27 Burst results for "Louise Kelly"

"louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:36 min | Last month

"louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro in Minneapolis. Today, Community leaders and government officials are calling for calm as the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derrick Show Vin nears its end. Children is charged with two counts of murder and one count of manslaughter in the death last year of George Floyd. Both sides made their closing arguments today. The judge has given the jury they're instructions. Authorities are bracing for possible violence and are stepping up security measures all across the twin cities and NPR's David Schaper is covering the story. He joins us from Minneapolis. Hi, David. Hi, Ari. Paint a picture for us. What do you sing in and around Minneapolis today? Well, you know, it's not just a heavy police presence here. But there's a military presence more than 3000. National Guard troops are here and you see these desert sand colored Humvees and rifle toting National Guard soldiers. Many of the street corners and outside of certain buildings, all around the downtown area in Minneapolis and some business district's outside of the city center. Just about all of this street level windows and doors are boarded up many government buildings air surrounded by concrete barriers, high fencing and razor wire. I've even seen some crews out. Adding to those fortifications today, 57 year old Sylvia Pogue, off of suburban Minnetonka, was quietly protesting the fatal police shooting of Dante right outside suburban Brooklyn Centers. Police Department. And she says that there's a palpable tension here. Obviously people are upset and they should be Um, but living here, you could just feel it in the air. The energy of this state, the city this area has.

Mary Louise Kelly Ari Shapiro David Sylvia Pogue David Schaper Minneapolis Derrick Show Vin George Floyd Ari NPR two counts Today last year Minnetonka one count today more than 3000 Dante twin cities Both sides
Fresh update on "louise kelly" discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:01 sec | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "louise kelly" discussed on All Things Considered

"Mary Louise Kelly. Arizona and Georgia are two states that were Republican strongholds for years. That is until big recent wins for Democrats, including in The U. S. Senate. A senator from each state is up for re election next year. Both they're Democrats, but they're using two different strategies for holding onto those seats and keeping the Democratic majority. Have you A B s In my hurt and Cage's been Giles explore the case. Georgia Senator Raphael Warnock spent a recent tour of the state champion in President Biden's massive infrastructure plan. He stopped at Bluebird in Middle Georgia, a leader in electric school bus manufacturing, We'll get that. But what year is that? 1948. That's the first all American heel here in full value that we're not thinks the federal government needs to step in.

Mary Louise Kelly Democrats 1948 Middle Georgia Both Raphael Warnock Senator Next Year Two States U. S. Senate Georgia Democratic Arizona Republican First President Biden Each State Two Different Strategies American Bluebird
"louise kelly" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:02 min | Last month

"louise kelly" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Mary Louise Kelly ahead this hour. We'll hear from the mother of Dante, right. The 20 year old black man who was shot and killed by police in Brooklyn Center. Minnesota. My old It was angelic, beautiful room. Even when I'm leaving fun, And despite negative rhetoric about labor unions, public opinion remains unaffected. Even as union membership numbers dropped over the years, unions have really held on and overall perception of the national level hasn't been as impacted by the rhetoric or the national focus after this summary of the day's news. Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. President Biden said today he will have all U. S forces out of Afghanistan By September. 11th of this year the 20th anniversary of the terror attacks on U. S soil that were coordinated from that country. Starting it was turned out to be the nation's longest war. Finding announcing the pullout, saying us could no longer justify military presence and what he termed a forever war. We went to Afghanistan because of a horrific attack that happened 20 years ago. That cannot explain why we should remain there in 2021 by noting that he is the fourth U. S president preside over American troop presence there, though former President Donald Trump had said he intended to have US forces out by next month. That timetable was deemed too aggressive by the current administration. White House says the U. S. Is still on track to reach its goal of inoculating roughly 300 million Americans. Despite a temporary setback, NPR's Windsor Johnson reports. Health officials have paused the use of the vaccine developed by Johnson and Johnson after reports of rare blood clots. The White House Cove in 19 response team says vaccine makers Visor and Madonna are expected to deliver tens of millions of vaccines in the coming weeks. Senior adviser Andy Slavitt says temporarily suspending the use of the J and J vaccine will not have a significant impact on the administration's vaccination plan. In the very short term reduced expects some impact on daily averages as sites and appointments transition from Johnson and Johnson to Madonna and Fizer vaccines. Federal officials are working to reschedule vaccine appointments for people slated to receive the J and J Vaccine. The CDC is currently reviewing several cases of rare but serious blood clots and people who'd recently received the shots. Windsor Johnston NPR NEWS Washington of report from Federal Reserve banks around the U. S shows economic activity is picking up steam is more Americans are vaccinated and pandemic restrictions or slowly relaxed. NPR's Scott Horsley reports most parts of the U. S turn on joint moderate economic growth. The fans latest beige Book says economic activity is accelerating, with strong manufacturing, an uptick in auto sales and a growing demand for travel and tourism. Speaking to the Economic Club of Washington, Fed chairman's Rome pals is the economy appears to be at an inflection point with stronger growth in the months to come. You see the economy opening, you can see ridership on airplanes going up and people going back to restaurants. I think we are. We're going into a period of faster growth and higher job creation and that that's a good thing, PAL cautions a new surge of Corona virus infections could still put the recovery at risk. He's urging people to wear a face mask and practice social distancing, at least for a while. Longer. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington makes close on Wall Street Today market started out better after strong earnings, however, they stumbled a bit. In the final hours of trading. The Dow was up 53 points. The NASDAQ 138 points. You're listening to NPR. From W Baby News in Atlanta. Good afternoon. I'm Jim Burress. We have light rain showers moving in 75 degrees at 504. Well, it may feel like the 2020 election on Lee just ended in Georgia. Some 2022 races are already starting to shape up. Emma Hurd has a round, up of which candidates have announced for the next round of statewide elections. Democratic State Senator Gingered and just announced her campaign for attorney general, joining Charlie Bailey and attorney who was the Democratic nominee for the job in 2018, the winner of that primary is likely to face Republican incumbent Attorney General Chris Carr. At the top of the ticket is incumbent Democratic Senator Raphael Warnock. Businessman Kelvin King is among the Republicans who have already announced a challenge. And then there's the governor's race. Former President Donald Trump pledged to campaign against former ally Brian Kemp, so many are waiting to see if any Republicans challenge the incumbent governor. On the Democratic side. The field appears frozen until former candidate Stacey Abrams announces whether she'll run again. Emma hurts. WLBT News. The head of Georgia's largest hospital system, says it's partnering with one of the state's top film studios to bring covert 19 vaccine doses. Two crew members Grady Health System. CEO John Halpert says medical staff recently administered nearly 300 doses of the vaccine at Tyler Perry Studios. Health workers will be back at those studios in a few weeks to administer second doses. Grady officials.

Mary Louise Kelly Brian Kemp Stacey Abrams Jack Spear Jim Burress Andy Slavitt Dante 2018 Emma Hurd 2021 White House Brooklyn Center 75 degrees Charlie Bailey Kelvin King Georgia September. 11th NPR Scott Horsley Grady Health System
"louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:22 min | Last month

"louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. Minnesota Governor Tim Walz has called a seven p.m. curfew for much of the twin cities tonight. This comes after tensions ratcheted up there following news that a police officer in the Minneapolis suburb of Brooklyn Center killed a young black man yesterday afternoon when officers tried to arrest him during a traffic stop. NPR's Martin Castillo is in the twin cities and joins us now. Hey, Martin. I also So how much do we know about what happened during that traffic stop. Well, today we saw the video from the body camera warned by the female officer who shot him. Dante, right, had been pulled over on a traffic stop. But police then found there was a warrant for his arrest. In the video. You can see him standing by his car. In the process of being handcuffed when he suddenly breaks free and jumps back into his car. There's a struggle briefly, the female officer yells Taser Taser Taser, but you can see in the video. She's holding a firearm. She shoots him and immediately says an expletive followed by. I shot him. The officers standing around her look stunned. And right now her chief is calling this an accident, an accident and what's been the response so far, too, that explanation. Initial reaction has not been very good. One African American woman protesting outside the police department there during the press conference told me nothing is an accident on do you remember? This is a very diverse suburb about 30% black. In fact, the mayor Mike Elliott, was born in Liberia. Here's what he had to say about the situation. Our hearts. Aching right now. We are in pain right now. And we recognize that this couldn't have happened at a worse time. Of course, all of this happened while the trial of Derrick Show Vin is still unfolding. He's the former Minneapolis police officer charged with murdering George Floyd. How do you think that trial has affected what's happened in Brooklyn Center? The reach was already on high security alert. Head of the show, Ben Trialed governor here, Tim Walz created something called Operation Safety net. The idea of being to offer law enforcement protection to peaceful protesters, while the same time quickly sending extra right police and even national Guard two places where things might get, it might be getting violent. The plan was already in place, and now they're stepping it up accelerating the next phase overnight, National Guard armored vehicles appeared a new places around the city. But that's also worrying people like Matthew Branch. He's a Brooklyn center resident. I talked to him He was protesting yesterday and he was shocked by the speed with which the right police showed up. It was terrifying how fast there were that many police officers armed to a T, who could respond that quickly. They were aggressive. They were intimidating. They were agitating the crowd and you could feel the energy change when they left the vicinity. Who is that opinion widely share that that riot police are making the situation worse. There's a deep divide on this this'll morning, a group of black community leaders in Brooklyn center met with the mayor and the police chief, and they were livid about how police there had used stun grenades and tear gas last night when protestors gathered outside police headquarters Especially offended by the way, police turned off the lights inside the department and shine bright lights at the crowd. On the other hand, today, I saw a white man delivering water and snacks to the officers guarding the department. And a lot of Minnesotans are very worried about a repeat of last summer, the violence of the destruction. For instance, Tony Hardy. I met him at the local shopping center there where he was volunteering to sweep up broken glass. Outside cell phone stores have been looted last night. But now the national Guard was setting up nearby. Finally, finally they're here, at least so that's good. We need him. The question really, tonight is whether police the National Guard will stay real visible, like Hardy wants or hang back and try to avoid provocation, which is what some of the community activists in places like Brooklyn Center are saying would be the better path. That is NPR's Martin cost. Who was in the twin cities. Thank you, Martin. You're welcome. A new study says sexual assault and harassment in the U. S military is causing troops to leave prematurely and that is hurting readiness. Thea authors hope the findings will help military leaders understand that the costs of sex crimes extend well beyond the victims affected from San Antonio, Texas Public radio's Carson frame reports. When Amber Davila joined the Army and 2011. She planned to stay in for the full 20 or until retirement. I used to joke that I was gonna eventually become the first female command Sergeant Major of the Army, she took pride in her communications security job. It made her feel like part of a team and a greater good. That all changed when Davila was sexually assaulted by a fellow soldier in Korea. Even though she was terrified of being ostracized. She eventually reported her attacker. He was discharged after a lengthy investigation. But for Davila, the ordeal wasn't over. You think you're okay? And then you know, the commander says, You know, Horseshoe on me is everybody kind of moves in and then suddenly Someone's brushing against me, and I'm right back in that formation in Korea, where this man is torturing me, and it just became overwhelming. She spiraled into anxiety and destructive behavior and spent more and more energy trying to appear fine. When it came time to re enlist. She had a panic attack in that's when I decided I couldn't do it anymore, so that I needed to get out. Tabula isn't alone in that decision, according to a new study by the Rand Corporation sexual assault, double the odds that a service member would leave the military within 28 months. And about a quarter of troops were sexually harassed, didn't re up. Andrew Morale is a senior behavioral scientist at Rand and the study's lead author. We all know I think that sexual assault sexual harassment has tremendous costs to the individuals involved in it. But I think less attention has been paid to what the institutional costs our morale use Defense Department data to track the careers of a group of service members who reported sexual assault or harassment. And he used a testicle analysis to figure out how their experiences translated to the entire force. Assaults were associated with about 2000. More people leaving the military than normal sexual harassment played a role in the departure of an additional 8000 service members. Orale hopes these startling figures push the military to fundamentally change its culture. I hope that they use it to emphasize the importance of leadership promoting a command climate that is not permissive with respect to sexual assault that sexual harassment and I think it's been hard to That those messages all the way down into the junior enlisted ranks. President Biden recently ordered a 90 Day commission to pursue solutions to sexual assault in the military. Lynn Rosenthal, a longtime advocate for survivors of gender violence, heads the commission. She told reporters in February that she'll organize listening sessions with service members, especially survivors. But she added that she's already heard enough to recognize how much they've lost. What I'm struck by here, as.

Mary Louise Kelly Tim Walz Elsa Chang Lynn Rosenthal Tony Hardy Andrew Morale Amber Davila Liberia February Matthew Branch Los Angeles Washington George Floyd Minneapolis yesterday afternoon 2011 Davila Martin today Martin Castillo
"louise kelly" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

02:24 min | 2 months ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Elsa Chang this hour. Should businesses be required to pay the standard minimum wage to workers who make tips like waiters and hairdressers. Having to worry about whether or not I'm going from make sufficient funds for the work that I'm putting in its archaic also, how young far right extremists in America are finding work arounds when they get booted off mainstream social media sites. We know there are a lot of young people online in white supremacist networks and how worries over the AstraZeneca shot are disrupting Europe's vaccination campaign. Those stories after these headlines Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear, President Biden and members of his administration, our barn storming the nation to tout the specifics of his nearly $2 trillion coronavirus relief plan. NPR's Windsor Johnson reports, Biden is promoting the benefits of the sweeping legislation with the stop Today in the key swing state of Pennsylvania. President Biden kicked off his help is on the way to her at a minority owned small business in suburban Philadelphia. Biden's rescue package includes billions of dollars in federal aid for small business owners who continue to struggle financially. The Biden administration estimates that 400,000 small businesses have closed because of the pandemic. The president is promising. The additional spending will bring what he calls transformational change by creating more jobs and pumping more money into state and local governments. Vice president Kamila Harris, meanwhile, is meeting with small business owners in Colorado shall join Biden in Georgia on Friday. Windsor Johnston. NPR news, a new report says in order to meet the goals of the Paris climate accord, the world needs to act urgently to speed up the transition away from fossil fuels. Report calling the challenge achievable but extremely difficult. NPR's Camilla Domino Ski is more. The International Renewable Energy Agency, or Irena is an intergovernmental agency dedicated to promoting renewables more than 160 countries are members. Irena says that current government policies will hold carbon emissions steady over the next three decades. That's a recipe for devastating levels of climate change. Instead, Irena argues that oil production should drop by 85% and renewable electricity used should rise sharply. Add some green technology and Irena says.

Mary Louise Kelly Elsa Chang Jack Spear Georgia Irena 85% Philadelphia America Friday International Renewable Energy Biden Pennsylvania Colorado NPR AstraZeneca Kamila Harris Paris climate accord more than 160 countries billions of dollars Today
"louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:47 min | 2 months ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"Louise Kelly and I'm Audie Cornish. In the new novel, Infinite Country. Immigration is not a single event that happens at a point in time. It's an ongoing process a constant flow of people cross borders in this story. The central family has one FT in Colombia and one in the U. S. That's also true of the author's family. Patricia Angle is Colombian American Our co host, Ari Shapiro, spoke to her about the main character in this book, a teenager named Talia. Talia's a 15 year old girl who was living in Bogota, Colombia, But she was actually born in the United States and sent back to Bogota, her mother's hometown as a baby as her mother tried to Make way and make a better life for her other two Children cutting and Ando, So Talia has lived 15 years away from her mother and where infinite country begins as she is locked up in a penitentiary for young girls, and she has one week to get back to bowl with that, because a plane ticket is waiting for her to finally get to the United States and be reunited with her mother and her other siblings. After so many years apart. And so the book is, in part an adventure story, but at its core is this family that straddles two countries divided between Colombia and the U. S. And from what I understand your own family has members relatives in both of those countries. And so how much of this writing came from your own experience? I could say in some ways everything and I could say in some ways very little. My parents are Colombian immigrants. But what that is my mother's hometown. She came to the United States with my father, similar to the characters of it in and model and infinite country in order to gamble on a better life and a better future for themselves and for their Children, So when that way they're similar. Um, the nuances in the details of our family's migration story are different, but what we do have in common is that Loss of homeland all the doubts and the longing and wondering if you made the right decision and disrupting your family history and leaving your homeland to begin a new life and another one. So our story is similar in that way. There's a really interesting way that one of the characters Moto the father frames, immigration, he says. Maybe we're creatures of passage meant to cross oceans just like the first infected ear's of our continent In order to take back what was taken. I had never thought of migration is kind of a mirror image of colonialism in that way. I think that what some people don't realize is that migration is the history of this planet. We have all arrived at the place where we are because somebody before us migrated. And it's something that we admire in the natural world and will marvel about it and watch documentaries about how animals have this instinct to migrate to pursue. Resource is when the human species has done exactly the same thing. Yet somehow we've been taught to look down on it and even criminalize it and look at it as if it's a drain rather than really something miraculous and quite beautiful. There's one part of the book where a character says that to an immigrant the U. S is a country of strangers and that being an immigrant is a kind of sentence that you cannot escape. So how do you balance that idea of immigration As a sentence? You cannot escape with the idea of immigration as an opportunity as an open door that you walk through to something better. These things can co exist, and that's one of the reasons why I wrote infinite country. Ah! The reality of migration and all its complexities is something that I grew up with, and observed in the people closest to me, the people I most loved and admired. Ah, lot of people have this idea that migration is ah, very Simple thing in that you'd make a decision to leave one country and make a life in another, and that is full of certainty and no regrets, And it's really exactly the opposite. It's a decision that's full of doubts. Wondering if you made a mistake. And it bears a huge responsibility because you've changed the future of your family line Forever s O It's full of opportunity enjoy, often to come to the United States. But also you always wonder if you made the right decision and you have to confront that and it can be a very painful and exhausting experience. Day after day, year after year. Is that doubt? Is that second guessing something that you've experienced when thinking about your parents decision to leave Colombia. Absolutely. I have so much family and in Colombia, and I have cousins whose existence is so different from mine because they live in the place where their parents grew up where our grandparent's lived where everybody has known our family for generations. Whereas I grew up in a place where my family was always identified as foreigners in a place where I may have lived for most of my life, but I don't have that intimate connection with the land. The book is full of these ancient Colombian myths about the creation of the world, their stories that involve the Condor or the Jaguar. Why was it important to you to weave these traditional fables into this otherwise very realistic, contemporary narrative, But some people view those as Myths or legends, and some people would take those same stories as historical truths as an indigenous history. In traditional knowledge. I'm a storyteller at the end of the day, and I'm fascinated by the stories That we carry that help us to understand the world and how we're connected to one another through place through bonds of just being beings, living creatures in the world, among other living creatures and animals. Well, this is obviously a very personal story to you More broadly. What do you think it is about this moment? That makes this book particularly Appropriate, particularly relevant. That's a great question. And for people who have lived this experience like this family in infinite country, this is this is not of this moment. This has been something that's been the state of affairs for years and decades. But I do think that this moment this year of quarantine now we're going into our second year of quarantine has possibly given people a taste of what it's like to be separated. The people they love for reasons that are completely out of their control. This is a family that is fractured by separation as a result of ever changing immigration laws, and they really have to try to remain a family over years and years of separation. There are some people because of the cove it pandemic who have not been able to see their loved ones who maybe live in the same city or in the same state for over a year now, and I think maybe they're starting to understand in some way as I have in new ways what it's like. To live with that space and really how your love is What sustains your family when you can't be together. Patricia Angles new novel is infinite Country. Thank you for speaking with us about it..

Louise Kelly Patricia Angles Patricia Angle Ari Shapiro Bogota United States Audie Cornish Colombia Talia 15 years two countries second year one week U. S. Bogota, Colombia both 15 year old two one one part
"louise kelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 3 months ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Ari Shapiro. This hour. The impeachment trial opens with arguments over whether it's constitutional to have this trial at all. Also ahead, a possible release from prison for the Saudi activist who led the fight for women to be allowed to drive in the kingdom. Her existence Shattered the whole government narrative off in power and woman, and we remember the music and voice of Mary Wilson, one of the founding members of the Supremes. We did dare to dream at a time when it was almost an impossible dream for us to want to be stars. That's ahead after these news headlines. Live from NPR news. I'm Jack's fear. Former President Donald Trump's second historic impeachment trial began with fiery arguments from both sides, including a powerful 13 minute video showing in graphic detail violence carried out by his followers last month at the U. S. Capitol, the Senate, then voting 55 to 44 that it has jurisdiction and can proceed with the case. Trump's defense. MPR's Tamarick, he said, it harkens back to the first impeachment trial. This is the argument that they have been making me in some ways. It's not even that different than the argument that was made in President Trump's first impeachment, which was simply That these Democrats have Trump Derangement syndrome, and they are trying to get rid of him remove him from public life any way possible. That is essentially the argument that Trump's legal team is making this time and made last time to NPR's Tamara Keith Trump is charged with inciting insurrection connection with the mob attack. By the administration today said states will see their application of Corona virus vaccines rise next week to 11 million. That's up by two million weekly doses since President Biden took office. But many states say it's still not enough. Here's NPR's Our quest involved. In California. The vaccination effort is still very much a work in progress with stadium sites across the nation's most populous state, either vaccinating well under capacity or not yet, up and running at the opening Tuesday of the newest site, Santa Clara counties, Levi Stadium Governor Gavin Newsom said supply continues to be the challenge. That's the constraint. When.

Donald Trump Tamara Keith Trump NPR President Mary Louise Kelly Supremes Ari Shapiro Mary Wilson President Biden Gavin Newsom Levi Stadium MPR California Santa Clara Senate Jack Tamarick
Biden administration to "re-engage" with U.N. Human Rights Council

All Things Considered

02:25 min | 3 months ago

Biden administration to "re-engage" with U.N. Human Rights Council

"And I'm very Louise Kelly. The Biden administration is taking a new approach to the United Nations, so it wants to make sure it has a seat at the table at U. N agencies that the Trump administration left that includes the Human Rights Council in Geneva as NPR's Michele Kelemen reports. The Trump Administration denounced the Human Rights Council as a quote cess pool of political bias. The Biden administration says the 2018 decision to pull out left a vacuum often filled by authoritarian countries. The diplomat representing the U. S in Geneva now Marcus are announced today that the U. S. Is rejoining first as an observer. We know that this body has the potential to be an important forum for those fighting teary and injustice around the world. Being president of the table. We seek to ensure it can live up to that potential. There are many human rights crises that could be discussed there. A military coup in Myanmar a crackdown on protesters in Belarus and Russia. Then there's Iran. The repression is at an all time high for the past 15 16 years I have covered it that Tutti Guy Amy, who runs the New York based Center for Human Rights in Iran, he says the U. S absence from the council was felt back in 2019 when there was a deadly crackdown on protesters in Iran. That was something that the Human Rights Council if it had its center of gravity should have immediately moved to an emergency session for it. It did not happen. The Trump administration blasted Iran for the violence, but Gammy says it would have been more effective if it had done so with others on the Human Rights Council. Trump's former U. N. Ambassador Nikki Haley accuses the council of covering for dictators and being biased against Israel, she says it's sad to see the Biden administration give it legitimacy. Eileen Donahoe has a different perspective. She was Obama's ambassador there and said U S leadership made a difference. We got a special rapid tour focus specifically on Iran. There was a commission of inquiry on North Korea. We got multiple special sessions on Syria, which meant that the focus on Israel decreased dramatically without the U. S. There, she said Via Skype, China has upped its game. Avoiding scrutiny of its crackdown in Hong Kong and with the U. S. Calls a genocide against Muslim

Human Rights Council Biden Administration Trump Administration Louise Kelly U. Michele Kelemen Iran Geneva Tutti Guy Amy New York Based Center For Huma NPR United Nations Gammy Marcus U. N. Ambassador Nikki Haley Myanmar Belarus Council Of Covering For Dictat Eileen Donahoe
After Record Turnout, Republicans Are Trying to Make It Harder to Vote

All Things Considered

05:25 min | 3 months ago

After Record Turnout, Republicans Are Trying to Make It Harder to Vote

"Louise Kelly, a record 158 million Americans voted last November. Many cast their ballots early and by mail well now, in the aftermath of President Biden's victory, some Republican state lawmakers are proposing bills that would effectively make it harder to vote. Here to talk us through what is happening with voting laws in three states where the 2020 election was really close our Stephen Fowler of Georgia Public Broadcasting, Abigail, since key of WK are in Lansing, Michigan. And been Giles of Cage's in Phoenix. Arizona. Welcome all three of you. Thanks. Thank you. Thank you for having us, Steven. I've got to start with you. Not only because George is my home state, but because there has, of course been so much focus on Georgia and on Trump's efforts to throw out Biden's victory there. What are GOP lawmakers they're discussing. Well this week, Many Republican lawmakers who pushed false claims of election fraud have signed on to a number of bills in the Senate aimed at making it harder to vote. And that's after Democrats flipped both U. S Senate seats and help defeat President Trump. They would do things like Ban absentee ballot. Dropbox is severely restrict who could request a mail in absentee ballot and would undo the so called motor voter law that automatically updates your voter registration. Whenever you go to the D. M V. Now there are a few proposals that seem most likely to be enacted. One would add some sort of security requirement when you request an absentee by male vote in the future, such as writing your driver's license I d number or sending in a photocopy of your I D when you request a ballot, All right, let's head west over to Arizona Been a zoo, you know Well, Biden's victory was razor thin there as it was in Georgia. What is the debate unfolding where you are? Well, we're seeing voting laws that would impact every step of the voting process. Starting with getting registered. One measure would make it more difficult for county officials to go out into the community and hold voter registration drives. There was even a bill to abolish the incredibly popular vote by mail system in Arizona. The sponsor backtracked off that idea within hours of introducing the bill. What other ideas include requiring people to get early ballot envelopes notarized that's been described by some as a poll tax, and another proposal says You could get an early ballot mailed to you, but you couldn't tell it back. They want you to hand deliver it to a polling place, and perhaps the most controversial ideas would directly impact the presidential election results. One plan would divvy up electoral college votes by congressional district like Maine and Nebraska. Another would actually let the Legislature straight up, revoke the certification of results and let lawmakers pick who gets the electoral college votes. Wow. Um, Abigail. How about Michigan Democrats control the executive branch, but Republicans control the Legislature. How does that dynamic play out in terms of what's happening with voting laws on the discussion over what to do with him in Michigan? Well, it's been a real split screen. We have Democrats and clerks who are pointing to this election as the safest and most secure of their careers. Bar. Bayram is one of the clerks from the larger counties and Michigan, and she called on Republicans this week to say what's been clear throat. All of these hearings that this election was fair and free of fraud. At the end of the day. If people do not want to believe this backed, they're not gonna believe it. Regardless of how many audits are performed. Reports are issue or how transparent the processes and in Michigan are. Democratic Secretary of State is saying she wants to do things like male absentee ballot applications to registered voters and federal elections. Republicans are countering with things like putting cameras on unstaffed ballot. Dropbox is neither of those are likely to get very far. But there is middle ground on issues like making sure there's common training for pole challengers on Stephen and been a quick quick reaction from each of you on that. How much of this in your state? It is. Real policy proposal. How much is for show? Well, Mary Louise after the last couple months of hand wringing over votes we've seen top Republican lawmakers in Georgia say that they're not going to do some of the more extreme proposals. They're not for cutting, no excuse absentee voting, and many of these bills are likely just to appease their constituents who say that more needs to be done. Why do Republicans in your states say changes like this are necessary, Given that there were no major issues with absentee voting in the 2020 election, Given that federal officials have confirmed it was the most secure election in American History. Stephen Bendy one. Do you want to take that one? Justification in Arizona is Pretty simply put as distrust, citing the misinformation that's out there and citing the fact that there are a lot of these Republicans constituents who say they have doubts whether or not those doubts are based on any valid information. Republicans have kind of push past that and just said the fact that there are doubt justifies continued discussions about the election. And changes to the law that they say might inspire some more confidence

Louise Kelly President Biden Stephen Fowler Georgia Public Broadcasting Michigan President Trump Arizona Biden Abigail Georgia Senate Dropbox Lansing Giles Bayram Donald Trump Legislature GOP Steven Phoenix
"louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:03 min | 4 months ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"Mary Louise Kelly. This our House Democrats want President Trump to resign or be removed from office. We'll hear more about where impeachment efforts stand. Ask yourselves is gunfire and the speaker's lobby a new normal. You're willing to accept. And former FBI Director James Comey weighs in on why he thinks Trump should be impeached, but not federally prosecuted. We don't want him center of our lives. I'd rather him in his bathroom, yelling at cars on the lawn at Mar A Lago with the camera lights off, Plus Mississippi flies a new state flag. Now news Lie from NPR News. I'm Jack Spear. In an extraordinary an unusual move. The country's top military leaders have signed a joint statement harshly condemning last week's ride at the U. S. Capitol. More from NPR's Greg Marie. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs, Army General Mark Milley and the other members say the January 6th Fry. It was a quote, direct assault on the U. S. Congress, the Capitol building and our constitutional process. Million. Other senior military leaders have stated repeatedly that they do not want the armed forces involved in U. S politics, but the violence has prompted them to take a more public position. The statement added that freedom of speech does not give anyone the right to resort to violence, sedition and insurrection. There was no mention of President Trump. But the statement by the Joint Chiefs stated that President elect Joe Biden would become commander in chief on January 20th. Greg, My RE NPR NEWS Washington As president Trump faces what is likely to be his second impeachment by the House this week, lawmakers are moving to remove the president even faster. They've now started debate on the topic of whether to attempt to remove Trump from office, using the 25th amendment, calling on Vice President Mike Pence to invoke his constitutional authority to carry that out. Although that's not likely to happen. There was growing disenfranchisement from Trump by members of his own party. Includes the share of the House Republican Conference. Congresswoman Liz Cheney. Impeachment vote in the House is expected tomorrow. Around the country. Officials and law enforcement personnel are taking steps to tighten security of state Capitol buildings. NPR's Greg Allen reports that follows a warning by the FBI that arm protester being planned it all 50 state capitals. In many states, legislatures are convening new sessions this week with tighter security in place in Olympia. Washington National Guard troops wrong hand is to protesters were arrested Monday for trying to enter the statehouse grounds. Michigan has banned openly carrying firearms in the capital there, a scene of armed protest through last spring following last week's violence in Washington, D C. Representative Geraldine Thompson of Florida says security is a concern. We're now even more, um, on Alert if if that's the best word for our safety, as lawmakers in Atlanta and 8 FT security fence is now being erected around the Georgia Capitol, Greg Allen NPR NEWS all air passengers entering the U. S will not be required provide a negative Corona virus test, according.

President Trump President NPR News NPR James Comey Joint Chiefs Greg Allen FBI U. S. Capitol Mary Louise Kelly Washington Congresswoman Liz Cheney Vice President Greg Marie House Republican Conference Washington National Guard Greg Jack Spear
"louise kelly" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:04 min | 4 months ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly. And I'm Elsa Chang. I had this now or what warnings were missed, that might have boarded the Christmas Day bombing in Nashville. There, we had information on him and that was passed over. That's a problem. That's a big problem. Also, covert cases are surging as his holiday travel at the nation's airports, and not everyone moving through those airports is obeying the rules about social distancing and wearing a mask. Human behavior is one of the most frustrating things and trying to combat the spread of covert 19 across the board, plus a new year's cocktail recipe to wring out 20 21st these news headlines. Life from NPR News in Washington. I'm Louise Schiavone. The count has begun in the U. S. Of freshly identified cases of the covert 19 variant believed to be significantly more contagious than the original. Now. California Governor Gavin Newsom says a case has been identified in his state. This new variant this new strain. That we have identified obviously from the United Kingdom. There's some other parts of the globe, identified in Colorado yesterday has been identified here in the state of California. In Southern California. In a virtual call with Governor Newsome Infectious Disease official Dr Anthony Fauci predicted there will be more of those cases and not just in California. Not surprised that you have AH case and likely more cases in California. And we likely will be seeing reports from other states Colorado with the first In Colorado. Meanwhile, health officials say a state National Guard members the first reported US case of the covert 19 variant first detected in the UK and state officials are investigating a possible second case there. Coronavirus cases, hospitalizations and deaths are climbing in Oklahoma, and vaccine distribution is now in the works. Jessica Gallaher reports This so called pods or points of dispensing sites for the covert 19 vaccine include community centers, fairgrounds and schools. According to the Oklahoma State Department of Health first responders. People over 65 health care workers not in a hospital setting will be part of face two of the state's program. State Health Commissioner, Dr Lance Fry says the pods will help provide more access as vaccine distribution is being opened up to larger populations. Currently, residents and staff of long term care facilities, paramedics and frontline health care workers, among others. Are receiving the vaccine for NPR news. I'm Jessica Gallaher in Oklahoma City. Stocks finished higher today amid light trading ahead of the New Year's holiday. NPR's Scott Horsley reports, the Dow Jones industrial average rose more than 73 points to close it a new record high. All of the major stock indexes enjoyed modest gains. The Dow rose about a quarter percent. Both the S and P 500 index and the NASDAQ were up a fraction Investors have been encouraged this week by the signing of a new $900 billion covert relief package that includes direct payments of $600 to most Americans. The Treasury Department says the first, those payments are now on their way by direct deposit and by mail. An effort to boost the payments to $2000 remains bottled up in the Senate. GOP Senate leader Mitch McConnell opposes the higher payments, and he's paired the proposal with other provisions designed to prevent passage. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington Dow hit a record high of 30,409 points. The NASDAQ was up 19. This is NPR. Heads up two spirits enthusiasts amidst the U. S. Europe Trade dispute. The office of the U. S Trade representative said it was adding tariffs on cognacs and other brandy's from France and Germany as well a certain non sparkling wines and aircraft manufacturing parts. Rebellion against mask wearing and the live free or die. State has the governor of New Hampshire, canceling a public inauguration ceremony as New Hampshire public Radio's Todd Bookman tells US Governor Chris Sununu's safety concerns are related to armed protesters. Protesters have been gathering here, Governor Sununu's private residence for weeks. The protests began in opposition to Sununu's issuance of a statewide mask mandate. In response, the Republican governors hometown of new Fields passed an ordinance this month banning picketing outside of private homes. This week, Protesters openly defied that ordinance, resulting in nine people being sighted and one man being arrested for trespassing. The governor says the protests have become quote more aggressive instead of a public inauguration slated to be held outdoors due to Cova 19. There will now be a private ceremony live stream to the public for NPR news. I'm Todd Bookman in New Hampshire. Complications of the current virus have taken the life of actress Dawn Wells. She played the role of Mary Ann on the iconic TV sitcom Gilligan's Island. She was 82 Wells had numerous TV parts and shows like Bonanza and 77, Sunset Strip..

NPR News Governor Sununu California NPR New Hampshire Dawn Wells Jessica Gallaher Governor Gavin Newsom Oklahoma State Department of H Scott Horsley Mary Louise Kelly Todd Bookman Colorado US Governor Newsome Elsa Chang
35 years ago, the city of Philadelphia dropped a bomb on its citizens. They are now ready to apologize.

Marketplace

03:50 min | 6 months ago

35 years ago, the city of Philadelphia dropped a bomb on its citizens. They are now ready to apologize.

"Mary Louise Kelly. 35. Years ago, a police helicopter dropped a bomb on a Philadelphia row house in a mostly black neighborhood. 11 people were killed. Five of them were Children. The bomb live on inferno that burned down more than 60 other houses, leaving hundreds of people homeless. This is now referred to as the move. Bombing move for the Black Liberation group by the same name was targeted. Last Thursday, the Philadelphia City Council passed a resolution that finally issues a formal apology. Philadelphia City Council member Jamie got to who represents the third district where the bombing occurred. Updraft the resolution and joins us now. Hey there! Welcome. Hi. So for those who maybe don't know, don't remember much about the bombing. Which you just briefly explain what what was move, and why was the city of Philadelphia so hostile to it? Yes. Move Woz, a black liberation group of back to nature group, and I think they were. They were different, right? Like many people in our society, and they were a group of black people who were different and who were very unapologetic about it. And I think over time, um, there developed Ah, Lot of friction between move. Andhra police in the city of Philadelphia. So You've got this apology through. Why is this important now? 35 years later, I think it's important because one no one was ever held accountable on been a real way for what happens with the move. Bombing, which was an atrocity is one of the only times in our country that Ah government bombed its home city. Its own citizens, Um There was no there was never a formal apology. That's something that was all also very striking to me. And so I was honored. Tonto work with the activists who really brought this the council to bring this about, And not only is this Not only that, I think this was important from a symbolic perspective. I also think it's important because we see echoes of what happened in the move Bombing in what we're seeing now between police and community and with the police violence that we've seen in the very same neighborhood. This is Russell. The neighborhood where Walter Wallace Jr was gunned down by police. Just that was just last month that police shooting Walter Wallace? Yes. Yeah, And I've seen you talk about how divisions between police and the community are, you know, not new, obviously. And until we actually reckon with them, their divisions and the problems we're going to keep on coming. Absolutely. I think that we can connect what happened to move with what we saw happen with well to Rawlins Jr. And I think what underlines both of these events and a lot of the police violence we see is racism and a lack of recognition of the humanity of black people in our in our neighborhoods on behalf of police, and until we confront what's at the core, I don't believe we'll be able to move forward. We just have a few seconds left. But along with the apology does this resolution also make some concrete amends to the generations of people impacted by the by the bombing? Well, along with this apology. The resolution establishes May 13th as an annual day of observation, reflection in and re commitment in Philadelphia to honor those that we lost on that day in 1985. And though that, um, can be seen as largely symbolic. I hope it will be the start of the listening and the conversations that we need to

Philadelphia City Council Mary Louise Kelly Black Liberation Group Philadelphia Move Woz Andhra Police Walter Wallace Jr Walter Wallace Jamie Rawlins Jr. UM Russell
"louise kelly" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:10 min | 7 months ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Chang and I Mary Louise Kelly. Tonight we hear from both of the campaigns about their debate prep later, food banks across the country are struggling to keep up with demand. We've never experienced food and security at this level, since we've been tracking the data for the last 20 years. Plus, Ecologists explain why some forest fires become so dangerous. Fire can start to create its own winds and then become this basically self fulfilling prophecy right as it can really start to drive itself forward and how the NFL is trying to contain Kobe outbreaks first, he said, lines Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. White House physician Sean Conley says President Donald Trump has been fever free for more than four days. NPR's Asia, Roscoe reports trumps doctor also says his vital signs remain stable and in the normal range. In his latest update on President Trump's health, Dr Shannon Conley said in a memo that Trump has been symptom free for more than 24 hours. Trump was hospitalized last week after testing positive for the Corona virus. He received supplemental accident on at least two occasions after contracting the virus, but kindly, said Trump is not needed any oxygen since his initial hospitalization. The White House has provided on Ly short written updates from Trump's doctor over the past two days, currently has not provided information on the state of Trump's lungs, or the last time he tested negative for the Corona virus and other relevant details about Trump's care. Aisha Roscoe NPR news in a non DeKoven 19 Tonight's vice presidential debate in Salt Lake City, Utah, will have additional safety procedures in place that includes a clear Plexi glass partition between the candidates on each side of their deaths, as well as 12 FT of spacing from one another. The audience will also be sated at least 6 FT. Apart and all those entering the debate hall will have their temperatures checked and be required to wear masks. Tonight's debate is the only scheduled face off between the two vice presidential contenders. It comes after President Trump's positive cove in 19 diagnosis. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi continues to blast President Trump. We're pulling the plug on negotiations on the next Corona virus relief measure, NPR's Windsor Johnston reports. The speaker's also brushing aside the administration's ladies push for smaller, piecemeal legislation. Speaking on a bee sees the view. Pelosi called President Trump's abrupt decision to put talks on hold a missed opportunity to provide much needed relief amid the pandemic. It is really important for us to come to this agreement. The president just popped off and make that announcement without even informing us that that was the case. He insulted the Constitution of the United States. The Trump Administration is proposing stand alone legislation that would provide another round of direct payments for eligible Americans and additional relief for airlines and small businesses. Congressional Democrats say that doesn't go far enough in providing Americans what they need during the pandemic. Windsor Johnston. NPR NEWS Washington Will the state of Wisconsin experiencing a major outbreak of cases of covert 19 health officials there say they're opening a field hospital with the state fairgrounds to deal with a potential overflow going to the state Department of Health Services? Only about 16% of Wisconsin's 11,452 hospital beds were available as of yesterday afternoon. Wisconsin currently has more than 850 Hospitalized Cove in 19 patients with 216 and intensive care on Wall Street. The Dow was up 530 points today. You're listening to NPR. Faced with an optic in Corona virus cases after a long low spell Italians when I'll be required to wear facemasks outdoors here, Sylvia Poggioli reports. The Rome government also approved the three month extension of the cove in 19 State of emergency. The outdoor mask requirement was already in effect in some regions, including lots still the region around Rome once the European epicenter of the pandemic. Italy successfully brought the infection curve down thanks to a strict two month long locked down in a very gradual reopening of the economy. But the country has seen a steady increase in infections in the last two months, although with much lower numbers that those recorded in France, Spain and Britain, the state of emergency was slated to end admitted October the extension to January. 31st gives the government greater powers and makes it easier to eliminate delays by bypassing the country's notorious red tape. Sylvia Poggioli. NPR News Roam. The former Minneapolis police officer charged with murder in the death of George Floyd has posted bond has been released from prison going to court documents. Derek Shaman posted bail on $1 million Bond. Floyd died on May 25th after charm and captives. Press need press down on Floyd's neck even a slight gas when he couldn't breathe. The incident sparked months of protests. Unprecedented wave of calls for police, accountability and racial justice traveling. Three other former officers were scheduled to stand trial in March. Credible futures prices lead somewhat today. Oil down 72 cents a barrel to close a 39 95 a barrel on the New York.

President Donald Trump NPR Trump Administration Trump president Sylvia Poggioli House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Aisha Roscoe Windsor Johnston George Floyd Wisconsin Mary Louise Kelly NFL Chang Hospitalized Cove Jack Spear Kobe
New Law Mandates California To Study The Issue Of Reparations For Slaves' Descendants

All Things Considered

04:28 min | 7 months ago

New Law Mandates California To Study The Issue Of Reparations For Slaves' Descendants

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Elsa Chang in January. 18 65 As the Civil war staggered into its final months, the US made a promise. It would take for 100,000 acres of confiscated southern lands stretching from South Carolina to Florida and redistribute it to formerly enslaved black people in 40 acre parcels. Well, that order did not last long. Within the year, Lincoln's replacement president, Andrew Johnson, broke that promise and handed the land back to plantation owners. That was the nation's first systematic attempt to provide reparations for slavery. More recently, the late Michigan congressman John Conyers, tried and failed for nearly three decades. Yet Congress to consider the same issue. Now California has taken Conyers bill and used it as an inspiration for a new bill signed into law last week. It is the first state law of its kind. California Assemblywoman Shirley Weber is the author of that Bill, and she joins us Now. Welcome. Thank you. It's good to be here. Good to have you So what this new law does is basically set up a task force to study the issue of reparations for the descendants of enslaved people and To make further recommendations from there. Tell me what are you hoping to see? Come out of this task force. Well, I think they're a couple of things we hope will happen. Obviously, we hope there will be a number of recommendations on what the state needs to do in order to repair the damage that's been done. But hopefully in addition to that, we will have robust conversations about the really deep and long and pervasive impact of slavery and racism in California and across the nation. I talked to too many people who tell me I'm not a slave holder. I didn't I didn't own any slaves. What does that mean to me? Well, you may not have owned them, but the impact of your forefathers owning them. As what is the impact of the various laws and limitations placed upon African Americans That made it difficult, if not impossible, for them to compete educationally and economically and socially still has its lingering impact, and we see that in the streets today, we'll give us some concrete examples of what form Might these reparations take Well, you know, it could be like it is a Georgetown where those folks who was slaves that landed Georgetown, every descendant of those individuals now could have access and free education of Georgetown. We could look at the issue of loans and grants for people starting businesses, and we have businesses that are suffering and sometimes failing in this pandemic. Because of our let the lack of support and financing that made it almost difficult, if not impossible, for them to own land and only businesses. We need to look at housing patterns. California had some very, very racist housing patterns that existed. But they're they're number of things that need to exist and to indicate that is tremendous amount of damage was done and puts California on the hook as well, because he basically California was a free state, right. A lot of people don't think of California as a slave state, but exactly what role California did play when it came to slavery. Well, we had one of most racist governors who talked about removing all black people from state of California free or slaves. We created laws that prevented them from being able to testify in court against white person. We had lots of things embedded in our land ownership that prevents folks from buying or selling homes to African Americans. All of those things are important, as they began to say, is this wide African Americans continue to struggle have the least amount of wealth amassed have low homeownership, all those kinds of things that even after generations and generations of struggle. We still find that these things prevail. And even though a few sneak through the vast majority do not Now let me ask you dealing with the legacy of slavery is an issue that this entire country needs to reckon with. So there are a lot of people say, Let's look to a federal solution. How would you respond to that? Well, we have We lived for federal solution for 30 to 40 years. At this point, it's just not happening at the federal level. And so after waiting, we said, You know what California could do this? And I've governor said, You know what we can lead the way and that we think will motivate others to do. Likewise, California state Assemblywoman Shirley Weber was the author of a new state law to study reparations for slavery. Thank you very much, thank you for the opportunity.

California Assemblywoman Shirley Weber John Conyers NPR Mary Louise Kelly United States South Carolina Georgetown Congress Lincoln Andrew Johnson Michigan Florida President Trump Bill Elsa Chang
NPR News Interviews Professor Anita Hill

All Things Considered

03:17 min | 8 months ago

NPR News Interviews Professor Anita Hill

"Considered from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro and Mary Louise Kelly has enough changed in the three years since the Harvey Weinstein story broke and the me to movement took off. A new report finds that for Hollywood and the entertainment business, the answer is no. The Hollywood Commission, a nonprofit that works to eradicate harassment and discrimination in the industry. Surveyed entertainment workers nationwide and found many are staying silent because they fear retaliation. Or they don't believe people in positions of power will be held to account. The chair of the commission is Anita Hill, who, of course, has fought her own battles over getting allegations of sexual harassment taken seriously. She accused now Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas of harassment and testified. Under oath back in 1991. Professor Hill joins us now welcome back to all things considered. I'm glad to speak with you again. I'm happy to be here. Tell me what surprised you in the survey results Well, the standout data was the data on accountability. We ask people Do you think that a person of higher rank Who was found to have our asked a person of lower rank would be held accountable and what we found is that 64% of the people we surveyed said that in fact, that person would not be held accountable. I suppose that's the thing that surprised me. I mean, on the one hand, it's not surprising that we're dealing with such deeply entrenched culture and history here. On the other hand, it's been three years of me, too, in the spotlight, and many powerful men have been held to account. You're you're absolutely right. We've seen some very high profile cases. And what we want to make sure is that it doesn't stop with just a few high profile cases. We know that they are problems throughout. Workplaces, and we want to make sure that everybody, whatever their position is Can count on being heard. So that's one piece of this. The other is persuading people who believe they're being harassed, have been harassed that they have a safe path to come forward and report it. I remember interviewing you, Professor Hill. Always. Almost exactly. Two years ago, September 2018 on we were talking because it was in the middle of the confirmation battle over Brett Kavanaugh. And we talked about the the personal cost of choosing to come forward. What do you say to someone who's weighing whether to do so or not? Well, you're absolutely right. There are personal cost. But even when people are willing to take the risk, there are other things that they're considering. People don't come forward because they think they won't be taken seriously. Unfortunately, the Cavanagh hearing really gave the impression that the Senate Judiciary Committee Did not take Christine Bozzi. Ford's claim seriously, and people see that example and becomes, you know what they think will happen to them.

Professor Hill Harassment Hollywood Commission Npr News Mary Louise Kelly Ari Shapiro Hollywood Harvey Weinstein Brett Kavanaugh Ford Clarence Thomas Supreme Court Senate Judiciary Committee Cavanagh Christine Bozzi
Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes: Trump Will Use Every Opportunity To Divide People

All Things Considered

06:01 min | 9 months ago

Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes: Trump Will Use Every Opportunity To Divide People

"And I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington today, the governor and lieutenant governor of Wisconsin now President Trump to stay away from their state. So did the mayor of Kenosha, Wisconsin, who says the city needs time to heal, But the president showed up anyway. Trump's trip comes after days of unrest following the police shooting of a black man, Jacob Blake that left him hospitalized. It also comes after a white 17 year old Kyle Riton house with charged with six criminal counts, including first degree intentional homicide. Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela. Barnes, a Democrat, joins us now Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me today. We're glad to have you. Governor Tony either sent a letter asking President Trump not to visit Kenosha. You've called for him to stay away as well. Do you see any potential benefit to having him? There may be a chance to meet and talk to him in a productive way. No, I do not because if a real leader would have proven that already, he would have given words Tio help console the people of this community of people of this state and the people of this nation because what happened in Kenosha? It's something that happens all too often in this country, and the president has offered no sort of resolve. You can look at the president's invective. You can look at the RNC, which tried to capitalize all such situations, which tried to politicize People who are crying out who are stepping up marching and demanding racial justice. And Donald Trump doesn't want to hear that He is going to use every opportunity that he can to divide the people of this state. A CZ. This is a critical state for his re election, and it's unfortunate because You know, these are realize that we're talking about Governor Evers called for a special session of the Legislature on Monday to address police reform. But Republicans didn't show up and that session lasted 30 seconds. To get any legislation through. You need Republican support. Do you have a plan for how to do that? Well, eyes unfortunate that you know, we could ask. What's our plan? When the Legislature and the Republicans in the Legislature don't get asked why they continue to ignore people, it took them forever to respond. A covert 19. They haven't responded to the health care crisis. They haven't responded to the dairy crisis that our family farmers are dealing with in this country. They haven't responded to gun violence prevention. They have responded to the client. Crisis, Every issue they continue to fail and ignore the people of this state. Kenosha is the latest city to deal with protests and sometimes counter protests that have turned violent governor ever sent in the national Guard as the protests were heating up, and some protesters said that having the guards there made unrest worse. Do you think the governor made the right decision by sending in the guards? So the governor sent in the guard's ate with controlling fires that were set. You know, this is all in the interest of safety because fires can get out of control. Fire touches the wrong thing. You have explosions that you can potentially have more loss of life. That was the purpose of the National Guard. I think what protesters were experiencing Was a heightened response from from law enforcement and the press conference that happened shortly after the young man who traveled to Wisconsin from Illinois to kill two people in our streets. The response was well, maybe if people weren't out past curfew, ignoring the fact that you're the shooter was also out past curfew. So to assign blame to that the victims that shows where we are in in terms of thought with some of the local law enforcement that's on the ground, and this is the reforming accountability that we're talking about. Whatever the reason, the guard was there, even if it was just to try to put out or prevent fires. It ends up being a law enforcement presence, the presence of authorities and this is the dilemma. I think for city and state leaders, how do you control what could become violent unrest? Without making people feel that the feds were storming in or with a guard is storming in. That's a really hard dilemma. Have you figured out the right balance of that? Is something that is a learning process. If I'm going to be completely honest, and and I I always I always promoted the fact that law enforcement should continuously Work to deescalate situations. Whether it is a or a personal interaction like the one with Jacob Blake and the three officers or whether we're talking larger scale events like protests and demonstrations. I think that you often see peaceful protest turned the other way when there is a heightened presence of what is perceived as authorities. So yeah, I do think there is there is a there is a problem. Because when people are protesting police, you know aggression with police overly aggressive police. The response cannot be over overly aggressive law enforcement. How to deal with violent unrest is becoming a major issue in the presidential campaign, and many Democrats who do not support President Trump worry that violent unrest helps him. That it lets him say the Democrats are weak on crime. What's your level of concern that you may be inadvertently helping President Trump's reelection efforts in that way? You know, I think that it's important for people to realize that again. The people who were killed. In Kenosha, where protesters they were killed by people who felt that they had a responsibility to help things to help matters to assist Now, like you mention Law enforcement are air National guards are there. They didn't eat health. Yet. These people are free to just walk the streets with long rifles, intimidating people. I think that is the important thing that people need to realize. Andi. I hope that folks to understand that Republicans continue to enable this sort of behavior this sort of behavior. That actually leads people did That's Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela. Barnes. Thank you for coming on the program. Thank you.

President Trump Kenosha Lieutenant Governor Mandela Wisconsin National Guard Legislature Governor Evers Jacob Blake Governor Tony Barnes Mary Louise Kelly Kyle Riton Washington RNC Illinois
"louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:08 min | 9 months ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Sasha Pfeiffer. The essayist Eula Biss focuses her new book on What Seems to be a simple question. What is capitalism for her? The answer to that question is complicated and elusive and comes in the form of short, often funny essays that make up her new book having and being had Eula Biss. Welcome. Oh, thanks so much for having me Fula. This book grew out of you having finally bought your first home and for a lot of people that would be considered a pure success. A goal of adulthood. But you say it gave you a sense of security that felt unfamiliar and even uncomfortable. Why did you feel that way? Yeah. This book came out of that contradiction of me enjoying All the new comforts that came with having AH, home have a more space and also a new kind of economic security. But feeling uncomfortable, I think, really, with the system in which I had acquired those things. And I wrote the book as an effort to hold on to that discomfort. I had the sense that the discomfort had something to teach me. You seem to think that if you lost the sense of discomfort, there actually was a lost there. What did you think you could lose by not feeling that way anymore. One of the things that I didn't want to have happened to me. As I entered this new life in lifestyle was I didn't want to begin to think that I had what I had, because I'd worked hard. Which is one of the patterns of thought very common to upper middle class. I don't believe that I got what I got. Because I worked hard. I believe that I got what I got because the system favors Me in a number of different ways one because I'm white, but also because I started out middle class, and I think that it's uncomfortable for people who start out with more to be reminded of that. So and I do think that this is damaging in so many ways. The implication is that people who don't have enough have just not worked hard enough. And that's damaging to people who are working extremely hard and still don't have enough because they're being underpaid. But it's also damaging to relationships between people who have more and people who have less. If there's this implication, hovering in the air that you could have as much as I have, if only you just worked a little harder. In the book, You actually seemed to make an effort to share exact dollar amounts. I think you say it felt important to you to do that. So you volunteer that your house cost? I think almost a half million dollars. You tell readers the size of the advance you got for your book. Why be so open about that things that people usually don't want to share? Yeah, I was open about that. Exactly because I didn't want to be. I made a rule for myself, and I made it after having written that section where I talked about the price of my house. That section summarizes a conversation I had with my sister, where I told her that what I'd really done was acquire a $400,000 container for a washing machine. But what I noted in that moment was that I was misrepresenting to my own sister. The price of my house, which was much closer to $500,000. It was for 85. So when I noticed myself lying to my own sister about money, I decided that if I was going to learn anything from writing a book about money I was gonna have to Use the actual figures involved, and I was gonna have to face honestly what I had And did you downplay the amount to your sister? Because you had a sense of self consciousness or embarrassment about having bought that size house or borrowed that kind of money? Yeah, I downplayed it because of self consciousness because I knew that my sister was trying to buy a house and that her budget was smaller than mine. And it made me feel uncomfortable that I had more than her. And I downplayed it because I just had not myself become comfortable with that the amount of money that I was dealing with and it still was two enormous a sum for me to even say out loud. At one point you're talking about your son paying for a Pokemon card. But although someone else thought he overpaid for the Pokemon card, what was it like for you to watch your son try to figure out what something was worth and why, and maybe not figured it out correctly. So was amazing in watching him learn how to play Pokemon the way it was being played in 1st and 2nd grade. At this school, I felt like I was seeing an economy be invented. But it was also somewhat excruciating to me because I saw the ways in which other Children and his baby sitter and I were training the values of capitalism into him. So, yes, At one point he gave away valuable Pokemon card because he just didn't like it very much. And then I heard his baby sitter saying to him, Were you a smart negotiator? And I thought, Oh, no. What are we doing? This kid is on Ly six, and we're already training him Not to be generous, and to get his much out of an exchange is he can possibly get out of it, even if he doesn't care about the thing he's giving away. Oh, that's so interesting. I mean, diamonds are objectively very expensive, invaluable, but if I don't care about them, and I just want to give them away Is that fine? Or is that flawed financial thinking under the logic of capitalism? It's insane, right? But by by some other logic, it makes perfect sense. Especially since diamonds are incredibly useful. You can eat them and you can't live inside them. After you finished your book. How do you define capitalism? In your words? Yes. So the definition that was most useful to me was David Draper's from Debt, the 1st 5000 years and his definition was the art of using money to make more money..

Eula Biss NPR Mary Louise Kelly David Draper Sasha Pfeiffer
"louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:21 min | 11 months ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Elsa Chang, The House Armed Services Committee had a host of questions today for Defense Secretary Mark Esper and Joint Chiefs of Staff General Mark Milley. Questions covered what the role was of the National Guard during recent protests, and they covered reports of Russia paying bounties for the Taliban to kill Americans. NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman joins us with details. Hey, Tom, also all right, So let's start the national Guard. I mean, there have been lingering questions over how they were used on June 1st in Lafayette Square in Washington, D. C. What did Esper and really say about the role of the guard that day? Will. They defended the role of the National Guard. The same guard troops were there to support civilian law enforcement and we're in what they called a static position. They didn't take part in clearing the park of peaceful protesters, Guard troops, they said. Are used to dealing with any civil unrest, supporting local authorities on a variety of for a variety of reasons, And they said it's a better alternative than using active duty forces as president. Trump had threatened. And is it clear who was actually calling the shots that day? You know it's not clear else, And that's really surprising neither as for normally knew, who gave the order to clear the park. But again, the guard was working in support of civil authorities. Justice Department as well as the Park police were apparently someone within those organizations gave the order. Now the Pentagon is doing what it calls an after action report on the guards rule in D C and also elsewhere around the country, including Training and equipment. Now. One issue in D. C was also a guard helicopter flew low over protesters in the wash from the blades swept them up in debris even tour some limbs from treason. The report's expect to determine why that happened. Okay, well, the other story I want to ask you about is reports of a bounty program in Afghanistan, where Russia was reportedly offering up cash sums to Taliban fighters to kill Americans. Why don't we know about this so far? Well, it did come up. Both Esper and Milly said the Pentagon has not corroborated reports of the bony program from the intelligence community, principally the CIA. The Pentagon is still looking into that, and they see no evidence that any Americans were killed. As a result of this supposed program. But general, Milley pointed out, and he's done multiple tours in Afghanistan that it's long been known that Russia was aiding the Taliban with training and equipment. Or deported meddling since 2013 or so. And also this is something I saw in the ground myself when I was in Helmand province a few years back with my producer, Monica if Stati Ava Thing is, Milly did go on to say the American troops there are at the highest level of force protection, and he said, there's not much more they can do at the ground level. This issue of Russian bounties is MME or something for top political leaders. Let's listen. The issue is higher than that The issue is at the strategic level. What should or could we be doing at the strategic level is their diplomatic and informational on economic of the sanctions of the dead marshes are their phone calls or their pressure, those sorts of things And I can tell you that some of that is done. Are we doing as much as we could, or should? Perhaps not interesting. He's saying that we probably are not doing as much as we could or should. So, is that language? Actually being echoed by the White House at the moment, Absolutely not. The White House criticized in New York Times, which broke the story about the supposed bounties. He's criticized him for revealing classified information in the president just dismissed the whole story as a hoax, and he said it was on ly to damage me in the Republican Party. But the Pentagon again Is looking into this taking it very seriously. And clearly, as you just heard, General Milley was much more forceful on Russia than anything we've heard recently from the White House. And if it's true, these bounties Millie said he would be an outraged general. That is NPR's Tom Bowman. Thank you so much, Tom, you're welcome. Scientists say they have identified an enzyme that could help explain how exercise Khun slow or even reverse some signs of aging in the brain. Exercising a bottle is not around the corner, but it's not out of the question, either. NPR science correspondent Richard Harris took a break from reporting about the Corona virus to look into this intriguing suggestion. Scientists were surprised to discover a few years ago that brain function doesn't have to get worse. And worse as we age solve. A lady's research was inspired in part by a finding that parts of the brain can actually re grow even in older people. Just because you have an old brand doesn't have to stay that way. One of the best known interventions that has a benefit on the brain is exercise. The problem is that the elderly are frail. Many of them can't physically do the exercise. Violeta and his colleagues at UC San Francisco have been on the hunt for factors in the blood that air boosted by exercise and that Khun Improve mental performance. Can we actually then transfer the benefits of exercise without actually having to do the physical component of the exercise itself? They now report in science magazine that they think they have a great lead. My sou exercise produced lots of a liver in time called G P l D one. And when the researchers revved up production of this protein in mice, nerves grew in part of their brains and the animals perform better on mental tasks in a maze exercise causes this protein to be produced in the liver goes into the blood that sort of damp in certain aspects of inflammation. And then the result of that is that you actually have improvement. In cognitive function in these older mice. The research team also looked at a group of older people who exercise more and there again, they found more of this enzyme. So the same thing is true Inhumans. If you're more active, you're producing more of this protein, and it's sort of circulating your blood. Now both aging and exercise are extremely complicated systems involving all sorts of components that interact in complicated ways. So violated had to think hard about whether a single protein could really have a big effect. I was definitely surprised that one protein could could have that much effect. But when I started thinking about it, Okay, it's one approaching. But really, it's changing. You know these other 100 protein, so I think that's why scientists are nowhere near understanding the complex relationship between all these interacting parts. Bradley Wise is at the National Institute on Aging. There's a long step between identifying this enzyme and making me a pill out of that. This is one piece of the puzzle. But the team at UC San Francisco is eager to see if they can find their way to making a medication out of there now patented Discovery. Elena says the discovery at least suggest a path forward. We don't have that, you know, exercise pill right now. You know, this lets us know that that I think is a viable thing to pursue. We're not there yet. You know, my mom gets really excited. She was like exercising about on like we're on our way. But we're not. We're not there yet. I wouldn't rush out to make GPL d one and give it to people Bill Freeman, researchers aging at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation and at the VA in Oklahoma City. He's excited about the new findings, but cautions that almost nothing is known about the potential downside of tinkering with this enzyme and the complicated system. It effects. There's a lot more research done, and in the meantime one of the things that we can all do. Is exercise we can we have that, within our own power and exercise has all sorts of health benefits beyond the brain. So if this ever does become a medication that would be most helpful for people who through injury or old age simply can't exercise on their own. Richard Harris. NPR news This is w when my C you're listening to all things considered news Headlines air.

Pentagon Russia Taliban Tom Bowman National Guard NPR Mark Esper General Milley Afghanistan White House Khun president San Francisco Richard Harris Milly Mark Milley Mary Louise Kelly Washington House Armed Services Committee
Fauci Says US Could Reach 100000 Coronavirus Cases a Day

Live from Here with Chris Thile

05:42 min | 11 months ago

Fauci Says US Could Reach 100000 Coronavirus Cases a Day

"This past week, Dr Anthony Fauci shocked many people in this country and around the world when he said before Congress And unless something changes Corona virus cases in the United States could reach 100,000 per day. What would it take to turn things around and keep us from reaching that? Terrifying number. Dr. Fauci spoke about this with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly. Can we turn this around? Can we turn these numbers around without an even more aggressive shutdown than we had in March? And in April? I believe the answer is yes, but we have to do things a bit differently. And what we've been doing, because when you talk about the goal of everyone to try and proceed towards normalization by taking steps in the opening America again Program, which would guidelines that had good and well demarcated benchmark. What we saw and it really varied from state to state with people out there. Congregating in bars congregating in crowds in a celebratory way, understandably because they felt cooped up without wearing masks. That is, you know, in many respects if I might use the word, it's a violation of the principles of what we're trying to do. It does not have to be 100,000 cases a day. I use that number. Because I wanted Jeff to jolt people into realizing their attention. So we did, and that's exactly what I wanted to do because as I've said so many times over the previous weeks, two months If you leave the virus to its own devices, it will take off on you. You've just sent a couple of things I want to follow up. When you talked about how things have varied so much state to state, you used the word guidelines a supposed to requirements. Does there need to be more of a coordinated federal plan? Do there need to be requirements? Or is it wise to have the strategy remain leaving this largely to states and local governments to figure it out? No Maryland, you bring up a good point, And there's a lot of argument about that about how this country is set up where you have the states that have the capability of making decisions because of the different and peculiar. Nature of things that go on in different states from a public health perspective. Would it be better if the federal government were taking a more sort of? Well, it might not be. I mean, I'm one that does taken assertive role. If you hear what I say whenever I'm talking as I am on this program You know, it is really saying that we must do these things, hopefully and I'm seeing it right now, after yesterday's numbers came out that many of the governors and mayors are actually demanding and saying it is mandatory. Now, if you're gonna go out, you have to have a mask on that is something that is absolutely essential, but you're right. There will be arguments. I'm one for more directive way of doing things, but in many respects, that's not the way this country works. So what do you say to the governors to our two local leaders who are not rolling things back? Somebody like Florida Governor Rhonda Santis? Well, what I do is two things and I've been doing it consistently and intensively. Yes, I do it publicly like I have the opportunity to do on your program and I get on the phone and I've been on the phone with a lot of different governess talking to them about what I think should be done. I have been very prescriptive in what I said. I said not think about it. Maybe you want to do it. I say, do it. And may I just push you on your hope that we can turn things around. Turn these numbers around without shutting down at least is aggressively as things were in March and April and thinking of another thing you said in your testimony yesterday, which is that? You were talking about why Europe has largely succeeded in the US has failed to control the virus, and you talked about how When the U. S shut down, it was in reality. Only about 50% of activity was really shutting down. Whereas in Europe it was more like 90 or 95%. That makes it sound like we had a shot and we blew it. You know, I would. You know, that's a very provocative word blew it. But certainly if you look at it, and I meant it that the numbers are true. If you look at the Europeans, they got the curve way down. Once the curve is way down, Mary Louise, it is much easier when you do get blips of infection as you try to open up. To contain those infections. And if you look at our curve, it peaked. It came down a little. And then it stayed about flat until just recently, when it re surged up again. It makes it much more difficult because you're not in containment. You're in mitigation, just sort of chasing after things as opposed to getting your thumb on them. It might turn you two vaccines. You have said we should have a vaccine by the end of this year, with production ramping up next year whether that vaccine works and how long it may work for whether we may be protected for life for just for a few months. Are those still open questions they are they are because right now, the one thing that is going well. Is the procedure of multiple different candidates and their candidates all over the world. There are several that are being looked at here in the United States. They're on track for going into advanced trial sometime this summer. It's something that we are not compromising safety. Nor scientific integrity to move quickly. We should get an answer sometime by the end of the year, and as I said, Say it again. Mary Louise, There's no guarantee. That you're going to get a safe and effective vaccine. But the early indications from the trial make me I use that word cautiously optimistic

United States Mary Louise Dr Anthony Fauci Europe Mary Louise Kelly NPR Congress Federal Government Maryland Jeff America Rhonda Santis Florida
Can blood plasma of recovered COVID-19 patients help prevent infection in others?

All Things Considered

03:10 min | 1 year ago

Can blood plasma of recovered COVID-19 patients help prevent infection in others?

"There is still no cure for code nineteen but there is one drug that helps a bit the researchers are hunting for better ones and now they're testing some of those in people and pure science correspondent Joe Palca spoke with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly about where we are with covert nineteen treatments right now the minute you start with the one drug that I've mentioned to that shown to help a little bit yeah it's called ram doesn't fear it does show it they have shown that it's shortens a stay in the hospital from fifteen days to eleven days but it doesn't reduce mortality and I know that scientists and and eight patients for that matter would like to have something better this is good but it's it's still not not not what you call it you are so they're looking for better things so in terms of things that are actually far enough along that they might actually show up at the hospital soon what are we looking at well actually some of these are in hospitals some as being tested there and some under what's called the compassionate use our emergency use one is called convalescent plasma this is plasma that's taken from patients who have gotten sick with covert nineteen and then recovered and their blood or their plasma is fall of the antibodies that help them recover from the disease and so if you take their plasma and give it to somebody who's sick the hope is that that will help them get better and and this is actually being used in other infectious diseases and it and it does work to some degree and then I mentioned there are other things that are being tested maybe aren't actually being used in hospitals yet what else is actually comprised mainly not routinely used in hospitals well one is an anti viral so ren disappears is a drug that blocks the ability of the virus replicates so is this drug with the terrific name of he I. D. D. two eight oh one it was developed at Emory University and it's now being marketed by a bridge back bio therapeutics and marked the big pharmaceutical company has joined in and the and that says to me at least that they see great promise there it's being tested in clinical trials in the U. K. and it seems to be showing great promise it's also shown to work at least in animal studies previously with the sars which was also a corona virus caused illness and so there's hope that it might work there right it means that the question on all of our minds this is for treatment that might be ready and ready soon what else you keeping your eye on well actually there is something called a monoclonal antibody which is a synthetic version of the antibodies that our bodies make and there is one monoclonal antibody that's already begun testing in humans there are others that are coming along very soon there are more than a dozen others that are coming in these are drugs that have been used to treat other human diseases and they actually do look quite promising in animal studies and they're anxious to try the more eager to try them in humans as

"louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

11:31 min | 1 year ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles respirator masks are a critical piece of protective equipment to prevent health care workers from breeding in the virus the mass have also been in short supply and that shortage was at the center of the hearing today on Capitol Hill one witness testifying was the public health official and whistleblower Rick bright he was ousted last month from his position as director of the biomedical advanced research and development authority or Barda now during braids testimony he recalled an email he had received in late January just about a week after the first case of cover nineteen was diagnosed here in the US the email it was from a mask maker in Texas warning that the nation's supply of respirator masks was quote completely decimated and he said the warranty the world is and we need to act and I push that forward to the highest levels I could in HHS I got no response from that moment I knew that we were going to have a crisis for health care workers because we were not taking action all right well for more on today's testimony and the administration's response I'm joined now by NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis and science correspondent Allison Aubrey had both of you Hey there hi there all right Alison let's start with you just remind us of who is it Rick bright and why was he testified on Capitol Hill today sure a Rick bright is a PhD scientist who was removed from his job as the director of bart and that's part of the federal government its role is to develop in procuring vaccines and drugs and items such as masks needed during a pandemic now he filed a whistleblower complaint with the office of special counsel he contends that he was removed from his post by top officials of the department of health and Human Services because of his urgings that funds allocated by Congress to tackle covert nineteen should be invested in scientifically vetted solutions and it not in drugs and treatments that lacks scientific merit all right will give us more detail on what we learn from him at today's testimony sure well in his testimony today he said the straw that broke the camel's back that led to his removal he thinks was his push back on expanded use of Cllr Quinn hydroxy clerk went to treat patients during this pandemic now this is a drug that was touted by president trump and those with political connections to the president right says there wasn't evidence to support widespread use of the drug in Kobe patients some initial data suggest it could be harmful and ultimately the FDA cautioned there should only be limited use of the drug right now in COPD patients and sue how did the president's allies after hearing today respond to bright allegations they largely veered away from attacking bright personally but they were shorted defend the president's advocacy for this drug we also know that the White House is largely stopped touting the use of the drug in public AT and recent weeks but this sort of paint a picture of saying that the Republicans that the president was working for every possible solution that could help people that had come down with covert nineteen that there was nothing sort of negligent or nefarious about the president's actions in many of the Republicans on the committee hearing today were to our doctors and said that the anecdotal evidence of the use of the drug bolstered the president's position okay well the White House may have stopped touting the merits of hydroxy core Quinn but has the White House responded to bright's testimony today yeah they sure did at the White House today both president trump and health and Human Services secretary Alex ease our we're at the White House and they push back trump has sort of characterize bright as a disgruntled employee he's our NHS pointed out that he wasn't removed from his job he was transferred to what they say is a very important new position at the national institutes of health to work on testing that he still being paid a rather generous salary and pointed to the fact that he's not working right now he's up on tests at capitol hill testifying in this is what eyes are had to stay at the White House allegations do not hold water they do not hold water but we should note that bright had defenders of this hearing today too he wasn't the only one that testified at the same hearing we heard from like Boeing he is the mask manufacturer that brit referred to in the beginning who warned him about the shortages he runs prestige Ameritech either one of the last American producers of N. ninety five masks and he came to bright's defense I'm a Republican I voted for president trump and I admire Dr Brian I don't know what he did in all of these other activities but I think everything I've heard and every time I talk to him and everything he said here made a lot of sense and I believe him you know bright is alleging that the trump administration ignored warnings about mass shortages and his request back in January that they needed to scale up and bones testimony largely backed up that allegation and he he testified in rather compelling ways about how he has worked for the more than the past decade to try to get the government to pay attention to our mass supplies and also know the billing did say he voted for trump but he did make a point to know that he is supporting Joe Biden now all right Alison back to you what more did Rick Wright share with lawmakers as he was urging for more masks you know overall I'd say he painted a picture of many missed opportunities to procure masks early on and to the poor quality of some of the masks being imported which he says have led to health care workers getting sick he said at the beginning of January he started to get signals about shortages he heard from industry colleagues that the supply chain was diminishing rapidly at that other countries are starting to block exports so he urged the higher ups within the administration to get more masks but he said he got pushback people didn't share his urgency said there was not a shortage and he says as a February seventh meeting with his department leadership this is what he heard they indicated if we notice there is a shortage that we will simply change the CDC guidelines to better inform people who should not be wearing those masks so that would save those mask for health care workers my response was I cannot believe you can sit and say that with a straight face it is an absurd and right moved on from the mask issue to say that he continues to be concerned about the administration's response he warned of a resurgence of code nineteen cases come this fall and he called for stepped up federal plan to control it without better planning twenty twenty could be the darkest winter in modern history the darkest winter in modern history or I I just want to shift gears a little at now and talk about the economy you know this pandemic continues to take an economic toll another three million Americans filed for unemployment last week there's been almost thirty seven million jobless claims in just the last eight weeks of sue are these numbers changing the calculation for lawmakers as they're trying to pass more rescue packages there is an increasing growing divide on the hill between the two parties about what needs to be done and Democrats are moving forward tomorrow with another three trillion dollar rescue package but they're really talking to themselves there's been no communication with the White House Senate Republicans say they don't want to take it up and plus he told reporters today she's basically relying on public opinion to bend in their favor I think that our conversations with the American people they're feeling the pain more than anyone obviously a who is saying something like that it's amazing to me how much patience and how much tolerance some can have for the pain of others close he basically saying Republicans will likely have no choice but to support legislation along the lines are offering all right that is NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis and science correspondent Allison Aubrey thanks to both of you you're welcome thank you to France now and in emerging controversy the pharmaceutical giant Sanofi set off a firestorm when its CEO said Americans would likely be the first to get any vaccine it develops the French consider the company a national champion and as NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports now from Paris the comments plunged France into angst over how the vaccine will be developed and who will get it sent fees worldwide CEO Paul Hubbard made the comments late Wednesday in an interview with Bloomberg news he said Sanofi's vaccine would probably be offered to American patients first that was understandable said Hubbard given how much financial support the U. S. is giving Sanofi's research French airwaves exploded in indignation in an illustration of how sensitive people are over the coronavirus clearly does Emily because he said if you need a more poignant polemics priority to the Americans if the no fee is the first to discover the vaccine does that shock you ask this TV commentator interviewing an expert the French deputy finance minister called it unacceptable for money to influence access to this vaccine head of the Socialist Party Olivier far went further I consider it kind of sucks thank you we cannot allow the vaccine that could have the entire world leave normally again be taken hostage by McIntyre financial interests president Emmanuel mackerel said the vaccine as a public good and should not be influenced by the laws of the market only VA Bosio head of Sanofi in France tried all day to explain his boss's comments but he said the US is offering more money and better regulatory incentives to develop the vaccine I don't come across it could only be looking on a vaccine is very long to develop it usually takes ten years and there's heavy investment and now we're being pushed to do it in eighteen months the Americans have been very organized and mobilized to accelerate things both financially and within regulations Europe has been much less so the E. U. recently organized a worldwide fundraising event where countries with the notable exception of the US and Russia pledged eight billion dollars for a vaccine yon is not this is a board member of the European medicines agency the equivalent of the FDA he says the E. U. talks about solidarity but doesn't show it and he thinks there will be fierce competition for a corona virus vaccine the way that it was fierce competition among the member states one need only started up in corporate active equipment and they got nothing and I'm the same way that the U. member states to close their borders they didn't exchange medical compliance date practically said everyone hurt himself by the end of Thursday the president of Sanofi sales Feinberg appeared on the nightly news in France for his grilling as good as sexologists and if you still have these three views it as unique will get set up with vaccine a few days or a few weeks after the U. S. asked the host explained okay bye Berg said you know country would be ahead of any other if Sanofi discovers a vaccine it will produce it in the US and Europe he said it would be a common good and distributed to as many people as possible Eleanor Beardsley NPR news Paris you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news support comes from clean power alliance for CPA customers who have recently become.

Mary Louise Kelly Washington Elsa Chang Los Angeles
"louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on KCRW

"This is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles the shortage of personal protective equipment that is masks gloves and other disposable gear has forced a lot of American hospitals and health care workers to fend for themselves people who have never given much thought to where supplies come from are now looking for connections to manufacturers in China and here's John it real which and Martin Kosgey happened following all of this and join us now Hey guys hi there hi Martin I want to start with you on the American side of things what kinds of people and groups over here are you seen getting into the import business well we've all heard the stories about governors working the phones trying call their CEO friends looking for connections for import of connections in China but smaller groups are doing it too even some individual doctors and certainly hospitals it's pretty much anybody who's decided they can't necessarily count on the feds or the states to come through in time with spoke with some of the stuff that they really have to have here in Washington state to the state hospital association has actually gotten into the import business they've been they had a trial run importing three hundred thousand surgical masks to seafood work I caught up with Cassie Sauer who runs that association just as she was arriving at the warehouse here south of Seattle where I am to inspect her first shipment of imported masks we have never imported anything you know we actually brought a Chinese translator with us to read all the labels in the box we opened up about ten percent the cartons to make sure they're all the same and they were so we cut one up and make sure it was three planet is we poured water into another one to make sure the water didn't go through and it didn't and we're just thrilled that it's here just thrilled okay so this is working than to just go to China and get your own supplies well so far she's a pretty happy they've imported another three hundred thousand or so since then but she says you know this is a stressful process for people who aren't in this businesses for their some financial risk here you know it she really wishes there were more of a unified national American purchasing effort here it is on the China on the China side for one thing you know she has no idea of her orders for master somehow conflicting with washing state's effort to buy the same masks Roland Thompson is helping her with these purchases he's in it's his day job as a state level lobbyist in Olympia but now he's kind of dived into this New World of imports he's learning this business on the fly because yes some contacts in China and he says those contacts are telling him that the competition in China is just intense they're all sorts.

Mary Louise Kelly Washington Elsa Chang Los Angeles NPR
"louise kelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mary Louise Kelly and I'm ari Shapiro this hour a call for federal workers to be able to telework during the pandemic if they are not provided weather and safety leave but still have to earn a paycheck so you know what they do they go to work also an update on human trials now under way for a coronavirus vaccine we hear from one company developing a vaccine and supermarkets racing to keep food and paper goods on their shelves if they feel that stores back room inventory that may not be enough because that makes a lot of one day your last and they're used to having a choice that last a week or two first the news live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jack Speer the World Health Organization is warning that young people not to be complacent about the risks coronavirus poses to them NPR's Jason Beaubien reports the highest fatality rates tend to be among the elderly the W. H. O. says significant numbers of younger adults are also getting extremely ill tell you read from cover nineteen remains around one percent varies from place to place is different countries are in different phases of the epidemic in responding differently to the health crisis most of the deaths globally have been among older people and patients with underlying health conditions but the WHO's head of emergencies Mike Ryan pointed out that twenty percent of deaths so far in South Korea have been among people under the age of sixty a significant number of all the ways that healthy adults can develop a more severe form of the disease he warned nations not to approach this as just a disease of the elderly Jason Beaubien NPR news applications for weekly jobless benefits surged in some states and what is an early sign millions of Americans are being thrown out of work in Ohio tens of thousands of people file claims for jobless benefits in just the first three days of this week for a host that is the state's lieutenant governor who spoke with NPR's All Things Considered today we had seventy eight thousand people file for unemployment during the first three days of this week that includes Sunday Monday Tuesday twenty nine thousand yesterday just put this in perspective the week before we had about sixty five hundred and some states the demand for unemployment health is likely to outstrip states ability to pay claims builders were less busy in Feb worry though by a smaller margin than the previous month the clients follow December surge that pushed home building to its highest level in thirteen years commerce department reported today analysts had expected a more significant drop applications for building permits fell five and a half percent for the first time since nine eleven the New York stock exchanges shutting down its crowded frenzied floor Jim zarroli reports the exchange said today this temporarily moving to all electronic trading the exchange says it's taking this step as a precaution amid the corona virus outbreak it will continue to operate on the same schedule but all trades will be conducted electronically the New York Stock Exchange has long been the most famous stock trading venue in the world densely packed with floor traders barking orders at a fevered pitch today it retains its iconic status in part because TV broadcaster still use it as a backdrop but in the age of computer trading it no longer serves the same function as it used to Jim zarroli NPR news New York on wallstreet stocks continued their downward slide today the Dow dropped another thirteen hundred and thirty eight points more than six percent the nasdaq fell three hundred and forty four points today you're listening to NPR live from KQED news I'm terrified there despite the plummeting stock market and uncertainty over the impact of the corona virus outbreak a report out today from the state legislative analyst's office says California is on strong fiscal footing for now KQED's Katie or reports the only owes report notes that California has a couple things going for it at the moment first the governor is proposing about twenty one billion dollars in reserves in the upcoming budget and the state has done a good job of paying down debt and maintaining a balanced budget but the state's dependency on volatile capital gains taxes could hurt it the LA projects those revenues will be several billion dollars below budget estimates declines in the stock market could also reduce future budgetary reserves on top of that delay tax filing deadlines all make for very unpredictable times in Sacramento I'm Katie or KQED news the university of California board of regents met this morning for an update on their response to the corona virus pandemic most campuses have transitioned to remote learning for the rest of the academic year and are encouraging students to move out of student housing Dr Carrie Byington heads the UC health system she says the system owns land that could be suitable for temporary hospitals and the governor is working with all of us in the hospital industry to look and see where those beds would be and how quickly we can build the reason say they are not planning to refund tuition and student fees at this time if you.

Mary Louise Kelly ari Shapiro
"louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And a merry Louise Kelly the new movie birds of prey and the fan tabby list emancipation of one Harley Quinn begins with the break up it was completely sure what that during an explosion it tells the world that joker and Harley Quinn have broken J. learn that a lot of people want me to powerful and very rich and very angry people sell Harley Quinn gathers a crew of women we each with her own beef against the people after Harley and convinces them to team up and fight birds of prey was directed by Kathy yen she's the first Asian American woman to direct a major Hollywood superhero movie and she talked with my co host Elsa Cheng yen says she was drawn to Harley Quinn story because she's a complicated female character she has these two conflicting sides of her she's Harleen quinzel L. PhD and and on the other side she is you know this angry mallet wielding super hero and when I talk to Kathy and I wanted to know how did she take Harley Quinn played by Margot Robbie from the joker's hot crazy girlfriend to the empowered woman at the heart of this movie well I think because she has to figure out who she is when she's alone when she's no longer the girlfriend and I yeah that great existential question answer the question of the movie it's a movie about identity and about all the all of these women finding themselves finding their strange totally like there's a scene in the film were highly sitting at a bar and she's feeling like just guided after her break up with the joker Harley Quinn.

Louise Kelly Harley Quinn Kathy yen Margot Robbie Hollywood Elsa Cheng
Iran considers options for retribution over Soleimani killing

Here & Now

02:49 min | 1 year ago

Iran considers options for retribution over Soleimani killing

"And will start the hour again in Iran where a stampede during a funeral procession for general Qassem Soleimani left dozens of mourners debt secretary of state Mike Pompeii reiterated today that the US will abide by the laws of war if it retaliates to any retaliation by Iran he was asked about president trump's threats to attack running cultural sites Louise Kelly is in the Iranian capital Tehran and joins us now once again Mary Louise let's start with the stampede what more can you tell us about that yeah it's an awful events and what we have a report from Iranian news agencies of does several dozen people it sounds like who were killed in a stampede this was in the city of Kerr mine which is a big city in southeastern around about five hundred miles from the capital Tehran where I'm speaking to you from and it's is the hometown of Qassem Soleimani so the body has been making its way through cities in Iraq and now Iran these last several days this was to be the last recession where mourners could come out and mourn him and then he was to be buried today obviously events got out of control there you sat down today with the Iranian foreign minister Mohammad Javad Zarif let's listen to a little bit of what he said to you this was an act of aggression an armed attack him albeit a cow would be armed attack against an Iranian official in foreign territory it's a must for war and we will respond according to our own timing and choice it amounts to warn will respond according to our own timing in choice what did he tell you about the options Iran is considering for response to the killing of so the money well that was exactly the question I was trying to pin him down on as you can imagine and you will be stunned to hear he did not telegraph to me exactly what a brunch next move will be he was very clear issue got a sense from there that there will be retaliation there will be revenge he spoke about how people's feelings here or hurt and the outrage here and you could hear it so the money was was a close personal friend of his and you could hear that the determination that this country will act what exactly they will do when exactly they will do it he wouldn't go there he said they will respond at a time and place of their choosing I will say I we heard from from a different top official here today is a man named Ali Shamkhani he's the top official on a Ron's answer to the national security their their National Security Council and according to Iranian media she has said they are considering thirteen specific options for retaliation which means journalists are now scrambling to try to figure out what those thirteen

Mary Louise National Security Council RON Ali Shamkhani Official Mohammad Javad Zarif Iraq Iran Tehran Louise Kelly Donald Trump President Trump United States Mike Pompeii Qassem Soleimani
"louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Two wrath in jersey but would not elaborate on any other enforcement actions that took place today they guggenheim has poohpoohed president trump's request to borrow a van gogh painting for the white house the washington post reporting that the museum's curators offer trump fullyfunctioning goal then toilet instead of the painting he'd asked for the eighteen carat toilet is called america it's by and a an artist it's currently in use at one of the museum's public restrooms the president had asked for the van doc instead the post says the museum has declined to comment further currently thirty two degrees overcast in central park at seven of six support for npr comes from the john d and catherine t macarthur foundation supporting creative people in effective institutions committed to building a more just verdant and peaceful world more formation is at macfoundorg this is all things considered from npr news i'm ari shapiro and i mary louise kelly in the year that president trump has been in office immigration has defined his political platform from the first day of his campaign to this week's government shutdown and the numbers show that he has made some dramatic change its immigration arrests in the us interior meaning far from the border went up twenty five percent over this past year we wanted to understand what the giant complicated immigration enforcement system looks like two one family caught in the middle of it so we've spent months reporting this story gathering documents sending producers to be there for all the unexpected twists and reversals and we've waited to tell you this story until we knew how it added it's wonderful it's a bright september day in the pacific northwest we're in the backyard of this singlestorey home tossing a sweet he toy the slobbering pit bull named the royce that's his real metronews the family asked us to change some other names and keep certain details vague because of their legal status when you walk through the front door of the first thing you see is a wedding photo a teenage bride and groom in mexico i love i am a central we're going to call them manuel and feet and on the frame with the photos from her wedding it says together forever lakewood athens they weren't going to some of whom thirty th the glasson's in.

trump white house washington post president npr catherine t macarthur foundati ari shapiro us athens america john d louise kelly manuel lakewood twenty five percent thirty two degrees eighteen carat
"louise kelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"louise kelly" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And i mary louise kelly in washington ruined you hear the story of a woman who died earlier this year a few weeks after giving birth her name was chalan irving she was in her midthirties she was black and piers were rene montaigne and propublica nina martin learned about her at the beginning of an investigation into the high rate of maternal deaths here in the us with in that alarming rate is an even more troubling one black women are three times more likely to die than white women sometimes it's an issue of poverty lack of prenatal care or not having access to the best hospitals racism also plays a role experts say prolonged exposure to bias is so stressful it can make the difference between life and death here's rene it is an especially cruel irony that sean ervine was focusing on the exact issue of how racism figures into health armed with a phd she was rising through the ranks of the centers for disease control and prevention where she research so many ways the body can be negatively impacted by its surroundings by any measure chalon had accomplished a lot highly educated and wellpaid g l nder on home and had access to the finest healthcare yet none of that protected her from becoming part of the shockingly high rate of black journal mortality so that way he on a recent afternoon we join chileans mother wanda irving in her home outside of atlanta she was surrounded by photos and mementos and caring for the baby chalon left behind when she died from complications of childbirth pitcher oath her in solely with the same outfits that was taken the day she collapsed the morning of the day she clips soleil is french for so for sun jesus lights of peru when she smiles in she's the only reason i have forgetting out a better every morning all the fact that in two thousand seventeen america of black woman is still three to four times as likely to die in pregnancy and childbirth and that there are twice as likely to suffer a lifethreatening complication i think that's a national disgrace dr michael lou spent years as head of the maternal and child health bureau that's the main federal funder of programs for mothers and infants he and others have done studies showing that an important cause of poor outcomes in childbirth all black women is prolonged exposure to the indignities and dangers of.

louise kelly washington rene montaigne us atlanta peru chalan irving nina martin sean ervine wanda irving dr michael lou