38 Burst results for "Louisiana"

High court to hear arguments over Biden's deportation policy

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 5 hrs ago

High court to hear arguments over Biden's deportation policy

"The nation's highest court is taking up a dispute over deportation policy. The Supreme Court will hear arguments today in a legal fight over immigration officers discretion in deciding which people in the country illegally should be deported. Federal appeals courts in Cincinnati and New Orleans reached conflicting decisions over Department of Homeland Security guidance issued in September of 2021 after President Biden was elected the directive prioritize those who posed the greatest risk pausing deportations unless individuals had committed acts of terrorism, espionage, or egregious threats to public safety, while a federal appeals court in Cincinnati overturned a district judge's order that put the policy on hold, Texas and Louisiana sued and won to freeze the guidance under a nationwide court order, saying it violated federal law, and they would face added costs from having to detain people with criminal records. It's the latest example of a strategy that has succeeded in slowing Biden administration initiatives by going to Republican friendly courts. Jennifer King, Washington

President Biden Cincinnati Supreme Court Department Of Homeland Securit New Orleans Louisiana Texas Biden Administration Jennifer King Washington
Fresh "Louisiana" from Bloomberg Surveillance

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:44 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh "Louisiana" from Bloomberg Surveillance

"Radio. Now, a global news update the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments today over the future of the Biden administration's immigration enforcement priorities and memo from the Department of Homeland Security last year tells immigration agents to prioritize the arrests of immigrants who threaten safety or national security along with those who have recently crossed the border. A lawsuit brought by Texas and Louisiana wants to stop that and puts curves on the government's ability to enforce priorities. The world's largest active volcano is erupting on Hawaii's big island started erupting late Sunday Night, Ken Han, a scientist with a U.S. geological survey is keeping an eye on the lava. Eventually just ten to 11 is very similar to what happened in 1984 and potentially could threaten populated areas around hilo, but we're looking at somewhere around a week before we expect woza to get anywhere near in that direction. The national Christmas tree will be lit up for the first time today. It's also known as the people's tree and it sits on the west lawn of the U.S. capitol. Now Michael kassner. When on president events are unfolding, it's important to let history teach us. Do you think it's a different world for the fed? Bloomberg balance of

Biden Administration Ken Han U.S. Supreme Court Department Of Homeland Securit Louisiana Hawaii Texas Hilo U.S. Government Michael Kassner FED
A Friendly Reminder: If You Feel Sick, Test for Covid

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

02:53 min | 1 d ago

A Friendly Reminder: If You Feel Sick, Test for Covid

"Oh, hi, rudeness, hi. Good morning. I want to add something to your warning there. Which is that even if you're fully vaccinated, that if you are feeling sick, test yourself. Get tested because you want to catch it early. And that's what happened, you know, my stepdad's in the hospital and that was one of the things is he waited to test until it was advanced and you can't get on the pax lova and all of that. So that's why I didn't have symptoms, but I tested yesterday because I was like, yeah. Don't you think that's part of it, rude, and I know you're in Louisiana now and so we're sending our love and light because we've all been through it and it's just I know you've had it like Chris and I have had it. Wait, oh yes, you've had a two I forgot. You finally. I got it in August. Yeah. But yeah, it is terrifying. We have a mom that's almost a hundred with Alzheimer's. It's just the sense in society that we're supposed to take care of other people or at least not be a to other people, right? Just depress me in the airport and on the plane and even in the nursing home. Like, nobody's wearing a mask anymore. I've gone back, you know, on the flights I wore a mask, you know? Obviously in the hospital, I. Just, it doesn't make any sense at this point not to, especially, like you said, as we're going into winter. And you know what? I also don't want to get the RSV bug the time. Right there. Yeah. So yeah, Doctor Fauci was talking about that. RSV flew, here we go. Hang on. We have vaccinations for clearly COVID, particularly with the updated boosters that are now available. We have vaccinations for influenza. We're already starting to see an early surge of both flu and RSV. We don't have a vaccine for RSV. This particularly problematic for children 5 years of age and younger and for the elderly. But there are things you can do with RSV is avoid congregate settings in particularly if you have a cold or a sneezing and stay home, wear a mask, wash your hands. And as Ruth said, get tested if you're feeling anything, right? But anyway, have some tests on hand, you know? Yeah. And by the way, some places, some pharmacies and I hate to be like, you know, you know, mister information this morning instead of making sodomy jokes. Oh, we'll get to those. We're going to want in with those. I saw what you did there. That's a mouthful. Anyway, there's, but you know, you can also some pharmacies if your insurance will allow it. They'll give you the test for free. And they will take care of it. Like a prescription or something like that instead of going through the whole, you know. Thank you. Thank you, mister. They will.

Alzheimer's FLU Louisiana Fauci Chris Ruth
Fresh update on "louisiana" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:47 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "louisiana" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Home estimate. 6 11 now in a hearing to decide whether to remove prince George's county board of education chair juanita Miller from her position continues today. Miller faces allegations of misconduct in office, will fill neglect of duty and incompetence brought against her by 6 former and current school board members. They claim Miller didn't act after approving a contract with a law firm, and withheld ethics reports from the board. The hearing which is being held virtually began yesterday with testimony expected to last throughout the week. Money is being wasted in D.C. when it comes to fixing things at schools and in other buildings. D.C. council chair Phil mendelson says the work order process is in his words a mess. Millions of dollars. A D.C. auditor's report found all kinds of issues with the department of general services responsible for fixing stuff and tracking it. In some work orders before and after photos were not the actual project, but stock images found on the Internet. I mean, why would one do that? Mendelssohn says the mayor is responsible for how the work gets done. Kyle Cooper news. A new federal lawsuit filed by the mother of one of the 19 children killed in the school shooting and Yuval di Texas claims that the city, the school district, and multiple police agencies fail to follow established active shooter protocols. That lawsuit also includes the gun manufacturer, alleging that Daniel defense marketed its AR-15 to young men prone to violence. The mother, Sandra Torres, is receiving assistance from the legal arm of gun control group every town for gun safety The Supreme Court hears arguments today over whether the Biden administration can prioritize certain immigrants in the U.S. illegally for deportation. DHS wants to focus on deporting illegal immigrants who pose a threat to national security or public safety. Texas and Louisiana have sued claiming the policy forces them to spend more money on law enforcement healthcare and education. The case is what of several challenging President Biden's authority to make policy without explicit authorization from Congress. Up ahead undoubtedly TLP new rankings are out on area grocery stores. We'll let you know if your favorite shop made the cut. 6 13. Honey, I did it

Prince George's County Board O Juanita Miller D.C. Council Phil Mendelson Miller Department Of General Services D.C. Kyle Cooper Yuval Di Texas Sandra Torres Mendelssohn Biden Administration Daniel DHS Supreme Court President Biden Louisiana U.S. Texas Congress
Crews rescue 2 from plane caught in power lines in Maryland

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 1 d ago

Crews rescue 2 from plane caught in power lines in Maryland

"Investigators are looking into why a small plane crashed in Maryland on Sunday. The small plane had left White Plains New York and was near the Montgomery county, Maryland air park in Gaithersburg, when it crashed into live power lines trapping two people inside and knocking out power to thousands in the area. Before first responders could rescue the two, utility contractors had to disconnect the high tension wires. So it would be safe for the rescuers and responders had to stabilize the plane and then the rescue. Montgomery county fire chief Scott Goldstein. Both patients have been transported from the scene to local area trauma centers. With serious injuries. But both are expected to survive. He talked to W JLA TV, state police identify the two as pilot Patrick Merkel of Washington, D.C., and passenger Janet Williams of Louisiana, both in their 60s. I'm Rita foley

Maryland Air Park Montgomery County Gaithersburg Scott Goldstein Maryland New York Patrick Merkel Janet Williams D.C. Washington Louisiana Rita Foley
Fresh update on "louisiana" discussed on Bloomberg Law

Bloomberg Law

01:40 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "louisiana" discussed on Bloomberg Law

"Thanks so much, Craig. I know it's a busy week at the court. That's Bloomberg new Supreme Court reporter Greg store. Coming up tomorrow at the court. It's a showdown over President Biden's immigration plan. The Supreme Court is going to review a stalled U.S. enforcement effort aimed at immigrants considered safety or security threats. It's also the latest showdown in the often successful legal campaign by Republican led states to block Biden's policies. In 2021, DHS secretary Alejandro mayorkas, directed U.S. immigration and customs enforcement to focus resources on arresting and deporting non citizens that were deemed most dangerous, plus recent border crossers. That policy departs from the Trump era enforcement against anyone in the country without authorization. Texas and Louisiana among others argued the policy allowed too many non citizens to avoid consequences for entering illegally, overstaying visas or otherwise violating immigration laws. A federal district court in Texas blocked the Biden policy nationwide this year and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th circuit and the Supreme Court rejected the Biden administration's bids to freeze that ruling. The arguments will center on whether enforcement priorities violate the administrative procedure act or the immigration and nationality act, whether the states have standing to challenge the policy and whether a separate provision of the INA bars district courts from enjoining such practices will have full coverage of those arguments on tomorrow's Bloomberg law show. Coming up next on the Bloomberg law show, FTX investors are going after Tom Brady, Gisele Bündchen, Larry David, Shaquille O'Neal, and Steph Curry among others. For promoting FTX services and products, the lawsuits allege they lured unsophisticated investors into the FTX debacle. You're

Bloomberg New Supreme Court Greg Store President Biden Alejandro Mayorkas Biden Supreme Court Federal District Court U.S. Immigration And Customs E U.S. Court Of Appeals Biden Administration Craig DHS Texas U.S. Louisiana INA Gisele Bündchen Steph Curry Larry David Tom Brady
Coast Guard rescues man overboard on Carnival cruise

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 3 d ago

Coast Guard rescues man overboard on Carnival cruise

"A cruise ship passenger who was missing for hours is found alive in the Gulf of Mexico. The coast guard says the 28 year old man was last seen Wednesday night and was rescued on Thanksgiving night. Carnival cruise line says the man was with his sister at a bar on the carnival valor at 11 p.m. Wednesday. He went to use the bathroom and never returned. His sister reported a missing the next day. A cargo ship saw a person in the water about 20 miles south of Southwest pass Louisiana and the mouth of the Mississippi River after the man was hoisted into a helicopter at about 8 30 Thursday night. He confirmed he was the missing cruise ship passenger. He was taken for medical care. The coast guard calls the rescue, a miracle. I'm

Coast Guard Gulf Of Mexico Mississippi River Southwest Louisiana
Judge rejects Jen Psaki's effort to quash subpoena

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | Last week

Judge rejects Jen Psaki's effort to quash subpoena

"A judge has turned away Jen Psaki's effort to quash a subpoena A judge has refused to quash a subpoena issued to former White House press secretary Jen Psaki that seeks her deposition in a lawsuit filed by Missouri and Louisiana It alleges that the Biden administration conspired to silence conservative voices on social media Psaki followed a motion in federal court Friday in Alexandria seeking to quell the subpoena saying that she had no relevant information to

Jen Psaki Biden Administration Psaki White House Missouri Louisiana Alexandria
The Power of State Legislatures

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

00:59 min | Last week

The Power of State Legislatures

"Debbie and I have been talking about the power of state legislatures to address issues in particularly election issues. I mean, look at this. Look at the not just GOP dominance in all these states, but it's the degree of dominance. I'm just going to read very quickly Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, Wyoming. And again, those are the states in which Republicans dominate both houses, but the margins are huge. Look at Wyoming. The Senate Republicans 28. It doesn't surprise me in white. And the house. 55 to 5. 5 to 5. But look at Texas, honey, Senate, 19 to 12 House 86 to 64. So I mean, you're not talking about one seat or two seat. You're talking about decisive majority. What Republicans say in these states go? Yeah. Those.

Debbie GOP Wyoming Arkansas Idaho Alabama North Dakota Louisiana Indiana Iowa Kentucky Mississippi Nebraska Georgia Kansas Montana South Dakota Missouri Texas South Carolina
Judge orders halt to Trump-era asylum restrictions at border

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last week

Judge orders halt to Trump-era asylum restrictions at border

"A judge has ordered a halt to Trump era asylum restrictions at the border I'm Lisa dwyer A federal judge in Washington has ordered the Biden administration to lift Trump era asylum restrictions that have been a cornerstone of border enforcement since the beginning of COVID-19 The regulation was authorized under title 42 of a broader law covering public health U.S. district judge Emmett Sullivan has ruled that enforcement must end immediately for families and single adults saying it violates federal rulemaking procedures However the ruling conflicts with another ruling in May by a federal judge in Louisiana that asylum restrictions remain in place The current ruling stems from a lawsuit filed by the American civil liberties union on behalf of the silent seeking migrants Migrants have been expelled from the United States more than 2.4 million times since title 42 took effect in March 2020 I'm Lisa dwyer

Lisa Dwyer Biden Administration Covid Emmett Sullivan Donald Trump Washington United States American Civil Liberties Union Louisiana
FBI's Elvis Chan Is a Key Figure in the Digital Censorship Landscape

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:07 min | 2 weeks ago

FBI's Elvis Chan Is a Key Figure in the Digital Censorship Landscape

"There is a senior agent and FBI agent in the San Francisco bureau, his name is Elvis Chan. Yeah, I'm not kidding his first name is Elvis. And that's strange enough. I guess his parents were fans of Elvis. But his last name is Chan. In any event, this guy is the linchpin. He's the key. For FBI involvement and in some ways, Biden administration involvement in digital censorship. Why? Because he's located in San Francisco. He has deep connections with the 300 or so Silicon Valley companies and platforms that are based in San Francisco. He has constant dealings with them. He evidently was actively involved not solely involved, but actively involved in the suppression of the Hunter Biden story. And this guy has been sort of, let's call it in hiding. And by hiding, I don't mean literally in hiding. I mean that the government is trying to shield him from coming forward and testifying. Now yesterday I had on the podcast representative Ken buck of Colorado who talked about a lawsuit that has been filed by the attorneys general of Louisiana and Missouri. And the purpose of the lawsuit is to ferret out information about the full extent of the FBI's and the Biden administration's collaboration with these big tech platforms. And so as part of that lawsuit, the plaintiffs demanded that this guy Elvis Chan come forward and testify. Now the Biden administration tried to stop that and they basically said that this is a guy who did not directly order Facebook or meta to suppress the Hunter Biden story. He's not the guy who did that. And the plaintiffs are like, we're not saying he is the guy that solely did that. Maybe he was part of a team. He certainly has had extensive connections with these Silicon Valley companies. And we want to find out the full extent of the FBI's involvement,

Biden Administration Elvis Chan FBI San Francisco Hunter Biden Elvis Chan Silicon Valley Ken Buck Louisiana Colorado Missouri Facebook
Democrats keep Senate majority as GOP push falters in Nevada

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 2 weeks ago

Democrats keep Senate majority as GOP push falters in Nevada

"Democrats have been able to keep control of the U.S. Senate but it's still a toss up on whether the House of Representatives will flip from blue to red It's nearly a week since the polls closed and yet a number of close races for congressional seats keep the balance of power undetermined House speaker Nancy Pelosi on ABC's this week with George Stephanopoulos says regardless of the outcome Democrats didn't get shoved out as many pundits had predicted because of their message to voters People over politics lower cost bigger paychecks safer communities Republican senator Bill Cassidy of Louisiana suggests that Donald Trump was the reason the Senate didn't flip Those who were most closely aligned with the former president did underperformed On NBC's meet the press Cassidy says the two parties have to work together and pass meaningful legislation that helps Americans not politicians Jackie Quinn Washington

Senate House Of Representatives George Stephanopoulos Bill Cassidy Nancy Pelosi ABC Donald Trump Louisiana Cassidy NBC Jackie Quinn Washington
Mark Levin: Don't Assume Anything, Go out & Vote

Mark Levin

01:14 min | 2 weeks ago

Mark Levin: Don't Assume Anything, Go out & Vote

"We have something they don't have Me on the radio Speaking to 14 and a half million people in every state in the country Every single state in the country So let's do it okay Don't assume you've won Don't assume it's a slaughter Don't assume your vote doesn't count in most cases it will count It's very very crucial That you do this And even though we'll be off the air after 9 p.m. Eastern Time there's crucial races that are going to be closing in Arizona and Colorado Iowa Louisiana and Minnesota and Nebraska New Mexico New York Wisconsin Wyoming 10 p.m. Idaho Montana Nevada Oregon Utah 11 p.m. California Washington state midnight Alaska Hawaii Alaska's key We want shabaka to win So it's very very important I have a few house races in the early closings that will be monitoring as well as some of the Senate races We've got a few in Virginia that are very close

Shabaka Alaska Louisiana Nebraska Iowa Arizona New Mexico Colorado Wyoming Minnesota Idaho Wisconsin Montana Nevada Utah Oregon New York Hawaii California Washington
Elon's Twitter Takeover Is the Louisiana Purchase of Our Time

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:45 sec | 3 weeks ago

Elon's Twitter Takeover Is the Louisiana Purchase of Our Time

"Elon purchasing Twitter is the single most consequential private transaction in American history. Nothing comes even close. You guys can if you guys have another piece in history that is close to a $44 billion purchase of the largest public square to liberate the ability to be able to incubate elite thought. I think it's the Louisiana Purchase of our time. I really do. Now, you might say, Charlie Elon is, you know, he's not one of us. He's already firing the executives. He's already restoring accounts. And he responds to Hillary Clinton with an article that says that this very well might have been a prostitute with Paul Pelosi. We don't know, but it's a question that's Elon, by the way. I'm just quoting Eli. And so we don't know. That's the world's richest man. Just asking a question of which the media should probably be doing right now. So

Elon Charlie Elon Twitter Paul Pelosi Louisiana Hillary Clinton ELI
Abortion clinic that opened days after Roe fell is inundated

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 3 weeks ago

Abortion clinic that opened days after Roe fell is inundated

"A new Planned Parenthood clinic in Kansas finds it as overwhelmed with demand from other states Just four days before a Kansas City Kansas abortion clinic opened its doors this past June the Supreme Court overturned roe versus wade The facility was planned as a place for women to get healthcare in a medically underserved working class neighborhood but now the clinic has been inundated with patients from other states that have restricted abortion like Missouri Arkansas Oklahoma Texas and Louisiana The three Planned Parenthood centers in Kansas say they are only able to take about ten to 15% of the patients seeking abortions Those turned away are advised to take appointments in Colorado or New Mexico if they can get one It can take two weeks to get an appointment for a day after pill thousands of patients likely aren't getting appointments at all Few predicted Kansas would take on this role although in August voters rejected an amendment that would have cleared the way for tougher restrictions Emily Wales the president of Planned Parenthood great plains says the ecosystem is not even fragile it's broken I'm Jennifer King

Planned Parenthood Clinic Kansas Roe Versus Wade Kansas City Supreme Court Arkansas Missouri Louisiana Oklahoma Texas New Mexico Colorado Emily Wales Planned Parenthood Great Plain Jennifer King
John Zmirak: Half of the Country Thinks the Other Are Unfit Parents

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:35 min | 3 weeks ago

John Zmirak: Half of the Country Thinks the Other Are Unfit Parents

"Piece I'd like to talk about, each half of the country thinks the other half are unfit parents. And one half is right. Okay. All right, so think about this. Half the country thinks the other half are unfit parents. When these liberals drag their toddlers into drag queen acts with sex workers dressed as strippers, stuffing money into their groins, do we think this is appropriate parental behavior? If they were going into a heterosexual strip joint, would we think that was okay either? No, we would be calling social services because they are sexualizing. They are psychologically abusing. They are grooming their own children. When schools in California basically try to create gender dysphoria in kids by giving them books that encourage them to question whether they were born in the wrong body. Or encourage them to think they might be one of 45 fictitious genders. That is child abuse. Now, we can say I can say I live in Texas, that's not happening in Texas. Is that enough? I mean, is it enough for us to say, all right, we're going to protect unborn children in Texas, but you can kill them in California, and you can set up abortion clinics at the airport. And you can ship abortion drugs from California to Texas to kill Texas babies here. In the same way, the liberals are not going to be satisfied with letting us protect unborn babies in Mississippi and Louisiana. They want them killed everywhere.

Texas California Mississippi Louisiana
The Rude Pundit Worries About Crime More in Louisiana Than New York

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:58 min | Last month

The Rude Pundit Worries About Crime More in Louisiana Than New York

"Other thing that we have to drive home, right? I don't have in front of me, but is it 8 out of the top ten states? Most crime word and states are red states. They're Republican states. I mean, the problem is, what was that debate in Oklahoma with Kevin stitt? The governor debate. Yeah. The woman running against him is half Meister. That sounds right, yes. I'm not related to hoffa or for her. But she said absolutely, of course. As Democrats tend to do, she cited a statistic correctly that crime is worse per CAPiTA under Kevin state in Oklahoma than in New York or California. And all he was like, oh, what are you not an entrepreneur at Nacho? Do you believe I had to times worse here? Because all the yahoos will go, oh yeah, that couldn't be, you know, but it's absolutely true. The problem is like you were saying with these moderators, they right there should have said yes, that is true. That statistic is true. I'm way more frightened when I go to go visit family in Louisiana about crime. Than I am in New York because, you know, you know why? Because we're used to being with people. We're used to looking at and, you know, being out and actually, you know, at least noticing what's going on, and sometimes even people that don't look like you. Yeah, I mean, you know, yes, you're gonna find a crime every now and then where everybody where nobody did anything, because everybody was too scared, but it's like, I'm gun states. They're the Yahoo gun states. Of course they're more dangerous than the murder rates are higher. Everybody solves everything with a gun there, right? Yeah, I'm more afraid walking around the neighborhood where my family lives because I because nobody is out. There's nobody outside. It is empty. And it's like walking through a ghost town because everybody's huddled inside their houses. And, you know, whereas, you know, I walk around in New York and it's like, oh, everybody's kind of hanging out, you know? It's a neighborhood.

Kevin Stitt Oklahoma Hoffa Meister New York Kevin California Louisiana Yahoo
Doorbell video shows malnourished Texas twins seeking help

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last month

Doorbell video shows malnourished Texas twins seeking help

"A woman accused of abusing her twin teens in suburban Houston has a criminal record of child abuse I Norman hall Court records show a mother whose twin teenagers told police in suburban Houston they were handcuffed and forced to drink bleach pleaded guilty a decade earlier to charges of putting her kids in danger Zika Duncan was arrested in Louisiana this week along with her live in boyfriend Doorbell videos show the 15 year old siblings barefoot and holding handcuffs knocking on homes before dawn in their neighborhood and Cyprus and asking for help According to an affidavit by Harris county constable the brother and sister were severely malnourished and said the abuse had been occurring for months the mother and boyfriend are being held in Baton Rouge and face extradition On Norman hall

Norman Hall Court Houston Zika Duncan Louisiana Cyprus Harris County Baton Rouge Norman Hall
10 juvenile offenders now in area of Louisiana adult prison

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

10 juvenile offenders now in area of Louisiana adult prison

"Ten young offenders from a suburban New Orleans juvenile latke plagued by violence and escapes have been transferred to the state's main adult prison I Norman hall the tint young offenders were moved from the British city center for youth to the Louisiana state penitentiary at Angola a sprawling remote maximum security prison farm north of Baton Rouge the temporary move was allowed by federal judge over the objections of criminal justice advocates and the young inmates families Each dean will have his own sale and be segregated from the adult population They will be moved back to a youth facility after renovations are completed Governor John Bel Edwards and correction officials announced the transfer of plan in July amid growing pressure from elected officials concerned about escapes I Norman hall

Norman Hall British City Center For Youth New Orleans Angola Baton Rouge Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards Dean
Dinesh Interviews the Attorney for Oath Keepers' Founder Stuart Rhodes

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:54 min | Last month

Dinesh Interviews the Attorney for Oath Keepers' Founder Stuart Rhodes

"Guys, there's a huge trial going on the oath keepers trial and I'm delighted to welcome to the podcast Ed tarpley, Ed's a criminal defense attorney from Louisiana. He's practiced law there for 42 years. In fact, he served as the district attorney in Louisiana from 1991 to 1997. He's one of the attorneys on the team representing Stuart roads Stewart Rhodes, the founder of the oath keepers. And welcome to the podcast. Thanks for joining me. A lot going on. I know in the courtroom and thanks for taking the time to step out and give us an update. How in your assessment is this trial going? And where is it at what stage are we at right now? Yeah, let me just say, first of all, that it's a pleasure to be on the podcast today. As you know, the local court rules prohibit me from discussing the evidence that's in the case that we have to be careful not to run astray of violating the local court rules. But there are many things I can tell you. First of all, I can say that we think the trial is going well. That we have an outstanding team of attorneys working on this case. I'm representing Stewart roads along with Bill linder with Phil lender and James Lee bright from Dallas, Texas, to outstanding lawyers, we have the other defendants, Kelly maggs has Stanley Woodward and Julie Halle from Washington, D.C., Ken harrelson, has Brad guy from New Jersey. Jessica Watkins has a Jonathan Chris from Pennsylvania and mister Thomas Caldwell has bay Fisher from Maryland. So we have a lot of outstanding attorneys on this case and we have a great camaraderie and rapport with each other. So I just think we have an outstanding team in this trial on behalf of the defense.

Ed Tarpley Stuart Roads Stewart Rhodes Louisiana Bill Linder ED Phil Lender James Lee Bright Kelly Maggs Stanley Woodward Julie Halle Ken Harrelson Brad Guy Jessica Watkins Jonathan Chris Mister Thomas Caldwell Bay Fisher Dallas Texas D.C. New Jersey
Quid Pro Joe Threatens the Saudis With Jack Posobiec

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:08 min | Last month

Quid Pro Joe Threatens the Saudis With Jack Posobiec

"Gears here, Jack, I want to talk about OPEC and quid pro Joe. What is the story here? It's a little confusing to most people. Walk us through it with your foreign policy expertise. So the timeline on this is important, right? So over the summer, when gas prices were getting really bad, Joe Biden and his crack team at The White House decided to go over to something called the strategic oil reserve. There are these giant caverns down in Louisiana bio, they're underneath the Louisiana Bayou, these actually salt caverns, limestone, one of them used to be owned by Morton salt, really interesting story. And we, in the 1970s, our country started filling these up as a reserve in case OPEC ever conducted another embargo against the United States or ever looked to cut production. Pay attention to that because that's going to come up later. So Biden decided that he didn't like where his approval numbers were. So what did he do? He started releasing oil from the strategic oil reserve into the markets and prices dipped for a little bit, but now they're back on the upswing again. So last week, Biden calls for OPEC to increase their production. And of course, we remember it was. He goes over there. He has the fist bump with MBS, The Crown prince that's basically in charge of how do you right now. Saudi Arabia's government is basically run my game, like Game of Thrones. It's Game of Thrones rules over there. So the king is pretty much he's down, but he's not out yet completely, but MBS is the prince is really running the government. Yeah, the prince is running down. So if you've seen Game of Thrones, that's basically how they run Saudi Arabia. And so OPEC plus last week comes out and says, you know what? We're actually not going to increase production. We're going to decrease production. Joe, we're very sorry about that. We don't like the things that you've been doing. We've decided that we're going to push off. And Charlie, you had Steve Bannon on here yesterday for that incredible discussion about the collapse of the Anglo American financial system worldwide. This is part and parcel of that because of course everyone knows that system. And maybe we should do some more episodes explaining this for people. It's backed by the petrodollar. It's backed by the fact that all oil transactions petroleum LNG must be conducted around the world in U.S. currency, even if

Opec Louisiana Bayou Biden Joe Biden JOE Morton White House Saudi Arabia Jack Louisiana U.S. Steve Bannon Charlie
"louisiana" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:40 min | 7 months ago

"louisiana" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Sorry, this didn't work. We were very honest with ourselves about the facts, the items we chose to feature in the first ads didn't resonate. And if we didn't have our spokesperson yet, who we discovered of the following spring and we named her Annie, she spoke with such credibility about what was unique about our brand, she told stories beautifully. And we married Annie with better product innovation and better margins. And that's when the magic started to happen. And that campaign continued while it's still on there today. I want to ask you about Annie because there was some controversy as you know around Annie. There was some people critics who said, hey, you know, Annie makes me uncomfortable. It's sort of feels like a mammy or an aunt jemima kind of having an African American woman representing the brand. When you heard that criticism, what did you think? I mean, did you think I should just never thought about that before? Well, of course we wanted to be sensitive in how we brought forward our spokesperson for the brand. So what we focused on was did she resonate with our customer and our customer was 40% African American nationwide. And we spent lots of time with our customer and ask our customers to let us know what stories they want to be told and if you look very carefully about the stories we told through and they were all about the unique food characteristics of this region of the country called Louisiana. She just really drew you into the brand and the product stories we had to offer in the way she did her job. I know that you left the company in 2017. He stepped down after ten years running a company who led the company through ten straight years of growth. I think there are 2500 or more Popeyes restaurants around the world. I mean, you had an incredible success there, right? Like you were sort of the poster child for a turnaround leader, the tons of articles about how you were kicked out of KFC and then you turned Popeyes around this incredible triumph. But I read a quote of yours where you basically said, look, the thing that I didn't fully achieve was getting the trust from the franchisees that I the full trust that I'd hoped to have gotten. You turn the company around, why wasn't that relationship fully mended? The subtitle of that quote was trust with franchisees, not permanent. You have to earn it every day. And that does get frustrating to the leader. Sure. Because you think you should earn trust and it should stick. But the reality is this is an economic relationship. And so trust was good when sales and profits were good and trust evaporated quickly when they weren't. And that's just the way it works. So I think that's the color story behind that quote. I look back on that time and say, I'm confident we achieved the highest level of trust I've ever observed between franchisors and franchisees, but we still had a job to do of earning it every day. You are now retired and you still serve on some boards, including on Chick-fil-A's board, we're talking right now in the middle of the greatest global health and past week economic crisis, certainly health crisis that anyone has experienced in living memory. This is a huge test. I mean, whether it's for Popeyes or Chick-fil-A or KFC or any of the dominoes in the brands you've been associated in the bisco, this is a huge test for all of these brands. I mean, God, imagine being the CEO of Popeyes right now, right? I mean, what do you have to lay off thousands of employees or of KFC? If you were running Popeyes right now, can you imagine what you would, how would you even begin to kind of navigate this? This crisis. Well, you know, I'm privileged to sit on three boards and I'm watching really good leadership teams tackle the decisions right now live and so I think the current stories are the most relevant here. The trait that I most admire in leaders I'm observing right now is those that are willing to say, I've never seen this before and my first step is to proactively seek advice and counsel from other wise leaders, other trusted advisers. They are not saying I am the savior. I know all the answers. That is exactly wrong. The fastest way to move accurately in a crisis is to take many inputs fast and sort out wisdom from those many inputs. So very first COVID call I was on. A young leader asked his board to bring together all the years of their career wisdom. We walked him through 9 11. We walked him through 2008. We went back to World War II. We talked about the 1929 depression. We talked about the Spanish flu. We told this young leader about things they'd never heard about read about or been a part of the decision making. And I really believe that that leader took in tremendous wisdom fast by asking those questions was open to receiving that council. And as a result, garnered lots of lessons of history. You know, history really does repeat itself. And I think the listener and the learner is the best leader for this time. Cheryl, when you think about leadership and your own journey, do you think that at least from your perspective, you've kind of born to be a leader that you had those skills from an early age or that you really had to learn how to lead? I think in many ways was prepared to be a leader by my parents and my education. So I think there's a preparation and an environment that you come from that can prepare you well for leadership and I certainly had that opportunity. I do think there's some natural gifts that are imbued in leaders. And then you marry that with the experience of my career and the mentoring that I received from many other great leaders. It's a total puzzle piece, right? It's a total puzzle of those things coming together to prepare me for a time, and then also in prepare me not to think I'm the answer to all leadership solutions. You know, I think leaders also need to be able to say no, I'm not the right leader for this particular company or this particular time. So I never want to lose sight of that. That's Cheryl Beck elder. She's the former CEO of Popeyes, Louisiana kitchen. In addition to now serving on the board of Chick-fil-A, Cheryl also serves on the board of US Foods and pier one imports. Thanks for listening to the show this week, the music for this episode was composed and performed by drop electric. And guy raz and you've been listening to wisdom from the top from luminary, built in productions and NPR. This message comes from NPR sponsor ADP, leveraging data driven insights to design HR solutions for businesses of all sizes to think beyond today so they can find more success tomorrow. ADP always designing for people. This message comes from NPR sponsor nerd wallet, need a change of pace, NerdWallet can help you take the first step towards making your dream a reality. Compare and find the smartest financial products for you on NerdWallet..

Annie Popeyes KFC Louisiana Cheryl flu Cheryl Beck depression Chick-fil board of US Foods guy raz NPR ADP
"louisiana" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:34 min | 7 months ago

"louisiana" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"That's why you were hired to do the job. Am I right about that? Well, I think there's two sides of that nickel. One is I think thinking of others does not lessen the way I think of myself. When I teach leadership, I tell people the definition is not be a doormat or have no confidence. The definition, the simply push your decisions through a filter of others before you felt for yourself. And so the flip side of the coin, though, is leaders today worry far too much about what others think and say about them. And far too little about being true to the belief system that they bring to leadership. So I would tell you when I became confident in my leadership philosophy, which is governed by the words, courage, humility, purpose, and principles. I stopped worrying so much about other people's opinions of my leadership or my decisions. So this is the philosophy. And this is the leadership philosophy that you would take with you to Popeyes. And at this point, you're on the board, and then you are asked to become the CEO, I guess in 2007. And if I understand it correctly, when you agreed to become the CEO of Popeyes, they had like four CEOs in the previous 7 years, which is not a great record. I mean, the situation there's arguably presumably even less attractive in some ways than the KFC job that you took 6 years earlier. Well, it was a very difficult time. They too were suffering a distressed relationship with the franchise owners because along with those four CEOs had been 7 years of declining customer counts coming to the restaurants and declining profitability at the restaurants and the franchisees were not happy. And they were literally barging in to board meetings to express their dissatisfaction with the leadership. So yeah, it was a messy time. I now call this these are leaders that like to walk into burning buildings. Because I found it exciting. I really did find it exciting and an odd sort of way to say, wow, there's lots of complexity here. And I do think brave leaders have that kind of worldview. They say, problems are my opportunities. And so I looked around at all that and said, wow, this is fascinating. And I saw and Popeyes, actually, the makings of a beautiful brand because Popeyes had been launched out of this incredible food history called the state of Louisiana that's rich with recipes and culinary inspiration that comes from kind of a melting pot of cultures that's called New Orleans. And so I just literally started reading Louisiana cookbooks immediately to say where's the insight and the idea that we could anchor this brand. So I saw a brand opportunity and everything else was just kind of off kilter and needed to be brought back to kilter. The franchise relationships, the cost structure, et cetera. So I ran into the burning building. So one of the first things you did was you went on a listening tour. You went to visit a bunch of cities and talk to franchise owners. And just get a survey like to do a survey of what was on their minds. And why were they so angry? What did you learn from doing that? Well, you have to remember these are the people that borrowed the money to build the buildings hired the people trained them and were serving our guests every day and they hadn't seen top line or bottom line growth in the business in years. And those that were building new restaurants were getting zero cash on cash returns. It was pretty desperate financial circumstances. What was it was there just a general downturn in fast food or was it Popeyes specific challenge? No, it was Popeye specific. We had not done our job of building this great brand. There was just lots of opportunity to tell the story of Popeyes in a fresh way that became the story of Popeyes Louisiana kitchen. We renamed the entire company. The second pillar was we were a fast food restaurant with the slowest drive-through times in the industry. We ranked 98 out of a hundred. Now, that's just brain dead. You can't be called quick service restaurant, right? They have terrible drive-throughs. So we decided to fix our drive-throughs. Third thing is we weren't making any money at the store level. Well, that's just a recipe for disaster. We found $45 million in the supply chain that just wasteful just wasteful spending or yeah, just lack of good practice and how we sourced and bid things out. Just lots of missed opportunity and that whole supply chain arena. And out of those three things, we created the economics that made people want to build more and we built over a thousand restaurants in the next several years. It was an a you get there in 2007. Your CEO number 5 in the previous 7 years and now there's a lot of pressure on you to turn this around. And people want quick results. And one of the, from what I read, one of the early things you did was to really convince the franchise owners to contribute a percentage of their money to pay for ads, national ads, and that Popeyes would throw in a lot of money and you would do national ads on cable television. First of all, I'm just, I was shocked to find out that in 2007, 2008, there was no national advertising for Popeyes. No, and it's fairly normal in a restaurant's development that there's a tipping point you reach where suddenly national television is far more cost effective than local. And we had reached that tipping point a few years back but had not acted on it. There was a lot of distrust between the franchise or the franchisees. So we started rebuilding trust and one of the ways we did that was making that decision together. We brought in a third party expert to show us the facts. And then my team made this brave proposal. Why don't we start with three national flights of television to prove that it works? And the franchisees said, well, give us some time to talk. And when they invited us back in the room, they said, well, if you want to be brave, why don't you kick in some money and we'll do 5 flights. They're proposal was far braver than our proposal. And they ask us to put skin in the game. And that's what we did. And oh my goodness, I'm so glad we went in it, locked arms because we launched that campaign in the fall of OA when the wheels came off the economy. And had we not built that plan together, there's no way we would have seen it through under the pressure of the crash of O 8. Our franchisees did not flinch in the fall of OA, even though it was not going well at all. We stuck with that media commitment for 18 months and we came out a market share winner on the other side of the economic collapse. Now, Popeyes is seems like it's everywhere and it's a huge, it just grew and leaps and bounds. But initially, I mean, when you started that national ad campaign, it was not successful. It didn't move really move the needle. And I guess you kind of came out and you said, hey, I'm.

Popeyes Louisiana KFC CEOs New Orleans
"louisiana" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

08:25 min | 7 months ago

"louisiana" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"To do real breakthrough new product launches that stood the test of time. One of the brands I think you were kind of in charge of launching was the planter's honey roasted peanuts, right? Is it right? Yes, honey roasted peanuts was one of the first innovations in nuts and a very, very long time. I mean, how do you go through peanuts? It just seems like a no brainer. It tastes great. I can't believe it took until what the 80s for somebody, for somebody to come up with that. The specific origin of that idea was in a small southeastern competitor that had kind of a candied coating on a nut. And so I guess the key to all product innovation is to start with the marketplace and start with the customer. And in that case, you know a scan of all the innovative smaller nut companies that were largely in the south at that point in time. And they were experimenting with flavor profiles and techniques that we had not tried. We had scale, but we didn't necessarily have the experimentation going on. That's a strategy all large companies can use is to look to smaller, faster moving and be fast followers. And probably the one that the second one I'm most passionate about from that time frame is gummy savers because remember those, yeah, sure they're still around. They're very much around a created a whole new way to think about lifesavers candy and was the first really fresh tasting gummy product made in the USA before that they were hard to chew bears that usually came from Germany. I think most of us trained as MBAs think we're supposed to come up with all the brilliant new ideas and launch our ideas. But in fact, the really big ideas come from your customers mouths. And so they don't say the customer usually can't say, well, I think you should launch gummy savers, but they can say, you know, of all the candies, I really don't like it when those bears get stuck on my teeth. And if you're listening carefully to that, you can say, listen, there's something they like about a more tender chew product. But it can't be stale and the flavors have to be good. Oh, lifesavers has really good flavors. I wonder if we could make a more gel based Chewy product. So insights that come straight out of the customers observations instead of our own heads are far more likely to yield a meaningful business opportunity. I'm guy rose and you're listening to wisdom from the top. We'll be right back. This message comes from NPR sponsor, the Alzheimer's association, connecting across industries with the shared goal of finding treatments for Alzheimer's and all other dementia. Since 1980, the Alzheimer's association has been working to fund critical research that increases the understanding of Alzheimer's disease, but they knew that an important part of the fight against Alzheimer's is also making sure that research is more accessible to people around the world. That's why they created the Alzheimer's association science hub, a free app that provides the latest news, information, and expert views about Alzheimer's and dementia research. Through the app, users can read research and news, access grant summaries and journals or receive breaking news alerts on the latest findings. To download, just visit your device's App Store and search for science hub, expand your knowledge with the science hub today, available where you get your apps. Welcome back to wisdom from the top. I'm guy Roz. All right, so you are at nabisco working in successfully launched two iconic products. You've got this successful career. You're probably on the fast track to bigger leadership posts and 92. You decide to kind of step out for a while. To focus your time on your kits and raising your kids, right? We had young children. I believe our kids at that point were about maybe two and 7. My husband had aging parents with health issues in Michigan. And I was kind of fed up with the leadership of nabisco at that point. It was going through a lot of change. And that confluence event said, you know, I think we can reevaluate this whole thing and try something different. So that's what we did. We picked up our kids. My husband called it an early midlife crisis. And he always says, and I don't recommend you both quit your job on the same day, which is what we did. We gave up all the stability. We actually living near my family at the time, so we moved away from my family to his, gave up our jobs and started fresh when you left nabisco in 92. Did you think that it was going to be a pause and you would go back to work or are you not sure? I never thought those decisions were either or I thought they were at a point in time. And I really encourage young families to think about it this way. Life and work is one whole equation, it is difficult to keep it all sorted out and working well. And so to not be so linear in your thinking that I always must work or I always must stay home or there's one answer for the next ten years. I just always thought that was overblown thinking. We had more of a two or three year view of our life and family. That's about the time frame you can even picture, right? 'cause you don't know what the next stage looks like, really. Certainly don't know. And so what are our kids need now, what are our careers where they at, what are the implications? But I took two major breaks in my 40 year career. And they did not topple over my career. No, in fact, to the contrary. I would suggest that during those breaks, there was some time of reflection looking back and looking forward. A chance to catch your breath, a chance to make sure you feel right about your family decisions and that everyone in your family's prospering, not just one or two of you. I think those are healthy. I think they're healthy things. I think it helps you live a life with fewer regrets. If you give yourself those breathing opportunities, I want to ask you about Domino's. Because you take this break from, I think, from around 92 to 95. And you were doing some consulting work on the side. But mainly you were at home. And I guess Tom monaghan, the founder of Domino's Pizza, which is based in Michigan where you were living at that point. I guess he offers you a job to become a senior vice president for marketing and product development. How does that how does it even come to you? What's the story? How does he find out about you? Well, it was quite serendipity. I had a mentor in New York named Laurel cutler, who was the vice chair of an ad agency. And she had really developed me as a strategic advertiser. I really adored her, and she was an adviser to Tom monaghan. He was a private company, but he had a board of advisers, and she was on it. So we're living in Michigan. I call up Laurel, and I said, I understand Tom monaghan needs a marketer. I would like for you to put my credentials in front of him. And she said, oh, honey, why would you want to do that? And I said, well, Laurel, it's a great brand. It's right next to where I live. And it appears to have a real turnaround brand opportunity. And she goes, well, of course, I'll call him right now. And so there's only like two examples of my whole career of that kind of mentor moment when she picked up the phone and said, Tom, you need to call Cheryl and you need to call her right away. And so I think we had lunch the Tom monaghan and I had lunch the following Friday at that lunch. He wrote the offer on a napkin. And he's quite famous for this. He's done it with baseball players and executives both. He wrote it on a napkin and he asked for an immediate answer. And I said, well, Tom, I'm honored to have this opportunity..

Alzheimer's Alzheimer's association nabisco dementia Tom monaghan NPR Roz Michigan Germany App Store USA Domino Laurel cutler New York Laurel Cheryl Tom baseball
"louisiana" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

02:50 min | 7 months ago

"louisiana" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"To this funding year. Wonderful. Well, I will save everyone the trouble of having to find those on their own. I will share those links far and wide. Thank you. Of course. But I think I speak for everyone when I say you are a true inspiration for the work you all are doing. I can't thank you enough for putting an effort for these plants. And really habitat in general. I mean, it's a piece of a larger puzzle that is so necessary for not only the biosphere, but our existence and no one feels that stronger than people that live on the Louisiana coast. So thank you for all of your efforts and for telling us about it today. I really appreciate it. Well, and I got to tell you, you talk about Maya efforts, if I was going out to rescue dollars, was by myself and I was planting about myself 300 of them. So, yeah, I'm going to face tonight of my group, but we literally have hundreds of volunteers. That's wonderful. That we do and would be possible without that help. Perfect. Well, shout out to every single one of them and Gary, thank you again for taking time to be the face of it tonight. We really appreciate it. All right, good. All right, well hang in there, stay healthy and keep it up. Thanks a lot. I appreciate it. And I appreciate it. Of course. It was a pleasure. Right. Cheers. All right, truly inspirational work. I thank Gary for taking time out of his busy schedule to talk with us and I really hope you will go check out the links in the show notes over at in defense of plants dot com slash podcasts and consider helping out the Louisiana iris conservation initiative. These irises are amazing. They need a future on this planet, but they're also part of a bigger ecosystem in all of this work goes into making swamps and freshwater wetland habitats, healthy again. Nowhere is this more apparent than the Louisiana coast and I really thank Gary and all of the volunteers that put in time to help these plants and their habitat. Once again, please check out those show notes and consider helping them out. And while you're there, consider helping out the show either by becoming a patron over at Patreon dot com slash in defense of plants or by picking up my book, some of our customizable merch or stickers. All of those links are also in the show notes for each episode. So check that out. And at the very least, consider hitting that subscribe button. I have a shout out to the latest producer on this podcast, a big thank you goes out to Dan, who just signed up at the producer credit level. So thanks to people like Dan, the show can keep running each and every week. So thank you again, Dan. I really appreciate it. But that is it for this week. I thank you all for listening. Keep checking back in because of course there is always so many good conversations just over the horizon. But until next time, hang in there, stay healthy and get outside if you can. This is your host Matt, signing out. Audio everyone..

Louisiana coast Gary Louisiana iris conservation in Maya Dan Matt
"louisiana" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

01:47 min | 7 months ago

"louisiana" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"When they had the big dedication of this program now, pipeline representatives from all around the country. Hey, wait a minute. So this small group in wolf Franklin museum. We have an idea that could fundamentally unbelievably increase the amount of wildflowers and policies. Not just the Louisiana, but it may be all over the country. So that's what's called hitting the home run. Yeah. That's something. Yeah. Hope you're happy. There's a few hundred hours from going out on the project. They really, and I hope it works because of the could be something you can hang your hat on and so and it shows this, it shows a willingness to work with instead of against all the time, which it always feels like people are trying to just divide, divide, divide, but if we can find that common ground and work with, you know, we could be improving a lot of what makes our society already pretty fun to live in, right? And make it better. Right. And so with that in mind, people listening, people listening to this are coming in from all over the world all over the country at the very least, maybe not necessarily all in Louisiana, but are there ways people listening can help your mission? Spreading the word, donating that kind of thing? Yeah, we do need money, not a lot, but we have to usually right after the bloom is when we restock our solving area in the containment spray and we got a lot more soil. So we generally try to raise a couple $1000 a.

wolf Franklin museum Louisiana
"louisiana" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

02:07 min | 7 months ago

"louisiana" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"Our there's about three or four Louisiana nurseries that are growing the culture wars. When to grow Louisiana on our go, then. Good. Getting the species. Plants that have to go out on the walls and because as I said, those in decline, you don't want to dig up over here and then move them playing them on a more administration over there. So at the same time, they do produce huge numbers of seeds. So I think we'll see develop some ownership is actually growing up I see because each in the wild, each flower produces a seed pod. And each seed pod can have between 30 and 50 or 60 seeds. Wow. Okay. Each flower stalk is three C so let's say 60 times three at a 180 C for. So when you see these pitches of masses of viruses, we did our collection at the base of our life for our huge last year. We collected 6000. Wow. Which is a lot of see. So yeah, I think I'm not even sure they're going to do anything unless there's demand. Naturally. And none of the places that are doing restoration projects are going to want to experiment with something new or something different. Unless the people had to run the project or land on his ass for it. So that's the people that wear out. We want to get to the people who ultimately are responsible when everything is done with the land to want who is in our system going back when they're properties again. I tell you, it's easy to sell. And I think the whole thing is actually.

Louisiana
"louisiana" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

03:43 min | 7 months ago

"louisiana" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"He struck up a conversation. And she says, I want to go see it. So she talked him in the window. It was a group there. When they realized who she was, it was like celebrity. And she bonded with everybody there. So she invited us all to come back to her nursery to learn more about what we did on the hopes that she can participate some way. That's fantastic. And so we go in there tomorrow morning. So things like that kind of half of them have been popping up. And there's so many things that's happened just in the last two weeks, I'd love to share with all the script that this has happened. I love it. We were cool. Because people, you know, people in south Louisiana, people are all here to tell you about Louisiana. That's awesome to hear. Yeah, especially considering the sort of cultural disconnect that has occurred over the last few decades. That's right. And a lot of what we're seeing the boardwalks coming out of the family. Wow. Because with the boardwalks allow you to do, and this is one of the things I've always said, you know, we talk about more stress duration and making sure to swamps or buffer between us and so on. But you don't know all this got to have a few 100,000 people have never actually seen this. I believe it. Yeah. We'll see it up close. Right. Because you know they all live behind the levees. 22 feet tall. And so unless you're fish or Han or something like that. It's not necessarily a good reason to go out and explore on the other side of the world. Yeah, and I feel like the word swamp in and of itself conjures up this idea of just bugs. People want to avoid, but when you finally get out and see when you're like, oh, this is really cool and beautiful and interesting. That immersion. Yeah. Well, one of the first places to get a more and more was the bar terrier preserve the start service fee. And that was the first time I think that the public could actually safely, like you hovering above it all. And let me tell you, I had to open table open house table. Sunday. This past song and I'll tell you it's crazy. I mean, a Boer with only like a photo foot and a half fine to give it on the Boer war for the snakes everywhere of a biologic. But man, everyone loves it. It's a matter of fact, I had a tough competition. It was. Not too many hours. This thing has teeth. And you know, when I'm working at the Boer war to kill me every time I run into somebody, I always dream they're going to say, we have a house, but it's sort of a wet alley. Who knows? Maybe it'll be interviewing me and a few years for the alligator. Yeah, right. Whatever way the wind blows. Yeah, exactly. This seems more, this makes more sense at this point. Yeah. So what happened was all these different places started getting bored washed into town regime with the big branch in Wakanda. While I took this race out to enjoy wildlife refuge as more and more Mandalay has.

south Louisiana Louisiana Wakanda Mandalay
"louisiana" Discussed on MIP Make It Plain with Mark Thompson

MIP Make It Plain with Mark Thompson

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"louisiana" Discussed on MIP Make It Plain with Mark Thompson

"Com <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> slash <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> politics <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of food. That's <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> point box dot com <Silence> <Advertisement> slash politics <SpeakerChange> of <Speech_Male> food. <Speech_Male> This episode <Speech_Male> is brought to you by <Speech_Male> abc. <Speech_Male> Get ready for sparks <Speech_Male> to fly during the <Speech_Male> epoch station. Nineteen <Speech_Male> grey's anatomy crossover <Speech_Music_Male> premier event. <Speech_Music_Male> All your burning questions <Speech_Music_Male> will be answered like <Speech_Music_Male> who will be the new <Speech_Music_Male> captain of station. Nineteen <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> now that meredith survived. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> What's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> next firm. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Brace yourself one <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> helluva return <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and a surprise guest <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on grazed never <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> saw coming. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Don't miss the station. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Nineteen grey's me. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Crossover premier event <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thursday september thirtieth <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on abc <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and streaming on hulu. <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Is there <Speech_Male> any <Speech_Male> organizing <Silence> mobilizing <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> jefferson parish <Speech_Male> or outside of <Speech_Male> jefferson parish <Speech_Male> to do <SpeakerChange> something <Speech_Male> about this <Silence> so <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> the one thing which <Speech_Male> is interesting is <Speech_Male> that new orleans has <Speech_Male> a ton of civil <Speech_Male> rights organizations <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> they've been solely <Speech_Male> focused on new orleans. There's <Speech_Male> not a lot of focus <Speech_Male> on jefferson parish <Speech_Male> for it you know. It's <Speech_Male> just the way it happens. New orleans <Speech_Male> sucks up all the attention <Speech_Male> the room <Speech_Male> but in jefferson parish. <Speech_Male> There's this amazing group <Speech_Male> called the village keepers <Speech_Male> and these are <Speech_Male> leaders in the <Speech_Male> black community from sort <Speech_Male> of all these different neighborhoods. <Speech_Male> They <Speech_Male> came together last <Speech_Male> year to <Speech_Male> push reforms for <Speech_Male> the sheriff's office. <Speech_Male> You know it's hard. <Speech_Male> It's they're they're facing <Speech_Male> a sheriff. That is <Silence> all powerful <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> But yesterday after our <Speech_Male> story ran on friday <Speech_Male> the aclu <Speech_Male> put out a statement <Speech_Male> demanding <Speech_Male> that the us attorney's <Speech_Male> office conduct <Speech_Male> were launch a federal <Speech_Male> investigation into the <Speech_Male> sheriff's office. <Speech_Male> Whether that happens <Speech_Male> will will <Speech_Male> have

"louisiana" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"louisiana" Discussed on Here & Now

"Our hips and jump in. We're just a few hundred yards from the gulf of mexico sunk. This is actually really solid. Good walking for wetlands. I can tell the water is already comfortably. Warm as the summer draws on it will be the fuel for powerful hurricanes that could wipe out the nearby port which services ninety percent of the gulf's offshore oil industry mac leading me toward the shore to show me something that could mitigated disaster. It's an unassuming plant called the black mangrove. Which is increasingly common here. These mangoes are actually a tropical species and because the climate is warming and we're not getting these hard freezes. These tropical plants are moving into the southern reaches of louisiana by now. Were out of the water trudging through a mangrove thicket. That belongs to conaco phillips. The oil company owns six hundred forty thousand acres in southern louisiana making it the largest private wetland donor in the country. Sounds like a muddy job. You have your covered by the time it's all said and done. Fleshy mangrove tubes. Stick up from the mudan trip. Us up mac and scientists. She works with named robert lane from louisiana state university. Say those tubes are called pneumatic fours there the root system. But they're also what sticks out of the water so that the plant can actually take oxygen. You want this. This is this is good. This is going to protect from storm surge. Yeah there's a whole the wetlands together and not dissipate since the nineteen thirties. Louisiana has lost more than nine thousand nine hundred square miles of land to erosion. That's the size of delaware. Blame the oil companies for much of it for decades. They've dug a system of canals through the fragile marsh to excess their wells climate change and sea rise are compounding the problem. Max says losing the land means losing a buffer from powerful storm surge. What really happens with a surge. Is you get this. Big wall of water with hurricane katrina. It was twenty eight feet. And then you also have the waves on top of the water so it really can. Cause massive destruction to levy systems like in hurricane katrina massive flooding by some estimates. It'll take ninety billion dollars in the next fifty years to restore the coast for the past several years. Sarah mac and robert lane have tested a theory. What if you collect a bunch of mangrove seeds known as propagators and replant them across tens.

conaco phillips robert lane louisiana gulf of mexico louisiana state university mac hurricane katrina Louisiana delaware Max Sarah mac
"louisiana" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"louisiana" Discussed on Here & Now

"Marsh. It washes through little cuts And before you know it a vote my go through two votes might go through it and then it just keeps getting bigger and bigger deep and deepening before you know it. It's going the state of louisiana predicts that if nothing is done in this area flooding will make daily life next to impossible within fifty years. The water will rise nearly three feet and by some estimates in the next eighty years half a million climate refugees will flee the parishes around new orleans. Know you've lived here your whole life. Have you ever thought about leaving. No no we've ought to people. We can't leave you know that's it. This is all we know you get water water. Go the way you come back. Start all over again. Four years later the water is back when hurricanes like ida tear through louisiana's fragile wetlands. They make a russian even worse. Climate change and sea level rise contribute to plus silt from the highly controlled mississippi river. No longer flows downstream like it once did so the land is actually sinking in two thousand seventeen. Sarah mack wanted to show me something that might help. Scientists from the feet steered her boat to the very place where ida made landfall on sunday too. Shallow marshes of port. sean. Mac drops anchor. We pull big rubber waiters up to our hips and jump in. We're just a few hundred yards from the gulf of mexico sunk. This.

louisiana Marsh new orleans Sarah mack mississippi river sean gulf of mexico
"louisiana" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"louisiana" Discussed on Here & Now

"Wgn oh total. Total devastation catastrophic anywhere between seventy five to two hundred people stranded barra carrier. the winds are still too strongly. I would kampe boats in the water to get to him very dangerous situation. I've never seen much more alive. Pertz of lafitte feet were flooded under at least ten feet of water. Dozens of people had to be rescued from their homes others evacuated before the levees were topped. Sarah mac was one of them when we spoke yesterday. I asked if her family's home was okay. We still don't know we haven't been able to get in yet at the islands. Still completely submerged will Right i mean judging by what you've first of all seen in the news and what you've heard from your friends and your neighbors on social media you must be. You must be concerned about what the state of your home is. Oh absolutely i mean through the storm. I was definitely getting videos from neighbors of houses being off their foundations and floating down the by in front of our house. The levy that was over topped immediately. Warehouses was seven and a half feet are home is eight and a half feet elevated and then of course wind damages are severe too so sometimes your house makes it through the flooding. But you'll still find you don't have a roof to come home to or who knows the extent of damages you know. We're hearing a lot of people say that this wasn't as bad as katrina because at least around new orleans the the levees held that's true I mean but it sounds like it sort of depends on on where you are right And at least in your area may may have been worse than katrina absolutely toiling vida and flooded all with katrina. This path and hurricane has had much much more significant damages of any hurricane ever for the community of lafitte. It's really just been devastated. I was anxious to hear how sarah was doing. Because i know her. She runs a coastal restoration. Company called thira resources for years ago last june. She took me on. Our boat introduced me to local fishermen business owners fellow scientists to help me understand an issue that feels all to relevant today. Louisiana's coastline is vanishing every hour of every day the state loses a football field worth of wetlands to coastal erosion as they learned in 2017 seventeen. It's affecting the environment and the lives of the people who live along the marsh trip. Annella this a little bit rip blank is a charter boat. Captain who's been fishing the by us his entire life we met at a dock in barataria fishing town about thirty miles north of the gulf of mexico. But they do. This boat goes out and he catches debate. This shrimp boat is part of louisiana. Has three hundred and fifty million dollars a year commercial fishing industry but it's under threat disrupted in recent years by powerful hurricanes and the twenty ten ep oil spill there's also a slower moving crisis erosion is changing the environment. That blank has relied on for years. Even my customers starting to recognize it now and don't come back once it leaves. Water is destroying the fragile marsh. It washes through little cuts And before you know it a vote my go through two votes might go through it and then it just keeps getting bigger and bigger deep.

kampe Sarah mac katrina Wgn thira resources lafitte Annella barataria new orleans sarah Louisiana football gulf of mexico Captain louisiana
"louisiana" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"louisiana" Discussed on Here & Now

"Than a million homes and businesses in louisiana are still without power today and it may be weeks before all the lights and the air conditioners turned back on. Hurricane ida has slowed to a tropical storm and moved north but it has left behind a tremendous mess flooded roads toppled power lines. Cars and houses swept away. At least four people are dead. Senator bill cassidy. A republican from louisiana joins us now from baton rouge senator. Thank you very much for making time for us today. Thank you for having me. I appreciate it look. I know you're no stranger to hurricanes in louisiana but when you recently flew over the southern part of your state in a us coastguard plane. Did you see anything that surprised. You were just just the grandma for example which is often had hard had obviously been completely washed oliver and one of my one of my colleagues said that he thought this was the worst. He's ever seen granddaughter Now maybe we should be surprised. It is an incredibly incredibly powerful hurricane and so we're not surprised On the other hand just to see the flooding. The devastation was heartbreaking in thankfully the levies. That protect new orleans held this time. Unlike what happened. Sixteen years ago during katrina. But senator as you well know. The power is out for a million people and businesses across the state and could be for weeks. It is very hot d. Do you feel like this could be a situation. Where many people survive the initial storm. But perhaps not the disaster that follows. Why don't think they'll die as long as they commonsense precautions but to your point the aftermath. We have to take care of just as much as we did preparing for the storm itself.

katrina louisiana ascension parish Bill cassidy hurricane ida chicago senate Bill michigan miami baton rouge carolina Carthage mahadevan oregon peace health sacred heart medi Dr welcome springfield
"louisiana" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"louisiana" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"It's trickier this. Labor market is behaving in a robert strange way. We know that we've got eight hundred thousand jobs to make up from before the pandemic but we also know that does a record level of vacancies and million so something is not quite working in the labor market. That i think is gonna take longer to sort out muhammed. Hillary and he is Chief economic adviser at alliens also in his spare time i suppose. The president of queen's college Cambridge dr earlier. And thanks for your time sir. I appreciate it thank you. This is a big week for housing. Data the national association. Realtor said today pending sales of existing homes fell last month almost two percent from june. It is the second month of declines. We're going to get the benchmark case schiller index tomorrow. That is home prices but a story now about the stuff that we put in our houses the biggest furniture chain in the world that would be i- kia is getting into the buyback and resale business as a way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Starting today at one store in suburban philadelphia the company's going to pilot a program to buy back. Its used furniture in exchange for store credit part of a plan. The company says to keep all those billy bookcases and malmo bedframes from landing in the landfill. Marketplace's amy scott reports. There's already a huge market for used ikea furniture. A quick search of craigslist. Dc netted six hundred thirty six items including an ex torp sectional for two hundred dollars. But what about what doesn't find a home around. Nine million tons of furniture are thrown out every year in landfills. Jonathan madison ski is a home furnishings. Analyst at jefferies. You really just need to walk. You know midtown manhattan to able to see that in in terms of folks moving in and out. Resale has taken off in the apparel industry with retailers like nordstrom and macy's and online sites thread up and the real real touchy waylon directs. Nyu stern center for sustainable business. She says i kia faces a big challenge in meeting. Its goal of zero waste by twenty thirty. It's not exactly known for durability. They may start to design the product. A little differently right if they find that there's a second life and more money to be made on it lasting a little bit longer. Other companies have a different take on sustainability. Michael barlow is ceo of furnish of furniture rental startup. his company went through kia's corporate accelerator. So he's diplomatic. We're not putting jeep. Veneers out there with customers in the first place because we need to refurbish those to a like new state and get them into a second third fourth home and that doesn't come at billy bookcase prices. I may me scott for marketplace. So we've got a bunch of shows that our podcast only you know that right million brazilians uncomfortable the uncertain our also yet. If you need to miss on your local public radio station you can get this program and david program in the morning in mice program on tech..

alliens queen's college Cambridge amy scott kia muhammed Jonathan madison schiller Hillary national association Nyu stern center for sustainab Realtor ikea jefferies philadelphia Michael barlow waylon nordstrom
"louisiana" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"louisiana" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Yeah what do you make not to get into the kremlinology of the federal reserve but number of senior federal reserve Regional presidents have come out and said you know what it's it's time to start cutting back on this support sooner or later. What do you make of that. Yeah we seeing the center of gravity within the fomc which is a federal reserve. Policymaking committee shift ships towards. Let's ease off. This incredible stimulus that was introduced in the midst of the cove. Emergency now why are they shifting if you regions one. Is that getting evidence that the inflation that we own experiencing is likely to be more persistent and higher than the old secondly. There's very little evidence that suggests that this is helping the economy and thirdly it continues to decouple acid crisis markets from the real economy which makes inequality worse and increases the risk of financial instability. What do you suppose you. And some of those regional fed presidents are looking at that either. Chair pal isn't seeing or is seeing and choosing to stay the course anyway. What clearly chat pound has evolved because he came out on friday and said that lots of ground has been covered to reach the maximum employment objective and that inflation objective has been met so clearly he sees things evolving. I think what's different. It's how you see the balance of risk. I can't speak for others. But i can tell you. I see two sided that there's a risk that we may end up doing more harm than good whereas the chad is still seeing it. More as one-sided so. I think it's a balance of risk argument rather than what's actually happening on the ground because what's happening on the ground debate clear we have higher and wolf assistant inflation and we've created one point nine million drops in two months and this balance is that powell thinks the the risks are gonna fade and and you think they're going to continue in accelerate. Perhaps he believes strongly that inflation as transitory. Meaning it is both temporary and reversible. I am saying you know what as as we have to be. More humble about inflation dynamic. There's a likelihood that inflation will be more persistent. That's number one and second. His legal history suggest to him that. It's better to make the mistake of under reacting to inflation than overreacting whereas my widow history is. Let's look at both these liking mistakes and make sure that we tried to balance you wrote in a in a bloomberg piece out today. I think about Chair powell working toward or trying to wordsmith his way. I suppose to constructive ambiguity and that is to say if i can interpret have a little bit both ways correct so so he acknowledged what other people have been seeing but then he hatched it in a very dovish packaging and that's why democracy got all excited and we got yet another record high so clearly the financial marcus. Love this liquidity paradigm. But he chat. How packaged by saying. Even though these things are happening he two things one is still ground to cover and to only time will tell whether the two percent inflation will be sustainable. This is basically giving himself optionality. He is basically trying to to have constructive ambiguity however the market at some point is going to insist on cleric all right well since chair powell Despite our repeated invitations has not yet decided to come back on the program. And i do have you here Let me try to nail you down on timing. How long do you think it will take before we have a sense of of. Who's right so i think at the end of the year. We're going to get the answer to one. Important question is inflation. Higher and mope assistant than the fed expects. The fed is looking to come start coming back down and have clear evidence that we would be within two near two percent next year on the employment front..

Policymaking committee fomc federal reserve Chair powell powell bloomberg
"louisiana" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"louisiana" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"You know all that fun that gets made of infrastructure week. They are really happy to have that infrastructure. Right now down in louisiana from american public media. This is marketplace in los angeles. I'm carl result is monday today. The thirtieth of august always have long everybody in the aftermath of hurricane ida down on the gulf coast more than a million people are without power and are probably going to be that way for a while. Communications networks are down. officials are telling people it's too dangerous to be moving around or to come back if they evacuated but there are a lot of ways. This whole thing could have been worse. So marketplace's kimberly adams gets his going with the return on investment in all that infrastructure that seems to have held back the worst of this storm. We're still waiting to learn the full scope of damage from hurricane ida but said louisiana governor john bel edwards at a white house meeting. Today there is some good news. All of our levy systems particularly are better levy systems in hurricane risk-reduction systems performed magnificently. It's a system that cost more than fourteen billion dollars. The response to the two thousand five devastation from hurricane katrina what happened during katrina was that the levee walls collapsed in more than fifty places and water just poured in from the lake and from canals that surround the city. Andy horowitz teaches at tulane university in new orleans and wrote a book on katrina. He evacuated to birmingham alabama with his family on friday..

hurricane ida kimberly adams louisiana john bel edwards gulf coast carl los angeles white house hurricane katrina katrina Andy horowitz tulane university new orleans birmingham alabama
"louisiana" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"louisiana" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Shows up at your doorstep. You'll be ready. Visit ready dot gov slash plan and make a plan today brought to you by fema and the ad council. This was supposed to be the time of year when we're all getting ready to return to work in an actual office with our colleagues many of whom we've only seen on video calls yet as we've been reporting from apple to wells fargo companies. Big and small are delaying their return to the office. And with the shifting timeline some companies are considering a new possibility when all is said and done offices may be closed for nearly two years. This is raising concerns among executives. That the longer people stay at home the harder or more disruptive a could be to eventually bring back. The wsj's chip cutter has been writing about workplace issues throughout the entire pandemic. And we're glad to have him here. Hi chit highmark morning chip. May i ask where you are working from in this day of remote working. I am still remote myself. I'm working from columbus. Ohio to be closer to my family goddess regardless of where you are chip. You have been in touch with the c. suite. I'm wondering is the fear of people never wanting to come back is just conversation or is this going to be a real issue. The longer we stay remote. This is a real concern. Among a number of executives across industries habits are powerful people have developed new routines in the pandemic and the longer that this has stretched on the more that people have sort of gotten used to working at home and sort of structuring. Their day around remote work the more that many say that there's sort of locked in to give this up and that's causing concern among executives feeling that it's going to be difficult and incredibly disruptive to bring people back into on any sort of pre pandemic schedules even people who maybe once were reluctant to embrace remote work. Who didn't want to get new office chairs at home they didn't they were largely working from the kitchen table. I've spoken with some of those workers. Who said they finally upgraded their setups. In recent months they feel like they're more comfortable now. They like remote work in some ways. And so i think all of this is causing. Some new worries across companies chip. Is there any data on this. So surveys have shown that actually people's preferences and people's feelings towards him at work have actually increased the longer the pandemic has gone on groups like pbc and others have surveyed workers and employers and many people have said that they would like to stay remote that they feel. This is working well for them and yet many employers had some concerns about long-term remote work. We've seen studies showing that productivity has largely held up but are there worries about other things like holding onto talent. This is a big worry. One executive at financial services giant prudential told me that talent is his number one concern at this point and that he feels that people can approach their jobs more from just looking at the numbers and how much they're paid. They're thinking now that they're remote than are disconnected from their colleagues. He says many are maybe more willing to take a call from a recruiter or to entertain an offer somewhere else. And i think we've seen this. Obviously across a number of different professions over the past couple of months as people have quit their jobs for something else but many people many executives really fear that not being able to kind of convene people to bring people together in person to let people see sort of the fun size of their jobs to be able to talk with colleagues and developed those relationships they think it sort of becomes a situation where it's sort of all drudgery. No fun that work. Maybe it's it's easier to sort of just say i'm going to take a job somewhere else. That might pay me a little bit more. I don't feel as tied to my current employer. How does this possibility of an even further delay play into the argument for a hybrid work minal. Some businesses supported others. Shun it that they do. It's still sort of has sort of a range of feelings. When you bring up hype hubbard work. But i think this really makes hybrid work sort of all the more appealing. Many workers many executives have said that they realize that working from home even a couple of days a week can be incredibly important can be really helpful. Sort of that heads down. Time has become a way for people to be more productive at home to get more work done. And i think many are sort of reluctant to give that up and so as we sort of talk about what returned to office might look like many companies are now realizing hybrid has to be part of that discussion so much shuffling so much adjusting as we watch to see what the kobe thousand nine virus doesn't acts with the delta variant does next chip what's next for companies companies are having a really tough time this fall. They expected things to be different and they set different plans. So many have stopped even giving return to office day to this point. They say that they're sick. Of just kind of continually moving them back. Companies like dell and others have just told workers that will let you know. We'll give you a lot of notice before you come back to the office. But we can't give a firm date at this point other companies had sort of planned over the coming months to finally bring people together. There were a lot of sales kickoffs and annual conventions and other events planned for this fall. And it's interesting. Some companies initially said. Can we make those events smaller and still hold them other said. Can we just invite the employees not spouses for example and now many companies are now delaying those events. Or cancelling them altogether and realizing that. It's just not safe at the moment. And so i think this becomes a really difficult time for people trying to figure out. How do we sort of run organizations. Keep people motivated. Keep them engaged with these. Continued delays chip cutter among. The many working. Remotely still chip. Thank you thanks so much. Mark and finally the internet uproar over how often.

wells fargo companies ad council fema wsj pbc columbus apple Ohio prudential dell Mark
"louisiana" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"louisiana" Discussed on AP News

"Louisiana and Utah. I'm Rita Foley. 80 News. I'm Ed Donahue. President. Biden had lunch today on Capitol Hill with Senate Democrats have no comments to said I was great to be home. Great to be back with all my colleagues and I think we got a lot done. Party leaders announced a compromise on a $3.5 trillion infrastructure bill, Press secretary Jen Psaki says. This is all part of the process. We feel this is working exactly as it should president of the United States proposes a bold agenda as he did back in March, Congress works out a path forward works out an agreement on where things look, that's what's happening now. Now he's going to engage. He's going to advocate with members. She's going to advocate with the American people. West Virginia Democrat Joe Manchin stopped short of saying he would back all the policy initiatives that President Biden and top Democrats are pursuing. A senior official tells the AP. The Biden administration will start evacuation flights for Afghan interpreters and translators at the end of the month. As U. S troops leave Afghanistan. Wholesale inflation over the past year jumped by a record amount. The A P S. Ben Thomas has the numbers. The Labor Department reports. The producer Price Index jumped 1% in June. Over the past year, prices at the wholesale level have risen 7.3%. That's the largest year to year gains since the government began the current series on wholesale prices in 2010 bed shared, Jerome Powell told Congress Inflation may be elevated now, but will likely moderate Judge has approved the sale of the oceanfront property where a collapsed Florida condominium building once stood to benefit victims of the deadly disaster. The Champlain Towers south could fetch $100 million. If you need a passport to travel, and you don't have one. Don't make any plans just yet. The State Department says the wait for a passport is now between 12 and 18 weeks. Even if you pay an expedited processing fee, there's a backlog of as much as two million applications, meaning passport requests submitted now probably will not be issued until the fall. This is a P news After months of fear in a city occupied by Ethiopian soldiers and forces from nearby Eritrea. Crowds of Tigre.

Rita Foley Ed Donahue Jerome Powell 2010 Congress March 7.3% Biden $3.5 trillion June $100 million Champlain Towers Democrats Joe Manchin Utah 1% Florida Eritrea AP Louisiana