26 Burst results for "Louise Kelly"

"louise kelly" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:39 min | Last week

"louise kelly" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"To all things considered. And at 5 44 you were listening to it on member funded 90.1. Good afternoon. I'm Jim burris. Well, when you tuned into all things considered this afternoon, you likely heard. And I'm married Louise Kelly, this hour leaders from Russia and China were in Uzbekistan. Post Mary Louise Kelly spoke those words about ten feet from where I'm talking to you from right now in WAB studio four, all of us would like to welcome Mary Louise to the station to Atlanta and for Kelly home. Georgia native Kelly began her career as a political reporter at the Atlanta journal constitution and in a full circle moment, the Atlanta press club just announced Kelly is one of 6 journalists it's inducting into its 2022 Hall of Fame. Earlier, we got a few minutes to chat. Welcome. Thank you. I'm so happy to be here. Before we were talking about kind of how you have specifically worked with ATC during the pandemic and maybe tell me a story about how that has changed the way you approach hosting in general. I know I have. I think it's allowed all of us to take ourselves a little bit less seriously, which you try to do. I mean, I came to NPR from the BBC. Where we were taught very much to project and be the voice of God and tell you what you need to know and I came to NPR and they're like, no, no, no. Just talk to me. Just talk to like one person. Just try to sound conversational. But it's hard you get in the big studios at NPR, and there's a million people on the other side of the glass, and it feels like you're doing something big and important. Which you are, but you're also just trying to have a conversation with hopefully whoever is out there listening and connect with them and tell them something that will be valuable to them and helping to understand the world, the country, their community. And when you're doing it all from your guest bedroom or your basement as we have all done all during the pandemic and the dog is running in and out and barking it in opportune moments and then in my case my teenage children are banging doors and running around in the house and you just think, you know what can you do? We're all in this together and it's pretty hard to take myself seriously sitting here in my spandex sweatpants and the dog banging in and out while I interview whoever the newsmaker du jour who's been plopped in front of me to interview is and you just think, okay, we're figuring it out best as we can go. I will also say though that having all of us done this from batic, the basement, the spare bedroom or for lucky enough to have one. For so long, to be back out in the world, to be here in Atlanta, talking to you and interviewing people in the same room. It feels great. A decade from now when we look back on what COVID was or is or did, how do you think we're going to frame it? Oh God knows, I don't know. I don't know that anybody's figured out the answer to that. I think we're all still trying to figure out even where are we now and what do we call this? Are we in post pandemic emerging from pandemic? And for a while, we kept hoping it was we were moving toward post pandemic and then a new variant in a new wave would come and so I think we're all still very much figuring that out. I don't know that it ever goes back to the way it was and all of all of us showing up to work in our coat and ties every day. I don't know that that's happening again. And some of that is changes very much for the better and some of it. I think we're going to have to figure out what all we've lost because there's been a lot. Mary Louise Kelly one of 6

Jim burris Louise Kelly Mary Louise Kelly Kelly NPR Atlanta journal Atlanta press club Mary Louise Uzbekistan Atlanta du jour Russia batic Georgia China BBC
"louise kelly" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

04:12 min | 5 months ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Considered I'm rob Schmidt And I'm Mary Louise Kelly When there's a huge line at your local coffee shop because maybe they're short staffed It can be annoying Well our next guest argues that for his industry staff shortages are more than an annoyance they can be life threatening Christopher white is CEO of road to responsibility That is a Massachusetts company that provides care and services for adults with disabilities They are struggling to find workers because they can't match the starting wage being offered by other businesses businesses like target say or Bank of America Christopher white welcome to all things considered Thanks for having me Mary Louise Just in a sentence or two would you tell me a little bit more about the people you are serving Who comes to a company like wood to responsibility So we serve adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities including autism and acquired brain injuries They are as young as 22 and our oldest person that we support is I believe 97 Okay so quite a range And when you say you're short staffed how short staffed what's the gap We have 260 vacant positions right now Which represents about 27% of our total workforce What is your understanding of why Why can't you hire an these people So keep it really simple is three big factors There's demographics that COVID drove a lot of boomers to retire a lot sooner than was predicted A vast immigrant population has for many years been a band aid for human service staffing was This really no longer available in the big one though is just the pay rates The employment market has changed radically in the I guess we're in a sort of post COVID world right now The transitioning out of COVID world Yeah how big is the gap I said you can't match wages being offered elsewhere The state contracts we have will support entry level wages of between $15 an hour and $16 and 79 cents an hour for our direct care staff We increased that rate using one time dollars this year to $17 an hour And thankfully that plus generous recruitment and retention bonuses stop the hemorrhaging of staff leaving the workforce but hasn't really allowed us to gain any ground Whereas people can go down the street and work for Dunkin Donuts for $18 an hour we can compete with it What does it mean to be trying to run a company and have 27% fewer staff than you need to be fully stuffed What are the consequences of that What isn't getting done Well we're getting things done by quality isn't what it was And people are exhausted I've got staff who are routinely working a hundred hours a week A hundred hours a week Yep Routinely Routinely You know so when people are working that much and are tired mistakes get made and again we're not alone This is happening everywhere That sounds like you're dealing with a really vulnerable population and what you're saying is they're delays in their care and their treatments that they need Yeah and for many people it means they're not getting services at all People that were participating in our day services either employment or a therapeutic day service for people who are more medically compromised and older we've only been able to get about 60% of the people we were serving pre COVID back into service And the folks that we have been able to get back in the service we've seen really major declines in their skills and abilities because they haven't been getting the support they need Christopher white thank you.

Christopher white rob Schmidt Mary Louise Kelly Mary Louise Bank of America Massachusetts autism Dunkin Donuts
"louise kelly" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:49 min | 8 months ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"For Friday From NPR news this is all things considered I'm Alyssa nad warney And I'm Mary Louise Kelly Three years ago back in 2019 I sat down with Arthur Brooks the writer and social scientist and he told me about an experience he had had on a plane where he'd found himself seated in the row ahead of an older gentleman And he was talking to his wife and I was like I didn't mean to eavesdrop but I couldn't help but hear And he was saying he wished he were dead And I thought it was somebody who must have been really disappointed about his life But then at the end of the flight he stood up and I recognized him as someone who's really quite prominent and who'd done a lot with his life And I thought to myself what's he doing wrong In other words if this really prominent really successful person wasn't happy with his life what does it say for the rest of us trying to find purpose relevance even joy as we age Arthur Brooks had started noodling the question he had written a piece for the Atlantic a piece he has now turned into a book It is titled from strength to strength Arthur Brooks welcome back to all things considered Thank you Great to be with you So in the three years since I have seen you you clearly realized you had a lot more to say on this topic this topic of aging and finding success in later life Lay out for us the big question here exploring the book Well I started doing research Again I'm a social scientist but this is very personal This is me search more than research really What can we expect if we're trying to work so hard to build something with our lives And I found that half the population tends to get happier and happier after 65 or 70 and the other half of the population more or less starts to go back down And the group that goes back down often includes the strivers the people who have worked so hard because the party ends And look if you don't do anything or don't do too much with your life You don't know when it's over But if you've worked really hard to build things to meet your goals to get rewarded when it finishes it can be incredibly disconcerting Disappointing even devastating to people And that's what I found And so I went in search of the solutions to that problem to look at the people who had cracked the code And I think I found it Okay well before we get there because now you've wet my appetite but let me just make clear how you are framing this This is a conversation about the second half of life Which you are defining is when like what age I'm a little worried about your answer Well so it's actually quite interesting given the fact that we live so much longer than when I was a kid You know when I was little the average age to death for a man was 67 Now if you live I'm 57 years old And I'm in perfect health As far as I know and actuarial tables say that I have even odds of living past 95 So let's just say your adult life starts at 20 If that's the case you're in good health You can pretty much expect or you should expect to live to 90 In which case half of your adult life is over at 55 And that means you have the second half left starting at 55 And I will note this is fundamentally an optimistic book The title from strength to strength is not from feeble to feebler That is where your data your research has left you that you're optimistic about her later years Incredibly I mean I started it out It was pretty grim The man on the plane And I thought oh my goodness is this what we have to look forward to And I found that there are people who have cracked the code but more importantly that we don't have to leave happiness in the second half of life up to chance And furthermore that we can find a new kind of success if we're willing to make some jumps and some changes and show some humility and have an adventure that's better than the first half Before we get to how to crack the code can I just question the premise that there is in fact a code to crack I mean I'm thinking I can point to people in my field and journalism in politics in law all kinds of professions who are at the top of their game in their 50s and their 60s and their 70s and beyond Are they what outliers the exception that proves the role of what Generally speaking they are the ones who have found the secret to second half success In other words there's a different formula for succeeding in the early part of your life and career Then that which is actually the most appropriate for the second half It requires different skills and different emphasis and those people that we see in almost every profession that are thriving As they get older they're the ones who've been able to make the shift And just again for people thinking huh really I introduced you as a social scientist You're saying this based on data that you have gone through compiled and looked at Yeah absolutely To say secrets it makes it sound like there's some sort of hack No you got to do the work You can't just wish for it and you can't hope you get lucky And that's the point The point of the work that I'm doing is a social scientist is to not leave your happiness up to chance But to remarkably increase the odds by doing the work at 25 and 45 and 65 so that by the time you're 75 and 85 and beyond you're happier than you've ever been So how do we do it How do we increase the odds Well to begin with there's a very interesting set of findings that said that success early on is based on one of two types of intelligence The first is called fluid intelligence which gives you the ability to solve problems to crack the case to innovate faster and to focus harder than pretty much all the competition early on in your career This is your Elon Musk brain And this increases through your 20s and into your 30s but then it tends to decline through your 40s and 50s meaning that you need to move to the second kind of intelligence which is increasing in your 40s and 50s That even your 60s and we'll stay high for the rest of your life That's.

Arthur Brooks NPR news Alyssa nad warney Mary Louise Kelly
"louise kelly" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

07:45 min | 11 months ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"And more businesses are spending more on capital equipment It was time Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Adi Cornish Gelvin was always a boy but the world did not recognize him that way That's the story in the new children's book It's called Kelvin and in it authors JR and Vanessa Ford show how young Kelvin navigates the complicated feelings of being a transgender kid And how he comes into expressing who he really is The Fords are also parents to two children Ronnie and Ellie who is trans And inspired this book We are in the 6th year journey into Ellie's transition And so it really encompassed us early on right after their 5th birthday because that was the time when they announced to both of us who they were And so that transition really was a labor of love in a labor of learning for all of us It really helped JumpStart what we needed to do you know to research this whole new lexicon of terms and vocabulary as well as it what does it mean for us to continue to support Ellie in their transition And it's a social transition right now because it really focused on their external appearance as well as who they felt they were inside So Vanessa tell me then about Calvin who's the child in this book and how does their journey so to speak begin For Calvin there are pieces of Ellie's story choosing a name from a loved item that they have is something that Calvin does and also that Ellie did There are pieces of what Calvin says that Ellie said to us early on But we have a large network of families with many children who transitioned around four or 5 years old And each one of these children have informed us of their own experiences and we've grown up with them in our community of families with trans kids I'd love for you Vanessa to read a page from the book and this is a page where Calvin first tells his parents I'm not a girl Calvin says I'm a boy a boy in my heart and in my brain Can you just read the reaction basically what the parents say in response Absolutely We see Calvin with Calvin's family sitting in his room and his father says we love you if you're a girl boy neither or both We love you whoever you are my dad said later dad told me the word for how I felt was transgender Being transgender means other people think you are one gender but inside you know you're a different one That's a moment that struck me because I think for people who have real kind of problems with the transgender community One of the things they talk about is the idea of indoctrinating kids that you're putting ideas in their head And I wanted to ask you about the language here because you have the parent telling the child this is the word for what you feel When we first were with our child when they were four there was one book out and it used the word transgender and we didn't use that word for quite some time in reading the book to Ellie to our child And did you just skip over it We skipped over it because we didn't want to provide a word However when we finally used the word Ellie's breath took out all the air in the room and said that's who I am There's a word for who I am And so some of this is our children may not have the language to describe how they feel or how they identify and sometimes having that language can be incredibly empowering JR later the book talks about the trepidations that Calvin was feeling going back to school And there were a lot of questions there How did you come up with the questions Was this something you got from professionals from kids What are the kind of fears kids can have So we did a lot of research between Vanessa and I we actually got a lot of input from families from friends from trans elders about how we should try to tackle some of these challenges that a young trans kid would personally embark upon And we wanted to strip out all the external trauma and challenges that a trans kid would potentially face You know we wanted to look internally from a young kid standpoint What are some of those internal thoughts and obstacles that they would face The what ifs I think every kid could identify with the what ifs And the what it's here though or how would everyone treat me What if my Friends wouldn't call me he What if what if Right And that's a really salient point in the book Right there's this page where Calvin encounters a kid on that first day of school and says you know my name and the friend says yep your dad told my mom you're a boy now And that's pretty much it They go off to play Yeah and that's actually one of the things we found on our journey that kids are really open They are accepting and interested and curious It's really adults and political figures who have taken the issue of trans kids and politicized and put all this fear mongering out there when in our experience and the experience of many people we've talked with kids may have a few questions like Calvin's friend did but then it's on to recess What are we doing next And when kids are able to be their authentic selves it draws in others around them What's your response to the parents who say not my kid I'm not ready to have this conversation I mean you yourselves talked about reading a book and skipping over the word transgender right I think right now is the time if there's ever was a time We have a political environment in which trans youth in particular are being targeted around the country We have trans kids coming out every day in classrooms around the country And I would just encourage them to take a risk your child is going to be open and eager to learn this and it may help them be a better empathetic friend to somebody in their class or their community And I would say learn from our experience We were scared We were fearful of even using that word in the beginning When in fact our child found it so empowering I would also add that our kids aren't a monolith They are unique in every single way And for parents in adults and caretakers give them the opportunity to be themselves At least being able to listen to your kids is one of the things that we always try to promote listen to your kids They know what's best for them because they're living their experience every single day We started this conversation talking about Ronnie and Ellie your kids right And Ellie who is transgender what do they think of this book Ellie has gone through a little bit of a roller coaster over the last three years that it's taken for this book Being very excited about it being very nervous about it and now again being very excited about it And I think what's exciting is they see themselves reflected but it is not Elise story It is a amalgamation of pieces of Ellie's story along with the stories of real trans kids that we know nationally But Ronnie and Elliot are both very excited I think a little bit nervous This has been a labor of love and it's coming out into the world It's like we're having a third child.

Calvin Ellie Mary Louise Kelly Cornish Gelvin Kelvin Vanessa Ford Vanessa JR Ronnie Elise Elliot
"louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"Mary Louise Kelly. During the pandemic, an APP called Clubhouse took off. And let people join live audio chats from their smartphones. Soon there were game shows on celebrity appearances and some people becoming audio stars. Now the big social media companies are jumping in. NPR's Shannon Bond has more on how Silicon Valley is hoping to turn a pandemic era fad into a permanent boom. Russia, Howard was an early adopter of live audio. Lately, she's gotten hooked on Twitter's version called Spaces where she was among the first users. They said they wanted it to feel like a dinner party. They wanted you to feel like you were hosting people in your living room. What? That's my thing. I love to have people in my living room. I love for us to sit on the couch together with a glass of wine in our hands and just go at it for hours together, having a good time. Howard now regularly host spaces on Twitter, including one called viral Talk, where she interviews someone whose social media post has gone viral. The chats are live and ephemeral. Once they're over, they're gone. So today Welcome to Twitter spaces and viral talk. She's done spaces with the rapper Soldier boy talking about a beef he was in with professional wrestlers, the wrestlers Act. What? The W W Year we can talk. We can settle out this right now over the phone over the Twitter space. Howard says she wasn't even following soldier boy when she first asked him to chat live with her So little of me. I slid in a soldier boys dms, like, Hey, how much to put our spaces with me And he was like, sounds good. And I'm like, what Have you ever talked to him before? No, Never. In just a few months, Howard has gone from fewer than 100 followers on Twitter to more than 5000 and calls herself the queen of spaces. She's one of a slew of people making names for themselves in live audio and tech companies are paying attention. Fiji. Simo is head of the Facebook APP, she says, for the world's biggest social network audio is today. What video was a few years ago? When you is one of these formats that we think is going to become very natural core way in which people interact the same way video has become one of these ways. Facebook, which is among NPR's financial supporters, is getting ready to launch a bunch of products from short audio posts a sound effects to live chat rooms. Similar to clubhouse and Twitter spaces. But there's another important piece of the puzzle building tools for people like Risha Howard to start making a living from audio for creators. We think of it, as like something that needs to be able to turn into a business for them from the get go, whether it's Facebook, Twitter or clubhouse, they all have a lot to gain from winning creators loyalty. There's the time people spend on their apps listening to audio and the companies could eventually take a cut of the revenue their audio stars generate. So the race to roll out ways for hosts to get paid is heating up. I think for a long time creators bore The burden of making money, and they do a lot of leg work in order to go get sponsors and advertisers. Esther Crawford at Twitter says that's a big shift. Now Some companies are paying creators directly, letting listeners tip them even looking at selling tickets for exclusive events. Twitter has already launched a tip jar for power users. This is a way for creators to be rewarded for their time and energy that they're putting into hosting these public conversations on Twitter. But even as audio becomes a feature on nearly any social network, you can think of There's a big question hanging over all of this as pandemic restrictions ease. People are obviously going to spend less time on these services. Right. Jason Citron is CEO of messaging app Discord, which has had audio chat for years. But I do think that people have form new habits and they've tried new things. And so we believe that at the end of at the end of the school day at the end of the workday, people are still going to come home and their friends are still going to be on their discord. Sow discord is doubling down on audio with live events and paid tickets areas where it will have plenty of competition. Shannon Bond. NPR NEWS Support for all Tech considered comes from C three A. I C.

Esther Crawford Risha Howard Mary Louise Kelly Jason Citron Shannon Bond Howard Twitter today Simo Clubhouse NPR more than 5000 Fiji wrestlers Act Russia Silicon Valley first users Facebook few years ago fewer than 100 followers
"louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Or visit w N. Y. C. Dot or that was Mary Louise Kelly. One of the anchors are a host of all things considered. If you've heard and you've listened to W, N Y C. You have heard Mary Louise Kelly as she has been Conducting wonderful interviews the past year about the pandemic and other issues. This is morning edition on Michael Hill. And with me today is W. Marcie's program Director Jackman Sin Cottam. This is the first day of W N. Y. C s spring fundraiser. In order for the drive to get a strong start. We're looking to get 3000 donations by noon on Friday. Listeners support is the largest source of w N Y C is funding and insurers that W m I C can continue to come to you. And the entire community. So be one of the 3000 make a contribution to support W. N. Y. C today. Call 888376 W and Y. C. That's 888376. 9692 or simply look for the donate button That's at W N Y. C that orc Thank you so much. If you've made a pledge this morning or in our response to our spots the last few days talking about that goal of raising 3000 donations by noon tomorrow. We do appreciate your support, and every single contribution at whatever amount you can afford, makes a difference and his meaningful to us. So thank you very much. One thing that we are experiencing this past year as a result of the pandemic is a loss in sponsorship support from the businesses and cultural institutions that we generally rely on for those support messages that you hear on W. N. Y. C. But the continued economics shutdown has created significant Headwinds for w. N. Y. C as these organizations have paused their sponsorship support of W. N. Y. C. So we've lost millions of dollars that we anticipated we would get when we were putting our budgets together last year. But I want to say one thing that's really helped us is the partnership of our monthly sustaining members that reliable source knowing how much we're going to begin. How much income we're going to be getting on a monthly basis from those monthly contributions is really helpful. So if you're not a sustaining member, we hope you'll consider becoming one today. All it means is you set up Whatever amount you think is the right amount to donate to W. N. Y. C. Many people give $10 a month, $15 a month or $20 a month, and you can set that up with your credit card, And then it automatically happens each and every month, but you don't lose control..

Mary Louise Kelly last year Michael Hill 888376. 9692 W. Marcie Jackman Sin Cottam 888376 3000 donations this morning today 3000 W, N Y C. millions of dollars past year $15 a month $20 a month w N Y C One $10 a month this past year
"louise kelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. This hour. The impeachment trial opens with arguments over whether it's constitutional to have this trial at all. Also ahead, a possible release from prison for the Saudi activist who led the fight for women to be allowed to drive in the kingdom. Her existence Shattered the whole government narrative off in power and woman, and we remember the music and voice of Mary Wilson, one of the founding members of the Supremes. We did dare to dream at a time when it was almost an impossible dream for us to want to be stars. That's ahead after these news headlines. Live from NPR news. I'm Jack's fear. Former President Donald Trump's second historic impeachment trial began with fiery arguments from both sides, including a powerful 13 minute video showing in graphic detail violence carried out by his followers last month at the U. S. Capitol, the Senate, then voting 55 to 44 that it has jurisdiction and can proceed with the case. Trump's defense. MPR's Tamarick, he said, it harkens back to the first impeachment trial. This is the argument that they have been making me in some ways. It's not even that different than the argument that was made in President Trump's first impeachment, which was simply That these Democrats have Trump Derangement syndrome, and they are trying to get rid of him remove him from public life any way possible. That is essentially the argument that Trump's legal team is making this time and made last time to NPR's Tamara Keith Trump is charged with inciting insurrection connection with the mob attack. By the administration today said states will see their application of Corona virus vaccines rise next week to 11 million. That's up by two million weekly doses since President Biden took office. But many states say it's still not enough. Here's NPR's Our quest involved. In California. The vaccination effort is still very much a work in progress with stadium sites across the nation's most populous state, either vaccinating well under capacity or not yet, up and running at the opening Tuesday of the newest site, Santa Clara counties, Levi Stadium Governor Gavin Newsom said supply continues to be the challenge. That's the constraint. When.

Donald Trump Tamara Keith Trump NPR President Mary Louise Kelly Supremes Ari Shapiro Mary Wilson President Biden Gavin Newsom Levi Stadium MPR California Santa Clara Senate Jack Tamarick
Biden administration to "re-engage" with U.N. Human Rights Council

All Things Considered

02:25 min | 1 year ago

Biden administration to "re-engage" with U.N. Human Rights Council

"And I'm very Louise Kelly. The Biden administration is taking a new approach to the United Nations, so it wants to make sure it has a seat at the table at U. N agencies that the Trump administration left that includes the Human Rights Council in Geneva as NPR's Michele Kelemen reports. The Trump Administration denounced the Human Rights Council as a quote cess pool of political bias. The Biden administration says the 2018 decision to pull out left a vacuum often filled by authoritarian countries. The diplomat representing the U. S in Geneva now Marcus are announced today that the U. S. Is rejoining first as an observer. We know that this body has the potential to be an important forum for those fighting teary and injustice around the world. Being president of the table. We seek to ensure it can live up to that potential. There are many human rights crises that could be discussed there. A military coup in Myanmar a crackdown on protesters in Belarus and Russia. Then there's Iran. The repression is at an all time high for the past 15 16 years I have covered it that Tutti Guy Amy, who runs the New York based Center for Human Rights in Iran, he says the U. S absence from the council was felt back in 2019 when there was a deadly crackdown on protesters in Iran. That was something that the Human Rights Council if it had its center of gravity should have immediately moved to an emergency session for it. It did not happen. The Trump administration blasted Iran for the violence, but Gammy says it would have been more effective if it had done so with others on the Human Rights Council. Trump's former U. N. Ambassador Nikki Haley accuses the council of covering for dictators and being biased against Israel, she says it's sad to see the Biden administration give it legitimacy. Eileen Donahoe has a different perspective. She was Obama's ambassador there and said U S leadership made a difference. We got a special rapid tour focus specifically on Iran. There was a commission of inquiry on North Korea. We got multiple special sessions on Syria, which meant that the focus on Israel decreased dramatically without the U. S. There, she said Via Skype, China has upped its game. Avoiding scrutiny of its crackdown in Hong Kong and with the U. S. Calls a genocide against Muslim

Human Rights Council Biden Administration Trump Administration Louise Kelly U. Michele Kelemen Iran Geneva Tutti Guy Amy New York Based Center For Huma NPR United Nations Gammy Marcus U. N. Ambassador Nikki Haley Myanmar Belarus Council Of Covering For Dictat Eileen Donahoe
After Record Turnout, Republicans Are Trying to Make It Harder to Vote

All Things Considered

05:25 min | 1 year ago

After Record Turnout, Republicans Are Trying to Make It Harder to Vote

"Louise Kelly, a record 158 million Americans voted last November. Many cast their ballots early and by mail well now, in the aftermath of President Biden's victory, some Republican state lawmakers are proposing bills that would effectively make it harder to vote. Here to talk us through what is happening with voting laws in three states where the 2020 election was really close our Stephen Fowler of Georgia Public Broadcasting, Abigail, since key of WK are in Lansing, Michigan. And been Giles of Cage's in Phoenix. Arizona. Welcome all three of you. Thanks. Thank you. Thank you for having us, Steven. I've got to start with you. Not only because George is my home state, but because there has, of course been so much focus on Georgia and on Trump's efforts to throw out Biden's victory there. What are GOP lawmakers they're discussing. Well this week, Many Republican lawmakers who pushed false claims of election fraud have signed on to a number of bills in the Senate aimed at making it harder to vote. And that's after Democrats flipped both U. S Senate seats and help defeat President Trump. They would do things like Ban absentee ballot. Dropbox is severely restrict who could request a mail in absentee ballot and would undo the so called motor voter law that automatically updates your voter registration. Whenever you go to the D. M V. Now there are a few proposals that seem most likely to be enacted. One would add some sort of security requirement when you request an absentee by male vote in the future, such as writing your driver's license I d number or sending in a photocopy of your I D when you request a ballot, All right, let's head west over to Arizona Been a zoo, you know Well, Biden's victory was razor thin there as it was in Georgia. What is the debate unfolding where you are? Well, we're seeing voting laws that would impact every step of the voting process. Starting with getting registered. One measure would make it more difficult for county officials to go out into the community and hold voter registration drives. There was even a bill to abolish the incredibly popular vote by mail system in Arizona. The sponsor backtracked off that idea within hours of introducing the bill. What other ideas include requiring people to get early ballot envelopes notarized that's been described by some as a poll tax, and another proposal says You could get an early ballot mailed to you, but you couldn't tell it back. They want you to hand deliver it to a polling place, and perhaps the most controversial ideas would directly impact the presidential election results. One plan would divvy up electoral college votes by congressional district like Maine and Nebraska. Another would actually let the Legislature straight up, revoke the certification of results and let lawmakers pick who gets the electoral college votes. Wow. Um, Abigail. How about Michigan Democrats control the executive branch, but Republicans control the Legislature. How does that dynamic play out in terms of what's happening with voting laws on the discussion over what to do with him in Michigan? Well, it's been a real split screen. We have Democrats and clerks who are pointing to this election as the safest and most secure of their careers. Bar. Bayram is one of the clerks from the larger counties and Michigan, and she called on Republicans this week to say what's been clear throat. All of these hearings that this election was fair and free of fraud. At the end of the day. If people do not want to believe this backed, they're not gonna believe it. Regardless of how many audits are performed. Reports are issue or how transparent the processes and in Michigan are. Democratic Secretary of State is saying she wants to do things like male absentee ballot applications to registered voters and federal elections. Republicans are countering with things like putting cameras on unstaffed ballot. Dropbox is neither of those are likely to get very far. But there is middle ground on issues like making sure there's common training for pole challengers on Stephen and been a quick quick reaction from each of you on that. How much of this in your state? It is. Real policy proposal. How much is for show? Well, Mary Louise after the last couple months of hand wringing over votes we've seen top Republican lawmakers in Georgia say that they're not going to do some of the more extreme proposals. They're not for cutting, no excuse absentee voting, and many of these bills are likely just to appease their constituents who say that more needs to be done. Why do Republicans in your states say changes like this are necessary, Given that there were no major issues with absentee voting in the 2020 election, Given that federal officials have confirmed it was the most secure election in American History. Stephen Bendy one. Do you want to take that one? Justification in Arizona is Pretty simply put as distrust, citing the misinformation that's out there and citing the fact that there are a lot of these Republicans constituents who say they have doubts whether or not those doubts are based on any valid information. Republicans have kind of push past that and just said the fact that there are doubt justifies continued discussions about the election. And changes to the law that they say might inspire some more confidence

Louise Kelly President Biden Stephen Fowler Georgia Public Broadcasting Michigan President Trump Arizona Biden Abigail Georgia Senate Dropbox Lansing Giles Bayram Donald Trump Legislature GOP Steven Phoenix
"louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"Mary Louise Kelly. This our House Democrats want President Trump to resign or be removed from office. We'll hear more about where impeachment efforts stand. Ask yourselves is gunfire and the speaker's lobby a new normal. You're willing to accept. And former FBI Director James Comey weighs in on why he thinks Trump should be impeached, but not federally prosecuted. We don't want him center of our lives. I'd rather him in his bathroom, yelling at cars on the lawn at Mar A Lago with the camera lights off, Plus Mississippi flies a new state flag. Now news Lie from NPR News. I'm Jack Spear. In an extraordinary an unusual move. The country's top military leaders have signed a joint statement harshly condemning last week's ride at the U. S. Capitol. More from NPR's Greg Marie. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs, Army General Mark Milley and the other members say the January 6th Fry. It was a quote, direct assault on the U. S. Congress, the Capitol building and our constitutional process. Million. Other senior military leaders have stated repeatedly that they do not want the armed forces involved in U. S politics, but the violence has prompted them to take a more public position. The statement added that freedom of speech does not give anyone the right to resort to violence, sedition and insurrection. There was no mention of President Trump. But the statement by the Joint Chiefs stated that President elect Joe Biden would become commander in chief on January 20th. Greg, My RE NPR NEWS Washington As president Trump faces what is likely to be his second impeachment by the House this week, lawmakers are moving to remove the president even faster. They've now started debate on the topic of whether to attempt to remove Trump from office, using the 25th amendment, calling on Vice President Mike Pence to invoke his constitutional authority to carry that out. Although that's not likely to happen. There was growing disenfranchisement from Trump by members of his own party. Includes the share of the House Republican Conference. Congresswoman Liz Cheney. Impeachment vote in the House is expected tomorrow. Around the country. Officials and law enforcement personnel are taking steps to tighten security of state Capitol buildings. NPR's Greg Allen reports that follows a warning by the FBI that arm protester being planned it all 50 state capitals. In many states, legislatures are convening new sessions this week with tighter security in place in Olympia. Washington National Guard troops wrong hand is to protesters were arrested Monday for trying to enter the statehouse grounds. Michigan has banned openly carrying firearms in the capital there, a scene of armed protest through last spring following last week's violence in Washington, D C. Representative Geraldine Thompson of Florida says security is a concern. We're now even more, um, on Alert if if that's the best word for our safety, as lawmakers in Atlanta and 8 FT security fence is now being erected around the Georgia Capitol, Greg Allen NPR NEWS all air passengers entering the U. S will not be required provide a negative Corona virus test, according.

President Trump President NPR News NPR James Comey Joint Chiefs Greg Allen FBI U. S. Capitol Mary Louise Kelly Washington Congresswoman Liz Cheney Vice President Greg Marie House Republican Conference Washington National Guard Greg Jack Spear
"louise kelly" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly. And I'm Elsa Chang. I had this now or what warnings were missed, that might have boarded the Christmas Day bombing in Nashville. There, we had information on him and that was passed over. That's a problem. That's a big problem. Also, covert cases are surging as his holiday travel at the nation's airports, and not everyone moving through those airports is obeying the rules about social distancing and wearing a mask. Human behavior is one of the most frustrating things and trying to combat the spread of covert 19 across the board, plus a new year's cocktail recipe to wring out 20 21st these news headlines. Life from NPR News in Washington. I'm Louise Schiavone. The count has begun in the U. S. Of freshly identified cases of the covert 19 variant believed to be significantly more contagious than the original. Now. California Governor Gavin Newsom says a case has been identified in his state. This new variant this new strain. That we have identified obviously from the United Kingdom. There's some other parts of the globe, identified in Colorado yesterday has been identified here in the state of California. In Southern California. In a virtual call with Governor Newsome Infectious Disease official Dr Anthony Fauci predicted there will be more of those cases and not just in California. Not surprised that you have AH case and likely more cases in California. And we likely will be seeing reports from other states Colorado with the first In Colorado. Meanwhile, health officials say a state National Guard members the first reported US case of the covert 19 variant first detected in the UK and state officials are investigating a possible second case there. Coronavirus cases, hospitalizations and deaths are climbing in Oklahoma, and vaccine distribution is now in the works. Jessica Gallaher reports This so called pods or points of dispensing sites for the covert 19 vaccine include community centers, fairgrounds and schools. According to the Oklahoma State Department of Health first responders. People over 65 health care workers not in a hospital setting will be part of face two of the state's program. State Health Commissioner, Dr Lance Fry says the pods will help provide more access as vaccine distribution is being opened up to larger populations. Currently, residents and staff of long term care facilities, paramedics and frontline health care workers, among others. Are receiving the vaccine for NPR news. I'm Jessica Gallaher in Oklahoma City. Stocks finished higher today amid light trading ahead of the New Year's holiday. NPR's Scott Horsley reports, the Dow Jones industrial average rose more than 73 points to close it a new record high. All of the major stock indexes enjoyed modest gains. The Dow rose about a quarter percent. Both the S and P 500 index and the NASDAQ were up a fraction Investors have been encouraged this week by the signing of a new $900 billion covert relief package that includes direct payments of $600 to most Americans. The Treasury Department says the first, those payments are now on their way by direct deposit and by mail. An effort to boost the payments to $2000 remains bottled up in the Senate. GOP Senate leader Mitch McConnell opposes the higher payments, and he's paired the proposal with other provisions designed to prevent passage. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington Dow hit a record high of 30,409 points. The NASDAQ was up 19. This is NPR. Heads up two spirits enthusiasts amidst the U. S. Europe Trade dispute. The office of the U. S Trade representative said it was adding tariffs on cognacs and other brandy's from France and Germany as well a certain non sparkling wines and aircraft manufacturing parts. Rebellion against mask wearing and the live free or die. State has the governor of New Hampshire, canceling a public inauguration ceremony as New Hampshire public Radio's Todd Bookman tells US Governor Chris Sununu's safety concerns are related to armed protesters. Protesters have been gathering here, Governor Sununu's private residence for weeks. The protests began in opposition to Sununu's issuance of a statewide mask mandate. In response, the Republican governors hometown of new Fields passed an ordinance this month banning picketing outside of private homes. This week, Protesters openly defied that ordinance, resulting in nine people being sighted and one man being arrested for trespassing. The governor says the protests have become quote more aggressive instead of a public inauguration slated to be held outdoors due to Cova 19. There will now be a private ceremony live stream to the public for NPR news. I'm Todd Bookman in New Hampshire. Complications of the current virus have taken the life of actress Dawn Wells. She played the role of Mary Ann on the iconic TV sitcom Gilligan's Island. She was 82 Wells had numerous TV parts and shows like Bonanza and 77, Sunset Strip..

NPR News Governor Sununu California NPR New Hampshire Dawn Wells Jessica Gallaher Governor Gavin Newsom Oklahoma State Department of H Scott Horsley Mary Louise Kelly Todd Bookman Colorado US Governor Newsome Elsa Chang
"louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:29 min | 2 years ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A Tuesday. It's all things considered from NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Elsa Chang, one key to controlling the Corona viruses preventing its spread across borders as England grinds through its second lockdown, researchers have found a most sequences of new cases in the U. K. Are from a Corona virus strain that originated in Spain. They think British tourists brought it home from their summer vacations. NPR's Frank Langfitt explains. Chris greatly was lying in a hospital bed north of London with covert 19. Back in September, He just returned from 10, a reef in Spain's Canary Islands, where he picked up the virus. He's speaking through an oxygen mask, recording himself on a cell phone for mine, Chris Coy Suddenly, parts of this are hard to make out, but Chris said he thought he was invincible. Didn't wear a mask. He recorded this lying in an intensive care bed. Not sure if he'll survive, thankfully, greatly did make it. He's out of the hospital now still recovering, but he wasn't alone. Researchers found that 90% of recent sequences of the virus here came from Spain. We identified a new variant of SARS cov, too. It seems to have started in a group of agricultural workers and then spread through Spain. Writers Holiday Travel was resuming across Europe. Mahad Croft is an epidemiologist of the universe to Baron in Switzerland. She's the lead author of the study with the University of Basil and set Covad, Spain, a consortium that sequencing the virus, she says cases began to rebound in Spain in early July. Despite this, most countries still allowed holiday makers to go to Spain completely understandable as Spain is a wonderful holiday destination. But we think this variant had an excellent opportunity to follow those travelers home and then start spreading in those countries, huh? Cough says the Spanish train has no special properties and emphasizes That the research does not show it drove Britain's second wave that was a result of people's failure to socially distance. But it does raise questions about the government's decision to encourage summer travel to the continent. Support the tourism industry but not test people When they returned. This is a great opportunity to re evaluate. How can we make this safer? Because when we've worked so hard with lockdowns to get our case numbers down, we don't want to risk that by opening up to places where case numbers are higher. How did you feel when you made this discovery? It's a feeling of disappointment because it shows that even though we did try hard over the summer, it wasn't enough. Many Britons loves May some like to leave the rainy English weather behind. Party alone the country's sunny Mediterranean beaches, others own homes there, including Sue Wilson, who lives in Valencia, Wilson says this summer, many British tourists ignores social distancing and didn't wear masks wherever on holiday, So I think the common sense got thrown out of the window. This case is in Spain spike together, the UK told returning travelers to self isolate Before Wilson flew back to England last month, she was required to fill out a government form explaining where she'd be staying. But when she ran to the airport here, there was no follow up. Nobody asked me any questions. Nobody asked to see my paperwork. I could have gone straight out the door and walk the streets and nobody would have challenged me. People realize that no one's going to check them. Why would anybody bothered to stay home? British officials declined to speak with NPR about how the government handled summer travel or the research findings regarding the Spanish strain. In a written statement, the Department of Health and Social Care said it continues to review data to assess the importation of the virus. The UK is averaging about 25,000 new cases and more than 400 deaths a day. Frank Langfitt. NPR NEWS London My very first paid gig as a journalist was summer intern at The Atlanta Journal Constitution. This was back in the mid nineties, and when I showed up to start in the A J C newsroom, Jim Galloway was already an institution. Galloway joined the paper in 1979. He still writes to political columns a week, plus a daily morning news letter. He says he has a few more in him. But after 41 years he is retiring in January, right after the big Senate runoff. Actions. Will Jim Galloway joins us now for something of an exit interview? Hey there, Jim. Mary Louise. It's great to be here. Thank you for having me. It's great to have you. Congratulations on The imminent retirement and I got to say you sure picked your moment has stepped down as the dean of political journalists and Georgia. I'm just gonna grant you that title at a moment when Georgia is is kind of the center of the political universe. Yeah. Some have greatness thrust upon them. I think this is one of those cases I saw you were planning to what gracefully step down at the end of the year. And you just couldn't stand to miss the runoff. You were like I'm going to stay. Well, it would be. I think it would be somewhat irresponsible to dump that on incoming staff. This is such a historic moment for for Democrats in particular in Georgia, because they're making something of a comeback. I'm not sure that they They will carry one or either of these 22 Senate seats, but my goodness, Joe Biden wins the state for a Democrat for the first time since 1992 with Bill Clinton. It would be. It would be like stopping the book with the last chapter unwritten. So if you're going out with a bang with this, this huge Georgia political story with with two Senate races in the entire U. S senate in the balance. Um Well, what you point to is, is one or two other stories that will stick with you That felt like a tipping point in covering politics and Georgia go back as far as you want. I know when you started at the paper. Jimmy Carter was president. I was also in the Internet age 18 76 when Carter was nominated, so I was working the phones that night when he gave a speech. I mean, personally, the most important significant moment was I was on Tiananmen Square. On June 4th 1989. That was a singular moment. And what drew you back to Georgia after covering something like that in China? Well, the agency is a Cox favorites. Privately, family held company and my dream When I started at the paper had been to be a foreign correspondents because Cox had them. I mean, they had bureaus everywhere and they were thinking you're putting one up in Beijing. So then I had my I did a University of Michigan Fellowship tonight. Wallace.

Spain Georgia Jim Galloway NPR News NPR Senate Chris Coy Frank Langfitt government England UK Mary Louise Kelly Sue Wilson London Cough Canary Islands Europe Tiananmen Square
"louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:30 min | 2 years ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro, The only incumbent Democratic senator who lost reelection this year was Doug Jones of Alabama three years ago, voters chose him to fill the seat of Republican Jeff Sessions, who became president Trump's first attorney general. While they knew this would be a tough re election fight, the Jones campaign did not expect a total wipe out He lost a former football coach. Tommy Tub, Orville, by about 20 points. Senator Jones joins us now to talk about what he sees as the path forward for his party. Welcome back to all things considered. Thanks. Alright. Appreciate you being here with me. You know, when you were elected in 2017 about 674,000 people voted for you. And this year about 914,000 people voted for you many more. And yet you lost in a landslide. So how do you interpret that? Well, I still think that I'm still gonna look at it as ah, lot of positive things going on the next truck. 300,000 votes is a significant amount of it, And I think there are really solid votes. I think they're a solid base that we built. You know, when you're running in an election year, that is his polarized as this one Woz and with the president, being his pocket res was we always knew it was gonna be tough. The biggest thing I think that challenge that we had was trying to get People to split those tickets. And obviously, that just didn't happen in Alabama. Well, let's talk more broadly about this question of whether Democrats can turn the South blue again because on the one hand No but narrowly won Georgia. On the other hand, Democrats lost key Senate races in Kentucky, South Carolina, Alabama. I'm What do you think the future of the party in the South is? Well, I think it's a very positive. I think that things were looking up. I mean, the fact that we're even having this conversation I think shows that there are things that people see out there as things moving for Democrats in the right direction Now, I don't think that you're going to see any of those deep South states. Turned blue anytime soon. And, quite frankly, I'm not sure that that's really the go. I think the goal will be to have the Democratic Party competitive. You've seen that in Kentucky. We've got a Democratic governor. You've seen that in Louisiana, where there's a Democratic governor. We almost had a Democratic governor and Georgia and in Florida, so I think that things are moving in the right direction. We gotta play long ball We've got organized. We've got to get out there. We need to talk about issues that are important to people and listen to folks and hear them out and see what they've got to say. And then we can. We can get candidates who can fulfill that mission. Let's talk about the specific policy positions that the Democratic Party is going to prioritize going forward because there's this split right now, where the Progressive Wing argues that if Joe Biden does not pursue an aggressive liberal agenda It's going to alienate some of the people who carried him to victory. Here's what Democratic Congress one per mil Ajai a pall of Washington state, told NPR last week If we don't deliver for them in these next two years before the midterm elections, I fear we will lose them for a generation. We have to show that we are for bold populist policies. That help working people across this country and the most vulnerable Senator Jones. What do you think Bold populist policies is that the direction the Democratic Party should take? Well, I think that she's right to some extent, but at the same time, I think what's missing and a lot of these discussions are is the fact that What is the goal? How you get to a certain goal we can disagree on. But we all agree. For instance, people need to have good health care. They need to have easy access to good, affordable health. Care How you get there. We can have the policy difference, but that's I think it's the keys to how you get to these goals. Better education, You know, lower cost of higher education, getting people good jobs, bringing jobs back overseas, all of those air so called populist issues. The question is how you get there, and I think that there's a lot more income and I talked about this a lot in Alabama when I'm talking about Republicans and Democrats, But you have to say the same thing about the Democratic Party. We got a big tent. We've got so much more in common than him really divides us. It's easy to divide right after an election where people kind of want to point fingers, But I think as we get into this new administration, we're going to find it, Folks. You're gonna work with each other to try to get the same goals met. You say everybody wants good education on everybody wants good health care, and those are not controversial positions. But The question is, Do you pursue those goals with programs that Republicans could use to paint Democrats as quote unquote socialists, or do you try to find something that might not be as ambitious but might get a broader swath of elected officials behind it? Well, in Monte, you're gonna have tea. Oh, work to get a broader swath. It's the only way you're going. To assess the congresswoman said Deliver You're not going to be able to deliver a far right or far left agenda. Nobody's been able to do that. And so you've got it in order to get things done in Washington, D C. You're gonna have to get enough people in both houses of Congress to get something passed. That's gonna be difficult to do. But regardless you're gonna have to try to reach that common ground that I keep talking about to try to get these goals accomplished. We didn't get the Civil Rights act of 1964. Passed without getting a broad swath of people coming on board to help. We didn't get the voting Rights Act done. We didn't get the A C even done without a broader support of that, even among Democrats, so we can do it. It's just gonna take some work..

Democratic Party Alabama Senator Jones president Congress Georgia Kentucky Mary Louise Kelly senator Jeff Sessions Tommy Tub football Ari Shapiro Louisiana Washington Trump Joe Biden attorney Orville
35 years ago, the city of Philadelphia dropped a bomb on its citizens. They are now ready to apologize.

Marketplace

03:50 min | 2 years ago

35 years ago, the city of Philadelphia dropped a bomb on its citizens. They are now ready to apologize.

"Mary Louise Kelly. 35. Years ago, a police helicopter dropped a bomb on a Philadelphia row house in a mostly black neighborhood. 11 people were killed. Five of them were Children. The bomb live on inferno that burned down more than 60 other houses, leaving hundreds of people homeless. This is now referred to as the move. Bombing move for the Black Liberation group by the same name was targeted. Last Thursday, the Philadelphia City Council passed a resolution that finally issues a formal apology. Philadelphia City Council member Jamie got to who represents the third district where the bombing occurred. Updraft the resolution and joins us now. Hey there! Welcome. Hi. So for those who maybe don't know, don't remember much about the bombing. Which you just briefly explain what what was move, and why was the city of Philadelphia so hostile to it? Yes. Move Woz, a black liberation group of back to nature group, and I think they were. They were different, right? Like many people in our society, and they were a group of black people who were different and who were very unapologetic about it. And I think over time, um, there developed Ah, Lot of friction between move. Andhra police in the city of Philadelphia. So You've got this apology through. Why is this important now? 35 years later, I think it's important because one no one was ever held accountable on been a real way for what happens with the move. Bombing, which was an atrocity is one of the only times in our country that Ah government bombed its home city. Its own citizens, Um There was no there was never a formal apology. That's something that was all also very striking to me. And so I was honored. Tonto work with the activists who really brought this the council to bring this about, And not only is this Not only that, I think this was important from a symbolic perspective. I also think it's important because we see echoes of what happened in the move Bombing in what we're seeing now between police and community and with the police violence that we've seen in the very same neighborhood. This is Russell. The neighborhood where Walter Wallace Jr was gunned down by police. Just that was just last month that police shooting Walter Wallace? Yes. Yeah, And I've seen you talk about how divisions between police and the community are, you know, not new, obviously. And until we actually reckon with them, their divisions and the problems we're going to keep on coming. Absolutely. I think that we can connect what happened to move with what we saw happen with well to Rawlins Jr. And I think what underlines both of these events and a lot of the police violence we see is racism and a lack of recognition of the humanity of black people in our in our neighborhoods on behalf of police, and until we confront what's at the core, I don't believe we'll be able to move forward. We just have a few seconds left. But along with the apology does this resolution also make some concrete amends to the generations of people impacted by the by the bombing? Well, along with this apology. The resolution establishes May 13th as an annual day of observation, reflection in and re commitment in Philadelphia to honor those that we lost on that day in 1985. And though that, um, can be seen as largely symbolic. I hope it will be the start of the listening and the conversations that we need to

Philadelphia City Council Mary Louise Kelly Black Liberation Group Philadelphia Move Woz Andhra Police Walter Wallace Jr Walter Wallace Jamie Rawlins Jr. UM Russell
New Law Mandates California To Study The Issue Of Reparations For Slaves' Descendants

All Things Considered

04:28 min | 2 years ago

New Law Mandates California To Study The Issue Of Reparations For Slaves' Descendants

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Elsa Chang in January. 18 65 As the Civil war staggered into its final months, the US made a promise. It would take for 100,000 acres of confiscated southern lands stretching from South Carolina to Florida and redistribute it to formerly enslaved black people in 40 acre parcels. Well, that order did not last long. Within the year, Lincoln's replacement president, Andrew Johnson, broke that promise and handed the land back to plantation owners. That was the nation's first systematic attempt to provide reparations for slavery. More recently, the late Michigan congressman John Conyers, tried and failed for nearly three decades. Yet Congress to consider the same issue. Now California has taken Conyers bill and used it as an inspiration for a new bill signed into law last week. It is the first state law of its kind. California Assemblywoman Shirley Weber is the author of that Bill, and she joins us Now. Welcome. Thank you. It's good to be here. Good to have you So what this new law does is basically set up a task force to study the issue of reparations for the descendants of enslaved people and To make further recommendations from there. Tell me what are you hoping to see? Come out of this task force. Well, I think they're a couple of things we hope will happen. Obviously, we hope there will be a number of recommendations on what the state needs to do in order to repair the damage that's been done. But hopefully in addition to that, we will have robust conversations about the really deep and long and pervasive impact of slavery and racism in California and across the nation. I talked to too many people who tell me I'm not a slave holder. I didn't I didn't own any slaves. What does that mean to me? Well, you may not have owned them, but the impact of your forefathers owning them. As what is the impact of the various laws and limitations placed upon African Americans That made it difficult, if not impossible, for them to compete educationally and economically and socially still has its lingering impact, and we see that in the streets today, we'll give us some concrete examples of what form Might these reparations take Well, you know, it could be like it is a Georgetown where those folks who was slaves that landed Georgetown, every descendant of those individuals now could have access and free education of Georgetown. We could look at the issue of loans and grants for people starting businesses, and we have businesses that are suffering and sometimes failing in this pandemic. Because of our let the lack of support and financing that made it almost difficult, if not impossible, for them to own land and only businesses. We need to look at housing patterns. California had some very, very racist housing patterns that existed. But they're they're number of things that need to exist and to indicate that is tremendous amount of damage was done and puts California on the hook as well, because he basically California was a free state, right. A lot of people don't think of California as a slave state, but exactly what role California did play when it came to slavery. Well, we had one of most racist governors who talked about removing all black people from state of California free or slaves. We created laws that prevented them from being able to testify in court against white person. We had lots of things embedded in our land ownership that prevents folks from buying or selling homes to African Americans. All of those things are important, as they began to say, is this wide African Americans continue to struggle have the least amount of wealth amassed have low homeownership, all those kinds of things that even after generations and generations of struggle. We still find that these things prevail. And even though a few sneak through the vast majority do not Now let me ask you dealing with the legacy of slavery is an issue that this entire country needs to reckon with. So there are a lot of people say, Let's look to a federal solution. How would you respond to that? Well, we have We lived for federal solution for 30 to 40 years. At this point, it's just not happening at the federal level. And so after waiting, we said, You know what California could do this? And I've governor said, You know what we can lead the way and that we think will motivate others to do. Likewise, California state Assemblywoman Shirley Weber was the author of a new state law to study reparations for slavery. Thank you very much, thank you for the opportunity.

California Assemblywoman Shirley Weber John Conyers NPR Mary Louise Kelly United States South Carolina Georgetown Congress Lincoln Andrew Johnson Michigan Florida President Trump Bill Elsa Chang
NPR News Interviews Professor Anita Hill

All Things Considered

03:17 min | 2 years ago

NPR News Interviews Professor Anita Hill

"Considered from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro and Mary Louise Kelly has enough changed in the three years since the Harvey Weinstein story broke and the me to movement took off. A new report finds that for Hollywood and the entertainment business, the answer is no. The Hollywood Commission, a nonprofit that works to eradicate harassment and discrimination in the industry. Surveyed entertainment workers nationwide and found many are staying silent because they fear retaliation. Or they don't believe people in positions of power will be held to account. The chair of the commission is Anita Hill, who, of course, has fought her own battles over getting allegations of sexual harassment taken seriously. She accused now Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas of harassment and testified. Under oath back in 1991. Professor Hill joins us now welcome back to all things considered. I'm glad to speak with you again. I'm happy to be here. Tell me what surprised you in the survey results Well, the standout data was the data on accountability. We ask people Do you think that a person of higher rank Who was found to have our asked a person of lower rank would be held accountable and what we found is that 64% of the people we surveyed said that in fact, that person would not be held accountable. I suppose that's the thing that surprised me. I mean, on the one hand, it's not surprising that we're dealing with such deeply entrenched culture and history here. On the other hand, it's been three years of me, too, in the spotlight, and many powerful men have been held to account. You're you're absolutely right. We've seen some very high profile cases. And what we want to make sure is that it doesn't stop with just a few high profile cases. We know that they are problems throughout. Workplaces, and we want to make sure that everybody, whatever their position is Can count on being heard. So that's one piece of this. The other is persuading people who believe they're being harassed, have been harassed that they have a safe path to come forward and report it. I remember interviewing you, Professor Hill. Always. Almost exactly. Two years ago, September 2018 on we were talking because it was in the middle of the confirmation battle over Brett Kavanaugh. And we talked about the the personal cost of choosing to come forward. What do you say to someone who's weighing whether to do so or not? Well, you're absolutely right. There are personal cost. But even when people are willing to take the risk, there are other things that they're considering. People don't come forward because they think they won't be taken seriously. Unfortunately, the Cavanagh hearing really gave the impression that the Senate Judiciary Committee Did not take Christine Bozzi. Ford's claim seriously, and people see that example and becomes, you know what they think will happen to them.

Professor Hill Harassment Hollywood Commission Npr News Mary Louise Kelly Ari Shapiro Hollywood Harvey Weinstein Brett Kavanaugh Ford Clarence Thomas Supreme Court Senate Judiciary Committee Cavanagh Christine Bozzi
Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes: Trump Will Use Every Opportunity To Divide People

All Things Considered

06:01 min | 2 years ago

Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes: Trump Will Use Every Opportunity To Divide People

"And I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington today, the governor and lieutenant governor of Wisconsin now President Trump to stay away from their state. So did the mayor of Kenosha, Wisconsin, who says the city needs time to heal, But the president showed up anyway. Trump's trip comes after days of unrest following the police shooting of a black man, Jacob Blake that left him hospitalized. It also comes after a white 17 year old Kyle Riton house with charged with six criminal counts, including first degree intentional homicide. Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela. Barnes, a Democrat, joins us now Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me today. We're glad to have you. Governor Tony either sent a letter asking President Trump not to visit Kenosha. You've called for him to stay away as well. Do you see any potential benefit to having him? There may be a chance to meet and talk to him in a productive way. No, I do not because if a real leader would have proven that already, he would have given words Tio help console the people of this community of people of this state and the people of this nation because what happened in Kenosha? It's something that happens all too often in this country, and the president has offered no sort of resolve. You can look at the president's invective. You can look at the RNC, which tried to capitalize all such situations, which tried to politicize People who are crying out who are stepping up marching and demanding racial justice. And Donald Trump doesn't want to hear that He is going to use every opportunity that he can to divide the people of this state. A CZ. This is a critical state for his re election, and it's unfortunate because You know, these are realize that we're talking about Governor Evers called for a special session of the Legislature on Monday to address police reform. But Republicans didn't show up and that session lasted 30 seconds. To get any legislation through. You need Republican support. Do you have a plan for how to do that? Well, eyes unfortunate that you know, we could ask. What's our plan? When the Legislature and the Republicans in the Legislature don't get asked why they continue to ignore people, it took them forever to respond. A covert 19. They haven't responded to the health care crisis. They haven't responded to the dairy crisis that our family farmers are dealing with in this country. They haven't responded to gun violence prevention. They have responded to the client. Crisis, Every issue they continue to fail and ignore the people of this state. Kenosha is the latest city to deal with protests and sometimes counter protests that have turned violent governor ever sent in the national Guard as the protests were heating up, and some protesters said that having the guards there made unrest worse. Do you think the governor made the right decision by sending in the guards? So the governor sent in the guard's ate with controlling fires that were set. You know, this is all in the interest of safety because fires can get out of control. Fire touches the wrong thing. You have explosions that you can potentially have more loss of life. That was the purpose of the National Guard. I think what protesters were experiencing Was a heightened response from from law enforcement and the press conference that happened shortly after the young man who traveled to Wisconsin from Illinois to kill two people in our streets. The response was well, maybe if people weren't out past curfew, ignoring the fact that you're the shooter was also out past curfew. So to assign blame to that the victims that shows where we are in in terms of thought with some of the local law enforcement that's on the ground, and this is the reforming accountability that we're talking about. Whatever the reason, the guard was there, even if it was just to try to put out or prevent fires. It ends up being a law enforcement presence, the presence of authorities and this is the dilemma. I think for city and state leaders, how do you control what could become violent unrest? Without making people feel that the feds were storming in or with a guard is storming in. That's a really hard dilemma. Have you figured out the right balance of that? Is something that is a learning process. If I'm going to be completely honest, and and I I always I always promoted the fact that law enforcement should continuously Work to deescalate situations. Whether it is a or a personal interaction like the one with Jacob Blake and the three officers or whether we're talking larger scale events like protests and demonstrations. I think that you often see peaceful protest turned the other way when there is a heightened presence of what is perceived as authorities. So yeah, I do think there is there is a there is a problem. Because when people are protesting police, you know aggression with police overly aggressive police. The response cannot be over overly aggressive law enforcement. How to deal with violent unrest is becoming a major issue in the presidential campaign, and many Democrats who do not support President Trump worry that violent unrest helps him. That it lets him say the Democrats are weak on crime. What's your level of concern that you may be inadvertently helping President Trump's reelection efforts in that way? You know, I think that it's important for people to realize that again. The people who were killed. In Kenosha, where protesters they were killed by people who felt that they had a responsibility to help things to help matters to assist Now, like you mention Law enforcement are air National guards are there. They didn't eat health. Yet. These people are free to just walk the streets with long rifles, intimidating people. I think that is the important thing that people need to realize. Andi. I hope that folks to understand that Republicans continue to enable this sort of behavior this sort of behavior. That actually leads people did That's Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela. Barnes. Thank you for coming on the program. Thank you.

President Trump Kenosha Lieutenant Governor Mandela Wisconsin National Guard Legislature Governor Evers Jacob Blake Governor Tony Barnes Mary Louise Kelly Kyle Riton Washington RNC Illinois
"louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:08 min | 2 years ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Sasha Pfeiffer. The essayist Eula Biss focuses her new book on What Seems to be a simple question. What is capitalism for her? The answer to that question is complicated and elusive and comes in the form of short, often funny essays that make up her new book having and being had Eula Biss. Welcome. Oh, thanks so much for having me Fula. This book grew out of you having finally bought your first home and for a lot of people that would be considered a pure success. A goal of adulthood. But you say it gave you a sense of security that felt unfamiliar and even uncomfortable. Why did you feel that way? Yeah. This book came out of that contradiction of me enjoying All the new comforts that came with having AH, home have a more space and also a new kind of economic security. But feeling uncomfortable, I think, really, with the system in which I had acquired those things. And I wrote the book as an effort to hold on to that discomfort. I had the sense that the discomfort had something to teach me. You seem to think that if you lost the sense of discomfort, there actually was a lost there. What did you think you could lose by not feeling that way anymore. One of the things that I didn't want to have happened to me. As I entered this new life in lifestyle was I didn't want to begin to think that I had what I had, because I'd worked hard. Which is one of the patterns of thought very common to upper middle class. I don't believe that I got what I got. Because I worked hard. I believe that I got what I got because the system favors Me in a number of different ways one because I'm white, but also because I started out middle class, and I think that it's uncomfortable for people who start out with more to be reminded of that. So and I do think that this is damaging in so many ways. The implication is that people who don't have enough have just not worked hard enough. And that's damaging to people who are working extremely hard and still don't have enough because they're being underpaid. But it's also damaging to relationships between people who have more and people who have less. If there's this implication, hovering in the air that you could have as much as I have, if only you just worked a little harder. In the book, You actually seemed to make an effort to share exact dollar amounts. I think you say it felt important to you to do that. So you volunteer that your house cost? I think almost a half million dollars. You tell readers the size of the advance you got for your book. Why be so open about that things that people usually don't want to share? Yeah, I was open about that. Exactly because I didn't want to be. I made a rule for myself, and I made it after having written that section where I talked about the price of my house. That section summarizes a conversation I had with my sister, where I told her that what I'd really done was acquire a $400,000 container for a washing machine. But what I noted in that moment was that I was misrepresenting to my own sister. The price of my house, which was much closer to $500,000. It was for 85. So when I noticed myself lying to my own sister about money, I decided that if I was going to learn anything from writing a book about money I was gonna have to Use the actual figures involved, and I was gonna have to face honestly what I had And did you downplay the amount to your sister? Because you had a sense of self consciousness or embarrassment about having bought that size house or borrowed that kind of money? Yeah, I downplayed it because of self consciousness because I knew that my sister was trying to buy a house and that her budget was smaller than mine. And it made me feel uncomfortable that I had more than her. And I downplayed it because I just had not myself become comfortable with that the amount of money that I was dealing with and it still was two enormous a sum for me to even say out loud. At one point you're talking about your son paying for a Pokemon card. But although someone else thought he overpaid for the Pokemon card, what was it like for you to watch your son try to figure out what something was worth and why, and maybe not figured it out correctly. So was amazing in watching him learn how to play Pokemon the way it was being played in 1st and 2nd grade. At this school, I felt like I was seeing an economy be invented. But it was also somewhat excruciating to me because I saw the ways in which other Children and his baby sitter and I were training the values of capitalism into him. So, yes, At one point he gave away valuable Pokemon card because he just didn't like it very much. And then I heard his baby sitter saying to him, Were you a smart negotiator? And I thought, Oh, no. What are we doing? This kid is on Ly six, and we're already training him Not to be generous, and to get his much out of an exchange is he can possibly get out of it, even if he doesn't care about the thing he's giving away. Oh, that's so interesting. I mean, diamonds are objectively very expensive, invaluable, but if I don't care about them, and I just want to give them away Is that fine? Or is that flawed financial thinking under the logic of capitalism? It's insane, right? But by by some other logic, it makes perfect sense. Especially since diamonds are incredibly useful. You can eat them and you can't live inside them. After you finished your book. How do you define capitalism? In your words? Yes. So the definition that was most useful to me was David Draper's from Debt, the 1st 5000 years and his definition was the art of using money to make more money..

Eula Biss NPR Mary Louise Kelly David Draper Sasha Pfeiffer
Fauci Says US Could Reach 100000 Coronavirus Cases a Day

Live from Here with Chris Thile

05:42 min | 2 years ago

Fauci Says US Could Reach 100000 Coronavirus Cases a Day

"This past week, Dr Anthony Fauci shocked many people in this country and around the world when he said before Congress And unless something changes Corona virus cases in the United States could reach 100,000 per day. What would it take to turn things around and keep us from reaching that? Terrifying number. Dr. Fauci spoke about this with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly. Can we turn this around? Can we turn these numbers around without an even more aggressive shutdown than we had in March? And in April? I believe the answer is yes, but we have to do things a bit differently. And what we've been doing, because when you talk about the goal of everyone to try and proceed towards normalization by taking steps in the opening America again Program, which would guidelines that had good and well demarcated benchmark. What we saw and it really varied from state to state with people out there. Congregating in bars congregating in crowds in a celebratory way, understandably because they felt cooped up without wearing masks. That is, you know, in many respects if I might use the word, it's a violation of the principles of what we're trying to do. It does not have to be 100,000 cases a day. I use that number. Because I wanted Jeff to jolt people into realizing their attention. So we did, and that's exactly what I wanted to do because as I've said so many times over the previous weeks, two months If you leave the virus to its own devices, it will take off on you. You've just sent a couple of things I want to follow up. When you talked about how things have varied so much state to state, you used the word guidelines a supposed to requirements. Does there need to be more of a coordinated federal plan? Do there need to be requirements? Or is it wise to have the strategy remain leaving this largely to states and local governments to figure it out? No Maryland, you bring up a good point, And there's a lot of argument about that about how this country is set up where you have the states that have the capability of making decisions because of the different and peculiar. Nature of things that go on in different states from a public health perspective. Would it be better if the federal government were taking a more sort of? Well, it might not be. I mean, I'm one that does taken assertive role. If you hear what I say whenever I'm talking as I am on this program You know, it is really saying that we must do these things, hopefully and I'm seeing it right now, after yesterday's numbers came out that many of the governors and mayors are actually demanding and saying it is mandatory. Now, if you're gonna go out, you have to have a mask on that is something that is absolutely essential, but you're right. There will be arguments. I'm one for more directive way of doing things, but in many respects, that's not the way this country works. So what do you say to the governors to our two local leaders who are not rolling things back? Somebody like Florida Governor Rhonda Santis? Well, what I do is two things and I've been doing it consistently and intensively. Yes, I do it publicly like I have the opportunity to do on your program and I get on the phone and I've been on the phone with a lot of different governess talking to them about what I think should be done. I have been very prescriptive in what I said. I said not think about it. Maybe you want to do it. I say, do it. And may I just push you on your hope that we can turn things around. Turn these numbers around without shutting down at least is aggressively as things were in March and April and thinking of another thing you said in your testimony yesterday, which is that? You were talking about why Europe has largely succeeded in the US has failed to control the virus, and you talked about how When the U. S shut down, it was in reality. Only about 50% of activity was really shutting down. Whereas in Europe it was more like 90 or 95%. That makes it sound like we had a shot and we blew it. You know, I would. You know, that's a very provocative word blew it. But certainly if you look at it, and I meant it that the numbers are true. If you look at the Europeans, they got the curve way down. Once the curve is way down, Mary Louise, it is much easier when you do get blips of infection as you try to open up. To contain those infections. And if you look at our curve, it peaked. It came down a little. And then it stayed about flat until just recently, when it re surged up again. It makes it much more difficult because you're not in containment. You're in mitigation, just sort of chasing after things as opposed to getting your thumb on them. It might turn you two vaccines. You have said we should have a vaccine by the end of this year, with production ramping up next year whether that vaccine works and how long it may work for whether we may be protected for life for just for a few months. Are those still open questions they are they are because right now, the one thing that is going well. Is the procedure of multiple different candidates and their candidates all over the world. There are several that are being looked at here in the United States. They're on track for going into advanced trial sometime this summer. It's something that we are not compromising safety. Nor scientific integrity to move quickly. We should get an answer sometime by the end of the year, and as I said, Say it again. Mary Louise, There's no guarantee. That you're going to get a safe and effective vaccine. But the early indications from the trial make me I use that word cautiously optimistic

United States Mary Louise Dr Anthony Fauci Europe Mary Louise Kelly NPR Congress Federal Government Maryland Jeff America Rhonda Santis Florida
Can blood plasma of recovered COVID-19 patients help prevent infection in others?

All Things Considered

03:10 min | 2 years ago

Can blood plasma of recovered COVID-19 patients help prevent infection in others?

"There is still no cure for code nineteen but there is one drug that helps a bit the researchers are hunting for better ones and now they're testing some of those in people and pure science correspondent Joe Palca spoke with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly about where we are with covert nineteen treatments right now the minute you start with the one drug that I've mentioned to that shown to help a little bit yeah it's called ram doesn't fear it does show it they have shown that it's shortens a stay in the hospital from fifteen days to eleven days but it doesn't reduce mortality and I know that scientists and and eight patients for that matter would like to have something better this is good but it's it's still not not not what you call it you are so they're looking for better things so in terms of things that are actually far enough along that they might actually show up at the hospital soon what are we looking at well actually some of these are in hospitals some as being tested there and some under what's called the compassionate use our emergency use one is called convalescent plasma this is plasma that's taken from patients who have gotten sick with covert nineteen and then recovered and their blood or their plasma is fall of the antibodies that help them recover from the disease and so if you take their plasma and give it to somebody who's sick the hope is that that will help them get better and and this is actually being used in other infectious diseases and it and it does work to some degree and then I mentioned there are other things that are being tested maybe aren't actually being used in hospitals yet what else is actually comprised mainly not routinely used in hospitals well one is an anti viral so ren disappears is a drug that blocks the ability of the virus replicates so is this drug with the terrific name of he I. D. D. two eight oh one it was developed at Emory University and it's now being marketed by a bridge back bio therapeutics and marked the big pharmaceutical company has joined in and the and that says to me at least that they see great promise there it's being tested in clinical trials in the U. K. and it seems to be showing great promise it's also shown to work at least in animal studies previously with the sars which was also a corona virus caused illness and so there's hope that it might work there right it means that the question on all of our minds this is for treatment that might be ready and ready soon what else you keeping your eye on well actually there is something called a monoclonal antibody which is a synthetic version of the antibodies that our bodies make and there is one monoclonal antibody that's already begun testing in humans there are others that are coming along very soon there are more than a dozen others that are coming in these are drugs that have been used to treat other human diseases and they actually do look quite promising in animal studies and they're anxious to try the more eager to try them in humans as

"louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:14 min | 2 years ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is All Things Considered I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Mary Louise Kelly the numbers are frankly overwhelming every day the corona virus death count rises at first based on early numbers in late February epidemiologists and experts estimated about one percent of infected people would die from covert nineteen but it turns out it is hard to come up with one number that accurately captures how deadly this virus is it is killing people in different states and different countries and different rates according to Johns Hopkins the mortality rate here in the U. S. is five point seven percent five point seven in Italy it's over thirteen percent in China it's five and a half percent which made us wonder why is the true death rate so all over the place and so hard to pin down well Natalie dean assistant professor of biostatistics at the university of Florida is here to help us try to answer that question Natalie dean welcome thanks for having me so how do you calculate how do you define what what the true death rate looks like with regards to the corners so the numbers that you just reported we call those the observed or crude case fatality rates and those are calculated as the number of deaths divided by the number of cases that have actually been confirmed that's very important because there are a lot of cases that are not confirmed people who have mild illness might be turned away or not be able to access testing we also know that there are a lot of people who are infected but don't develop symptoms so that means that there's actually a much bigger denominator than what is reflected in this observed the case fatality rate so you're saying testing plays a crucial role in understanding how many people have been sickened and and have are now infected with code nineteen and without knowing those numbers it's really hard to to get what but the death rate is right we know that test ng tends to focus on people who are most severely ill and so is missing a lot of those mild cases and is definitely missing anyone who doesn't have symptoms so we know that those numbers are over estimates and they also vary a lot by country because there will be different availability of testing in different countries where is the death rate highest workers at lowest so far so looking at the statistics from Johns Hopkins University conceived Belgium right now seems to be reporting the highest crude case fatality rate at a little over fifteen percent similarly high in France the United Kingdom and Italy and we know that it's quite low in some Asian countries like Singapore and South Korea and certainly it's reflecting who's being tested but then it also reflects things like quality of care in those countries you've done research on Ebola on ZK it has how does the challenge of identifying the true death rate for the corona virus compared to with with others so the corona virus is definitely different from Ebola Zika Ebola is a very severe disease and so we have pretty few of these a Santa Monica mild infections that makes it easier to detect people who are sick and then track them to see who dies the guys the other end of the spectrum where most infections are pretty mild or asymptomatic so then it becomes really hard to establish severity coronavirus is somewhere in the middle somewhere likely below one percent of people who are infected at di but we're trying to nail down exactly where that number lines and why is this number important why do scientists need to devote resources to figuring it out the number impacts how we determine our response strategies very interesting understanding risk factors for severe illness so whether that differs by fax or on the presence of a their diseases race ethnicity and then that will allow us to identify groups that we want to pay close attention to Natalie dean she's assistant professor of biostatistics at the university of Florida thank you very much thanks I really appreciate it the corona virus pandemic has completely shut down concerts and other live events some people like Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti are even predicting that live events won't resume until twenty twenty one so ticket holders are looking for refinance but as NPR's Andrew Limbong reports the process has not been that easy show Cronin is a mental health therapist in Vancouver Washington she bought tickets for six events through Ticketmaster reality I have to get to run all the hello may I get your that's the one with Green Day Weezer fall out boy journey with the pretenders and you get the point Clinton says she can't get refunds because new rules Ticketmaster announced last week stipulate that a show has to be either officially canceled or have new dates announced in order for the purchaser to be eligible for refunds and since neither has happened in Cronin's case and she bought pairs of tickets she's out nearly a thousand dollars she's thankful she still employed even imagine what somebody would be going to right now if they had a thousand dollars in tickets just sitting there that they know they're not gonna be able to use and they're stressing about if they're gonna be able to pay their rent or buy their kids food or you know anything like that the lines into Connie is a complicated one and it's been a struggle for ticket buyers to get their money back because they aren't Ticketmaster's primary concerns is dean Budnick he is the co author of the book ticket masters the rise of the concert industry and how the public got scalped ticket master we're really ultimately is responsible to its venue clients and those are the individuals that it wants to protect in other words its primary business relationships are with concert promoter stadiums and arenas before last week's Ticketmaster's website seem to back off of refunds for postponed events entirely the ensuing media coverage caught the attention of two members of Congress democratic representatives Katie Porter from California and bill Pascrell from New Jersey who wrote a scathing letter encouraging that ticket seller to reconsider in a statement Ticketmaster said it's made four hundred million dollars worth of refunds so far and its parent company live nation along with rival E. G. announced new refund policies last week which still require a concert to be cancelled or officially rescheduled with new dates to trigger a refund those policies don't go into effect until may first dean Budnick says live nation and AEG simply don't have the money to give back because contractually they were least that money to the concert promoters to the event producers who put on those events but Nick says with smaller club level shows these funds are usually held in escrow so they're easier to access but for big shows at stadiums ticket purchasers money is already in the hands of venues and artists now you may say well Gee that is Ticketmaster's fall because that's their contract they entered into but Nick says over the past few decades artists have gone a larger share of ticket sales to make up for declining records the that's led to higher ticket prices and more service fees to be shared among the venues and promoters keep juggling is a consulting director for media research a media analysis firm he says that any post corona virus world the deals between all parties in the ecosystem are likely to change and everybody on that value check will be expected to take a hit on the including artists but right now it's Adam Burke stage hands food vendor security guards and ticket holders who are feeling the pain Krista Riley is a teacher from Michigan she bought red wings hockey tickets as a gift for her dad the game was set to take place last month and she still can't get a refund I'm not working right now I will work until September so having that extra two hundred and thirty Bucks would be really off some customers like Riley and cash Cronin from earlier whose ad thousand Bucks are part of a group exploring a class action suit one such complaint is going through the courts now others have reached out to the credit card companies to try to get the money back but either way they'll be waiting for a.

Elsa Chang Mary Louise Kelly
"louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"This is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles the shortage of personal protective equipment that is masks gloves and other disposable gear has forced a lot of American hospitals and health care workers to fend for themselves people who have never given much thought to where supplies come from are now looking for connections to manufacturers in China and here's John it real which and Martin Kosgey happened following all of this and join us now Hey guys hi there hi Martin I want to start with you on the American side of things what kinds of people and groups over here are you seen getting into the import business well we've all heard the stories about governors working the phones trying call their CEO friends looking for connections for import of connections in China but smaller groups are doing it too even some individual doctors and certainly hospitals it's pretty much anybody who's decided they can't necessarily count on the feds or the states to come through in time with spoke with some of the stuff that they really have to have here in Washington state to the state hospital association has actually gotten into the import business they've been they had a trial run importing three hundred thousand surgical masks to seafood work I caught up with Cassie Sauer who runs that association just as she was arriving at the warehouse here south of Seattle where I am to inspect her first shipment of imported masks we have never imported anything you know we actually brought a Chinese translator with us to read all the labels in the box we opened up about ten percent the cartons to make sure they're all the same and they were so we cut one up and make sure it was three planet is we poured water into another one to make sure the water didn't go through and it didn't and we're just thrilled that it's here just thrilled okay so this is working than to just go to China and get your own supplies well so far she's a pretty happy they've imported another three hundred thousand or so since then but she says you know this is a stressful process for people who aren't in this businesses for their some financial risk here you know it she really wishes there were more of a unified national American purchasing effort here it is on the China on the China side for one thing you know she has no idea of her orders for master somehow conflicting with washing state's effort to buy the same masks Roland Thompson is helping her with these purchases he's in it's his day job as a state level lobbyist in Olympia but now he's kind of dived into this New World of imports he's learning this business on the fly because yes some contacts in China and he says those contacts are telling him that the competition in China is just intense they're all sorts.

Mary Louise Kelly Washington Elsa Chang Los Angeles NPR
"louise kelly" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm ari Shapiro this hour how might Joe Biden handle the economy and the coronavirus rescue money if he wins the presidency we look back to when he pushed the two thousand nine recovery act through Congress to maybe the most battle tested president from the perspective because we can't woman thinks it was planned for anyone I could think of also the two trillion dollar package that already passed is supposed to help small businesses will it as a small business owner I'm really not counting on it I'm just kind of doing what I can on my own to keep myself afloat and NPR's life kit tackles corona virus induced anxiety now these headlines live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jack Speer as the death toll from the corona virus pandemic continues to mount New York City funeral homes and cemeteries are unable to keep up NPR's Greg Allen reports officials said the city may have to temporarily enter some of the dead in a public park AT refrigerated trailers big enough to hold one hundred bodies each have been deployed to hospitals throughout New York City some hospitals now I've added a second and even third trailer hold remains of people who die from cold nineteen or other causes New York City councilman mark Levine says that the death toll doesn't soon level off the city will likely start doing temporary interment digging trenches in a city park were caskets will be buried in a way that allowed the bodies into be disinterred and given a proper burial at such time as the crisis is over in our normal cemetery systems and funeral home system is running again marine since the defense department has said mortuary specialist in New York City but that more help is needed Greg Allen NPR news British prime minister Boris Johnson has been moved into an intensive care unit today after symptoms of COPD nineteen worsened that's according to his Downing Street office which says Johnson was admitted to St Thomas's hospital over the weekend British prime minister first announced he was suffering from the disease caused by the coronavirus ten days ago and initially being continued to run the country from his residence was now asked the foreign it secretary Dominic Raab be deputized for him Britain has no formal succession plan should the prime minister become incapacitated the fifty five year old Johnson tested positive for the virus on March twenty six south Carolina's governor is ordering residents of that state to stay home with few exceptions as NPR's Sarah McCammon explained South Carolina had been among a dwindling number of states without state homeowners governors are under pressure from medical groups and federal officials including Dr Anthony Fauci to order their residents to stay home in an effort to reduce the spread of the corona virus a handful of Republican governors have been holdouts but now South Carolina governor Henry McMaster says infections are rising and now is the time to many people all the roads too many people on the water's too many people in the stores too.

Mary Louise Kelly Joe Biden ari Shapiro
"louise kelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm L. C. Chang ahead this hour president trump wraps up a trip to India which included a rally at the world's largest cricket stadium but the two countries are still far apart on a trade deal I think the Indian side has to appeal to trump's strategy to appeal to this friendship analysts Angelus is trying to break the cycle of incarcerating people with mental health disorders I mean I think that the average person must see that's something needs to change it's so apparent that the numbers are growing we'll talk about a small but promising diversion program now here's live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jack Speer seven candidates vying to be Democratic Party presidential nominees are debating tonight in Charleston as NPR's Bobby Allen reports the match up getting under way at this hour comes days before Saturday's primary in South Carolina during the last debate former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg took a drubbing from the other candidates and especially from Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren who's strong performance prompted a big fundraising boost now billionaire Bloomberg might be looking for a rematch but attacks could also focus on Vermont senator Bernie Sanders a self described democratic socialist who has emerged as the party's front runner attention will also be on former vice president Joe Biden who has invested heavily in South Carolina with the democratic electorate is majority black a poor debate and primary showing in the state provided could exact a devastating blow to his campaign Bobby Allyn NPR news a month before the U. S. Supreme Court is due to take up his case is over tax returns and financial records president trump is out with an unusual suggestion president saying he thinks two liberal justices on the court should not take part in those or other cases involving him in his administration trump made his remarks critical of justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia sort of my order during a news conference in India today he's wrapping up his visit to that country March follows similar comments he made on Twitter justice justice is generally decide for themselves whether to recuse themselves from cases it's highly unlikely either would sit out cases involving the president the centers for disease control and prevention is calling on Americans to start to prepare for the possibility of more aggressive measures to stop the spread of the corona virus in the west here's NPR's rob Stein the CDC says the spread of the corona virus from China to other countries in recent weeks has heightened fears that it's probably just a matter of time before the virus starts spreading in the United States as a result everyone should start planning for what they would do if tough new measures are needed in this country to snuff out outbreaks that could include things like closing schools requiring people to work from home and canceling public gatherings the CDC stresses that the risk right now is very low but that could change quickly rob Stein NPR news consumers were slightly more confident this month with an index from the conference board up three tenths of a percent from January we're consumers views on the present situation for business and labor market conditions foul also worth noting the survey was done before the latest market plunge attributed to mounting worries about the spread of the corona virus conference board economist Lynn Franco says consumers continue to be the outlook is favorable say when combined with solid employment growth they believe it should be enough to support continued spending and economic growth another day of dramatic declines on Wall Street investors still struggling over the facts of the corona virus the Dow dropped eight hundred and seventy nine points today you're listening to NPR live from KQED news I mean you can service co police say they're investigating the assault and robbery of an elderly man in the Bayview district over the weekend the incident was captured in a video posted on social media it shows a group of men shouting racial slurs at an Asian American man collecting recyclables then hitting him and robbing him longtime community activist Marlene Tran said she thinks the incident was racially motivated and that this kind of crime is often under reported many of the victims and other than that everything was free to speak out so I defuse this is their opportunity to you know provide them with appropriate transaction services they should.

Mary Louise Kelly L. C. Chang India president
"louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And a merry Louise Kelly the new movie birds of prey and the fan tabby list emancipation of one Harley Quinn begins with the break up it was completely sure what that during an explosion it tells the world that joker and Harley Quinn have broken J. learn that a lot of people want me to powerful and very rich and very angry people sell Harley Quinn gathers a crew of women we each with her own beef against the people after Harley and convinces them to team up and fight birds of prey was directed by Kathy yen she's the first Asian American woman to direct a major Hollywood superhero movie and she talked with my co host Elsa Cheng yen says she was drawn to Harley Quinn story because she's a complicated female character she has these two conflicting sides of her she's Harleen quinzel L. PhD and and on the other side she is you know this angry mallet wielding super hero and when I talk to Kathy and I wanted to know how did she take Harley Quinn played by Margot Robbie from the joker's hot crazy girlfriend to the empowered woman at the heart of this movie well I think because she has to figure out who she is when she's alone when she's no longer the girlfriend and I yeah that great existential question answer the question of the movie it's a movie about identity and about all the all of these women finding themselves finding their strange totally like there's a scene in the film were highly sitting at a bar and she's feeling like just guided after her break up with the joker Harley Quinn.

Louise Kelly Harley Quinn Kathy yen Margot Robbie Hollywood Elsa Cheng
Iran considers options for retribution over Soleimani killing

Here & Now

02:49 min | 2 years ago

Iran considers options for retribution over Soleimani killing

"And will start the hour again in Iran where a stampede during a funeral procession for general Qassem Soleimani left dozens of mourners debt secretary of state Mike Pompeii reiterated today that the US will abide by the laws of war if it retaliates to any retaliation by Iran he was asked about president trump's threats to attack running cultural sites Louise Kelly is in the Iranian capital Tehran and joins us now once again Mary Louise let's start with the stampede what more can you tell us about that yeah it's an awful events and what we have a report from Iranian news agencies of does several dozen people it sounds like who were killed in a stampede this was in the city of Kerr mine which is a big city in southeastern around about five hundred miles from the capital Tehran where I'm speaking to you from and it's is the hometown of Qassem Soleimani so the body has been making its way through cities in Iraq and now Iran these last several days this was to be the last recession where mourners could come out and mourn him and then he was to be buried today obviously events got out of control there you sat down today with the Iranian foreign minister Mohammad Javad Zarif let's listen to a little bit of what he said to you this was an act of aggression an armed attack him albeit a cow would be armed attack against an Iranian official in foreign territory it's a must for war and we will respond according to our own timing and choice it amounts to warn will respond according to our own timing in choice what did he tell you about the options Iran is considering for response to the killing of so the money well that was exactly the question I was trying to pin him down on as you can imagine and you will be stunned to hear he did not telegraph to me exactly what a brunch next move will be he was very clear issue got a sense from there that there will be retaliation there will be revenge he spoke about how people's feelings here or hurt and the outrage here and you could hear it so the money was was a close personal friend of his and you could hear that the determination that this country will act what exactly they will do when exactly they will do it he wouldn't go there he said they will respond at a time and place of their choosing I will say I we heard from from a different top official here today is a man named Ali Shamkhani he's the top official on a Ron's answer to the national security their their National Security Council and according to Iranian media she has said they are considering thirteen specific options for retaliation which means journalists are now scrambling to try to figure out what those thirteen

Mary Louise National Security Council RON Ali Shamkhani Official Mohammad Javad Zarif Iraq Iran Tehran Louise Kelly Donald Trump President Trump United States Mike Pompeii Qassem Soleimani