like, you know, no one's really keeping an eye on 'em fiv, see an opportunity to go and take this would and then turn around and sell it for a pretty significant profit in some cases, Tessa are they targeting abandoned looking buildings or kind of is source. So when people drive through parts of rural America, you know, they do see Barnes falling down on the side of the road, and those aren't really attractive to thieves. You know, if the wood is rotting there's no resale value in that. And additionally, they don't want to hit Barnes center on main roads, because if someone drives by you know, he's you know, sees lights on at a barn at two in the morning. And you know, that's a pretty good indication that you know, there may be no good going on at that bar. And so really they're kind of on back roads being hit the middle of night. Or if they are on a main road Feazel pull around to the back side, and you know, hit the back of the barn where it won't be seen by by Tessa. What about this would makes it so popular? So right now, reclaimed wood is a huge designed to actually has been for several years. I mean, if you watch HDTV or you go on Pinterest or SE, I mean, they're just ideas for what can be done with reclaimed wood, and you know, bourbon barrels and barn wood. And you know, you name it, there's probably some kind of trendy look that can be put together with reclaimed wood and people also like the history of it. So, you know, talking to folks who who work in, you know, wood processing and interior design. You know around Kentucky, they say will people like the the history they like knowing that this is local that it's got a story and also associated with going green. You know, there's no need to cut down new trees. If we've got you know old would that? Also looks really cool that can be. A used. We're speaking with tested Duval of the Louisville courier journal about people stealing wood from old barns Tessa. If I'm a sif. I take this stuff. What do I do with it? Where do I take it? It's not that hard to find folks who will take this would that you found. So there are, you know, lumber processing companies all over the state. You know, there are some that operate more legitimately than others. So I've talked to folks who by reclaimed wood who will ask for a w nine from someone who's looking to sell, you know, they know telltale signs of you know, boards, you know, looking ripped off the side of the barn. It's got kind of a distinctive looked when it's a hurried down of a barn. But, you know, unfortunately, there are there are still, you know, lumber yards that will take this would without you know, kind of going through those steps and checking legitimacy, but a lot of places because this has been such an an ongoing problem a lot of places are working with, you know, law enforcement inner -tunities, and we'll post signs and say, you know, we won't. By you're still in water Yvette fill out of w nine or what have you because it is just such a problem as we Jennifer Kushinka with tests divall at the Louisville courier journal. It's thirty minutes now after the hour on this weekend. Newsradio kale? Be John Cooley jumping news congresswoman, Debbie Dingle, delivering the Democrats weekly address reassuring lawmakers on Capitol Hill, the Tim's all willing to work with Republicans, but are not willing to leave their oversight post publicans in houses Senate will work with us..

Louisville courier journal Kentucky Tessa Jennifer Kushinka Barnes Duval Barnes center Newsradio kale John Cooley America theft Pinterest Debbie Dingle Senate Tim thirty minutes
"louisville courier" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"louisville courier" Discussed on 600 WREC

"With barn would have been stealing Kentucky memory's not for what's in them. But to feed a growing desire for the farmhouse shiek popularized by programming on HGTV. The thieves are taking ancient weathered barn wood. And using it to make a new house look old. Here's this weekend's, Jennifer Kushinka, reclaimed wood is having a moment, and that's causing some problems in states like Kentucky, which has more old barns per square mile than any other state tested. Duval of the Louisville courier journal has taken a look at a growing problem related to this would it's theft and joins us now Tessa who's stripping old barns of weathered wood. Folks across the state. This has been a problem and more than a dozen counties across Kentucky, and it's been going on for several years. So you know, what I'm hearing from sheriff across the Commonwealth is that whether barn would is basically the new copper, so when folks come across Barnes that might be off main road or look like, you know, no one's really keeping an eye on 'em fiv, see an opportunity to go and take this would and then turn around and sell it for a can't profit in some cases, Tessa are they targeting abandoned looking buildings or kind of eyesores. So. People drive through parts of real America. You know, they do see Barnes falling down on the side of the road. And those aren't really attractive to thieves. You know, if the wood is rotting there's no resale value in that. And they don't want to hit Barnes center on main roads. Because if someone drives by you know, he's you know, sees lights on at a barn at two in the morning. And you know, that's a pretty good indication that you know, there may be no good going on at that bar. And so really they're kind of on back roads being hit the middle of night. Or if they are on a main road diesel pull around to the back side, and you know, hit the back of the barn where it won't be bypassed by a what about this? What makes it so popular? So right now, reclaimed wood is a huge designed and actually has been for several years. I mean, if you watch HDTV or you go on Pinterest or at sea. I mean, they're just ideas for what can be done with reclaimed wood, and you know, bourbon barrels and barn wood. And you know, you name it, there's probably some kind of trendy look that can be put together with reclaimed wood and people also like the history of it. So, you know, talking to folks who who work in you know, what processing and interior design. You know around Kentucky, they say will people like the they history they like knowing that this is local that it's got a story. And also, you know associated with going green, you know, there's no need to cut down new trees. If we've got you know, old would that also looks really cool that can be. A used speaking with Tessa Duval of the Louisville courier journal about people stealing wood from old barns Tessa if I'm a sif, and I take this stuff. But what do I do with it? Where do I take it? It's not that hard to find folks who will take this would that you've found. So there are, you know, lumber processing companies all over the state. You know, there are some that operate more legitimately than others. So I've talked to folks by reclaimed wood who will ask for a W nine from someone who's looking to south. You know, they know the telltale signs of you know, boards, you know, looking ripped off the side of the barn. It's got a distinctive looked when it's a hurried down of a barn. But, you know, unfortunately, there are there are still, you know, lumber yards that will take this would without kind of going through those steps and checking legitimacy, but a lot of places because this has been such an an ongoing problem. A lot of places are working with you know, law enforcement in their communities, and we'll post signs we won't. Die. You're still in water eve fill out of w nine or what have you because it is just such a problem is we Jennifer Kushinka with tests divall at the Louisville courier journal. It's thirty minutes now after the hour on this weekend..

Tessa Duval Louisville courier journal Kentucky Jennifer Kushinka Barnes Barnes center HGTV America theft Pinterest thirty minutes
"louisville courier" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"louisville courier" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Barn would fees have been stealing Kentucky memory's not for what's in them. But to feed a growing desire for the farmhouse shiek popularized by programming on HGTV to thieves are taking ancient weathered barn wood. And using it to make a new house look old. Here's this weekend's, Jennifer Kushinka, reclaimed wood is having a moment, and that's causing some problems in states like Kentucky, which has more old barns per square mile than any other state tested. Duval of the Louisville courier journal has taken a look at a growing problem related to this would it's theft and joins us now Tessa who stripping old barns of weathered wood. Folks across the state. And more than a dozen counties across Kentucky, and it's been going on for several years. So you know, what I'm hearing from sheriffs across the Commonwealth as weathered barn would is basically the new copper? So when folks come across Barnes that might be off main roads or look like, you know, no one's really keeping an eye on them. Fiv see an opportunity to go and take this would turn around and sell it for a profit in some cases, Tessa are they targeting abandoned looking buildings or kind of is source. So. People drive through parts of rural America, you know. They do see Barnes falling down on the side of the road. And those aren't really attractive to thieves. You know, if the wood is rotting there's no resale value in that. And additionally, they don't want to hit Barnes center on main roads because if someone drives by you know, he's sees lights on at a barn at two in the morning. And you know, that's a pretty good indication that you know, there may be no good going on at that bar. So really they're kind of on back roads being hit the middle of the night. Or if they are on a main road to the backside, and you know, hit the back of the barn where it won't be seen by passers by Tessa. What about this would makes it so popular? So right now, reclaimed wood is huge design credit actually has been for several years. I mean, if you watch HDTV or you go on Pinterest or at sea. I mean, there's just ideas for what can be done with reclaimed wood, and you know, bourbon barrels and barn wood and eat. Oh, you name it. There's probably some kind of trendy look that can be put together with reclaimed wood and people. The history of it. So, you know, talking to folks who who work in you know, what processing and interior design. You know around Kentucky. The history they like knowing that this is local story and also associated with going greed. You know, there's no need to cut down new trees. If we've got you know old would that? Also looks really cool that can be reused. We're speaking with tested Duval of the Louisville courier journal about people stealing wood from old barns Tessa, if I'm a sif, and I take this stuff. But what do I do with it? Where do I take it? It's not that hard to find folks who will take this would that you found. So there are, you know, lumber processing companies all over the state. There are some that operate more legitimately than others. So I've talked to folks who by reclaimed wood who will ask for a W nine from someone who's looking to sell, you know, they know the telltale signs of you know, boards, you know, looking ripped off. Distinctive looked when it's a hurried down of a barn. But, you know, unfortunately, there are there are still, you know, lumber yards that will take this would without kind of going through those steps and checking legitimacy, but a lot of places because this has been such an an ongoing problem. A lot of places are working with law enforcement in their communities, and we'll post signs and say, you know, we won't buy your stolen water. You've got to fill out a W nine or what have you because it is just such a problem this weekend? Jennifer Kushinka with tests divall at the Louisville courier journal. It's thirty minutes now after the hour on this weekend. Newsradio twelve hundred w is Antonio, and I heart radio stick. Fox News until NATO a house committee already issuing a subpoena for an unredacted version of the Muller reports saying they need to do as their members of congress. Meanwhile, President.

Tessa Louisville courier journal Kentucky Jennifer Kushinka Barnes Duval Barnes center HGTV theft Fox News America President Antonio congress Pinterest Muller NATO twelve hundred w
"louisville courier" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

05:16 min | 2 years ago

"louisville courier" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Being with us. Foreign would be have been stealing Kentucky memory's not for what's in them. But to feed a growing desire for the farmhouse shiek popularized by programming on HGTV. The thieves are taking ancient weathered barn wood. And using it to make a new house look old. Here's this weekend's, Jennifer Kushinka, reclaimed wood is having a moment, and that's causing some problems in states like Kentucky, which has more old barns per square mile than any other state tested. Duval of the Louisville courier journal has taken a look at a growing problem related to this would it's theft and joins us now, tesla who stripping old barns of weathered wood gas. So folks across the state, this has been a problem and more than a dozen counties across Kentucky, and it's been going on for several years. So you know, what I'm hearing from sheriffs across the Commonwealth is that whether barn would is basically. The new copper. So when folks come across Barnes that might be off main roads or look like, you know, no one's really keeping an eye on them. You know, fiv see an opportunity to go and take this would and then turn around and sell it for appraising profit, in some cases, Tessa are they targeting abandoned looking buildings or kind of is source. When people drive through parts of rural America, you know, they do see Barnes falling down on the side of the road. And those aren't really attractive to thieves. You know, if the wood is rotting there's no resale value in that. And additionally, they don't want to hit Barnes center on main roads because if someone drives by and sees, you know, sees lights on at a barn at two in the morning. You know, that's pretty good indication that you know, there may be no good going on at that bar. And so really they're kind of on back roads being hit the middle of the night. Or if they are on a main road diesel pull around to the back side, and you know, hit the back of the barn where it won't be seen by by Tessa. What about this? What makes it so popular? So right now, reclaimed wood is a huge designed actually has been for several years. I mean, if you watch HDTV or you go on Pinterest or SE, I mean, there's just ideas for what can be done with reclaimed wood, and you know, bourbon barrels and barn wood. And you know, you name it. There's probably a some kind of trendy look that can be put together with reclaimed what and people also like the history of it. So, you know, talking to folks who who work in, you know, wood processing and interior design. You know around Kentucky. The the history they like knowing that this is local that it's got a story. And also, you know associated with going green, you know, there's no need to cut down new trees. If we've got, you know, old word that also looks really cool that can be reused. We're speaking with tested Duval of the Louisville courier journal about people stealing wood from old barns Tessa if I'm a safe, and I take this stuff. What do I do with it? Where do I take it? It's not that hard to find folks who will take this would that you found. So there are, you know, lumber processing companies all over the state. There are some that operate more legitimately than others. So I've talked to folks to buy reclaimed wood who will ask for a W nine from someone who's looking to sell, you know, they know the telltale signs of you know, boards, you know, looking ripped off the side of the barn. It's got a distinctive looked when it's a hurried down of a barn. But, you know, unfortunately, there are there are still, you know, lumber yards that will take this would without kind of going through those steps and checking legitimacy, but a lot of places because this has been such an an ongoing problem. A lot of places are working with you know, law enforcement in their communities, and we'll post signs and say, you know, we won't. By you're still in water. You've got fill out of w nine or what have you because it is just such a problem is weekends. Jennifer Kushinka with test divall at the Louisville courier journal. It's thirty minutes now after the hour on this weekend. Faye? Everyone. Let's stop what we're doing right now. And take a moment. That felt good. Just like that. We had a nice special sort of moment.

Louisville courier journal Kentucky Tessa Jennifer Kushinka Duval Barnes Barnes center HGTV America theft tesla Pinterest Faye thirty minutes