17 Burst results for "Louise Bourgeois"

"louise bourgeois" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:02 min | Last week

"louise bourgeois" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Sort of debuted your artwork? I think so. I think it's, I mean, I imagine myself like faith ringgold and Alison saw and pat steer in Louise Bourgeois, I want to be in my 80s and my 90s still making art. I'm in this for the long run. So I'm fortunate that what I've done and what I'm doing has provided me some success, but I would be doing this if I didn't have success. So for me, it was no rush up the mountain. I still see myself as an emerging artist because I'm still, there are still things I want to be doing. Well, especially if you want to be working in your 80s, there's a long road in front of you. There's a long road and dirty. And so there are women in the arts that I look to as mentors, whether I know them personally, some might do carry me weems, mentioned faith re gold, pets, like these are women who are still working and making the best work of their life. It's not like they've peaked in or still just riding the wave. They're making the best work of their life. Exactly, Lorraine o'grady, like all of these women that I look at, not a hindrance, these are women that, for me, personify who I want to be in the world. You've created work that very intentionally redirects the body politics in old master paintings, certainly your first show back in 2012 at the Brooklyn museum, the title of the show was a riff on gustave Colbert's scandalous 1866 painting, the origin of the world, which was a close up study of a model's crotch and you used your own body as the model for your interpretation, which became the origin of the universe and it kind of loved that expansion. But your painting sleeve do fem noirs is a reprise of Colbert's 1866 sleep, but you replace the white heterosexual sleepers with two powerful black women who are lovers. You use the images from Picasso's Guernica, your take on Edward Manet's 1863 painting, the Degeneres, sole herb, the luncheon on the grass, which is to formally dressed men sitting in a park with a nude woman just, you know, as we all do, you've remade as le Degeneres, femme noir, the three black women. What do you make of the conversation around this historical relationship now that seems to be sort of positioned as Matisse Manet and micheline? I mean, I think it's radical and powerful. You know what I mean? Like, that's what excites me. For young girl, when they're Googling something like Matisse, my name comes up. This is discovery. Like for me to assert myself within that western canon is to really try to dismantle and deconstruct the notions that persist. So that way when young girls and boys who look and think like me and they're doing these search that it's not all of these white faces that come up through history, it's very important and that's a strategic thing that I thought about. It's like, how do you, how do you align yourself within this conversation? And then if more people do it enough, then they become minuscule and our images become, you know, the algorithm of that changes. Yeah. I want to talk about the use of gaze in your work. The subjects in your paintings and your work are almost always looking directly at the viewer. Their gaze is unapologetic, proud. I would describe it as kind of fierce, how would you describe it? I guess I would say my work conveys that black women's existence in this world is revolutionary, radical, innovative, and unapologetic in her gaze is powerful. Whether I am incorporating new techniques and bringing western canon ideas in these dimensions, I'd like to think that that concept is a thread that runs through. That that's what I'm thinking about like, okay, is this radical? It might be an innovative. How am I expressing my? Because that's how I see black women. At first, the gaze for me really is more about love. Love for myself, love for black women, love for women, and love as a queer woman who loves women. And it's not always about that. It's about all of that. It's about all of who I am. You know what I mean? My relationships with my friends, my mother, my lovers, like all of that, it's about love. And how do you convey that? How do you share that? How do you celebrate that? And how am I doing that? And about also love about images that I grew up with, you know, when you think of celebrity and mentorship and images and how these images shaped me as a black woman, how jet magazine has shaped me like how looking at the beauty of the week and the beauty of the month how that gave me a sense of self as a young kid and seeing those images and printed matter matters. I'm interested in my work, not necessarily being about trauma. Although I think

pat steer Lorraine o gustave Colbert Louise Bourgeois Edward Manet ringgold le Degeneres Matisse Manet weems Alison Brooklyn museum grady micheline Degeneres Colbert Picasso Matisse herb canon
"louise bourgeois" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:15 min | Last month

"louise bourgeois" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Was still prime minister because she sent mistakenly a classified email to someone who wasn't actually who was the wrong recipient. So there are also other reports that she has used a private phone several times. So she is really not, she has not dealt with her highly responsible job in a responsible way. And by all these things that are now, it's a trip leaking stuff, which is, again, undermining Rishi sunak's new government and the prime minister, as we know what above all, he's promising the country's stability and right now we are again seeing quite the opposite. Stephanie vaults and thank you as ever for joining us on monocle 24. You were the globalist. UBS has over 900 investment analysts from over 100 different countries. Over 900 of the sharpest minds and freshest thinkers in the world of finance today. To find out how we could help you. Contact us at UBS dot com. 7 45 while nudging 7 46 here in London, it's time to talk news from the art world, joining me to do that is Ben Luke, our critic and podcast presenter for the art newspaper good morning then. Hi, Emma, how are you? Very well. Thank you. Great to have you with us. What news from the world of art? Well, first of all, is this news that Francis Morris the director of Tate modern is stepping down. She's been at the Tate since 1980 7. Amazingly and has been the director of Tate modern since 2016 and a very distinguished director, I think. She has advanced the cause that had long been there, but she's now put it into overdrive of having women artists and artists of color at the heart of what Tate modern does. And I think she's got a great curatorial eye, a fantastic ability just to present beautiful shows he did the Louise Bourgeois show, the Agnes Martin show their really wonderful shows and I think the take will miss a tremendously. Why do we think she's leaving? I think it's just, you know, 35 years at one institution really would test anyone. I think it's also been really tricky. I spoke to her actually during the pandemic. And I think that put a lot of stress on the institution in all sorts of ways. Obviously, there's no one coming in, the gallery shut down, all those financial problems that we've actually talked about on this show on numerous occasions. And I think that was quite wearing too. There was some things which emerged from that period as well, for instance, on the Tate exchange program and artist was proposed to particular program and was prevented from doing that and that meant what she said was censoring a black artist from taking part in that program. That was a really big storm. And I don't think France's Morris was directly responsible for that at all, but I think again, there's all sorts of ways in which managing an institution like Tate modern is a tremendously stressful thing, as well as a wonderful thing which she would the first thing she would say is it has been a wonderful opportunity for sure. And in what state does she lead Tate modern? I think she leaves it in a really interesting moment. I think they have to address the issue that I just discussed about representation about this idea of the Tate exchange program was a very forward thinking idea about involving the communities around Tate modern directly in the program. And I think they have to get that right. But I think also it's in good stead in terms of the collection. They really have made massive progress in terms of the much greater representation in terms of the collection and in terms of the way the galleries are looking. I still think they've got a lot of work to do to really integrate that new building that was opened in 2016 and really get people familiar with it and use all those spaces to their best effect, the tanks obviously in the bottom of that building is the absolute landmark space of that. And I think they're using that brilliantly already, but there are a lot of other spaces there which I think could do with more work in terms of curatorial work. But generally, I think it's in a good position curatorial, but it needs more work in terms of outreach in terms of community outreach and in terms of representation. And that's an interesting point you make there because quietly tait has been run by women for a very, very long time in the chair and director Maria belshaw. Is a woman who came from a background in the northwest, which was brilliant at reaching out to communities, making connections with schools, doing all the things that you just mentioned. Absolutely. I think that has to be part of, it's very difficult, I think, for a massive institution like Tate modern, to reconcile all the competing elements of its brief. So on the one hand, they've got to raise a huge amount of money from private causes from private money. And that's really difficult for a massive institution like the Tate. To do that whilst also having a very important role in the local community and trying to extend that and try to make it a really human space and a space which can be there for everyone, which is when you go to take modern to one of those Friday night events, the unique events that they do. You really do feel like, wow, they really achieve what they set out to do in 2000, really expand the diversity of its visitors, really expand the breadth of the program and so on. But I still think that they have to keep on their toes about all of that. And I think the Black Lives Matter moment has been a huge moment for all museums to look at themselves and say, are we doing enough here? And I don't think any institution anywhere in the world has been doing enough. They've now started to recognize that and to put in programs which address it, but I still think that I think that's probably the overall the biggest problem for all museums across the world is to finally address all of the root the systemic problems that they have had in terms of representation right the way through from the beginning of the founding of the institution. And the art newspaper will be asking all the questions all the time, I suspect. It will. Let's move to, let's stay in London, but the repurposing of the reimagining or the redesigning of bits of the National Gallery. Well, the art newspaper certainly got to be in its bonnet about it. That's true. I think this is a really, if you know anything about extensions in the National Gallery, you will know that in 1984, there was a very famous speech made by Prince Charles now King Charles, about a monstrous carbuncle on the face of a much loved and elegant friend, which was an aborted extension to the museum.

Tate Rishi sunak Tate modern UBS Ben Luke Francis Morris Agnes Martin Louise Bourgeois Stephanie Maria belshaw Emma London Morris tait France National Gallery Prince Charles King Charles
"louise bourgeois" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:16 min | 6 months ago

"louise bourgeois" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Time to talk about art and culture with the arts journalist Amaro's Abrams, good morning Emirates. Good morning, Emma, how are you? Very well, thank you. I'm glad to hear that art Basel's back up and running and going at full throttle. Yes, yes, it is. It's been a big week at art Basel preview started earlier in the week and it opened to the public yesterday. Everyone was very excited about a 40 million pound sale for all Louise Bourgeois, which got everybody kind of in the mood for the spending at art bars and I think that was the most expensive artwork to sell during the preview. But everybody has gathered all the Americans are able to travel comparison to last year as are the Asian collectors, which means that there's just far more people, far more spending and far more buzz in the city this time. And that clearly is a brilliant thing for an art world which had to completely reinvent itself during the pandemic. Is there a sense that the pandemic is a thing of the past now? Yes and no, I think some people are trying to hang on to elements that they thought were better for the art world. So some people were getting the train across Europe to the fair rather than flying because people are trying to maintain a more eco conscious approach. And but in other ways, there was no masking, everybody was kind of flying in private jets coming into Basel. So I think it's kind of 50 50. Let's move on to the continuing story of the return or the attempts by the Greek government to get the Parthenon marbles out of the British Museum and up back into the amazing Athens Parthenon museum at the foot of the acropolis. I mean, for so long, there has been more and more increasingly arguably ridiculous resistance to this move. But is there a suggestion that something is going to happen? Because there have been talks, haven't there? There have been talks. And public opinion seems to be very much with coming to some kind of compromise. George Osborne's chairman of the British Museum didn't need to be this week saying that there could be movements on this and basically he's saying it's not just up to him. It's up to the other trustees and the government have also said it's up to the trustees of the British Museum and they are saying that there could be there has to be a compromise. But there could be a situation where they would loan or exchange, which is like, I think something that mirroring something done by the Italian government whereby they swapped to artifacts with Greece. So they could have something in the Parthenon museum returned from Italy and they got a statue to display in their own museums. But it's telling. Is there any indication as to how this would work? Because the section of the personal marbles, the panel, which is which is in the British Museum, is really large. I mean, it's a good 30 meters long. And how are you going to just pop it over to Athens? Raises more questions than answers. That's what I think this statement has done. It's raised a lot of questions. And the museum released a kind of statement after he kind of went on the radio and said that it's kind of very blanket. It's like, we're happy to discuss loans and I think there's a lot as you say to be ironed out before anything could happen because it's not a question of just a part of the path and on it's this huge kind of very central bit of the building. And finally, let's move on to the first trailer from the new biopic of Marilyn Monroe has come out. Tell us about it. Well, it's called blond, it's based on the Joyce Carol Oates book of the same name and stars. Anna de Armas. And she was meant to be Naomi Watts, I think, an older actresses, but it's ended up being her, and they released a trailer this week, and it does look extremely good. It's directed by Andrew dominik, and he has said that it's quite dark and it's quite dramatic, and it's apparently quite a feminist take on her story. And it's I think it kind of paints a picture that we all know of Marilyn. But the story hasn't been told, so I guess her struggles and what it was like to be a kind of a sex symbol at that time. She is, you know, she become this icon and she's been in the news a lot lately because of this dress that Kim Kardashian wore that she wore in the last year of her life to sing happy birthday to JFK. And it's kind of this whole kind of iconography of the last year of her life is kind of being discussed and discussed and discussed and this film is coming out on the 23rd of September. So I think there's this kind of slightly kind of dark, more reverent approach to her as an icon. I'm a rose Abrams. Thank you so much for joining us on monocle 24. You're listening to the globalist. UBS is a global financial services firm with over 150 years of heritage. Built on the unique dedication of our people, we bring fresh thinking and perspective to our work..

Basel British Museum Greek government Athens Parthenon museum Louise Bourgeois Amaro Italian government Abrams Parthenon museum Emirates Emma George Osborne Anna de Armas Europe Andrew dominik Greece Joyce Carol Oates Athens
"louise bourgeois" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:55 min | 6 months ago

"louise bourgeois" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Finally, it is time to head to art Basel back in its usual slot and full of joy. Now, Monaco's culture editor quiero rime is doing the heavy lifting for us. Good morning, Kiara. Just tell us a little bit about what the atmosphere is liking at buzz on there. Oh, it's been summing for days now. So I think that has really void spirits. And I think that speaking to everything will gather us every one has been really enthusiastic. I mean, no one's ever going to admit that they're not having a fast day of sales. But I think looking over a few shoulders of PRs that were going through sales sheets and counting up how much had been sold. Quite a quite a lot of galleries made millions worth of sales within the first few hours of opening on Tuesday. And I mean, I guess something that has made really the headlines over the past couple of days is that howser and worth has managed to sell a spider by Louise Bourgeois worth almost $40 million. So we're talking about big money here. People come very seriously in the collectors from all around the world are here to make their choices and they make them very early often they come or a pre prepared, they're not what they want. They hit the stands in the halls and this is business business business. It must be a lovely feeling to be back in a place where things are moving and things are being done. Or is it a sort of a celebration of art or is there, as you say, a real focus on business here? Well, I think Basel is the biggest and most important commercial art fair in the world. So this is very much a place for collectors dealers and gallerists to meet. Insane that. Basel is also a place where everybody comes very happily to see the museum shows on the side. I think that different arts have different identities. And so there are certain that are more invested in the social aspect of things. If you go to art Basel Miami Beach, then there's a lot of parties. It's a lot of spirits. Here in basil, it's a bit more down to business. So I have to say that they have now experimented with launching a Basel social club complete with swimming pool on the hills outside the city. So there's a little bit of glamour kind of seeping in here as well. But I think also people really appreciate the museum shows here. I've been able to go to country museum, they are really kind of world class in that respect. So again, different fairs, different vibes, the Venice Biennale is very much more about looking at the art. It's got a much more kind of public profile, very much more facing, not just the industry, but also the public. But then the artists that you have seen in the Venice Biennale, they're very much in the holes here right now. Their pieces. So you kind of look at Venice, but then the shopper Basel. A briefly, how much of the last two years influenced the way that people are viewing art dealing with art as well? Well, I think that from the point of view of the way that the market operates, not that much has changed, but some things have. I think most notably here at art Basel, this is a traditionally been a very conservative and essential respects kind of commercial fair dominated by the big players. It's notoriously very hard to get in here to if you apply it's hard to make it to the kind of roughly 290 galleries that are on show. But I think this edition we are noticing more participants for a wider wider variety of countries first participants from the African continent. So I think that there is definitely an effort or a reflection of reality that art is being decentralized and a lot of the most interesting players were also there is market interest and not necessarily coming from the traditional world centers of art anymore. Thank you so much for joining us on the line from art Basel. So we have time for today's program many thanks to all my guests and to our producers Reese James Emma sell Charlie filmer court and Sophie monahan coombs are researchers lilian fawcett and Isabel Rosen and our studio manager is Chris a black girl with editing assistance from Adam heaton. After the headlines more music on the way, the briefings life at midday in London and the globalist back at the same time tomorrow I hope you can join me for that if you can. But for now from me Eminem goodbye, thank you very much for listening. 24 days. You're listening to monocle 24.

Basel Basel Miami Beach Kiara Basel social club Louise Bourgeois Venice Biennale Monaco swimming Venice Reese James Emma Charlie filmer Sophie monahan coombs lilian fawcett Isabel Rosen Adam heaton Chris London
"louise bourgeois" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

01:43 min | 8 months ago

"louise bourgeois" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"As Gareth Harris reports, the Greek national museum of contemporary art in Athens will receive a 140 pieces, take gets a 110 works while the Guggenheim in New York and the museum of contemporary art Chicago will assume joint ownership of around a hundred works. Among the artists represented in the collection are Louise Bourgeois, Steve McQueen, Sarah Lucas and Kiki Smith. The collection gifts will also be accompanied by the creation of a network of curators, including a.

Gareth Harris Greek national museum of conte museum of contemporary Athens Sarah Lucas Louise Bourgeois Chicago New York Steve McQueen Kiki Smith
"louise bourgeois" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

09:45 min | 10 months ago

"louise bourgeois" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"The albertinum show has been selected by Richter himself and it includes the work fells or rock of vast abstract painting from 1989. Dietmar Elgar, the curator of the Gerhard Richter archive in Dresden, work with the artist on the show, and I spoke to him about this landmark abstract work. Deep Mark, it's Gerhard Richter's 90th birthday, and you're doing a special display. Can you just tell us how you've done it? Because Gerhard Richter is directly involved, isn't he? Yes, it is. We started very early because we wanted to have his 19th birthday exhibition. So I asked him that he's doing this exhibition with us. And we started to try to do an exhibition on his foundation that he founded only recently. But then we noticed that too many works had been shown in Dresden before. So we stopped that idea and it took some time then and suddenly gerat came up with the new idea with a free spaces and he called me and asked me to come over. And have a look at it. And it was an exhibition with free spaces and free themes that he shows. And so it's mostly his exhibition and his choice, how the exhibition looks like now. That's interesting. And you've chosen to talk about the work fells. Which is an abstract painting. I'd like to begin just by talking about what role Gerhard sees the abstract paintings as playing in his wider earth because he thinks about the range of works that he makes as a very complex entity, doesn't he? He sees them in relation to each other. Yes, that's correct. And the abstract paintings are based part of his work, I would say even more than half of all his paintings sculptures, abstract, and these abstract works that we know at this abstract. There are other abstracts like the gray ones are the in paintings, but the abstract paintings, which is caught like this as a group. The which are mostly colorful and with a wide variety of composition. This is a specific group in the abstract books and it surely half of this whole body of work. Yeah, and he makes these paintings using a squeegee. Can you say something about that technique? So the squeezy brings some chance in his abstract works. And that is very important for him, so he uses it and he corrects it. So you can not control the squeezy. Yeah, you use it and you put it on the canvas and the structure it brings to the painting can not really be controlled. And then he has something that is chances very important for him. And after this crazy was used, then he controls it and he changed it and then he goes on with a squeezy and chance is again part of the composition and so it's between chance and control. So it's like nature, yeah, lots of chance in these works. Yeah, and of course, in this work that we're talking about fells. The movement of the squeegee is down the canvas as opposed to a cross it, isn't it? And that's quite significant, isn't it? You can recognize the squeezy from this very tiny point that it leaves. It's not like a brush. It has a more mechanical structure. And in these folds that we want to speak about, you also see this and this crazy was mostly used from top to bottom. Does he move it all the way? Does he always move it all the way from the top to the bottom or will he start it sometimes in the middle of the canvas? Are there any rules he applies? For instance? Yeah, he was also a horizontally. And sometimes if it's a smaller squeezes, there are sizes from 30 centimeter up to two meter, then he can also move it back and forth and there are more flexible to use. But with a large ones, they are very stable. So he goes from left to right, or he goes from top to bottom. And there are more mechanical mechanical. And fails, of course, means rock, and it's obviously tempting for us to see images within the work because he's given it that title, but does he, in any way related to the actual phenomenon of a rock or stone? Yes, if he finds something that like a hook where he finds some detail that reminds him of something in nature, then he gives it a title and otherwise our mostly, there are untitled and just called abstract painting. And this, of course, this painting is enormous, isn't it? Is it three meters high? Yes, it is. And two meter 50 wide. That's extraordinary can you tell us about the experience of standing in front of it? Oh, it's overwhelming. It's a great painting and drive deep into it. And you actually recognize something like a rock in this structure because it has a darker lower part and a lighter upper part so it looks like a rock standing in front of you. And like a horizon in the back. And of course, it has a real significance to GitHub, doesn't it? Because on the one hand, yes, he's chosen it as one of these works in this show, but also he gave it to benefit the albertinum, didn't he? Yes. So this was the main reason maybe he put it in the show because it has this close relationship to Dresden and shows and raised and this is a most important painting that we have in our collection. It's only a loan form of private collection, nevertheless. It's in Dresden since 20 years. And it's very much related to the whole history of Gerhard and Dresden and his return to Dresden. So it came to us as part of a charity auction that was hold after the flood in Dresden and most of the museum was underwater. And then there was a charity auction Richter gave this big painting for this charity auction and raised a normal price. And collector who bought it after he bought it set to our generator director, Martin wrote that he is willing to give this painting as a long-term loan to Dresden museum. And then Martin wrote contacted rich that and asked him to contribute other loans and to make a bigger installation in Dresden with free spaces and this was the beginning of Gerhard's return two traced and the archive was founded a few years later. That's great. And of course, as it's shown in the exhibition, as you say, there are three rooms. One of the key things in this very personal selection is that there are very personal images. They were images of Gerhard's family. And that's again this sort of crucial thing about Richter's work is that there's a to and fro between the representational and then this kind of abstract painting, right? Yes. This is still going on, and it's during his whole earth of 60 years. This is relationship or this contra point between abstract works and figurative works like landscape of portraits. And in this exhibition that we have now, there is this one room with abstract works and one room that has figurative works. The key painting may be in this exhibition. It's a self portrait from the Museum of Modern Art in New York. And around his self portrait, there is his whole family with his wife and his children. So it's very personal selection that he did for the exhibition. Did he tell you about how it felt to look back over a career at the point of his 90th birthdays? I mean, he always seems to me is to be a very unsentimental painter, a very in a way he looks very rigorously at his work and doesn't seem to involve sentiment, but it still must be quite a momentous thing for him as reaching 90 and looking back over his career. Surely, as we haven't spoken actually about that, but it has some kind of sentimental because he's collecting his family around him, but on the other side, you're correct. He's a very unsentimental painter or an artist, because several of these works are showing his family like a self portrayal paintings of his wife and also one of his images. He has sold and he's very unsentimental about these images because he gave them.

Dresden Gerhard Richter Dietmar Elgar Gerhard Richter archive Deep Mark Gerhard Richter Dresden museum GitHub Martin Museum of Modern Art New York
"louise bourgeois" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

02:32 min | 10 months ago

"louise bourgeois" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"In Saudi Arabia so there you go. Lastly, you did mention that the desert X show is spectacular. Give us a flavor of a couple of other artworks in that show. As I said, you sort of come across one piece and then you think it can't be bettered or be more spectacular and then you walk through the canyon and there's another just a spectacular piece, and it's quite overwhelming. How to single things out is difficult. But there's a sort of golden waterfall as such sort of hanging down one of The Rock faces, and this installation is by an artist from Ghana called sej ataki clotty. He sort of shrouded The Rock in crafted tapestries made from yellow, coffer gallons, which I think are plastic containers used in Ghana. So it's kind of like a yellow waterfall running running down The Rock face. And it's hard to describe it. I mean, you have to see it to believe it. But that really stands out. And then there's an absolutely incredible piece further down the canyon by an artist called Stephanie Douma. And she has literally dug out of the ground out of the sand. A greenhouse. She's created a subterranean greenhouse. And she's put a whole array of solar panels on the top, which kind of mounted flush with the desert floor, which is feeding a bed of plants inside inside the greenhouse. And you kind of go in and it's a sanctuary in the coolest possible sense in the temperature is low. It just drops when you walk in. And it's just a feat of engineering. I mean, I have asked if any of these works will be permanent because four or 5 pieces from the last desert X in 2020 are permanent. So I think that's still to be decided. But Stephanie Dumas underground greenhouse must stay surely. I hope they decide that it should be a permanent piece because it's amazing..

Ghana Stephanie Douma Saudi Arabia Stephanie Dumas
"louise bourgeois" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

08:28 min | 10 months ago

"louise bourgeois" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"He said that he felt that the desire to make culture a part of the fabric of Saudi Arabia is a sincere aim. It's not cynical, and he says that starting at the grassroots you know, art has been taught much more in schools. That kind of thing. I think two or three years ago, the Saudi Arabian government went back to grassroots research and decided to increase the provision for art in schools. I think that comes across a lot. The royal commission for alula is working with a network of 50 teachers of art. Their training so many local guides in Diyala district. And I think that's very interesting, you know, some of these people were drivers. Some of them came from some of the communities, the agricultural community. So I can see the benefits on the ground. I have to be honest in terms of employment and skills. It's always been a lot more cynical I could say that it is obviously trying to whitewash certain aspects of the history and politics of the country. But I think I have to strike a balance and on balance. Now I'm here, I have to say that I'm quite impressed by the fundamental more grassroots approach the government has taken. I'm more convinced others might not be. One of the interesting things is that Philip tinari is the chief curator of the diriyah Biennale, which is another of these events. And Philip denari is an art curator he's worked in China, worked for a long time in China. And in your article made comparisons between China opening up and Saudi opening up. Can you say more about that? Yeah, I mean, I think that is actually fascinating. I went to the durian Biennale earlier this week. It's in an area called the Jax district on the outskirts of Riyadh, which I think was consists of lots of warehouses. It was quite an industrial part. So I had in advance read an article in the art newspaper by a colleague called minister gronland. She wrote a piece for I think it was December issue. And she does a very good job actually of summarizing how tinari approaches the biennial and how he tries to draw analogies between China and Saudi Arabia. I think that's a really interesting comparison to make because what he's trying to do is establish parallels between Saudi Arabia and China in the late 1970s when China faced a sort of similar relaxation of social and legal restrictions. You could argue that Saudi Arabia is going through a similar sort of phase. I have to say, in terms of the huge economic and social transformations, Saudi is going through at the moment as well. He's trying to draw very intelligent I think parallels between the two countries. And he does it under a thematic umbrella called feeling the stones, which I think is a Chinese Provo for trying to establish a strategy for coping for trying to find your way through what I suppose is that the new more open climate as such. And it is interesting because he's brought in a few Chinese artists. He's filled it biennial with mainly Saudi artists. And it's good. I mean, he manages to show historic social economic differences and similarities between the two countries. I think he told Melissa at the time, how do you think about or contextualize the very specific and very precious energy of this moment of optimism and openness? As Melissa points out, it's still a bit of a gamble because China's internal ditton to whatever you want to call it quickly seized up, I guess, post 1980s, you could argue, I'm not sure. We're probably going through a more authoritarian face now with China. I think so. In a sense, perhaps China's closing down in a sense especially if you look at areas like Hong Kong with censorship is on the rise. It is a bit of a gamble to take that thematic approach. But you know, again, they really are pleased by annulus happening. It was very busy when I went. There seems to be plenty of public art program in I should mention that there seems to be a real effort to attract local audiences. They are very much marketing it as Saudi's first contemporary art biennial and although it is an X should be taking place every two years. We should say that really, but yeah, it's interesting, isn't it? Because the comparison with China is troubling, but it is also informative because on the one hand, outside of China, many Chinese artists now have a profile that they never had before their opening up. And so the local communities of artists have gained great exposure and become really prominent artists across the world. But on the other hand, as you say, we've reported on this podcast about what's going on in Hong Kong, what's going on with the genocide of the Uyghur people. And just because artists are finally having a chance to show their work, doesn't mean that the human rights abuses don't continue. And I suppose that's the means by which we're going to judge Saudis efforts in the future, isn't it that fundamentally what the rest of the world wants to see from Saudi is a permanent relaxation human rights abuses being ended, as well as a cultural opening up. Yeah, I mean, I suppose, isn't that the most difficult paradox, any kind of society faces, especially one that's been as authoritarian as this one in the past, you know, you try to open up to the world, and yet we know that issues still remain. But as I said, there are still differences I think the women seem to be more liberated. Held this unfolds. I'm not so sure. And one of the questions I kept asking all the different curators, some of the artists, who will come because at this point in time, alula has been very much marketed as a luxury experience really. I think that's much more manageable from the point of view of the number of people they want to let in. Because of its luxury, it's high end, obviously you have to have the money. To be able to afford it. It's interesting, this is not a backpack as territory at all at the moment. There's a limited number of flights, I suppose. So how will it be marketed and what route will they take? And then I ask everyone as well who benefits and that's a difficult one for a lot of people to answer. I suppose I'll ultimately the artists do benefit. And as you've just mentioned, in terms of basic exposure, this is going to put them out there. As it did for those Chinese artists of a generation previously, but I'm not so sure how this will pan out long term, you know, because what you're asking is that basic society and governmental policy changes in terms of the treatment of minority groups. But how will that change? I'm not so sure. I'm not an expert on Saudi governmental policy. But that is not going to be transformed or changed overnight, but I may be being blunt or rather naive on that one, but I would be cynical, I think. Just to return to the UK memorandum of understanding with Saudi Arabia, what does that mean? Is there anything tangible that was given to you as an example of how the UK and Saudi are going to work together? No, it was and I did inquire actually. I went to the department of culture in the UK and they gave me quite a stock statement. I asked the ministry of culture here in Saudi Arabia and they, I mean, they didn't comment further on the proposed partnership. But the UK department for cut digital culture media, the DCMS as the D Doris is in the region to strengthen ties in sports, tourism and the arts. What was interesting? I am not sure I mentioned this at the beginning. She signed the memorandum at the diriyah Biennale. So that was quite strange as well because I didn't expect her to turn up there to be honest. But she did do it against a really stunning backdrop actually of a work by the Saudi artists Sarah Al Gandhi. It's called the birth of a place and it's sort of looks like a load of stalactites, and it was all about the gentrification of the Jack's district area. So I didn't really get more details about what the memorandum might mean. I think it becomes an interesting point in time for both governments, as I say, perhaps the belief of UK government felt the need to have a soft power offensive at this point in time. I'm not sure. But again, for Saudi, it's part of a complete rebranding and I think I mentioned in my online piece that there's just an avalanche of arts events here at the minute and it's hard to single out certain ones, but the desert saluda is one of the main ones. But I did speak to an unnamed UK curator who again raised the issue of the LGBTQ rights when he saw the news about the Doris signing and reminded me that the homosexuality remains prohibited.

China Saudi Arabia diriyah Biennale Saudi Arabian government royal commission for alula Philip tinari Philip denari tinari Diyala Melissa Riyadh Hong Kong Provo UK department of culture ministry of culture here UK department for cut digital Sarah Al Gandhi DCMS desert saluda
"louise bourgeois" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

07:58 min | 10 months ago

"louise bourgeois" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Welcome back. Now Saudi Arabia is embarking on a soft power drive with an avalanche of contemporary art events, including the diriyah Biennale, just outside the capital city Riyadh, the two work sculpture commissions for public art in Riyadh, the Jeddah edition of the roving exhibition B and Al saw, and the second edition of desert X alula, a version of the Californian public art show, which launches in alula this week. Gareth Harris our chief contributing editor has been in Saudi Arabia to find out more, and I spoke to him about what lies behind this burst of contemporary culture. Gareth, you're in Saudi Arabia. What are you there for? I'm here mainly to see the desert X alula sculpture exhibition. It's the second edition launching in the historic heritage area of alula, which is the northwest region of Saudi Arabia, it's a bit of an undiscovered treasure. It was really totally inaccessible, like ten or 20 years ago. But in its efforts to open up to the world, the Saudi Arabian government has decided to embark on quite an ambitious cultural initiative in the area. Which involves launching 15 what they are calling cultural assets, which involve building museums and galleries and other cultural venues across the district. But they've started that process with desert X alula, which is the kind of dual in The Crown of cultural events launching this week, although it's a pretty packed week I have to say in terms of other exhibitions, there's an art salua week. We've been shown around alula artist residency program called oasis reborn. But there's the text alula is the showstopper. So I was taken around the site earlier today. Before we come on to that specific show, it's clearly a massive soft power push, right? It's a big statement to say Saudi Arabia is opening up and interesting things are happening here. Yeah, I mean, it started, I think, around 2017 when the Saudi Arabian government introduced a tourist Visa as far as I'm aware it was 2017. I visited Saudi Arabia in 2017 to see an arts festival called 21 39 and the differences between then and now are striking. So in 2017, it took me, I don't know, two or three weeks to go to Visa from London. I think it took me ten minutes online this time. To get an E Visa and I think the way that they are facilitating that process indicates how keen they are for international visitors to come to the country, you know? It's so different as well in terms of the changes in society. I think women now see more liberated cheer as well, which is quite striking. They don't seem to wear the headscarf as often. Although I think we need to be quite blunt about this. They are probably still living in one of the most depressive societies in the world still, but the differences are quite incredible. In terms of opening up, you're right. I mean, I was struck on the way over to see Nadine dores sitting just across from me on my flight. This is the UK culture minister. UK culture minister. I was quite shocked because obviously the British government in a little bit of a state at the moment. So to see the team Doris UK culture secretary on the plane was surprising. I found out she's sure to sign a memorandum of understanding with the Saudi Arabian culture ministry, which by the way was only formed about two or three years ago as well. So in terms of opening up generally, they are really pushing on the international front. The desert X alula has many international visitors. I've noticed there's a strong curatorial contingent this time from abroad. Perhaps we could say it's a difficult sell at the moment. We can't get around that issue of human rights. The gym is Jamal Khashoggi was murdered in 2018. Exactly. And it's interesting how that's still being discussed here. I mean, it's very much and our apps, some commentators are saying the moral qualms about discussing that murder are easing. I'm not so sure about that. Obviously, we can't discuss it in the open here. But I think what is fascinating is the desert salute sculpture show is touching on topics, which I think had, you know, possibly a little bit delicate here. The artist Cesar darwood, he's made two sculptures and they look quite incredible. I mean, I can not overstate how spectacular things look within this setting. They are dotted around a rock landscape that's thousands of years old. And I think sometimes it must be out daunting for artists to come here and take on that challenge actually. But chazelle Darwin's done an incredible job. He's produced two sculptures and they're sort of based on this sort of coral like forms, and they are sort of they have a sensitive surface which reflect the changes in temperature. It's meant to reflect, I guess, climate change effects, that kind of thing. And I suddenly thought about this. I thought, you know, climate change here is still not really an openly discussed topic. I'm not sure Saudi Arabia was the most compliant country at the cop 26 talks. Recently in Glasgow. So I think the fact that shazad has kind of done this. You know, presented these works on such a public platform is pretty admirable. I have to say. So I don't know, it's a difficult argument, isn't it about the human rights abuses? It's unavoidable. Desert X is obviously this LA based big sculpture thing that happens in a totally apparently free society. And now it is the same organization but connected to a Saudi organization within a similar setting. Have you talked to the curators about freedom of expression? And about what they're permitted to show and to what extent they were even self censoring or anything like that? There's a few people I spoke, I was put to Nora aldehyde. She's the arts and planning director at the royal commission for alula, which is the main Saudi governmental body overseeing the whole master plan here. And I did mention the issue of human rights in passing really. But of course, she said, it's still important to have cross cultural dialog. This is the kind of stance they take here. You know, it's important to have a dialog between artists of different nationalities, is it better to have a dialog between artists than not have a dialog at all? You know, I was looking at czar Darwin's piece. I'm glad it's here. I'm glad it's on show in such a public setting. I do think that it's better to begin to have that dialog than never to have it take place. There will be people who will say that this is a classic case of art, washing its presenting spectacular, extraordinary works of art, seductive settings, and it's using art to cover up for appalling human rights abuses. But the fact is there are also Saudi artists that are represented in this show too. Aren't they? So you're talking about that dialog. And there is a scene in Saudi Arabia that is also being displayed here. So there are local artists. It's not just about using big international names to come over and drop them into the space and use that to watch. There are also local artists involved, right? Yes. I mean, there are Saudi artists, I spoke to an artist called Donna, our tani. She's half Saudi Arabian half Palestinian. And again, she just seemed to absolutely rarely see the opportunity to be here. She just thinks it's about really valuable platform. I spoke to as well to a guy called sumantra gosh. He's the artistic programs director for the royal commission for alula. And he was quite Frank actually, I said to him, is this one very ambitious cynical master plan to better the country's reputation, that kind of thing..

Saudi Arabia alula Saudi Arabian government Riyadh Gareth Harris Nadine dores Saudi Arabian culture ministry Jeddah Jamal Khashoggi UK Cesar darwood Gareth chazelle Darwin shazad British government royal commission for alula Visa Nora aldehyde Saudi governmental body London
"louise bourgeois" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

03:54 min | 10 months ago

"louise bourgeois" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Louise Bourgeois, the woven child is at the Hayward gallery in London until the 15th of May. Louise Bourgeois and Jenny holzer, the violence of handwriting across a page is that the kunstmuseum in Basel from the 19th of February also until the 15th of May, and Louise Bourgeois paintings is at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York from the 12th of April until the 7th of August. Coming up, we hear about a burst of contemporary art shows in Saudi Arabia and look at a great abstract painting by Gerhard Richter. But first, here are a few of the top stories on our website this week. Tate is to remove the Sackler name from 5 locations at its two London museums amid ongoing calls for institutions to distance themselves from the family which manufactured and sold the highly addictive opioid OxyContin through their firm perjury farmer. As Christina Ruiz reports, the Sackler stand accused of misleading doctors and the public about the harms the drug posed in order to maximize their profits, the $13 billion family fortune comes largely from the sale of OxyContin. They deny the allegations. Despite this, the date said in 2019 that it would keep the secular name in its galleries, but it's now reversed this decision and it will be removed from 5 places to a Tate Britain, the central octagon and a gallery and three at Tate modern, the escalators lifts and also a gallery. Tate says it was mutually agreed to remove references to the Sackler family during the latest round of updates to the gallery's signage. Members of the crypto art community have accused BuzzFeed news of doxxing the founders of the world's most expensive NFT collection board ape yacht club BAC, following a report from the news website that revealed their previously hidden identities. A series of 10,000 Simeon NFTs launched in April 2021, bay C has a current trading volume of more than $750 million and claims a growing legion of celebrity owners, including Paris Hilton and Justin Bieber. Escobar Jell-O writes in the article published last week the New York tech journalist Katie napolis named the two men behind the online pseudonyms Gordon goner and gargamel, as Greg solano and Riley Aaron, respectively, both from Florida, BAC supporters and other members of the crypto world accused BuzzFeed and the toplis of violating the tenets of anonymity that they claim their community depends on. And finally, as could be a Jell-O reports a security guard at the yeltsin center in a Catherine Berg Russia has been charged with vandalizing a 20th century painting after drawing eyes on its faceless figures, less than 24 hours after starting at the gallery, three figures by the Russian avant garde artist and a la Porsche was at the time on loan from the state tretyakov gallery in Moscow for an exhibition, news of its broke in December after visitors had alerted gallery staff to small, crudely rendered eyes, scribbled on two of the paintings in ballpoint pen. This week, following a police investigation, it emerged that the vandal was a security guard employed by a private company. The exhibition's curator and aracena said that the 60 year old guards motives are still unknown and that he had suffered a lapse insanity. You can read all these stories and much more at the art newspaper dot com or on our app for iOS and Android, which you can download from the App Store or Google Play. We'll be back after this..

Louise Bourgeois Sackler Christina Ruiz Jenny holzer Tate Hayward gallery Gerhard Richter doxxing London Metropolitan Museum of Art Simeon NFTs Basel Escobar Jell New York tech Katie napolis Gordon goner Saudi Arabia gargamel
"louise bourgeois" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

02:59 min | 10 months ago

"louise bourgeois" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Really talked about that. But what it does have. And I think this is something which may be in the emphasis on the psychic trauma and everything else. People miss is lots of humor. Yeah, I think Louise is sort of Louise is trying to resolve something in the works. She's not trying to disturb anyone. She's not trying to shock anyone. And Louise had a sense of humor. She liked to tease. She had this sort of black humor in a way where she could be very sarcastic and she would be very witty and very seductive and witty for sure. There's a range to the work which I think expresses the range that she had as a person. Complex person, very up and down, very, very uneven, very aggressive, very emotional. And I think as she got older, you know, these sort of the aggressiveness in her. And she was quite aggressive. Sort of subsided. You get older, you can't have so many tantrums, you know, you can't sustain it because physically, on the body, it takes its toll. But I think as I said, bringing things together. She wants to bring the berets together. There is this idea of, as I said, as opposed to tearing things apart. Which is in the early work, I think this idea of let's bring things together. Let's make it harmonious, let them exist together, let them peaceful. Maybe that's what you're sitting there. There's a peacefulness to me in this piece. It's very calm. One last question, it's a very busy year for Luis bourgeois for the eastern foundation this year because we have the metro of paintings coming up. There's Jenny holtzer curating a show of her work in Basel. Why are we seeing this extraordinary moment for the week? COVID. COVID really reorganized a lot of the exhibition. Things were postponed and this was the slot. They're all very different projects and that show as you said is paintings and a lot of these paintings have never been seen. And it should be sort of a revelation that Jenny holzer's take on Louise, Jenny is a very fantastic artist. But it's her look at Louise and the relationship to text. And Jenny, it's not a show of Jenny's work. It's really about Louise because she's projecting Louise's text on buildings. So it's really her really looking at Louise's work and really making something extraordinary. She made an incredible catalog. Literally like an artist's book on Louise's work with her writings and other works from the kunstmuseum Basel. So they're all very different projects. I mean, the thing about Louise is that there's still so many aspects of the work that you can do. We're not repeating anyway. So we're doing these shows because each have a singularity in a field where each contributing to understanding really something that's quite complex that you could rearrange your work in various ways and see different connections. This is Ralph show and but I always see new things that I never saw. And that to me is the strength of the work to be honest. It's not like you can't fix it in a way..

Louise Jenny holtzer Luis bourgeois eastern foundation Jenny Basel Ralph
"louise bourgeois" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

08:07 min | 10 months ago

"louise bourgeois" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Materials. Well, when she started to in the 1990s when the cells began. She was moving to incorporate her own objects. She wanted to create an architectural setting that could house it. That she could control it would set the scale. And so that everything within the piece is confined with it. She didn't have to depend on the museum space or a gallery space or someone's house. All the coordinates she was able to control. You know, she preferred claustrophobic spaces anyway. She said, at least with a claustrophobic space, and you know your limits in a strange way. So I think everything with Louise, first, there's the emotional psychological impetus. But then there's reality of making something. And it's a give and take. We said you want to do this and the material does that, or you cut something wrong and you need to. So there is this process. She always described it. I quoted many times the idea that she's on a journey without a destination. She's no, she's going in the right way, but she doesn't know what the peace will end up. And it's always, there's always this struggle. She attracted to ambiguity as well, because that's one thing I love about the work. I know some people might want more resolution, but for me, it's so pregnant with atmosphere with enigma. There is an contradictory impulses. It's really this idea between she could love you and she could hate you. She loved her mother and yet she was resentful of her mother. She loved her father and she hated. I think those kinds of things are those contradictory where these things need to be together, but they are actually opposites. And how do you hold them together? That's the psychic split. That's the contradiction. That's the anxiety in a strange way, because there's always a tug. Let's go down into the lower gallery. We're now surrounded by two works which are called couples, and these are these black bodies, but both of them feature prosthetic limbs. Tell us about these. So these were actually first shown in same pancreas and bell tower in London. But this idea of couples. We always had this fear of abandonment, which was a very early trauma that she had. And it really was she never really got over it. So it's the idea that she wanted the couples to be together forever inseparable. On the other hand, it's a combination. I think the two pieces of one with the prosthetic arm is a much more aggressive, much more, maybe sort of sadist kind of thing. It's locking it, making sure it's not going to go away, but is willing to maybe inflict damage to hold it together. And the other piece you see the woman underneath, she's got a leg. She's much more passive. She's more like a more passive, so you have this sort of sadist masses or passive and active in a strange way. But so she had this idea to bring things together. This whole phase of her life is the opposite of cutting and chipping away is actually bringing things together. I mean, you see that in a lot of the works. And the prosthetic devices like every thing Louise as it has multiple references. It's never one thing. I think that's what gives the work a certain complexity and a certain kind of you're not quite clear what's going on because there's multiple things going on. Her sister had a bad leg. She basically talked about when she worked at the Louvre. She was a docent at the Louvre and she said, all the soldiers in World War I who were wounded were guaranteed a job by the French government, and so she said she would go down to the cafeteria that he had the place with the amputees eating and all that and she just found it difficult. But then she lived near a prosthetic maker. And then her neighbor next to her had a prosthetic. So there are all these things of different chapters of life where that becomes a form. But for her, it was the idea also positive. I mean, the idea is you have to figure out how to survive. So if you need a peg leg or you need this, I mean, there's this will to survive. There is a way you need a crutch you need, you know, you need a way to stand up and you need to function. That's how you get through like. You've got to figure out how you're going to survive. What do you need to do to get through the day? And live. Let's go upstairs. Now in lady in waiting we saw a rather diminutive version of the spider. Here we have a monumental one. And this is called spider tell us about this work. So the spider was an ode to her mother, and you see the eggs in the belly of this large spider. But what you wanted to do is really make the web into architecture. And you see the two bones. So that's how you know the spider's web is used to trap for food. So she's created again her architecture. You are meant to enter this and sit in the chair and be under the protection of the mother. And it has also many narratives going on within it. But it's the idea of memory of time, smell bringing back memory. You have a bottle of chalet Moore, which is the perfume that she wore here at panels. You know, like the panel on the floor, you see the genital was cut out. Yeah, I wondered about that. Was it cut out? Is it serendipity? It's always deliberate. The biggest buyers for tapestries that are being restored where the Americans. The newly rich American, but they didn't want genitalia on their walls. So their mother would cut out the genitals and put a flower there. And you see the insertion of these flowers here, which is so everything's sort of everything and every piece sort of reverberates in another piece and continues, but you know it's about memory. It's got time, the passing of time. They were trinkets and lockets, aren't they? Certain events where she went or commemorated in that and she has the cupping jars on the left of the wall, which is what she did to her mother. She took care of her mother who was quite ill. She always saw the spider's dainty, but also very clever and very friendly. In the fabric restoration workshop, is it that Louise the young Louise would draw the feet on the way you have the panel of the foot on the left because most of the tapestries had their most damage on the bottom. And so Louise would come in and draw the feet that then would be revolving. And obviously, as with many of the spiders, you have the eggs in the belly of the spider. Here they're wrapped. What's the significance of the fabric wrap? You just protected. There's like almost like a skin like an egg in a way because they're glass, the eggs are actually glass, and this is this sort of fleshy sort of coating. They're her stockings. Basically. Do you ever articulate why she really wanted to explore the mother so much in those final years? I think it was an unconscious move towards the mother because I think she was getting old. There are other bodies of work where there's all these pregnant women and gouaches and you have a whole room downstairs of mother and child. Well, Louise is in her. She's not looking to have another kid. It is this relationship to her mother, but she's looking for a mother to take care of her. She's thinking about her own mother. Louise never talked about death. She would never really talk about it. But I think she realized that she was getting more fragile. I think that was the other impetus for this whole close thing. She had held on to all these clothes and garments that belonged to her mother and I think she said, well, I don't want these things have such memory to have such meaning. And if I put it in the work, they're going to last longer than my own physicality. And so they're all these sort of fighting against the passage of time, but also wrapping certain things up in a way. That's nice. Well, let's go and see your work now, which definitely alludes to death at least. We're in the final room of the show, and it's a body of work that was produced right at the end of Louise's life. And in this particular work, it seems very, very potent with imagery relating to death. What looks like a mortuary slab? Is that too literal interpretation? I think Louise would object to that interpretation. She's using her berets, which she wore her whole life. And so they are clustered like this multiple breasted figure in a strange way. I don't think the reference to a mortuary slab is not as part of this whole series about the passage of time. But it's also like a landscape to Hershey made these breast landscapes and all that. It's the most figurative of these last four vitrines for sure. But I think to her is more this peaceful sort of repetition, this idea of growth, a lot of these the rest of the works deal with progression and growth and these are like pods that seeds that are growing and all that. I think there's multiple residents. As I said, it's definitely figurative, but I know she never referred to this as death. As I said, she never.

Louise French government Louvre London Hershey
"louise bourgeois" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

07:54 min | 10 months ago

"louise bourgeois" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"As a Louise Bourgeois show opens at the Hayward gallery in London ahead of others in Basel and New York. I take a tour of 5 of the French American artists late works with Jerry gorovoy, who worked with bourgeois for 30 years. Our chief contributing editor Gareth Harris has traveled to Saudi Arabia, where a host of contemporary art shows have just opened, but does this as some commentators have said, mark a new era in the country's approach to culture. And in this episode's work of the week, dietmar Elgar, the curator of the Gerhard Richter archive in Dresden, Germany, tells us about fells and abstract painting from 1989 at the heart of a new show, curated by Richter at the albertinum in the East German city. Before all that, a new series of our sister podcast a brush with continues in the podcast I talked to leading artists in depth about the influences and cultural experiences that shape their life and work. The latest episode is a brush with Charles ray, and it's followed next week by a brush with Alison Katz, the Canadian painter, so do subscribe wherever you get your podcast to hear that and to explore the archive of more than 30 conversations. Now, a host of shows of the work of Louis bourgeois are opening in the first half of this year. Next week, the kunstmuseum in Basel brings bourgeois together with the American artist Jenny holzer for a unique show, while in April, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York hosts what it hopes will be a revelatory show of bourgeois paintings. But the first of this spate of exhibitions opens this week at the Hayward gallery in London. The woven chard looks at bourgeois prolific use of fabric in the last two decades of her career before her death in 2010. Textiles were of particular significance through her life, partly because her mother was a Tapestry restorer, and those textiles were then sold in a gallery in Paris, run by bourgeois father, characteristically, the artist used fabric in a huge range of visionary, psychologically charged and deeply symbolic sculptural creations. Jerry gorovoy was Louise Bourgeois assistant for the last 30 years of her life, and is now president of the eastern foundation set up after her death. I took a tour with him of some of the key sculptures in the Hayward show among the greatest works of her final years. Jerry, we're standing in front of in respite in the Louise Bourgeois show at the Hayward gallery. This is the earliest sculpture in the show, and it sets the tone in lots of ways, doesn't it? Tell us about this work. This piece sort of marks the slow progression in Louise's work where she is incorporating objects from her life and found objects. Most of the work let's say prior to the 70s was pretty much abstract. But there was this movement to incorporate things. So in this piece where you have all these threads. So what happened that Louise got a studio that was a former sewing factory, and they made blue jeans and they sort of moved, I think, to Asia. So when she took over the studio, which was this concrete space in downtown Brooklyn, there was all the remnants of this sewing factory. And there were all these spools of thread. You know, they stayed there for a while, but that was the impetus really that Louise wanted to do something with it. And so she made this armature where she basically rested these spools of threat. They sort of from the thread. She sort of unwind each spool and threaded to a needle, which is then piercing this very pink form, which is ambiguous. I mean, you'll see this pink form in many works. It's obviously stands in for the figure. It's a little bit of sexuality, but it's a little bit of this marking of time. I mean, the thread in a way, it was just a perfect sort of material for her thematic concerns, which is a sense of time, a sense of repair, reparations. She came from a Tapestry. The idea of sewing in a way. So it just all sort of came together. I'd like to ask about this idea of reparation, because she talked a lot about this, didn't she? And she associates that with her mother, her mother was repairing literally repairing tapestries, she was in this Tapestry workshop. But also when we look at this, he talked about this sort of pendulous rubber form. It's pierced quite brutally with these needles. So it's not just about repair. It's about damage too, isn't it? Well, it's a little bit like in other pieces she uses the same sort of technique and a piece called conscious and unconscious. A series of these large vitrines. So I mean, the needle definitely is a marker of time. It is maybe a seat of a trauma of seat of a certain memory or incident that's sort of there is piercing something in a way for sure, but it's also marking something. I think it's this idea that we have moments in our life, which really are quite significant to our psychic life and to our relationship to other people. It does not necessarily have to be trauma. It could be trauma. It could be anxiety. It could be jealousy, robbery, but there are moments in time where the body is really imprinted with psychological damage. I think it's one thing. You know, but it's also, as you mentioned, her mother, I think. There was this move not only to the found object, but moved to this identification with her mother. And that only came about really in the 1990s, where there was a shift, there's a lot written about her antagonistic relationship with her father. But at a certain point, she's moving away and sort of the last 20 years of her life at the father did not loom very large at all. I mean, unless someone brought it up, she wouldn't really refer to her father so much. It was really this idea of the mother. And one of those sort of key motifs illustrating the mother is the spider. So let's go and look at a work, which includes one now. Okay. So lady in waiting is part of a series of cells and a subgroup portrait cells that Louise made. Beginning in the 2000s. We're actually maybe even a little earlier. So this one you see basically a spider sitting in a chair in the chair is covered in Tapestry and so it was a spider. And from the window of this architectural setting are these 5 spools of thread. The number 5 for Louise always had this reference to the family. She grew up in a family of 5 and she had three sons. So there's this sort of idea and the threads go into the mouth of the spider. Now, this is lady in waiting, which is basically related to a previous piece, this idea of eugenie Grande and the balzac novel. But the idea Louise always felt that she never lived the life she wanted, and she kept waiting and waiting and she was waiting for something to happen. She moved. She made work and all this. So it's this idea that fear and anxiety probably kept her from living the life, at least that she fantasize or the life that she really wanted. And so you have this idea that the spider is sort of almost blending into the environment. Like most of the defensive camouflage thing. Because despite it was an ode to her mother, but she also associated the spider with her own creative process. The spider builds its web out of its own body. And it's used to trapping, but we felt that she, the sculpture has to come out of the body. The relationship to the body is one of the key things. She's got a feel when she's making work or art. She has to feel it through the body that she is expressing what she wants. I wonder if we might talk a bit about process while you're talking about that. So can you tell me about the process of how this came together? With Louise work with assistance. So this here would have the taps to do what Louisa do is that Louise had some tapestries from her background, but then actually wanted to work. Then she would get more tapestries to fill in. So here, what she did was this chair, she found and then she would cut the Tapestry and pin it, both on the sculpture and on the chair. And then she had an assistant who was so sewing person who was able to sew it on after her. And there was a very specific element to this that sort of key elements of the sales, particularly where wood is used. The.

Jerry gorovoy Hayward gallery Louise Bourgeois Louise Gareth Harris dietmar Elgar Gerhard Richter archive East German city Basel Alison Katz Louis bourgeois eastern foundation Charles ray Jenny holzer London New York Dresden Richter Metropolitan Museum of Art Saudi Arabia
"louise bourgeois" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

09:07 min | 1 year ago

"louise bourgeois" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"And I'm learning how far away I forgot. Julie, what's going on? I'm sorry, first of all I mess this up. Second of all. No, it's okay. It's the topic tonight. Oh no, what's wrong? So heads up, everybody. This episode will discuss some taboo topics that may not be suitable for all yours and listener discretion is advised. We never have that. We don't have that often, Joel. Oh boy. I'm scared now. So, anyway, Laura, I said, Lauren, so fabulously introduced last week, we had a wonderful listener on Twitter, who suggested that we do define December. And we thought that would be a great topic. And then immediately, Lauren was like, I'll do Midler and I was like, okay, I guess I'll do this other topic. And I mean, no one had a gun to your head. No. So, I mean, you've all seen the episode description. Our episode this episode. It's called an exercise in poor taste. The abject art of John Waters. Every day's like yellow every night is a bed to see. Oh boy. So I am going to probably get increasingly uncomfortable as this episode goes along. I'm going to try to say things as clinically as possible. I feel like this is a real, I'm really an outsider on this one. I'm really shut the outside looking into this episode. You know what? This is. I'm your avatar today because if you are already not familiar with John Waters, then you are in my boat and I'm mixing a lot of metaphors now, but this is great. I'm right here with you. I'm here. You're here with, you know? I'm here with you. I'm your support, you know? If you need a break, I might just throw a phrase. Yeah. Yeah, yeah. Toss it to me. I'm happy to, I mean, I'm not much more knowledgeable. So we're both in the same boat. Right. Okay. Again, feel free to jump in if there's things that I'm leaving out or things that you think are also things people should know about. Okay. Great. So yes. I believe in you. Welcome to the second half of divine December, everybody. So John Samuel waters junior was born in April 1946 in Baltimore, Maryland, and he grew up in lutherville, which was a suburb there. He got very interested in puppets around age 7. And he would actually put on very in demand violent and gory puppet shows for birthday parties and people loved it. One of his favorite childhood games was called car accident and involved crashing his toy cars together and making up very gruesome detailed stories about the people trapped inside his vehicle. Oh my God. And to satiate her son's appetite for the macabre, his mother would often take John to the junkyard to look at the smashed cars there. That's a great Saturday afternoon activity. Julia Julia, I was not expecting this to hit so hard, so quick. Early, boom. Just early like, oh, wow, okay, no. And it is youth, John Waters would use a pair of binoculars to watch B movies and X rated movies at his local drive in. So yeah, here's. When he was a teenager, his grandmother gave him a handheld 8 millimeter brownie camera with which he and his friends shot many of their first experimental films. So watershed number actually finished college, he briefly attended New York University's film school, but he was expelled for smoking marijuana cigarettes on what? Jazz cigarettes? The horror. So he grew his iconic razor thin pencil mustache when he was in his early 20s because he wanted to look like the singer Little Richard. And later in an interview with out magazine, he said quote, I wanted to be the only white man in America who had one. And I still might be really. I don't even realize I have a mustache anymore. I've done it for so long. I just shave it from the top every day, clip it twice a week from the bottom and if I miss I just draw it on. So he's committed. He's had this look for nigh on 50 years now. Committed to the bit. A lot of credit. So John Waters has mainly resided in his hometown of Baltimore, Maryland, for his entire life. All of his films are set and shot in Baltimore, often in the working class neighborhood of hamden. He also maintains departments in New York City in San Francisco and he of course has a summer home in provincetown. Waters is an openly gay man and an avid supporter of gay rights in gay pride. His favorite movie is the 1939 classic The Wizard of Oz, a film that has inspired him since he saw it at a young age because he views the ending as tragic with Dorothy having to return to the drab injury, Kansas and leaving the world of colorful characters in fantastical magic in Oz. That's a surprise. I was not expecting a movie so that's so like childlike and innocent and sweet and mainstream to be his favorite. Yeah, he is very, again, he's an avid filmgoer. He's a big book collector too, and so he is consumed a lot of literature and media and everything over the years. So I can tell he's kind of like a playful eccentric kooky character. Yeah. In real life, there's I'm sure there's much to come in this episode, folks. So here's my kind of disclaimer portion about this. And this is how I'm kind of viewing his Oprah through this lens. The Tate in London describes abject art as art which explores themes that transgress or threaten our sense of cleanliness and propriety, particularly referencing the body and bodily functions. So the object is a complex psychological philosophical and linguistic concept that was developed by Julia kristeva in her 1980 book powers of horror. So in practice, the abject covers all bodily functions or aspects of the body that are deemed in pure or inappropriate for public display or discussion. The object has a strong feminist context in that female bodily functions in particular are objected by a patriarchal social order. In the 1980s and 90s, many artists became aware of this theory and reflected it in their work. In 1993, the Whitney museum in New York stage and exhibition called abject art repulsion and desire in American art, which gave the term a wider currency. And in depicting what most people would rather not see the theory goes, this type of art breaks through societal taboos, especially those surrounding sexuality. So Cindy Sherman is seen as a contributor to the object in art as well as many others, including Louise Bourgeois, who Lauren, who covered in her excellent episode one or two, don't be so bourgeois. So if I I'm approaching John Waters filmography through the lens of that it is abject art. Yes, and I think that is the right way to go. I would argue maybe because I was recently talking about ugliness and beauty if you want to watch my talk about it, it's on our Twitter. But this concept of the sublime, right? So the sublime is the appreciation of beauty through the lens of horror. So it's this concept of appreciating beauty through a storm or something that could destroy you like the ocean or something like that where you're afraid you're terrified, but you're seeing it as like this awesome, beautiful thing. So I would say that abject art is like the appreciation of disgust through horror, I guess, is like a little bit of that. It's like the opposite of the sublime, but still seeing it in the lens of like fear and disgust and not my jam. No, it's my jam. No, it's not, it's not popular. It's not loved. So yeah, it is a very repulsive. It is evoking emotions in reactions. Absolutely. But I don't know, I don't want to see something with menstrual blood. That's just not that's just not for me. Yeah, and you know what? That's okay. Life is a rich Tapestry and everyone can like the things that they like. Exactly. Yeah. Exactly. Exactly. So the filmography of John Waters. His first short film was called hag in a black leather jacket in 1964..

John Waters Lauren John Samuel lutherville Baltimore Julia Julia Midler Maryland Julie Joel Laura Little Richard Twitter Julia kristeva New York University hamden provincetown nigh Whitney museum
"louise bourgeois" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:58 min | 1 year ago

"louise bourgeois" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The week before the 20th anniversary of the September 11th terrorist attacks were having conversations here on all of it around the anniversary through music, poetry, media and today, art. Artist Brenda Berkman is also a retired F D N y captain. Let that sink in for a minute. Considering men outnumber women in the F D n Y by 3 to 1 brand is actually the reason women can serve in the f D. N y at all. In 1982. She filed and won a lawsuit against the fire department over part of the entrance exam and with 40 other women became among the first woman to ever serve in the department. Her second act in life has been as sort of a visual historian overhear our career. She's documented mostly in black and white drawings. How the city has changed in the wake of the events of September 11th 2000 and one In the moments before the planes hit to that beam of light familiar to New Yorkers today that rises above the skyline. Later this week. She'll show her work at ST all of College in Minnesota. In an exhibition called Altered Skyline, Brenda Berkman's 30 60 years of one World Trade Center and those works. Those 36 works will be part of the 9 11 Museum's permanent Collection. I'm pleased to welcome artist First responder and former F D. N y captain Brenda Berkman to the show. Captain. Welcome. Alice and Great to be here. And what a what a generous introduction. But I have to just say one thing. Men outnumber women in the New York City Fire Department today and 2021. Bye. 1000 to 1. Uh, so there are 1% women in the New York City Fire department. And that's uh way more than 20 years after I won my lawsuit, 1982, But let's talk about art. Yeah, I'm looking at my watch. Is 2021 that statistic? Wow. Yeah. I wanted to buy part of your story because you were actually in law school before becoming a firefighter. Why did you want to join the department? Well, I'd always wanted to serve my community. My parents and my teachers had really instilled in me as a kid. You know the desire to make the world a better place and I was a little tomboy. That's what girls were called in those days who likes physical activity. I like sports, but this was all pre title nine and I wanted to combine those two things I wanted to combine my brain and my physical abilities. To serve my community and who who? Who's better liked than firefighters. Really. We come in the middle of the night and all kinds of weather and every neighborhood and People. Respect what we do to admire what we do and and we're able to help them whenever they call. Everyone old enough for members where they were when they found out about the planes that hit the towers. And you were a firefighter at the time. But you were you were off duty that day. What did your morning look like? And then what did your day turn into? So I got up that email. It was election there, right, So primary day and I got up. I was going to go work in a primary campaign and I was having my second cup of coffee at nine o'clock in the morning. When my telephone rang, and it was a friend of mine from Kentucky, saying, Turn on your television. People may recall that the first tower was sent at 8 46. I had no inkling what was going on. But when I turned on the television, I immediately thought terrorism. Because I saw the amount of fire that was in that building and I knew it couldn't have been an accident. And then I started to go towards Towards headquarters. But while I was out on the street, I discovered that second plane had hit the South tower at nine on three. And then, of course, everybody was confirming that it had to be terrorism. And I ran to a nearby firehouse instead. And the whole group of us who were off duty made our way over to Manhattan. And when we got there to Manhattan, the second tower had just fallen. Ah! The soft, Howard already fallen. And then just as we got to the Manhattan side North Tower film and we were in this huge dust cloud. With no equipment. Um All the all the fire trucks and the equipment had already been sent to Manhattan and the off duty folks really had nothing with him to speak of. We had no breathing apparatus or Radios to communicate with And there we were looking at not only, um, the total Incineration of the Of the two towers, but all the smaller surrounding buildings Including seven World Trade Center, which was 47 stories high and I'm fired from top to bottom. So it was really difficult day. It was the kind of day where a lot of senior people like myself I had almost 20 years on the job. We looked at this. Worse than anything we could have ever possibly imagined. But we're Certainly nothing like we've ever been to. And, uh, a lot of us thought, you know we could die today. My guess is Brenda. But we started looking for people do you mean I have some firefighters with me who were also opportunity. They had no equipment. We started looking for anybody who might be alive to be able to get them, You know, to the hospital. Get them out of the rubble. Um It was an incredibly difficult day and unfortunately, Allison, you know, you may also recall that She didn't walk out of the trade center. Um on 9 11. It was very unlikely that you survives the trade center. So Few people were rescued after the towers collapsed and after Seven collapsed at 5 20 in the afternoon, which came down You know, right on top of the area that I was That we were looking and, um so we were running down the street as well. Yeah, it was. It was it was bad, And then it went on, you know, for many weeks and months, um, 10 months. We were looking for first for people and then for a remained And when, when and why did you turn to art as a form of expression? I'd always wanted to do something creative. You know when your firefighters spent a lot of time breaking things, and, uh Even as a kid. I wanted something creative. But in my family, you know you went. You got a profession. You got a job. Maybe you were a teacher. If you were a girl, you know in those days and And I was really focused on, um Unemployment and on a job doing something valuable, uh, with my job. And then when I retired from the fire department five years after 9 11, I thought, you know, this is my chance. I don't know anything about art. I I know nothing about and I don't know if I'm gonna be any good at drawing or whatever having to do with art, but I'll give it a shot. I'll see what I can do. And I found the Art Students League, which is such a joke because People every practically every artist in the United States has cycled through the art Students League in New York at some point in their career, you know, you hear George O Keefe for Louise Bourgeois, or, you know you name the artist. And that artist has gone through the our students like And I fell in love with printmaking. And of course, I had to do the most. Complicated process, which is stone photography and involves, you know these big stones and heavy stones and you're grinding them And then you're drawing on processing and Print him and I loved it. I not only loved making the image I loved learning the process. And figuring out how do I do this? You know, how do I control the medium and Them for 10 years. I did nothing that had anything to do with 9 11. Interesting, at least not obviously. And for the 10th anniversary, I decided to do this self portrait of myself just in civilian clothes, but with my hands over my head, I'm all like bent over like something's falling on top of me. And that was really, you know, talking about not only the day of 9 11 and how so many people, including myself, were, you know an imminent threat of being crushed by stuff. But also like the psychic, uh, damage to people that you know, really. Cause them to be bent over and and.

George O Keefe Brenda Berkman Manhattan Allison Louise Bourgeois 2021 1982 Kentucky United States Brenda 10 years New York Art Students League 47 stories Alice 10 months Minnesota 1% 36 works New York City Fire Department
"louise bourgeois" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"louise bourgeois" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"I hope i i hear there is. I'm i'm quite sure they will be just the sort of note about these wonderful characters and just how you how you decided to let them into connect and as you say never never quite too much but there is this wonderful linkage through. It happened really organically. I mean i've i've sort of a moment ago. I described the way in which i write. And i'm i'm sort of with louise bourgeois. The you know the artist on this you know she wants said i trust my unconscious completely. Mount consciousness my friend. I actually use the word intuition rather than the unconscious feel i. Didn't i think of myself as an entirely intuitive writer. So that's what's so wonderful about that first draft. You're kind of thinking okay. I'm going to go with whatever i have and i'm going to trust it and before prior to this interview. Actually i went back and just skimmed through a still have the first draft of the stories. It's amazing the extent to which it's all there already and the sentences aren't good enough you know and there are some links that haven't been made towards that pretty much. There and i was quite surprised by that. Because i was thinking i'd i'd sort of built them up gradually over the last ten years because every time i had a two week or three week gap in something. I'd go back to one of the stories and rewrite it but you know this. So much of what happens when you write as mr is mysterious to me I don't sometimes. It feels like the writing is coming from somewhere deep inside like the very back of your head deep inside your heart or wherever it is and then other times. It feels like it's coming from outside. And you're kind of transcribing something. It often felt like that with barcelona dreaming. You know that. Because i was trying to capture the city it was as if the city new i loved it and it was going to tell me stories about itself. It felt at sounds a bit spooky. I know but it just felt like that at certain points. You know not quite like being dictated to. But as if i was transcribing something that already existed or something. That already happened how the city loves you. You love the city and we love you and this book report thompson. Thank you so much thanks georgina. Thanks for having me bustle. Energy mean is published by hachette. You've been listening to meet the writers. Thanks to the production team of nor whole and sophie. Monaghan combs you can download this show and previous episodes from our website or app from soundcloud mixed cloud or i tunes georgina. Tina godwin funky listening..

Tina godwin georgina thompson two week soundcloud barcelona first draft hachette three week sophie one of the stories louise last ten years
"louise bourgeois" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"louise bourgeois" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Next feminist public art. Is that a contradiction in terms once perhaps public art has long been the preserve of men commissioned by men made by men, often in memory of men. Groundbreaking abstract works such as French artist Louise Bourgeois giant spider sculptures or Japanese artists. You York, Osama's polka dots and mirror installations have challenged that monopoly. It's in London's Parliament Square, for instance, the first statue of a woman by your woman only arrived in 2018 in the shape of the suffered just Millicent four set Into New York, the first touch of a real woman rather than a fictional character only appeared in Central Park last year. But how about in the cities of the Philippines and Egypt? Get a feminist take on art outside the gallery from Manila and Cairo. I spoke to two award winning artists the Here she had, whose work exploring women's rights and Arab identity has been seen on gallery walls and street corners alike from Vancouver to Tokyo. And Nikki Luna, who's represented the Philippines at the Cairo and Singapore. BNLs with her installations. Addressing violence against women is the artwork isn't all about the world we live in. I mean, what's the point off union having it? So I really, really wanted to go and actually do community work with gender based on sexual violence among women and girls. Can you give me an example, Nikki? I made these beauty queen crowns. And if you go under the current coming from small speaker, she would hear voices Miss Universe crowns that you popularly see in developing countries where everything stops when it's Beauty pageants. But what does it do to marginalize people? I was working with the community. They were informal settlers. Their houses were tear gas, you know, so they were running with toddlers and babies topless. I went there. I took care of them. But at the same time I ask permission if I could interview them now, I asked the eight winning fast questions of Miss Universe and one of them wasps. So if you could do something outrageous for one day, what would it be? And why, Right? What was the answer? The first thing she would say worth Oh, just wash the laundry or I'll just clean. Because she couldn't grass like Like what? Outrageous, So I had to be patient and wait. It's only for one day. It's something you've been wanting to do that you're dying to do something outrageous. Something different. And then finally, Ah, like an epiphany. I know I'm going to study. Well, that's very sobering. So that is the kind of art that I always tried to make. I'm just a tool, a vehicle for their voices. What about you? But here? Can you tell us more about what inspires you and give us an example of your work? I like to highlight work from different communities. But I think the most charged time for me when that shift in my practice happened was during the Egyptian uprising 10 years ago when I started a spring stances on the street. It's very raw. It's very accessible. And to me, the street is more interesting to work with than AH Gallery or a museum where events are curated. It's organized. You have the option off chance on the street. So somebody passing by can comment on your work. Erase it. Take a picture uploaded Get you a sandwich because they love your work. One of your pieces of it. I think it's the stenciling of blue bras. On the walls of Cairo. There was a video off three men stripping a woman naked. She was a veiled woman wearing our beta. And they revealed her blue bra. On the next day, they were must demonstrations by women rights activists all over Egypt. Because of that video, there were literally hundreds of artists who went down to the street who created paintings and murals. What I did with the blue bra is merely turn it into a Nikon so that you easily recognize it. Can you give me an example? Nikki off When your work has been at its most public, I made a huge mirror. And it said, Ah, song is there many beautiful women There will always be rape. That's a quote from president a tattoo right? Definitely, and it was quoted in so many news outfits. It seemed as if he was forcing it on us that this is something that we should accept normalizing it. Yes, trivializing it as well. So I made this mirror and I put it in a public space in a parking lot in in the Philippines. There's nothing to say that this was an artwork, so it's just leaning on a wall and then off course, it's a mirror so people are so attracted. Mirrors. I wanted to make them face themselves and asked, like, Where do you stand on? It went viral, didn't it? People were taking pictures of themselves and sharing them on social media. Yes, actually, the title of that work is look at her. Because, like placing the blame on women, you know, I guess that gives you an idea of how social media can be used to make public heart. Even more public. Yes. What about you? But here in 2010, I created a work of art that was installed at the House. Dickinson Munich, The artwork was entitled 1000 times. No. On to me. It was a statement against everything I wanted to say no to. It's an abstract. No. I looked for 1000 different shapes of the letter No in Arabic. But then 10 years later, and 2020. Because of my sexual harassment of women raped during the pandemic and the lockdown, lots of young women started sharing messages and creating awareness about these And suddenly I find that my original 1000 times. No goes viral. What more could we be seeing in feminist public hearts in regard to imagery and issues and I'll start with you. But here I think we have so many issues that have not been addressed our right to breastfeed in public the right of women to pass on. Their nationality to their Children. And my part of the world. Some countries. What about you, Nicky? We'd love to see women statues, fine Women heroes, she rose. But is that enough? We need to open mind. So it's better when you have not just female statues, but you raise female issues about here. Do you have anything to add to that? I think we need the statues naked. I will disagree here. We need role models. We we need to put more scientists more creative minds. Yes, Sorry. I did not make that clear. We need women statues, but other things we need both way won't just settle for women. Such is No, Don't settle now, Nikki. We wanted on Because we deserve it all. Nikki Luna and the hair she had Nikki Luna's work crafted new imaginings is due to be on display at New York's a gallery until March, pending the coronavirus restrictions that is And Baia Sheehab spoke. You can crush the flowers. A.

Nikki Luna Philippines Egypt Cairo Louise Bourgeois New York Manila London York AH Gallery Nikon Osama Millicent Vancouver Parliament Square Singapore Central Park