35 Burst results for "Louisa"

"louisa" Discussed on Unbottleneck - Digital Marketing Solutions

Unbottleneck - Digital Marketing Solutions

01:41 min | 8 months ago

"louisa" Discussed on Unbottleneck - Digital Marketing Solutions

"Seo person who's shifted into product. But i think she's still has some really interesting things to say would be pasta gut. Tom these amazing and she's always very active on social media shares. Just a lot of great resources. She is at cnn now But she was previously working in news on seo. And so. i would definitely recommend on posner. Got tom as well. Sweet so people wanna follow you. What is your social Handle sure so. Mine is just louisa franck on twitter and then it's a louis says seven twenty on instagram. But i would love to touch louis. We'll have to talk about the seven twenty later for stems from stands for my birthday my birthday edges past. It's still is thirty one. This amazing yeah looking over twenty one. Well been amazing I want to be conscious of your time and thank you for giving so much great advice and at a lot of fun talking about news. Seo i think after this big roll out a page update finishes maybe we can do another short one just to kind of discuss what we felt. The the changes were once the dust settles at might be fun thing to do and If you guys are doing or listening you're doing any sort of news. Seo please always on on social learnt so much she so Willing to share and give and give you one of the person to be grateful for thank you and thank you guys for For listening again. And we'll see you all next episode. Sounds good thank. You have a good day..

louisa franck louis posner cnn Seo Tom tom twitter
How Podcasts Are Taking Off in China With Louisa Lim of 'The Little Red Podcast'

Podcast Movement 2021

01:26 min | 10 months ago

How Podcasts Are Taking Off in China With Louisa Lim of 'The Little Red Podcast'

"I'll put the little red podcast has been going for five years now. We just had our fifth anniversary. And i remember when we started it. We actually wanted whether there was even space for another podcast on china because at that. Time is one podcast seneca which seemed to be the massive podcast. This'll grand old daddy of podcast been going to such a long time and we did think. Is there any space for anyone else in the field but we will give it a go and see how it goes now. Of course we've seen this kind of explosions. He said precaution. China i think a long time the put costing about china was also exclusively in english. Now another thing that we see is a lot off interest in chinese language. Podcasting about china's. You know those kind of audience that you can get doing chinese-language costs it is crazy. So i think you're all these different opportunities opening up and jihad also showing. The puck costs on china reaching different audiences. Ours was always quite nowadays. Focused at academics. And journalists policymakers people with kind of very deep interest in china. But i think we're also seeing that General audiences more and more interested in all kinds of china contact and podcast is just. It's the perfect. Delivery system isn't

China
"louisa" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

The Freedive Cafe Podcast

02:57 min | 11 months ago

"louisa" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

"My like it's a talent into most sink wise. I can't imagine not timing when came into my life albeit Six it was kind of transformation for me. It was like i was drowning. And then i discovered to freak outs freebies. It's it was something missing my life. I i think mixing them. I've been involved. Which is begin when that's not i. I've lost myself so i face i fund making such life by saying that by on imagine if i would be like if i most no perfect yeah i mean people A lot of people are resonating with you right now. just thanking the You know thinking nature thinking a time thinking evolution that they landed in the fortunate position to be able to enjoy enjoy the underwater world as as we as we do louisa. Thank you so much for coming to the free dot. Cafes awesome to have you here it's been totally fascinating talking about a safety and free devon competitions and just Here in your story thanks for coming tummy is seen such thank you so much for having me. I feel really honest to be on the show and it's been a great time and enjoy the rest. You time there in the hab. If you see any friends of mine police say hi and dive.

louisa
"louisa" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

The Freedive Cafe Podcast

05:40 min | 11 months ago

"louisa" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

"Slightly lost the ability to focused internally on meyer on my. I'm so used to being vigilant With my students. I know you've lived with obesity action Situations where we participate in having to do with stuff so that's probably a elements. Ptsd at some Having who lost lighting safety dot kind of adds another little another little source in your head actually this even possible united that need to make sure As well we need to rely on athletes not making decisions as we committee. You know what the safety team medics with the judges with you. Organize had beaten. We judgments some on nonsense on whether be so. That's that's a k. but yeah slutty could Obvious and identity anyone. The is lack trees As Petitions sedan with an incident could say they will unite completely fine and oh yeah Olguna role playing as bit of is going to be a bit of residency. I think i meant to take Again i'm not use to taking time to Relax you know. Visualize you know like call myself and i realized now that I forget i'm used to it. It's like practice in all. You have to without preparation times. So i think in a way that starts from behind My diving so anyone is interested in getting Professional harness that something to take into consideration. I think it's also true instruct ching and then getting to try to take a tough shift of face all right. Let's let's start to wind things up here and we are going to get into these desert island questions that i i did. I did send them to you. Yeah i like god. I'm so bad at. Always get to this and i'm like hang on a minute. I didn't send questions did i. Now i'm gonna have to put you on the spot but for you. I actually did send you them in advance. So he didn't if he had put me on the spot on the iphone also all right. Well let's fire into the What would be your perfect morning routine. This section of the podcast desert island questions on the patriot extended version of the show. You can find out which three books this person would take to a desert island where he would go and plan if you could travel back in time to anywhere and what would eat if they could only eat one thing for the rest of their lives. If you wanna find out the answers to these fun questions sign up at patriotair dot com slash free dot cafe. Alright so yeah. Thank you so much for answering questions Louisa already had you here for an epic time just before we finish up completely If people want to follow you or you know get in touch with you for services what what are your websites and social media and all that kind of thing so.

Olguna meyer obesity desert island Louisa
"louisa" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

The Freedive Cafe Podcast

01:41 min | 11 months ago

"louisa" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

"They would stop doing. I think to could turn umbrella. I would say that we may only to eat one side of the bed and be confident that in our busy also in If he did nothing wrong. I think that would be you know having sutton about tennessee. Having in a guaranteed sex just i used to scoop docking. Shut scuba diving. ns time. These i still remember the sector checks that we used to do. Safety checks texted used to do Because i did it silently times and it takes seconds things that we can just be more well off.

"louisa" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

The Freedive Cafe Podcast

07:50 min | 11 months ago

"louisa" Discussed on The Freedive Cafe Podcast

"Ok- before we get into that Free diving safety stuff louisa. I want to find out a little bit more about your background. So maybe you could just tell myself from the listeners like Grow your from and you know how you came from being. You know young louisa wherever you grew up to ending up in this wonderful international world of free diving. She grew up in london. So anyway the see but i was one of those kids went sort of line. The boston home my breasts. I enjoy swimming classes all that much but my my paternal grandmother might dad's mum she She hadn't house by seeing my irish granny and she would always get us into the sea so my dad my granny on on his side and my brother and i you know we got on the kid would be in the law and yeah. I always enjoyed enjoyed I didn't come to free diving tellers about eighty six. I started scuba diving. When i was around gonna stay twenty two. I miss Australia on. I had a few months left in the country. And i. I made a list of the things that i definitely had to do that. and scuba diving with with top. The list that was i went up to kansas Working on on a scuba diving boat there. And then i continue travelling. I came across freeze on Scuba diving instructor when i was living in an article So that would have been in about two thousand than say i I heard Tiny streeter And she i think had broken record in two thousand and two she still has. I believe and you know. I'd never really heard about free dining and Just a little bit with my the my boyfriend. At the time we Today off from teaching scuba diving we would. We would go and and find way to get into the sea and we dive down to pick up rocks and modern exciting both sides seeing how i think back now we would type events and i it was crazy but but i you know that was the first time i came across apnea as an activity course talking dozen twelve now. I'm a little bit confused here. Because i just tell you well. I just started the the video chat with you. Always start with a little bit of video and didn't start feed Thirty six but you. You look like you might be thirty six. So are you are you. Are you blessed with You know longevity in your looks and sitting in at nine forty four be forty five in. May you said you don't you don't look. I was sure you would even younger than me. Actually so i was like wait a minute. Them out the mass. Don't add up here So but Okay well In that case i'm with you okay so you you took your first free diving course in two thousand twelve did you just say and was not hub which is very much mindset here in was always the two thousand twelve. It was The hop i was lucky enough to have lots of ericsson. Is my instructor. talent begin. To course she probably who doesn't really wouldn't already been still dying again courses in those days. But i was lucky enough to have her so she was already really excellent instructor. Previous world-record-holder i sweden in static. And just the next excellent free data as she. She linda kennedy atop the first year scientists. Yup the so many like almost like your your generation that came out of Luton linda's school so many of you guys of of interviewed on the show. Yeah yeah i mean they. They were really pioneers in in that world and here in here in and the fact that they both women as well you know really and they still still such great. I'm coaches and running. Schools and i was very fortunate to have to have my initial training with with them. 'cause i said had linda adulated stage. He came in and told me his my three mind foresaw. I was very fortunate to stop with a really excellent basis in free diving with with those and did you do then move into a deep diving and training for deep free diving yourself. Did you get involved in competition. Seen as an athlete or have you stayed more on the ken of the education and the safety and behind the scenes. Kind of thing. I started when i did that. Cost was still living in london. And i had I had a bit of a A cloud that say over my head at that point in london. I really felt like there was something missing from my life and i needed. I needed to spend some time in the sea. So i came to scuba dive that i did. This of course exceed just for two weeks and on that just really kind. Kindness earned is in ten things around for me. I immediately found enough with free diving. I think off to that cross. I count on Ended up at about seventy three meters within the week. That i did my big aniko since that i went back to london. I came back in december that year but to hop on. I did my three on my eighty. Four mica mazdas program am. I think i was sent down in like forty six meters. And then i came back again. I was free lot. So i was able to to travel on a head quiet periods on came back in may I think i did a competition safety course. Little bit of safety on many call. they're running. I came again in august so like a year later on august. Two thousand and thirteen accumulated a training camp. Johnny sons and on the back of that. I then did a couple of competitions because it was getting really well for me people at that point training for the world championships in kalamata two thousand fifteen september and so a lot of people around the having this training for that someone had to put the team kosei were injured and people sitting the only widened you. Why didn't you think about competing. Why don't you chance so. I had never been wanted to compete. I didn't really As stretch onto it. But i was kind of swayed into i had to one. Competition dive to qualify. So i did that hearing Fifty meters emotion..

louisa london linda kennedy Luton linda swimming apnea boston kansas Australia ericsson sweden linda kosei kalamata Johnny
Essential Quality Wins 2021 Belmont Stakes

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Essential Quality Wins 2021 Belmont Stakes

"Belmont Stakes, the third leg of the Triple Crown with a covid reduced crowd, cheering them on down the stretch. Essential quality pulled away from the pace setting hot Rod Charlie with the nature of a mile to run to win by a length and a quarter, finishing a distant 3rd 11 lengths back was Preakness winner Rombauer sent off as the 65 favorite essential quality becomes the 11th Belmont winner in the last 20 years to skip the Preakness. After running in the Kentucky Derby Eclipse Award winning trainer Brad Cox picks up his first Triple Crown victory, as does Jackie. Louisa is Brad Kelly Is

Rod Charlie Belmont Stakes Rombauer Brad Cox Kentucky Jackie Louisa Brad Kelly
The Power of Visualization

Life Transformation Radio

00:10 sec | 1 year ago

The Power of Visualization

"I'm joined by Ruth young Louisa, we're going to discuss how to inspire others to believe in the power of visualization. And how to overcome things. You never thought you could,

Ruth Young Louisa
Let Loose After Lockdown: London's Best Gallery Shows

The Art Newspaper Weekly

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Let Loose After Lockdown: London's Best Gallery Shows

"Louisa. This is the second time we've had a sort of major release from lockdown. How do you feel this time. Majorly released it has to be said. I think this time because the last lockdown was so grim so dark so awful with knows that of timeframe attached. I think this time. It's it's a great feeling of release. The great feeling excitement to be seeing onto gang. We've been gazing at those wretched screens for too long. It's so lovesick up close and physical with artworks again. I don't know about you. But the last time in last june when the galleries opened only remember being sort of accelerated to see the art but also incredibly fearful. We didn't know so much. Perhaps about the virus at that stage the vaccine programs hadn't started. I was almost overcome with fear before. And i don't feel that next time. Feel like i really am genuinely relishing. Opportunity finally to get back in and looking at what you think that loads expression new normal but i think we have learned to clinic. Manage it manager anxiety. Each of us are different. Sponsors different thresholds. But somehow everybody seems less paranoid in in the galleries. There a little bit more relaxed about you. Coming observing all the social distancing. But there's not that sort of tight lipped white knuckle field. People really excited to be showing that arte gain for you to be coming in and appreciating. It's i think there is a general kind of exhale dying on and a love of looking here. That's a really good way of putting. It isn't ex. Haley says of sense of every body just coming together for a for a positive moment and you've had conversations with dealers to that effect. I mean i was in say because who sneakily opened in other western gallery in bury. St by the way with this opening mba galleries. She has houses. Rodney nonni. Beautiful to glass horses annexed. Great big exuberant boulder shaped canvases on the walls. And she's so excited to be showing people work. I mean let's not forget auditors. Get demonized but yeah the really good ones want people to see that. They don't want to sell it. They want to show it. They want to support their

Louisa Rodney Nonni Haley
How Ellen Louise Curtis Demorest Changed The U.S Fashion Industry

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:55 min | 1 year ago

How Ellen Louise Curtis Demorest Changed The U.S Fashion Industry

"Ellen louise. Curtis was born on november fifteenth. Eighteen twenty four in schuylerville new york to henry de curtis electra. Able she was the second of eight children was a farmer and the owner of a men's hat factory family lived a comfortable life made more lively each summer by dramatic influxes of tourists. Each year notable members of society would make their way to nearby. Toga springs ellen. Later wrote that the visitors turned typically dull surroundings into places that present the spectacle of a grand reunion of wealth fashion and beauty out of doors from a young age. Ellen was interested in fashion. after graduating from school. Ellen's father helped her harness her interest into a career via women's shop of her own. The millenary shop was quite successful and after a year. Ellen moved the shop to troy new york. And then to brooklyn in eighteen. Fifty-eight ellen married william jennings demorest a thirty six year old widower with two children. The couple would also have two children of their own a son in eighteen fifty nine and a daughter in eighteen sixty five. The family moved to philadelphia where they ran an emporium. It was there that ellen's career really took off as the story goes ellen and her sister kate or working on a system of dress making when they saw their african american made cutting address pattern out of brown paper ellen was inspired by the idea to create tissue paper patterns of fashionable garments for the home sewer some historians refute that the idea originated with ellen and her maid and instead suggest it was i had by a man who had become ellen's rival ellen's family moved back to new york and began manufacturing patterns. They also opened a women's store on broadway in the fall of eighteen. Sixty ellen and her husband became selling paper patterns and publishing quarterly. Catalog called mirror of ellen. Higher journalist and women's rights advocate jane cunningham croly to work for the publication. The magazine was filled with sewing tips and tricks pictures of accessories. Sheet music poetry and fiction. Each issue included a tissue paper pattern and sewing instructions. The magazine was well timed and circulation. Grew quickly a sewing. Machines were then becoming commonplace in middle class homes the magazine also featured contributors including writers julia. Wardhaugh louisa may alcott and robert louis. Stevenson ellen frequently made strong statements in the magazine and support of women in the workplace. She also took firm stance on domestic abuse prison reform and mental health treatment among other topics as the cadillac business. Thrived ellen and williams brick and mortar store on broadway. Grew to ellen and her sister. Kate adapted foreign styles into patterns and made samples for the store. The store is fashion. Openings became major social events ellen. And william store was also notable for the couple's hiring practices. They hired african. Americans at the store on equal terms as white employees long before integrated workplaces were a norm in eighteen. Seventy six ellen became a founding member of cirrhosis. the first professional women's club in the united states throughout that decade while most businesses were failing ellen and her family continued to do well according to historians up to three million patterns. Were mailed each year but ellen success didn't last forever in the eighteen eighties. Ellen's empire began to decline ellen and william had failed to patent their paper patterns a competitor ebeneezer butterick had done so successfully at first butterick stuck to men's and children's ware but by eighteen sixty seven he'd expanded to women's patterns to ebenezer butterick company remains the center of the paper pattern industry today in eighteen. Eighty five william demerist retired to devote himself to the temperance movement. that year. He ran for lieutenant governor of new york. On the prohibition ticket a decade later in eighteen ninety five he died that same year allen suffered a stroke and was left bedridden. She moved into the hotel renaissance new york where she died of a cerebral hemorrhage on august tenth. Nine eight she was seventy three years old ellen. Louise demerist took her love of fashion and made it accessible. To the everyday woman in revolutionizing the fashion industry she also committed herself to the betterment of opportunities for both white and black women though she failed to patent patterns. Her impact is still apparent today.

Ellen Ellen Louise Schuylerville Henry De Curtis Electra Toga Springs William Jennings Demorest New York Jane Cunningham Croly Wardhaugh Louisa Robert Louis Stevenson Ellen The Magazine Curtis Williams Brick William Store Brooklyn Alcott Kate Philadelphia
Sexy is Timeless With Luisa Diaz

Cafe con Pam Podcast

05:10 min | 1 year ago

Sexy is Timeless With Luisa Diaz

"Luisa the welcome to come see us fan Saddest On people well-meant went guantanamo's kenneth lisa. What's your heritage come from who kansas louisa. Well kidneys louisa is trying to figure it out. But i i tell you what i am and what i've been doing what doing so i am not enough from venezuela in i grew up in venezuelan with my grandparents with i adore magnum weather. I grew up in small town in venezuela though what the super super state and they have the opportunity to come to the united states. And then some i came here to study. I went to the university to four business when i came here. Didn't know how to speak english at all in a hear about that. You didn't either an idea exactly what you may show one of your blood. 'cause i wanted to learn so bad so i wanted to surround myself with people that only speak english because i wanted to ask so. It wasn't very hard challenged. Because when i went to college didn't know how to speak english at all i so i knew in. Ibm it goes. I guess he'll was in noise Yes so but i didn't give up. I finished my education which was So so so happy and telling you a little bit about me from venezuela combing In had done so many other. Great things that you're going to be asking reward about it but you want me to answer the specific questions seven steps news. Okay good question. i can't him. I got married my first mary. I and my sick of marriage. Now when i met my hus- every though so i will have because my husband used to work for the american embassy in meeting in my country when i was ecstatic in one of the university concert that that was administered. Minnesota was beautiful lone That you here panda venezuela unfortunately very very sad contouring. Now people that really hungry that is not venezuela i grow up the minnesota eyebrow was a beautiful country has beautiful memories of my country. Anees very sad to see the country. The people desperate this matter saying is not the same by that is not when you are hungry on the is doing nothing for you. You know people lose the dignity people whose fact people lose who they are is like you said different things is that the footing is likely john gordon. My concert right now on his breaks my heart by amid my husband there in move here in continue with my education so that was the freeze tonight. Came him so you met him there and then he was like it's time to move back home anthems banana. Who does yes. We got married in my country and then via allows magnon. No noise is so funny but cook when the when i met my husband ex husband you know. He wasn't typical american told Blue is very hansel. I guess he has the most beautiful blue eyes is like. I was saying lowest. Lou is by didn't know how to speak spanish in. I didn't know how to speak english so when we met. He says ola senior double nita us like okay. So we went out a few timelines for launch. He used to pick me out for launch in. We launched and we'll look each other and we couldn't speak with assist mile. It was so cute in. We need that like a couple. Moore's acrimony guests at the ultra takeover. Nicotiana kimmy get it. I see it knows or he does he hope one day i said to hindu nowak. Don't call me don't call me anymore. I need to speak to you. I need to talk to you. Glad continual and so he was very sad in three months. He called me back. He was speaking spanish separately. Sap cohe layer is finding by himself. She in the newspaper bowl. So classes i Three mosey call me and louisa. Komo is task unit seat on more. Saudi yo who is there who is this. So yeah and how our love story star mary. Yeah

Venezuela Kenneth Lisa Luisa Louisa Guantanamo Kansas American Embassy IBM John Gordon United States Minnesota Nicotiana Kimmy OLA LOU Nowak Moore SAP Komo Saudi
"louisa" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"louisa" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"Had i been inspired by a book but it felt now in hindsight like very retroactive. That like someone would tell me. Oh it's kinda reminds me a little bit of this and then i would like latch onto that compensate. Like yeah of course. It's like that. Even though i had never read that book sorta thing Yeah but definitely like i. I wish that there was a book that had kind of given me a little bit more guidance that i had read and felt like oh this is the kind of course i wanna however this is the kind of writer i want to be but i just never ever really found one i think and so after all those Tries at manuscripts you have your debut coming out on february. Twenty third like home. It's called so. I gimme the synopsis of what the books about. Yeah so like home. I always like to refer to it as my story about friends family community and what it means to change. It is a sixteen year old girl named cello who she loves her neighborhood so much but then one day. There's like an active vandalism. That happens to neighborhood store that's owned by one of her best friends and she kind of goes into the spiral where it's like like she feels like. Oh i know this place. I've grown up here but suddenly the cracks starting to show and she really has to come to terms with the idea of like. Is this the place. I thought it was are the people around me the people that i thought they were like her. Perception of her neighborhood is changing her relationships with friends or changing all of these things and she really is just like fighting against at every point learning. I think who she is. And how she fits into the fabric of what her neighborhood is becoming. And what was that initial idea that when you were finished that project number four returned to this one. What was that thing that you kinda hung onto an and wanted to kind of explore. They got you writing this entire story. Yeah it's so weird. Because time i described the story. I'm like it's this and there's all these themes in it's great but then whenever i talk about the inspiration i was like oh. I watched a korean drama on cry at the ending. And then i was like oh i really wanna write a story like that I will take a step back and just explain a bit better though When i grew up like i grew up in a neighborhood i grew up in a city. West of toronto called mississauga and the neighborhood. I grew up in. There is very to the kind of neighborhood that i came up with in my book on. They grew up in was a lot more boring than the neighborhood of my book like there weren't any businesses except at the end of the street. it was just all residential. There's a park lots of kids. There was a school but myself and my friends. We were all very close in what i'm realizing. Now is probably not very typical like we all on the same street. Our parents all kind of knew each other. We all want the same school. We played together all the time like we were very very close and it was also interesting because my parents immigrated from nigeria. A lot of families on the street also immigrated from different parts of the world so it was like we would go to school together in the kids and then they will come to my house and like my parents had probably never interacted that closely with anyone from any of these countries but they would learn a lot from these kids and then like they will learn a lot from our neighbors and we all..

nigeria mississauga february sixteen year old Twenty third cello korean toronto lots of kids one day four project one
"louisa" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"louisa" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"I want to write a book or whatever and i think from there. I kind of begin to conceptualize. Maybe like what an author is what a writer is and all of that. Yeah it's strange. Now that you mention like very much was into telling stories and writings and stories to reading them interesting and could you mentioned like in your high school years when you were going through your reading. The classics phase. Was there kind of one or two. That stood out that you really remember enjoying. Yeah i did like as much as i was kind of okay on shakespeare. I really like off fellow reason Twelfth night as well. I really liked and then the catcher in the rye which i've come to note like recently i guess it's a pretty controversial choice for like favorites sort of is like i have not read in a very long time but i remember reading it in high school and feeling like this is like it was very easy for me to read like i run the whole thing. Like an evening I liked the voice. Like i know that holton as the main character like he is quite annoying and just the way that he goes on about nothing but i thought that was really cool. That i was reading a book and i was getting like. There's a reaction coming at me based on this character. Because i don't think prior to that moment. I don't think that it ever happened before. Like i would just read stuff and be like osas cool and then continue reading but that was the first time that i was like oh man like this kid. He's like really going through a lot. Like whatever the case says. Yeah but i think that that kind of was like in high school and so at what point what event or just and what stage of your life did you move beyond. Just your love story kind of recreationally. I'll say to really coming up with the idea of being committed to..

two one first time catcher in the rye Twelfth night shakespeare
"louisa" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"louisa" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"This is what book cook do you. I'm brian kelly and thanks for listening this week. I have debut author. Louisa who's first book like home is out on february the twenty third and so in this conversation we get into how she kind of got into writing her journey of writing this book in particular what inspired it and how it came to be so listening so louise what book hooked you It's so funny. I had to think long and hard about this because growing up. I feel like it's a little bit like blasphemous to say maybe but i was never the biggest reader so there was one book series that i'm sure everybody knows about like very popular series growing up That was the one that i read obsessively But i think another book that really stood out to me When i was like in elementary school versus when i read it and then maybe middle school but it's clockwork by philip pullman. Which is like. I don't know because i don't know many other people like obviously people have to have read the book but i don't know many people who talk about it like they always talk about his his dark materials serious and i've never read. That of clockwork is kind of like I want to know more than my page is really short. It's like a middle grade sort of chapter book size and it is about if i can remember clearly. A it's about it's like it's one of those things where there's multiple stories in one so it's like someone is telling a story and the story he's telling then becomes like the main story you'd like kind of like come to life in comes back like it's hard. I'm not doing a good job explaining. Like i always loved it because it was because i thought it was cool. How he he was able to like. Tell two stories at the same time Really stood out to me is something that i'm like. Oh why how did he come up with this like. It seemed very intense to come up with me like as a kid reading it But yeah. I think that's probably the one book that i'm like. I wish i could mitigated. Inspired me a lot but also i wish i could bright something similar and because you kind of said that you weren't a huge reader necessarily as a kid. What was the circumstances behind this book. Do you have any recollection as to why this stood out for you so much. For what got you reading this book along those lines..

philip pullman Louisa brian kelly february first book one book two stories this week one twenty third one of those things
Storytellers: Harriet Jacobs

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:10 min | 1 year ago

Storytellers: Harriet Jacobs

"Although the veracity of her story was challenged for decades are storyteller of the day is now recognized as the true author of her work. We're talking about harriet jacobs. Harriet jacobs was born in eighteen. Thirteen endan north carolina to delilah and daniel jacobs. Both her mother and father were enslaved. Her grandmother had been emancipated by her former enslavers. When harry it was six her mother died and she was left in the care of her enslavers. Margaret horn blow margaret taught her to read and write an uncommon practice for the time but when harriet was twelve her fortune changed. Margaret passed away and instead of emancipating. Harriet bequeath. terry her three-year-old niece. mary matilda nor calm. Harriet subsequently moved into the nor com household. A family that did not share margaret's relatively more progressive views within three years. Though harry it was just a young teenager she had become the sexual fixation of mary's father. Dr james nor com. His sexual harassment was unrelenting and he refused to allow harry to marry. It was then. Harriet made a calculated decision. She decided to return the advances of another white man. A local lawyer by the name of samuel treadwell sawyer. She hoped that bearing the children of a different white man with spur her master into a rage her goal was to drive doctor nor com to sell her. Her plan did not succeed after bearing two of sawyers children dr nor com punished. Harriet by sending her to do backbreaking labor on his plantation while they're harriet. She fled to her grandmother's house and hit an crawlspace. Harriet remained in hiding at her grandmother's for seven years. During this time she revised her plan. Harriet wrote letters to dr nor com falsely claiming. She described to the north. This time around. She hoped dr nor comet sell her children to their father. Eventually this plan came to fruition and sawyer bought both of his children back from dr nor com soon after sawyer was elected to the house of representatives and moved with the children to washington. Dc desperate to reunite with her children. Harriet to fled north while searching for her children. Harriet found work. As a nurse. Made for the abolitionist. Nathaniel parker willis and his wife cordelia willis dr nor com continued to pursue harriet and. She was frequently forced to go into hiding often relocating between boston and new york eventually in one thousand fifty two the willis family was able to bhai harriet freedom during her time in the north. Harriet became involved with a feminist abolitionist group. It was there that she met. Amy post amy taken with harriet. Personal journey recommended that she read a book about her life. Harry agreed and decided to write her autobiography. Under the pen name brent. Her book called incidents in the life of a slave girl was published in eighteen. Sixty one with the rise of the american civil war. The book quickly faded from public discourse and remained relatively unknown for the rest of heriot's. Its lifetime harry. It was eventually reunited with her daughter. Louisa during the civil war. Harriet worked to aid former slaves who arrived as refugees in washington. Dc dedication to the recently emancipated community. Brought harriet back to the south in eighteen sixty five. Harriet and louisa settled in savannah georgia to continue relief efforts but due to persistent racial persecution forced to flee north once more this time harriet settled in cambridge massachusetts or she opened a boarding house. Not much is known about the final chapters of harry. It's life but we do know that she eventually returned to washington. Dc with her daughter. It was there that harriet died in eighteen. Ninety seven she was eighty four years old. It wasn't until the feminist movements of the nineteen sixties and seventies that incidents reappeared. Initially it sparked controversy. The books editor lydia. Marie child was a white woman. Common thought at the time was the autobiography was actually a novel written by child in one thousand nine hundred. Eighty seven historian. Jean fagin yellen corrected that narrative with her annotated edition of incidents yellen lays bare at the true identity of the author and the limited role child played in publishing the original manuscript at long last. Harry its name was attached to her work. Her role as auto biographer transformed. The significance of the taxed inherits writings. She describes her state of mind. She rejected the advances of dr nor calm in favor of sam sawyer. She explicitly discusses using her sexuality. As a tool to manipulate the white men who sought to further subjugate her harry it also acknowledges the judgement she received as a woman with two children born out of wedlock in her book. She argues that it is cruel to prescribe nineteenth century. Morality onto enslaved women as their fundamental rights had already been so profoundly violated incidents in the life of a slave girl remains one of the most important books of its kind. It is the only first hand account of the life of an enslaved woman at the time and gives unmatched insight into harry. It's perspective as she fought against forces of sexual and racial oppression in doing so. The autobiography occupies a unique space in both african american and feminist literature

Harriet Harriet Jacobs Harry Daniel Jacobs Margaret Horn Harriet Bequeath Mary Matilda Dr James Samuel Treadwell Sawyer Margaret Sawyer Nathaniel Parker Willis Cordelia Willis Bhai Harriet Delilah Amy Post Sawyers Washington
Contemporary public art: who is it for?

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:33 min | 1 year ago

Contemporary public art: who is it for?

"Louisa. When i look back over the newspaper dot com archive in in relation to christoph boucle. What i found was a lot of fierce debates mentioned in the articles about him often involving authorities as well as art world people. He wants to create this kind of control. He doesn't need so so tell us about this latest controversy. Why is it such conservancy. It starts off by the venice biennale in two thousand nine hundred nineteen when we will all of us walking through the arsenal and that was a vast rusting boat on the key side. Not in water. That's not an unusual thing to see. It looked kind of weirdly home amongst the other sort of naval paraphernalia around in the snarly but then of course there was no notice nothing to identify it. If diligent you look up in the catalog but unite was very mysterious but of course word of mouth soon came through this was indeed a work and art not a piece of rusting boatlift over by the navy it was balkan nostra it was cooled and it was actually the very boat which had been leaving libya for its louis laden with excess. Don't know how many of the thousands immigrants trying to get it collided with portuguese freighter. Got into trouble and sunk killing everybody. Pretty much on board. I mean it was an absolute atrocity slash disaster. The boat was then taken by the italian navy to sicily where there was an incredible detailed forensic investigation on all of the bodies of the victims many of whom were trapped in the hall of the boat. They'd be impacting. It was it was a trafficking boats. It was a horrific horrific scenario There was a forensic detailed investigations to who the identity of these people were many of their families traced and so they learn to the terrible fate of relatives now. I didn't quite know how this happened. But then time passes from two thousand fifteen. Somehow a deal is struck with the sicilian town of augusta where this both ended up in the naval base to bring it to the venice biennale as an exhibit. Christopher cal had signed a contract with the town of augusta that he could borrow the boat for yeah it would be exhibited has been and then he would return it a year later so the boats there everybody feels extremely conflicted about some people said it was a brilliant idea that shows how decadent the art world is how decadent our world is how uncaring we are. It was kind of appalling. I felt the boat was parked right by the cafe. So you start swinging europe roles and your and your cappuccinos. Perhaps not knowing there was in effect the site of mass atrocity a mass grave. Right beside you. So was it makes us think about our place. In the world on carrying thought about crises unfolding very close to us or was it. An exploitative opportunistic attention seeking Profile raising artwork by christopher. Koop and as you say he does have form in this respect. He's done other things. He's crushed landed a mosque in venice inside the catholic church for another being all for the icelandic pavilion. Several years ago he also set up community centers on controversial other things in tasmania. We'll probably talk about in a minute. So but this was a big one and yes it's very raw and the debate in the controversy still rages but the latest part of. This debate is a year on from the being ali. The boat is still. There is a dispute between the being early organization and bianco and he's gallery well absolutely yes. Because as i said he signed a deal with the city in town of augusta. Maybe you know. Maybe money exchanged hands. I don't know but anyway but the deal was that the boat would then come back to augusta where apparently it was intended to be the centerpiece for memorial park with the consent of the relatives. Also in all kinds of rumblings around the time in the been on it was stated apparently the families had given their permission for this boats to be used or some families are given their permission. I mean gardeners specific. But that will talk of permission. But now there's the boat the biennale a now say they have been hassling buco since november last year to bring this boat back to honor his agreement to honor the contract with cillian town of august. Gustave saying they want the boat back as well now sources close to buco say that because he never talks to the press which is another thing we can talk about minute They say apparently the boat was damaged in transit coming venice so it's going to be impossible until the cradle support is fixed for it to come back again to augusta so buco is now trying to get insurance to pay for this either from the benaroya. Who said no go away or probably problem rudely or indeed from the shipping company. But i mean. I would say that you know only ethics about whether you actually share bin ali or not. I felt squeamish. I think we're dead. People are concerned it starts to get very problematic. Any put all those ethics to one side. You honor the agreement to the families you on the agreement to the place from whence you lent it and if and if the cradle got caught up and pay for it or you make your gary who house involved not show for penny or two to cough up and pay for it you know. I draw lines more lines in the sand. Whatever want feels about artworks raising profile of terrible crises. Apparently there's talk about taking the boat to brussels to show how come the the eu have been ignoring the immigration crisis. I mean lofty motives. But you know this is a place where over thousand people died.

Christoph Boucle Augusta Christopher Cal Venice Biennale Venice Italian Navy Louisa Libya Sicily Biennale Navy Koop Bianco Tasmania Catholic Church Christopher Memorial Park Europe Cillian Gustave
There's not enough internet for remote learning to go around

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

02:44 min | 1 year ago

There's not enough internet for remote learning to go around

"This fall, we've been talking every Monday about education and technology during this pandemic including how access to high speed Internet and devices is just not cutting it across the country and there's new data on this in our latest marketplace Edison Research poll thirty percent of parents or guardians with kids. Online and making less than fifty thousand dollars say their Internet access is inadequate for online school marketplace's Scott Tong reports from Virginia on the broadband gap in central Virginia's Louisa County working mom Megan duck gets her two daughters online for school. By getting in the car they drive to a Wifi. Spot School district has set up in the Strip mall parking lot and here you can see a small jury rig flatbed trailer with solar panels powering electronics that send out an internet signal and from the car they log on the zoom. If we know like if their teachers say we have to do something we have to go to the Wifi spot because you couldn't even begin to logging on the website. Not. From home where they have just one choice for Internet service satellite, it's costly and it's not reliable doesn't work if it wind blows that doesn't work also at the hotspot. Today is fifth grader oriented Nestor Riding Shotgun next to her grandma in their suv, her online class. Let's her message the teacher for the box. It just POPs up on your computer win where at school it got good editor at their. At you need help you get acid they'll bested U. back. When your home. Do. You ever wish you could send a message yes I do. Her family has no broadband at home a reality for one third of rural Americans according to a recent

Spot School District Megan Duck Virginia Edison Research Scott Tong Strip Mall Louisa County Editor
The Four Remembrances

Tara Brach

05:43 min | 1 year ago

The Four Remembrances

"NAMA. Stan welcome. When I was in college many many many many decades ago. i. read the series of books that were written by Carlos Causton Yada about the Shaman Don, I know many of you. are familiar with them and had many takeaways but perhaps the most memorable. was built into this little quote right here. The Shaman Don Juan's teaching. How can anyone feel so important when we know that death the stocking us the thing to do when you're impatient. is to turn to your left and ask advice from your. An immense amount of pettiness dropped if you're death makes a gesture to are if you catch a glimpse of it. Are Few just have the feeling that your companion is there watching you. And A men's amount of pettiness dropped if you're death makes a gesture. So, this notion of death as an adviser is one that really actually goes through many many spiritual traditions. It's the wisdom of impermanent. and. When we open to remembering the truth that the slice of life is a flash, it's coming and going our perspective shifts in a very dramatic and usually very, very wholesome way. All pettiness falls away. And I was reminded of this. Recently I was Jonathan we're having dinner with a couple and one and one of them. The man said that he asked himself most days. How would today be different if I asked advice for my dad? What would I remember? What would be important today and he's just use that as one of his daily practices. And I think it's a really powerful one if we say, well, how would The rest of this day. If we really were paying attention to the reality that this life is command going and we don't know when. So, typically, we don't remember to tap into that wisdom we get into what I often call that that daily per transfer. Our concerns are way way narrow way small. Some years ago I saw this cartoon and it's got a graveyard and the bubble that you're reading coming up from under the ground. and. It says, Hey, I, think I finally decide what to do with my life. This is the caption pushes the late. Envelope to exciting new levels. Remembering what matters? So it's an all wisdom traditions, but I know that Since since college and it's deepened from in growing up that the more that I am. Intimately a radically sensing. Okay. This body mind is here now and it's going. Really the more I open to love. There's a there's a direct correlation to remembering death an opening to love. And it came clear in a certain way. When I was at a meditation retreat with harm and I went with a very dear friend and we had both been quite busy in our lives and we're thrilled that we're GONNA be able to take off a weekend and go to this retreat that was only a few hours away Virginia. And it was a lovely retreat. At the end of it took not Han it everybody get into pairs. buddied up with my Louisa, WHO's happens to be a teacher in our community here and he said, okay. Now, what the first thing to do is to bow and say Nam Nam Astaire's means I, see the the divine, the later or the sacred in you. So we did that then he said, hug each others who are hugging each other and he said now on the first breath as you're breathing reflect I'm going to die. I'M GONNA die in the second breath you're GonNa die you're. And then on the third and we have just these precious moments together. So. We did that we looked at each other and there was a level of. Presence and intimacy and love that was so fresh. It was so fresh. It was not an idea about loving. There were no barriers there was just in the face of hey. We've got these moments. The the loving that was always there just manifested in its full flesh. So love and presence in death and I don't think that at all as grim. into the slightest are at all as. You Know Morose. It's. It's really. The whole spiritual path is one of remembering and forgetting you've probably noticed. That we, we get inspired we get in touch with something we quiet down, we sent some wonders beauty or some tenderness. Oh. Yeah. This is why I do this stuff.

Nam Nam Astaire Don Juan Carlos Causton Virginia Jonathan HAN
Louisa Thomas on the Fractured World of Tennis

No Challenges Remaining

05:01 min | 1 year ago

Louisa Thomas on the Fractured World of Tennis

"Welcome to no challenges remaining I'm Ben Rothenberg, and I'm thrilled to be joined once again on the show this year by Louisa Thomas of the New Yorker Louisa thank you for being back. We were both in DC when we last recorded, I think in February or so in my apartment. Right, early days of the pandemic I know in the early March even like right when things we saw it on horizon. Now I don't even have that apartment. And you're living in DC more full-time now and life has changed a lot and we're currently doing this from the same city different parts of DC. On Zoom. So Louisa thank you for being one of these calls. I. Will Look Forward to most today of my probably seven eight him calls today. So you have this piece of today in the New Yorker which I know you've been working on for a long time it's a very comprehensive peace about basically everything's happened since we last podcast did and also on I will thank you again for this throughout the show. But you also kind enough to come on a roundtable show. We did after the press conference that day which I want having to scrap because I waited like forty eight hours and a lot of things would you describe the peace happened which changed the tennis world typically in that time namely that Adria tour that derailing so I'm curious for you. What you were as you were trying to process tennis, they don't even too much about tennis during this time period. So as you were trying to synthesize in process tennis in everything happening Dennis for the last five months, just describe the challenge that of of trying to figure out where to start what to include, how to how to make it. All make sense as a as a writer writing for missing largely a non tennis audience. I mean I I feel like the piece looks very different than what I had originally envisioned. I mean it's sort of the story of near the pandemic for me, what I what I originally imagined. In my life was going to look like. Back in March is not at all the case you know in in March I thought, Oh, I'm gonNA write a piece about. You know about these different parts of the tennis ecosystem and how they're you know how they exist during the during the pandemic because during the shutdown because I had, you know obviously as sunset, the Tennessee is a very kind of fragmented sporting a lot of ways that the experience of a top player is not at all like the experience the double specialists, which is not at all the experience of a lower ranked player, which is not at all experienced a coach or an empire or Y- that there's A. Great Diversity of experiences. So I was originally going to do this kind of like daisy chain vignette anecdotal piece. Which I did these little portraits of people in my original idea had been to situate each each person at at Indian Wells when they learned that the tournament had been canceled and that was the piece I said about to right and actually that was the piece I originally did right? I mean this piece has gone undergone like many many many pro. You know the interest in that and I was sort of pretty happy with that approach and I think that actually one of the underlying ideas of the piece is that there is this kind of. This there's like I said this fragmentation and that was definitely reflected in that piece as well. But what happened was that like actually things started happening And what you're describing in terms of like US recording podcast and then immediately having to scrap it because you know just things change. So fast that was actually the experience of this piece as well. We were set to we were talking about running at the end of. May. Kind of in anticipation of some news of tennis coming back or not coming back or anything then. And then the protests happened and obviously the gravity of that I mean there was none of that in the piece of point. Obviously. So the gravity of that need us think well, maybe we should you know hold off for a couple of days. This is not like A. Timely piece, it can run whenever. So let's let's wait until. Maybe also think about incorporating some of tennis's response and things like that. And then you know so I kind of that piece ready. Ready to go with that, and then the US Open announced or levers like rumors about the announcement. So I was like. Well, let's hold off for that and then. You know kind of reworking at each at each stage like rewriting it and reworking and talking to more people, and you know doing a little more reporting and also just rethinking more and more about what this like this process is said about tennis and so yeah, I, mean, this piece took on many massive revisions not just because of the quality of writing any piece undergoes a lot of work. But this one I felt like I kept having to scrap it and start again because something would happen and. The thing. That was heartening though was that there was never something that made me I mean there's always something I was learning from things along the way, but there was never something that made me think I'm completely wrong. Just. Completely off, it did become less and less about kind of individual actors and more and more about how tennis kind of sets up people to be individual actors.

Tennis DC Louisa Thomas United States Ben Rothenberg Indian Wells Writer Dennis Adria Tennessee
Addressing Health Disparities in Puerto Rico

Here & Now

03:39 min | 1 year ago

Addressing Health Disparities in Puerto Rico

"Of the continental US, the covert 19 pandemic is happening as the push for social justice continues. Natasha Alford is a journalist for the Gri Oh, and Pulitzer Center grantee. And she traveled to Puerto Rico shortly after the island's political protests in 2019 to understand another uprising taking place on the land What she calls the Afro Latino revolution. She joins us now. Welcome to hearing now. Thank you so much for having me, Tanya. Yes. And Natasha. What? Through lines? Are you saying between the Afro Puerto Rican community and what's happening in other parts of the country in the protests for racial justice? How does PR's history and culture Play out in the construction of race and racial experiences. Yes. Oh, there's so much to unpack there. But you know, the first thing I'll say is after the death of George Floyd, we immediately saw protest. We saw vigils and we saw memorials in honor of his life right in Puerto Rico, So obviously there was something that really resonated with people there. And specifically in Afro Puerto Rican communities. Now often times when people think of Afro Puerto Rican Sze, they may associate them with just one community. One town one neighborhood. I'll give you an example. Louisa has a really high proportion of residents who identify as Afro Puerto Rican. But the reality is that there are black people everywhere in Puerto Rico. It's just his divers as the United States. And so we saw that what was happening in the continental US was really resonating. It's resonating because there are similarities. What have you found in terms of health disparities without for Latinos and other types of disparities? Do they mirror what we see in the continental United States? Yes, I think that there are parallels, and it makes sense, right? Because well, you think about the history of Puerto Rico. There was slavery there as well. Right? Even though our societies may be different, you know, we think of the continental US we think of segregation and Jim Crow. Ah, lot of people just don't know the history of Puerto Rico and and slavery and the aftermath of how it played out. They often assume that Puerto Rico is a Nyland of racial harmony that it is a racial utopia. The phrase La Grande Familia, Kenya. Is about being one Puerto Rican family. But a lot of people will tell you that that's actually not the case. And so with health disparities, one thing that researchers have found is that darker skinned Puerto Rican Sze report poorer health outcomes. And some of the reasons for that are social treatment. The communities in which they live in are sometimes poorer exposure to social stressors. There's ah great research paper that was written that came out of the University of Puerto Rico by Jose Caravaggio, Quito and S. R Boudreau and they talked about Changing the way that we measure those disparities by changing the language we use. So we often think of black and white in the United States, but they did a study where they asked people to list the shade of their skin tone. When they did that they actually got more information that showed what those health disparities were, and the key was using local language and understanding of race rather than trying to impose the continental US is language when it comes to race. Of course,

Puerto Rico Afro Puerto Rican Sze Afro Puerto Rican University Of Puerto Rico Puerto Rican Sze United States Natasha Alford George Floyd Pulitzer Center Tanya Kenya Louisa Jose Caravaggio R Boudreau Jim Crow
Tommy Orange Reads Louise Erdrich

The New Yorker: Fiction

04:58 min | 1 year ago

Tommy Orange Reads Louise Erdrich

"This month we're going to hear the years of my birth by Louisa Drake, which was published in the New Yorker in January of two thousand eleven growing up in the midst of a large family I had never registered visitations from my presence. At those rare moments when I was alone as something strange. The first time I was aware of it was when I was taken from Betty and putting the White Room. After that occasionally had the sensation that there was someone walking beside me or sitting behind you. Always, just beyond my peripheral vision. The story was chosen by Tommy Orange whose first novel there there was published in two thousand eighteen and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Hi Tony. Hey Deborah. So what made you choose a story by Louis urging for the podcast so you had published, I think last year. Short story of hers called The stone is a pretty short short story and is it was a strange story and it just struck me So when you asked me to choose a story I went looking for another one of hers. She's actually published a lot in the New Yorker because I haven't known her for Short Sir she only as one collection of short stories you don't with pretty massive career, most of her stories started stories and end up in her novels. Yes. That's what I've heard her say and this one just struck me I think it's such a perfect story. In what way is perfect for you. You know what I love that fiction can do is the way it can get inside a consciousness and the way it can push mystery. There's something. So mysterious in this story and I don't necessarily always like magical realism but what Lewis does so well, in a lot of her work is sort of pushing boundaries of reality where it still believable still realism you never are asked to believe too much sort of realism's magic. There's something so strange and mysterious about it and really powerful the sort of cultural touchdowns that she does. So subtly though a native culture plays into it in the way, white culture comes up. Yeah. It's interesting because there is a supernatural component, but it can also be read as almost completely realistic. You can kind of how much you WANNA. Think of this as a kind of allegorical story and how much you want to think of it as real. Yeah. This is exactly what what I love about this story and what Louise doesn't work like I said. And if you've been reading, Lewis worked for most of her writing career at least. I mean, she's definitely one of my favorite writers of all time but I came to her a little bit later in my reading path. It wasn't until I was going to the Institute of American Indian Arts Getting my MFA a lot of native literature I didn't come to until getting into the program I. Sort of came in through a back door reading. Wise. I read a lot of work in translation, but I read love medicine I and just completely fell in love with her work. And do you feel the connection for you is that you have shared native American heritage? Definitely when I first started reading actually was a little bit turned off to some native fiction because it was. So reservation based and I, I have this urban experience but that was just sort of at the beginning of me thinking about native representation what it would look like in my own work the way that she handles bringing in native culture I think is so perfect. There's a clumsy way to do it and she never does it that way. always comes across really organically. and. Do you think that this story the the years of my birthday this characteristic if that main character as we'll discover is actually not native. Yeah I. Think the way that that works for the reader to something. Really Cool. Sort of putting you into a native family as a white character does a lot of work for the story I think. We'll talk more after the story and now here's Tommy Orange reading the years of my birth by Louise urge. The years of my birth. The nurse had wrapped my brother and a blue flannel blanket and was just about to hand him to his mother when she whispered. Oh God there's another one and out I slid half dead. I then proceeded to diner ernest going from slightly pink to a dull grey blue at which point the nurse tried to scoop me into a bed warm by lights. She was stopped by the doctor who pointed out my head and legs. Stepping between and the mother, the doctor addressed her. Mrs Lascher I've something important to say your other child had a congenital deformity and may die. Shall we use extraordinary means to salvage it? She looked at the doctor with utter incomprehension at first then cried. No.

Louise Deborah Tommy Orange Lewis Louis Louisa Drake White Room Pulitzer Prize Institute Of American Indian A Betty Mrs Lascher Tony
13 nuns at Michigan convent die of COVID-19

TIME's Top Stories

02:14 min | 2 years ago

13 nuns at Michigan convent die of COVID-19

"Thirteen religious sisters at a Michigan Convent have died from the Corona virus with twelve sisters passing in the span of a month, the women aged sixty nine to ninety nine were all members of a Felicien, sisters. Convent in Livonia Michigan on Good Friday. The virus took the life of sister. Mary Louisa was ninety nine by the end of the month eleven. Other sisters had passed seventeen more. More were infected, but recovered according to sister, Noel Murray Gabriel. The director of clinical health services for our lady of Hope Province, a thirteenth sister, despite an initial recovery passed away in June the sisters in presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mother Convent in Livonia as well as all of us in the province are still very much dealing with the loss of so many sisters says Suzanne Wilcox. Wilcox English Executive Director of mission advancement for the Felicien Sisters of North America the sisters. All of whom were longtime members of the convent, lived prayed and worked together prior to their retirements. The women had worked as school teachers college professors and principles. Librarians nurses and organised sister. Mary Louisa was Indiana had served as the sunshine person for the local minister, sending Peace Day and birthday cards. Cards to the sisters in the infirmary and obituary reads sister Victoria Marine dykes sixty nine lead nursing students regular trips to the Felicien sisters mission in Haiti sister Rosemary Wallach Eighty six spent eight years working as a secretary in the Vatican Secretary of State Sister Thomas Murray Would Hausky seventy three once led a second grade class to win a national prize and a Campbell's soup commercial competition. The death of the thirteen nuns could be the most serious loss of life experienced by a group of religious women in the United States since the nineteen eighteen influenza pandemic, according to Global Sisters report a nonprofit Catholic News outlet globally at least sixty one felicien sisters have died, but other religious orders have also been struck by the virus with six sisters, dying of covid nineteen at the Our Lady of Convent in Wisconsin in April. The convent closed its doors to visitors in. In March and placed strict restrictions on group activities, but the virus still reached the convent and spread quickly for many sisters who normally pray alongside those who are dying, having to socially distance during a time of grief was difficult. Normally we will share stories about the sister. We have lost during the vigil the night before the funeral says English, but we have been unable to do so. Their collective impact on the community has been and continues to be very deep, says English.

Blessed Virgin Mother Convent Global Sisters Our Lady Of Convent Mary Louisa Suzanne Wilcox Noel Murray Gabriel Michigan Executive Director Of Mission Hope Province English North America Livonia Director Rosemary Wallach Indiana Felicien Haiti Thomas Murray Secretary
Students may not get "the true college experience" this year

Nightside with Dan Rea

01:48 min | 2 years ago

Students may not get "the true college experience" this year

"International students in Massachusetts and across the country may be forced to leave if they're university goes virtual. More from w TVs. Louisa Moeller full classrooms in person debate that used to be Valeria Mendy old is experience at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. I was in shock. I was like, I can't the can's right like he has now the grad student from Mexico says Uncertainty from the pandemic has turned into hyper uncertainty with a new directive from Immigration and Customs enforcement that international students in the U. S will have to leave the country or risk deportation. If their school switched online on Ly Learning. Harvard, for example, had just announced it would hold on ly virtual classes in the fall. What am I gonna do with my with my lease on my apartment when I'm going to go with my furniture? Go back to Mexico. Where am I going to say international students are basically confronted between two choices between risking my own health and, you know, attending in person classes or be deported from the US. Maya Nasser, a PhD student at MIT worries that if she leaves, she won't be allowed back on top of the challenges she could face trying to learn from her home country of Lebanon. Right now open on its passing through an extreme economic crisis. The country is on a brink of Herman. We do not have access to power electricity, InterNAP. Ice is expected to release more guidance later this week. But Sarah Sprites her with the American Council on Education, which represents over 700 colleges and university, says the impact could be huge. So we have over one million students in the U. S that come from other countries on they actually have $41 billion impact on the U. S economy. That was the estimation from

Mexico Valeria Mendy Harvard Kennedy School Of Gove Ly Learning Sarah Sprites Lebanon Louisa Moeller Harvard Massachusetts Immigration And Customs Internap Maya Nasser American Council On Education United States MIT
A Tennis Star Catches COVID-19

No Challenges Remaining

05:27 min | 2 years ago

A Tennis Star Catches COVID-19

"Welcome the no challenges remaining. It is Sunday. June twenty first twenty, twenty I am Ben Rothenberg I was working on posting are editing an episode that I recorded a couple days ago with buddies and frequent guests, this show remobilize into all and Louisa Thomas also this episode for the beginning of it. round table talking about the open their plans etcetera etcetera. Then a couple less than an hour ago, there was a posted popped up. I think I dream and remained Toumani. Join me again hello. Hello. Irene was the first one is. If I saw a post, this poster came up on your instagram feed, and can you describe what you saw instagram? Basically posted a photo of himself with a mask, announcing that he is back in Monaco and tested positive for covid nineteen an he apologized for possibly endangering others so yeah, it was him basically disclosing that he has positive, and as we know agree, gorgeous got back from Croatia where he was playing in the Adria tour and a couple of days before that he was playing in Belgrade as well, so he's playing Novak store, and yeah, and we mentioned that obviously on the podcast we recorded two days ago. I it it should be noted that we've seen many patriots of Griego over the past couple of weeks. But that's the first pitcher. We've seen what I'm wearing a mosque. Stu Point to money no I think. Yeah, so this is sort of tenses. Thing hopefully it get to a Rudy Gobert moment in tennis where Gregoire realized I have nothing fallen close attention, paying close attention to the Adria tour, but grew on court yesterday a Saturday in Croatia playing a match inside our Croatia as part of this Adria series traveling around the Balkans he was in. Serbia and we talked about this. A bunch on the show and I think I will probably still. Post the show recorded before, but I feel like this will change the tenor of its I want to post these. Get this one up I throw show that we are connected to reality more than maybe the other episode from two days ago because I think as Louisa, early people say on the show like. In these times a lock change short period of time, this is obviously a big moment for tennis. One that I think it's fair to say that we all feared was very possible with looking at Adria series, which is exhibition event sort of started by Novak Djokovic determined director. Quote Unquote was Georgia Djokovic of ex brother. It was being held in Belgrade and a few other planned stops around the Balkans They just actually after the news of Dmitrov positive test. They just can't sold the final match of today's session in. Montenegro which was supposed to host next weekend had already said thanks, but no thanks to Adria tour canceled their leg of the event. We sort of imagined Asia tour, which was an event. Whichever one you twenty? How about you described? He described what what we saw because he posted a bunch of photos. From recent days what Adrian Tour Bend like the got people concerned something this. Business was sending. The optics are not good. Let's put it charitably that way. Yes essentially what we've seen is What is a very regular event in very abnormal times you know? Whether it's you look on twitter on on streams on on Youtube big crowds in the stadium at Novak's Club scene players. And hands and invading each other's personal space and Interacting with fans you've seen videos of. Them are on the out in a club stripping together. and. Will these images that would be normal in normal times, but these aren't normal times, and it makes you cringe a bit. And so there there there's been tons of criticism and. Of course. Rich kind of. Received a lot of criticism for an we actually spoke. To US ball. And he said kind of that. He's aware of the criticism from the West. But you know what while things may be bad in the UK or the, us, it's not. It's not the same in Serbia. And, yeah, and for that reason you know people have been kind of reacting to that and reacting badly, and that's kind of where we. Can I add? They also had a kids day. That had a lot of kids. We've seen the photo of that as well and they've had a football match, and they've had a basketball match in Croatia. They went to a concert with Donovan John August the new version others the other day, and the thing is you have players who came from countries. Who aren't Serbia and Croatia in that? You have you have players someone like Gregoire? Who flew from the states, then winces Bulgaria, possibly also to Monaco. You also have such as Vera. Vera who's traveling from different places Sasha's also saddlebrook for quite a big portion of the quarantine time you have people traveling from different places, and they got off the plane, and you see the video of them getting off the plane and immediately hugging Novak, and immediately being welcomed people into walking around the no masks I don't understand how you can get a flight and already know that that person that person didn't have time to get tested, so that already was

Croatia Novak Serbia Gregoire Louisa Thomas Belgrade Georgia Djokovic Tennis Monaco Adria Montenegro Ben Rothenberg Vera Adrian Tour Bend Toumani Donovan John August Rudy Gobert Stu Point Irene United States
The Mescalero Apache Tribe declares a state of emergency as COVID-19 cases start to emerge

Native America Calling

03:42 min | 2 years ago

The Mescalero Apache Tribe declares a state of emergency as COVID-19 cases start to emerge

"This is national news. I'm in Prenton Gonzales. The Mescalero Apache tribe in New Mexico declared a state of emergency Monday as tests confirm the first cases of covid nineteen on the reservation in New Mexico. At least four people tested positive for the disease. The tribe says it's waiting on the results of some six hundred other tests. Mescalero ordered lockdown businesses and public establishments for at least the next two weeks. The tribe is also closing tribal government offices to the public. The order puts restrictions on individuals movements and asks that one member of each household use Tuesdays and Thursdays for buying food and other essentials. The tribe is closing entrances to tribal land although the main highway through the reservation remains open. Mescalero president gave Aguilar told Q. E. T. V. The measures are away to protect the tribe. He says merely urging people to practice physical distancing failed to keep the virus from spreading an out of state. Seafood worker is the first person to test positive for coronavirus in the city of Valdez. Alaska officials say the infection was caught through. Routine. Testing Louisa. Castroville is Acting Infectious Disease Program Manager for the Alaska Department of Health and social services in video conference Monday. She said it's not clear yet. How the individual contract the virus it's individual came to Alaska from the lower forty-eight in late April and Co was quarantined. Onsite there for two weeks because as some demonic during that timeframe as well and there's been working on campus since then and has not left. It's not clear the source of the infection whether this was something that was picked up locally since the person had been there for a month or whether this is the test that we're seeing the positive result if it's picking up virus that might have been An infection in the distant past. And we're just seeing residual virus from that Castro deal says health officials are working to determine anyone who may have come in contact with the infected person. Alaska officials remain vigilant as the commercial fishing season is getting underway and thousands of people. Come from all over the world to work and processing facilities. The state has a little over four hundred positive cases of covid nineteen total as of the start of this week. The regional hospital in gnome close to the public. After an employee tested for the coronavirus. The Norton Sound Health Corporation expected employees to go back to work Tuesday after all of them are tested for the virus. Katie Oh news reports. The facilities were subjected to afford a extensive cleaning on Friday. The city manager issued an emergency order restricting travel into nome and mandating a two week quarantine for anyone traveling into the city from the outside. Some face masks sent to the Navajo nation through a company established by a former White House. Aide may be inadequate to properly protect those who wear them the news organization Propublica reports almost two hundred fifty thousand of the masks sent by a company headed by former White House. Deputy Chief of Staff Zach Pontus may not fit the guidelines established by the Food and Drug Administration propublica reports. The total cost for the masks is around eight hundred thousand dollars. The report goes on to say that in another one hundred. Thirty thousand masks are not the kind specified in the procurement data. The News Organization Says Flint is secured. The three million dollar deal with the Indian health services. Eleven days after he formed the company the sell personal protective equipment. Ihs officials say the masks are unsuitable for medical use. The regional office is determining whether to return them flint told propublica his connections to the White House played no role in his company selection as a provider for IHS the Navajo nation has the highest per capita rate of corona virus infections in the nation with National Native News. I'm Mark Hughes.

Alaska White House Mescalero New Mexico Prenton Gonzales Aguilar IHS Alaska Department Of Health Valdez Acting Infectious Disease Prog Norton Sound Health Corporatio Nome Flint Food And Drug Administration Mark Hughes Castroville Katie Oh Propublica
"louisa" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

06:05 min | 2 years ago

"louisa" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Small businesses in the states seeking clarification on phase one of the governor's plan to reopen the economy next Monday WBZ TV's Louisa Moller an image of dozens of people holding beautiful blooms inside Charles Tom Flores June bug recalls a Rosier time before covert nineteen where I'm not even trying to make money I'm just trying to break even I'm just trying to sell enough to cover by to pay my bills basically like so many other small business owners Amanda Mitchell closed June bug and other trials town boutique place and gather in mid March since then she went from fourteen employees to to created two websites overnight and started handle over her products with no ability for customers to pick up products in store or at a curb you feel like you're working ten times as hard or this smallest portion of what you usually do in sales now she can consider re opening but has more questions than answers how are we going to be able to afford to bring everybody back at the store is completely full product again plus place and gather is only four hundred and twenty five square feet making social distancing in nearly impossible I can't foresee more than one person being allowed to shop in there that time her plea to the governor allow curbside pick up so she can survive if that happens you think you could survive as a business we're working around the clock we're working more we already worked a lot and I were working even Marxists say a float so yeah the B. C.'s Erin cutters K. looks at what doctors at a New York hospital are doing in the search for a culprit nineteen vaccines doctors at Roswell park comprehensive cancer center in buffalo said they were starting to test in corona virus patients a two drug combo used for treating some cancers Dr Bram Segal is with us how might a cancer therapy help treat covert nineteen some of the pathways that are relevant for let's say anti viral disease defense can also be exploited to odd man antitumor immunity we took in essence the reverse course for cove in nineteen and said well let's let's now look at the same pathways and see if we can augment them therapeutically so that they defend against viral infection are there naturally similarities between corona virus and cancer that made this obvious for you to try no actually the virus and the tumor cells are are completely different the the part that's similar in essence is our immune responses to tumor and virus that could be exploited therapeutically could you say a little bit more about how these two drugs act and what your hope is they'll do inside the body of a coronavirus patient so our innate immune system is able to recognize viruses and one of the main things that will do is drive interferon recumbent interferon is a drug and it's one of the drugs or using an hour regimen but our body naturally makes interferon to defend against viruses and and and other infections it will stimulate in ourselves a specific enzyme called are in aces so hiring nieces what they do is they degrade RNA and when it went when you think of corona virus and other viruses are in fact are any viruses the second agent called winter Tollemache Richard toll Ahmad is double stranded RNA and it's safe it's designed to be a viral mimics so when it's introduced into a cell it will be recognized by certain receptors that will also result in interferon alpha endogenous interferon alpha production and other downstream pathways that protect from viral infection so it's tricking the body into to making its own defense yes yes that's in essence the premise of it so at this point we're limiting enrollment to peace patients with cancer because they have higher risk of of more severe COPD infection and we're also limiting enrollment to people with mild or moderate cove in nineteen disease but not severe because we want to use this window of opportunity to augment their innate host defense so that at an early stage of covert they may be able to you know defend against virus and prevent the replication cycle of the virus you know as it goes from one cell to another to another if we're arming the cells ahead of time that might defend against viral spread doctor brand Siegel at Roswell park comprehensive cancer center in buffalo which is now undertaking what is one of the very few studies in the world to repurpose an experimental cancer therapy as a treatment for coronavirus the shut down on Broadway has been extended again until at least early September although an exact date for performances to resume has yet to be determined Broadway producers are now offering refunds and exchanges for tickets purchased for shows through September sixth Broadway theaters abruptly closed March twelfth knocking out all shows including sixteen that were still scheduled to open and postponing indefinitely the Tony awards schedule Broadway grossed one point eight billion dollars last season and attracted a record fifteen million people producers and labor unions are discussing ways theaters can reopen safely traffic and weather together coming up on the balls of tough as nails WBZ ten thirty say night eight o'clock the show is a construction show but we will be talking about all the ins and outs of every other aspect of life.

Louisa
Samantha Irby Talks About Wow, No Thank You

The Book Review

06:42 min | 2 years ago

Samantha Irby Talks About Wow, No Thank You

"I think of it night as selling a book but as supporting the booksellers and publishers and other authors who are out there and also helping readers because readers are are desperate right now. I want to read. Actually something that Carl Siegel our critic wrote in her review of your book. I hope you're not one of those people that avoids reading reviews of Your Book. I am but I know that this was positive because everyone told me it was positive. So I'm braced for it and it's cool okay. All right ready. She wrote instead of a rule. Then a recommendation. For this moment if the grips of the pandemic your ability to interpret an exponential graph has increased well exponentially while your patients for narrative has plummeted. Tries Samantha. Irby so she's heartily recommending. You as something to read right now in order to give listeners a taste of why that is. Would you read a little bit from your new collection? Wow No thank you. Yes so. This is from Piece called hung up and it is about my love of cellular phones. I was late to the technology game. I'm staring down the barrel of my fortieth year and I bought my computer six or seven years ago. I didn't get my first iphone until they'd been around for years partially because I thought who needs that. I prefer to live in the real world mostly. I was skeptical because the idea of walking around with a five hundred dollar computer in my pocket seemed ridiculous and dangerous to me and the idea that I can somehow scraped together the money to purchase said pocket computer while also maintaining a roof over my head. I E partying all the time and paying for basic cable was hilarious and unrealistic. I was the last dinosaur at the club sending multi tap texts on an analog Nokia e fifty one with no camera when I finally upgraded to a smartphone. Several years after unsolicited selfish had taken hold of the nation. My exhausted psalms cracked and bleeding from a decade of repeatedly jamming down the two key to make a letter see. I didn't get what all the fuss was about. Okay sure this glowing rectangle in my bag can tell me the weather anywhere in the world at this exact moment but who cares but wait. It could also figure out precisely what wrong street. I'm turning down and steer me back in the right direction and it can count. How many steps? I took today while saving for me all the passwords I can never remember. Please excuse me while I build a shrine to the new most important thing in my life. I've read on my phone that we as a nation as a species have a problem with cellphones. Insert facts about the harms of cell phone usage. That I'm never going to research because I do not enjoy feeling like an underachiever. But do we really. Is there actually a problem with rescuing our brains from the doldrums of sitting at a red light or from the Malays caused by having even even a single second to sit alone with one terrible thoughts? I don't have children. Therefore I don't have any opinions on whether electronic devices are a bad influence on the mental growth and development of a child. If you tell me they are than I believe you. I'm sure there's scientific evidence prove it and I'm positive. There are doctors and licensed professionals. Who would attest to the DILATOT? Serious effect modern technology has on the brains and interpersonal skills of adults. But hear me out. Maybe it's worth it. That was great. What about you Samantha? Have you been able to read for fun during this time? I'm not ever so distracted that I can't pick up a book which I feel is good so I have been reading a lot of fiction and like nothing about disease or being locked in a room. But you're a huge thriller Fan Right. Is there s recommendations like good escape reading either thrillers or Wa which I know you also love yes so I am like pretty obsessed with this writer Louisa. Luna there are two books in this series so far. I don't think the series has the name. It's like an Alice Vega novel I think is maybe like the subtitle but the first one is called two girls down and her second book in the series is called the Janes and I just reread both of those and they are so good she so good thrillers are my thing and she is a master and I just reread Mary. H K choice books emergency contact and permanent record and they're both Y. A. They make me feel totally uncool because she has mastered the way. Young people talk. And I'm like man I kind of don't know what they're saying but I do love this a lot. She is a super cool writer. So this is your third book of essays. The first one meaty than we are never meeting in real life now. Wow No thank you. I'm curious how like in your mind or they categorized as different periods of Your Life. Different themes different topics. How do they stand apart for you? Well meaning to me feels most like. Here's an overview of my past. Here's a here's how we got here kind of and then we're never meeting in real life is kind of a mix of. Here's how we got here. Here's where we're going because I'd met my partner at that point. But she wasn't my wife yet and I hadn't moved from Chicago to Michigan yet. And then while no thank you is like where I am right now. It's a Kalamazoo Essay collection. It's me in Kalamazoo in our raggedy farmhouse with the cats. Like this is where I'm

Samantha Kalamazoo Writer Carl Siegel Nokia Irby Dilatot Partner Alice Vega Chicago Michigan WA Louisa Mary
"louisa" Discussed on Someone Lived Here

Someone Lived Here

09:23 min | 2 years ago

"louisa" Discussed on Someone Lived Here

"In the bellevue hotel up on beacon hill really near the effingham and she could be near her publisher and then go out with friends to the theater or to a concert. Louisa also enjoyed the city since it gave her more privacy. It was here she wrote work. It follows christie who works many different jobs. Louisa said to a friend of the book christie's adventures are many of them my own this was begun at eighteen and never finished until h.w. Beecher wrote to me for a cereal and pay three thousand four. It work was an app title for a book written by louisa because she truly never stopped working during one book's publication and other two would be written in a journal. She wrote. When i had the youth i had no money now. I have the money. I have no time and when i get the time if i ever do i shall have no health to enjoy life. I suppose it's the discipline i need. But it's rather hard to love. The things i do and see them go by because duty chains me to my galley but louise's constant work made so much possible for her family and her sisters may would travel back and forth from europe often spending years at a time there painting professionally in london paris. It was in europe where she got the word that their mother had died abigail alcott also known as marmee both in little women and in real life had been declining over the years. Louisa wrote in her journal of her final day. She was very happy all day thinking herself. A girl again with parents and sisters round her looked often at the little picture of may and waved her hand to it. Goodbye little may goodbye. While louisa anna and bronson alcott grief together may was alone in london she had befriended a swedish man who is kind and sympathetic in her grief. Their friendship turned into love and at eight thirty seven may alcott married ernest. Mira ker in london a year and a half later. The couple were expecting a child. May wrote to louisa saying if i die when baby is born. Don't mourn for. I have had in these two years more. Happiness than comes to many in a lifetime may did not die in childbirth. They name their baby louisa main yorker but a month after may turn for the worse and she began making plans for what might happen. May's husband ernest senate telegram. Ralph waldo emerson. Louisa found emerson looking at maze portrait. He said my child. I wish i could prepare you. But alas alas the telegram read may instead may request it that louisa raise her daughter and in louise's journal she wrote. I see now why. I lived to care for maize. Child and not leave anna. All alone lulu came to the united states after a few months and they celebrated her first birthday. Louisa adored her niece. She and anna worked as a team to raise their sisters child. In june eighteen eighty. Four louisa sold orchard house. She wrote in her journal. Glad to be done with it though after living in it. Twenty five years. It is full of memories but places have not much hold on me when the deer persons who made them deer are gone. She sold the place. To william torrey harris a friend who was involved in bronson school of philosophy. He was often in washington. Dc and use the home. As a summer home. He did very little to change the house and never painted over the sketches by may that adorned the walls despite louise's consistently poor health. She continued to write and publish books with one to two books coming out every year and in her preface to jo's boys she shared a bit of her sadness with her audience quote to account for the seeming neglect of amy. Let me add. Since the original of that character died it has been impossible for me to write of her as when she was here to suggest. Criticize and laugh over the namesake. The same excuse applies to marmi. But the folded leaves are not plank to those who knew and loved them bronson alcott had been getting sicker. He was eight years old when she visited him. She knew it was most likely their final meeting. She went to visit him and he said i am going up. Come with me. She returned to the physicians home where she was staying and went to bed when she woke up the next morning she had horrible head paint. She recognized her nephew and then was unconscious. Her and her father had shared a birthday and when she died on march sixth eighteen eighty eight. She did not know that her father had died. Two days earlier bronson alcott was eighty eight. Louisa may alcott was fifty five and that made anna. The first born of the little women also be the last living lulu went back to europe to live with her father at the age of nine and as had become tradition louisa had given her a parting gift lulus library a published collection of thirty two short stories in three volumes. They were stories that she told to may as a child and retold to her favourite niece. Before i left concord. I wanted to see the place. Where louisa and her family were buried on a hill in sleepy. Hollow cemetery is a path called authors ridge. There is a large stone for the alcott's with small headstones in front. They're all equal in size with their initials elizabeth for daughter who never made it past. Twenty two now sits in the center surrounded by her family. Louise's is easy to spot as visitors. Have left notebooks pencils even though i think louisa deserves break from writing lake most graveyards. The alcott's are not alone. The path is called authors rich because they're surrounded by their community of friends and neighbors who also just happened to be famous authors emerson. Thoreau hawthorne are all a few steps away. from the alcott's there's also the grave of a neighbor who made it possible for us to walk through orchard house today around nineteen ten twelve years after lewis death. The home was up for sale but it was in really bad condition. The real estate prospectus is what they used to call. It said perfect site for new mansion. There were no trespassing. Signs in the yard It really looked like it was just about ready to be torn down. Living next door was a woman named. Harriet loath rip wife of publisher. Daniel loathsome so they were a wealthy family. She saw girls with copies of little. Women clutched in their arms. Peaking in all the windows and braving right through the no trespassing sign in the tall tall grass and she thought she that house should be saved. It's really ashamed. Think of that that nobody will be able to see it anymore. It's right there where. Louisa wrote little women. She set the book there as well so she bought the house so that it wouldn't be torn down. Then she went to the women of conquered many of them belong to something called the concord. Woman's club many women from the club discussed it and decided to form their own corporation. But they had to have their husbands do it for them because legally they had no standing. This was still before women had the vote. Women didn't have the right to form a corporation a nonprofit corporation anything and they formed. The louisa may all memorial association husband's helped to legally form the corporation. But it was still the women doing the work. They had freddie and johnny. Anna's two sons come in and help them with paint color. What color was supposed to be. No and they've really helped. And then they brought back. Freddie and johnny and his two sons brought back furniture personal belongings. I mean it really was amazing. How the whole thing came together. Orchard houses still run under that nonprofit that harriet loath rip and the other conquered women created over one hundred years ago. The life of louisa and her sisters was an as simple as what she wrote in little women but the love between them was as real infection as it was in life. Thank you so much for listening to this bonus episode. Leave a review. So i can smile after crying. My eyes out recording this whole episode. We'll be back this spring with new episodes and you can follow on instagram. So you don't miss any updates thank you. Jan turnquest and orchard house. And tim k hill for music. If you have any questions about the show and want to read more on louisa good org website. Someone lift here dot com..

louisa Louisa bronson alcott bellevue hotel christie abigail alcott marmee louisa anna Mira ker ernest senate telegram london louise's journal anna orchard house europe louise william torrey harris bronson school of philosophy lulu beacon hill
"louisa" Discussed on Someone Lived Here

Someone Lived Here

08:10 min | 2 years ago

"louisa" Discussed on Someone Lived Here

"Did in the eighteen hundreds. Oh she she loved to run now. This is very unusual. Women were not supposed to love to run in fact no one was supposed to just like to run for running. Say i kind of agree with eighteen. Hundreds on this one. She ran through fields. She ran in concord One time. She missed the train that she was going to take into boston and she had to have somewhat run. I mean it was either very fast walking or a little jogging in there too because she made it from concord to boston's approximately twenty miles. She made that in five hours. That's four miles per hour in hoops. Curtain boots louise's running also tells a lot about her mother who didn't just allow her daughters to be independent but encouraged it misses all. Let her daughter run because she knew her daughter loved to run. Even if other people would say that's not proper misses all cut just didn't worry she said you you do. What's right for you. Louisa and her mother both could be frustrated by the restrictions of their time. Louisa and her mother were very much alike in their makeup in their temperament. And i think mrs alka was often angered by quote. Today we would call social injustice. It made her angry to see the way women were often treated. They sometimes sheltered women who were being put today. We would say abused by their husbands back. Then it was. Legal and louisa was the same way. Louisa had a temper and louisa found it very hard sometimes to put up with what society thought she should be doing and i think that both of them realized that about each other. They felt very connected. We're now going to continue to the next room. This is louise's bedchamber. Although she and anna shared it at first when they first moved into the house and this little shelf desk is what bronson built for her and it was such an exciting thing because it wasn't just that she had this lovely desk to right on but it was that it gave her a sense of agency. Her mother gave her this little pen with a note. May this your muse inspire. And i just think that that is That's a very symbolic gesture. When anna was twenty nine she moved out of the family home to marry john pratt they had met while acting opposite each other in a play in concord. They were married downstairs in the parlour. This left louisa and may in the alcott home. A couple years later in eighteen sixty two louisa would decide to serve as a nurse in a union hospital in washington dc. She was thirty years old. The matron of the hospital was hannah. Ropes she was also a published writer. The two women worked together in the morning shifts. Louisa would write letters home with stories from her experience. One of these stories became death of a soldier which gives a nod to the sister. She was still morning. I had been summoned to many deathbeds in my life but to none that made my heart ache as it did. Then since my mother called me to watch the departure of spirit akin to this in its gentleness and patience strength as i went in john stretched out both hands. I knew you'd come. I guess i'm moving on man in the beginning of january both hannah ropes and louisa may alcott got pneumonia which would become typhoid fever. Calomel was a common medicine. Thought to cure illness. It also contained mercury after a week. The superintendent of all union nurses sent word to bronson alcott of louise's worsening condition. When he arrived two days later he found her semi conscious and extremely thin in a room with broken windows. She was able to travel home five days later the day before they left hanna. Ropes would die in that hospital and louisa was far from better. It was in this bedroom where she slowly recovered when she's in this room and they're they're watching over her. They think she probably won't even make it but they all take turns sitting with her while sitting with her may paints the flower panel may said she wished that she could bring fresh flowers every day but these would last longer and she was right. They definitely lasted longer. The panel goes from the desk up to the ceiling. There's a black background with white cala lease in orange. Mr sion's their green leaves intertwined cala lease were thought to represent beauty and mr cham's to represent a victory in battle and louisa may alcott was victorious in her battle. Although her health would never fully recover she survived and would go on to immortalize herself and her family. Her stories of the civil war published in a boston newspaper and then republished in a book. Titled hospital sketches. She wrote them under her own name but continued to write what she called her blood and thunder tales under the pseudonym a. n. barnard her publisher. Thomas niles urged her to write a novel for girls. She started it and then stopped based off her past experience. She didn't believe that a book for young women would be that profitable that's when her publisher suggested trade. He would publish her father's book on philosophy if she wrote the book that would become little women partially based off her own life but with changes that made it more widely understood. When luisa wrote little women she changes time. She takes their young years. That were lived before the civil war and moves that youth into wartime that way her father who in real life was too old to go now. He's the right age he can go off and serve in the civil war that would mean that the whole family is struggling because that was often the case. If father's away at war than the women are left at home not very financially well off but everybody understands that sacrifice so louisa wanted to have that kind of simple background. She didn't want to try to write a book and explain all their moves and all of her father's teaching ideas and what they were all thinking and struggling with it made it a much cleaner tail. Her father was a very philosophical. And that sort of fits with the idea of a minister and then she really gives her father her war experience. She took care of the ill now. The reverend mr marches in the worries not fighting. But he's taking care of them in spiritually so she just gives him her work experience than the telegram calms. He's very ill. That's exactly what had happened. The telegram had gum. She was the one who is ill and he. Everybody worries that he's not gonna make it and then he does make it so i think it just makes it much more socially acceptable it just flows better and it fits with the time because everyone had just been through this terrible war experience. Many people had lost loved ones. And it's it's sort of a brave story we can keep going where we're not giving up. We're going to keep our family together as best we can and keep moving forward and unlike the book. A rich aunt wouldn't bring manna europe. But instead louisa may would travel there together off of little women success while in rome. Louisa and may got word that anna's husband had died ten years after their wedding in that front room of orchard house. Louisa wrote them. A book called little men dedicated to john. And anna's two boys and leaving them. The prophets may would stay on studying art near up but louisa returned to concord at thirty eight where both responsibilities and fame. We're awaiting her. Louisa did not enjoy being famous. She enjoyed the financial security for sure she. She wanted that. She wanted the success. That comes with selling your books. But she did not want people knocking on her door asking for autographs. She would talk about how reporters would sometimes sit on the fence out here in front of orchard house sketching her when she was going out into the garden with one of her nephews. I mean this was not a pleasant experience and she said fame was.

louisa Louisa concord louise mrs alka boston john pratt anna alcott hannah ropes bronson alcott Mr sion mr cham bronson Thomas niles typhoid fever hannah pneumonia
"louisa" Discussed on Someone Lived Here

Someone Lived Here

08:03 min | 2 years ago

"louisa" Discussed on Someone Lived Here

"In this bonus episode of someone lived here. We're at orchard house the home where louisa may alcott wrote little women. Her book has had many failings and interpretations including the recent oscar-nominated film from greta. Gerwig but we are here. To explore is the real story of the four sisters who are so full and charismatic that we still want to see them brought to life one hundred sixty years later and their real lives were much more complicated than their fictional counterparts. Welcome to someone lived here. A podcast about the places. Cool people called home i'm your host kendra gaylord. We're outside of brown painted colonial house on lexington app in concord massachusetts. The shape is very rectangular but has a center gabled roof on the front. That makes it more recognizable. Louisa wrote and set little women in this home but her own childhood wasn't a stable. The family rarely stayed anywhere more than a year. Whatever mr l. cuts work required was where they would live. That's jammed turnquest. She's the executive director of orchard house. And we'll be helping us better understand the alcott family louise's father bronson alcott was a teacher with at the time groundbreaking thoughts on teaching. He believed in equality both of gender and race. He didn't believe in hitting children in the classroom and thought students should engage in conversation around topics. But there are plenty of challenges. When you're ahead of your time. They had a tough time financially. Because bronson alcott's schools were dependent upon tuition paid by parents and if parents started to get nervous. What do you mean. You're not beating the children. Don't you know that spoils the mr. Okay what do you mean. You want to admit a black child if you do that. Art kits are coming out of the school. Pretty much nothing that bronson alcott tried to do really brought in enough income. Sometimes it did bring in some. But it wasn't enough and this was not a small family bronson and abigail married. When they were both about thirty they had four daughters within ten years. The eldest anna was known as the actor. Louisa as the writer. Elizabeth called lizzy the musician and the youngest may the artist. Everyone in the family tried to help. Mrs all took in laundry. She took in boarders. She was paid social worker. At one point anne as louisa and her sisters got older they took on more responsibility. Louisa taught one of the first kindergarten classes in boston. Ana taught school as well. may was painting. She'd sell these paintings. She'll do these little slender paintings that she called potboilers because they could be sold so quickly. Meanwhile louise's writing potboilers because she could sell those under a pseudonym and they may have been working but they were also having fun the plays that were depicted in little women were originally put on by louisa and her sisters and the family had a lively social circle. Ralph waldo emerson. The poet and writer was a close friend of a family and his children. Were around the age of louisa and her sisters and they got to explore the outdoors with none other than henry. David throw thorough was like an older brother to louisa enter sisters. He was a lot older fifteen years older than louisa but he was trusted to take them berry picking and he'd show them all the secrets of the woods. You know here are the animal tracks he could make bird calls perfectly. He was the one who inspired louisa to write little fairy stories because he called her attention to this little plant with cobwebbed draped over it and he said what you see here and she said why. See a cobweb. He said no no no. It's the handkerchief of a fairy and that inspired her to start to think about the forest full of fairies and imps and human children who were influenced by the fairies and. She wrote this entire book that she dedicated to ellen. Emerson called flower fables. And after years of moving it was their friend who encouraged the family to settle that on it was ralph waldo emerson who really wanted bronson cut in his family to put down real roots in concord and ultimately that's what they did with orchard house. This is the home where they lived the longest by far and they worked so hard to make it a home. They were buying land because of the apple orchard and it was a good bargain for them because all the buildings on the land were thrown for free. Because they're in horrible shape and bronson alcott worked hard with workman to make the whole thing livable for his family to make a habitable home for them and louisan our sisters actually painted and wallpapered inside and so it was a a great family effort. And i think they were all very very proud of it. Elizabeth watched as they fixed up the home and saw it come together. She wasn't able to help because she was sick. And then she got sicker. She died at the age of twenty two right before the family would move into the house. We're in right now. I mean. I just don't think there are words to describe the the grief that they felt and as people do they just say well i have to keep living. I have to keep doing the things that are required of me every day. So they did but their hearts were so heavy. It was really really difficult for them. We're now going to walk around this home. And the first thing i want you to see is something still connects this home to elizabeth. It's a small room on the second floor behind brunson and advocates but it was later used as a place for the grandchildren to stay and in the corner by the window is a tiny couch. The little sofa was a salesman sample. they didn't have furniture stores. You just take the pieces of furniture around on a cart and the dollar in the middle was made by beth and the face was painted by me so she's quite precious. It's a sewn doll wearing a long black dress with white buttons down. The front and expressive is painted by may feel the difference. That part of the house was structurally from the main house. And now this is the tenant house that got added on and the minute you walk in heels this as bedroom it's smaller than most of the rooms but feel so light and lovely. A light grey wallpaper with white flowers covers the corner. The rest is painted a light gray and the trim of the entire room is a color you might know well and this unfortunately is the color of painter's tape today but the girls thought this plush blue was so striking wonderful very exciting to have that and then of course all over the walls in this room may is decorated mostly the woodwork can see roundly under the windows over here. This is a big one that is particular favorite of a lot of people dot drawings in pencil but looks like something. You'd find engraved on the marble walls of a greek temple with horses pulling a god surrounded by angels in this room. There's also a trunk with something very special inside. I mentioned when they did their place. They could run up the back stairs and come and change costumes and these boots were made by louisa. Now this is something we know for. Sure and that to me is quite thrilling. That she made them she wore them. This is a sketch that may did of louisa. Playing the role of rodrigue. Oh in the sketch. Louisa is down on one knee while her older sister. Anna is in a fake tower which is actually just a pile of dressers. The actual boots that are in front of me are brown and knee height and look worn but not from being a century old but from being run up and down the stairs one hundred times and that brings me to something. Louisa did that very few women or people.

bronson alcott louisa orchard house Louisa Gerwig kendra gaylord Ana taught school louise bronson concord ralph waldo emerson mr l alcott greta oscar Elizabeth lexington lizzy abigail massachusetts
"louisa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"louisa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of Louisa may Alcott's novel little women combines the much love story of four sisters with a new story of Joe trying to get the novel published well those stories and more this hour just after the live from NPR news in Washington behind Dale Willman the rector of Notre Dame cathedral in Paris says the landmark may never be fully saved the cathedral was severely damaged by a fire in April the rector says any reconstruction work probably won't begin until twenty twenty one today was the first time Christmas services were not held in the cathedral since the French Revolution isn't trump is spending Christmas said as private estate in Palm Beach Florida in a video posted online he wished the country a happy holiday we say a special prayer for those military service members stationed far from home and we renew our hope for peace among nations and joy to the world on behalf of the entire family we wish everyone a joy is and a very happy happy new year on Christmas Eve trumpet his family attended the service of the Southern Baptist church Turkey's president is visiting North Africa today for talks with Tunisia's leader NPR's Peter Kenyon reports that the visit comes after the two countries signed to controversial agreements president Recep Tayyip Erdogan took the unannounced trip to meet his Tunisian counterpart along with Turkey's defense minister on November twenty seventh Turkey Indonesia signed a pair of by lateral agreements one promising Turkish assistance should the internationally recognized government in Tripoli needed against forces led by warlord Khalifa Haftar the other said that America I'm boundary agreement that on Chriss could legitimise Turkish drilling for hydrocarbons in the eastern Mediterranean the Turkey Libya maritime accord has been rejected by Greece Cyprus Egypt and Israel who have plans to drill in the same area Peter Kenyon NPR news estable Michigan's Attorney General is pending an investigation into how Michigan State University handle complaints against his former sports physician Larry Nasser as W. D. ET is Quinn Klinefelter reports state officials say the university is withholding thousands of documents needed for the investigation to continue almost two years ago officials began examining how Michigan state dealt with victims of NASCAR who is serving what amounts to a life sentence for molesting hundreds of girls and women but Attorney General Dan and nestles as Michigan state is timing the effort by refusing to give investigators about six thousand documents related to the case in addition she says former Michigan state president and former Michigan governor John angler will not agree to an interview Michigan state officials argue the documents are covered under attorney client privilege three former Michigan state officials have been charged in connection with the investigation for NPR news I'm Quinn Klinefelter in Detroit the remains of a US soldier killed in Afghanistan arrived at Dover Air Force base in Delaware today thirty three year old sergeant first class Michael global of Washington township in New Jersey was killed on Monday in a roadside bombing in northern Kunduz province US stock markets are closed today for the Christmas holiday on Tuesday the major indexes ended nearly flat in a short day of training you're listening to NPR and this is WNYC in New York on Shawn Carlson New York governor Andrew Cuomo has been previewing his political goals for twenty twenty so W. my sis Danny Louis looked at how his twenty nineteen plans with almost a hundred different policy proposals governor Cuomo had an ambitious start to the year and a lot of the big ticket items went through the child victims act passed he signed off on a congestion pricing plan for Manhattan and the states right laws were overhauled but a big reason for the successes was that this was the first time in years that Democrats controlled the assembly Senate and governorship there was this pent up demand to get things done Blair Horner is with the New York public interest resource group so much so that some of the proposals that the governor called former in his state and say the past even before his proposals made it to the printer one notable flop legalizing recreational marijuana but Cuomo is expected to push hard for that in the new year about a hundred men gathered in the main hall of Grand Central today they were there to pay tribute to mom adult homeless woman who died from exposure to the cold in the nineteen eighties her death inspired the creation of the doe fund which has since help people like Oscar lands out I just twenty two and was homeless a year ago not anymore the dog is that I've been in for so long.

Louisa Alcott
"louisa" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

08:02 min | 3 years ago

"louisa" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Louisa Louisa. Father on this throw your only often some you'll have conquered death open for us pass. HR? Grind me. Celebrate Pasco feast of the resurrection to be renewed by your spirit, and re board into the light of the reason he is gall and lives unrein's you in the unity of the Holy Spirit for around. A reading from the acts of the apostles. Peter proceeded to speak and said, you know, what has happened all over today beginning Galilee after the baptism that John preached. How God to Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Spirit and power. He went about doing good and healing all those oppressed by the devil for God was with him. We are witnesses of all that he did both in the country of the Jews and injure Roussel them. They put him to death by hanging him on a tree this man God raised on the third day. And granted that he'd be visible not to all the people, but the witnesses chosen by God and advance who ate and drank with him after he rose from the dead. He commissioned us to preach to the people and testified that he is the one anointed by God as judge of the living and the dead. Said to him all the profits bear witness that everyone who believes in him will receive forgiveness of sins through his name the word of the Lord. He sees. He's. A reading from the letter of Saint Paul clawson's brothers sisters. If then you were raised with Christ secret is above for crisis seated at the right hand of God. Think of what is above not of what is on earth for you have died and your life has hidden with Christ. And God in Christ when Christ your life appears then you too will appear with him in glory, the word of the Lord. Thanks. He's. The Lord be with you. Reading from the holy gospel. According to job. The.

Louisa Louisa Saint Paul clawson unrein Roussel Peter John
"louisa" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"louisa" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"This is the John Batchelor show. Louisa Thomas her book is Louisa the life of MRs Adams, Louisa Adams is now the secretary of state's what and John Quincy is pleased to work all the time. And he claims afterwards that the only success of the Monroe administration. The only thing that comes to anything, and we'll be remembered is foreign policy by the State Department. And he's right. We have the Monroe doctrine, we don't know Monroe for anything else. He's absolutely right. However at this point around him everywhere, and in Louise's home in Washington in every home, they visit at the White House, certainly in all the debates is slavery. And there is no one version of Louisa Adams's opinion of slavery. So I want to start right here at the moment of the Missouri compromise eighteen twenty what is her opinion Louisa? You know, before she never talks about it never mentioned that. End chocolates. He doesn't really pages. You know? And she does start talking about a she does think about it. She goes, the basic congress Yasser father-in-law, which he thinks, you know, she starts, but she a scare, you know, she thinks will lead to civil war and she's seen something of war and her family the family, and she's very as we've discussed buried her father. So guess she she never goes far enough. Do they keep do they keep slaves? So she keeps us live. That's unclear.

Louisa Adams Louisa Louisa Thomas Monroe John Quincy John Batchelor Monroe administration Louise State Department White House Missouri Washington
"louisa" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"louisa" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Thomas biography of MRs Louisa John Quincy Adams is entitled Louisa starting. Our life of MRs add all this is prologue the birth of three sons and a daughter after many miscarriages the loss of the daughter in Russia. The crisis of the losing of her of her daughter Louisa the travels from Petersburg in winter, December fourteen to January fifteen into the springtime of eighteen fifteen arriving in France. And in Paris just as Polian escaped from Elba. This is the hundred days the revolution is about to reawaken Louisa arrives and hotel do Nord. She's greeted or she finds John Quincy. And after all this excitement. They do go to the theater of the night that Napoleon's there. He goes off to his fate and Louisa and John traveled to London. And they take an address a house in ailing which Louisa Thomas tells me as a suburb of London at this moment. Louisa Louisa Thomas. I believe our heroine finds peace in London. Does she like being there? Does she want to stay there? She doesn't she doesn't. It is night. Dylan. I'm John Quincy loves it. Actually, you know, and they have a very kind of family life. The thunder with them from joining them in London. Right. George and John travel from their grandparents and they meet in London. Yes. They live in a little beautiful house 'cause Austin house, and you know, and they have a wonderful life. She however is somewhat ambitious.

Louisa Louisa Thomas MRs Louisa John Quincy Adams Louisa London John Quincy Napoleon Petersburg Russia France Paris Elba Nord Dylan Austin Polian George hundred days
"louisa" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

05:09 min | 3 years ago

"louisa" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Show. Louisa Thomas's overwhelming new work biography follows the adventures of Louisa Adams, Louisa Johnson Adams, born seventeen seventy five to the Johnsons American and British mother and father. She is now marriage John Quincy Adams, his father, John Adams has just has just been defeated for the pre in the presidency by Thomas Jefferson, John Adams is now going home and it's unclear what their fate is. But Louisa with child George Washington Adams is finally to come face to face with what we know she didn't understand Abigail Adams, Louisa, they they get home. And Louisa goes off to her family. The Johnson's in Washington John Quincy immediately racist north to Massachusetts does. Louisa our heroin. Does. She object to the fact that John Quincy is going to leave her so quickly and race to his mother. She. It was tough on her that she felt like, you know, she wants to see her family, and he sent her actually south by herself and she begged him begged him to come. She actually didn't even tell her family that he wasn't planning on it. And she convinces that you know, he comes and gets her and then brings her north himself. And you know, it's a long journey in those days you've to understand between the trip between Boston Washington, six something like three weeks, right normal circumstances. Leaving October thirtieth and arriving Boston November twenty fifth. Yes. Almost more than three weeks more than three weeks. I was actually somewhat she she complain that you know, they were if they were going any slower they'd be crawling. She complained that he was kind of yanking her top speed was something about their mental states at that moment and they arrive in Quincy, Massachusetts and Louisa gets her. I look at the household of John former ex president of the United States and Abigail Adams, and you write that Luisa is utterly astonished. What did she see? How did she regard Abigail? It's amazing. It's let's see she later rates but had she stepped onto Noah's ark. She could not have been more, honest and feet. This is a woman with lived all over the world or know the western world. So the idea that Quincy is the most exotic place no world, you know, it's kind of amazing Abigail she had a kind of distrustful relationship. But I. You know, thought of her is not American thought of her as a quote, finally and Louisa kinda was made to feel her different Abigail gave her pleats of fine preserves instead of instead of what everyone else is eating and police have no idea how to run a New England household. She just had no idea, and it was traumatic. She felt like she couldn't suit the detail that Louisa learned when she went to Washington is important here when she met her father living in Georgetown. He was shrunken. And lined an aged what's wrong with him Louisa. Dying for one thing. You know, he he. Yeah. It's unclear you know, again, doctors medical records. We can't we can't diagnose diagnose in the same way. You know, who knows actually what's wrong with him gallstones, maybe something that chocolate suggested. But really he's kind of broken heart. I mean, he is he has no money his former partners doing him. He keeps waiting for money to come through it doesn't. And he knows that he's going to leave his family indus-, destitute, basically. Yeah. No. It's a it's a terrible moment. John Quincy, however is also anxious about his future. So Louise's going between these two families the Johnson's in the atoms and the atoms have had tragedy. One of their sons is dead their daughters. Nabis husband has abandoned her. So there are troubles in all directions Louise's recording. All this. She's our she's are time travelers what she she reports to us and again, and again, I'm struck by. She's not modern, but she sees the the tensions in a fashion with we use psychological language. She does not she uses the language of Roma of the romantic age by eighteen o free. John Quincy has been appointed. By the legislature to be a Senator in Washington hamels Louisa are Louisa the heroin. How does she regard going to Washington with a Senator? Interesting..

John Quincy Louisa Louisa Johnson Adams Abigail Adams John Quincy Adams Louisa Thomas Washington George Washington Adams heroin Massachusetts Luisa Louise Boston John Thomas Jefferson Senator United States New England Georgetown Noah