18 Burst results for "Louis Leakey"

"louis leakey" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

05:37 min | 10 months ago

"louis leakey" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"You do get free rides on the monorail with any price level? Well, yeah, I'm sure that's probably right. Felix or the streetcar If it existing on Felix, That's that that's that they threw. It has a bone to people who are complaining about the possible We are parking issues down there yet free monorail tickets with your season tickets. But somebody's clunking out 35,000 doesn't care that would not be writing the monorail that is coming in a helicopter and a hell of a hat. On top of the thing. The 35,000 He's probably not too bad when you consider what the Seahawks right if you had a box at Centurylink Field, and the tickets for the Seahawks are crazy astronomical, even get even get them. So 35,000. That's at 44 games that what it is? Yeah, Yeah, yeah, that's I mean, that's 44 games right there compared to the eight you get with the with the NFL. And they're also special clubs here for the people like you, John that will attend these events up in the clouds where they have the cathedral seating and things like that they'll candelabras and whatnot. So, but those are a little bit more expensive. I'm not talking about those prices because very few of us can afford that. 795 bucks take it 95 tickets. Yeah, yeah. I mean, if you think about me that 60 Imean if you look at the full season prices, it's going to be anywhere from 140 bucks to 280 bucks per game. Yes, for the lower bowl 90 to 170 for the upper bowl. So roughly, yeah. I mean, it's For the overflow for the life of that times, 326 games. You know, you have to break it down what you can afford, But the other thing is, is there also, you know, 5000 plans that you could choose their 40 different plans You could choose from as a depositor. What you run through all of them with have a cup of coffee up here. I'll grab the one That's really important is that 5000 the plans? The seats are going to be 100 bucks or less, okay overall, so they're really not that bad if you can afford that half season And then they're gonna have you know what? 5 606 100 tickets. I think for walk up single game tickets. Those will probably never be available. You know, you're gonna have to really jump on those because the demand is going to be great to see the NHL in Seattle. I mean, it's going to be great. And so it's going to be hard to get your hands on those tickets. But those are only gonna running 40 bucks. So that's a really good deal. I'm anxious to see what like Wicky does when he went down to Tampa and took a team virtually from nothing and then all of a sudden made it a cultural phenomenon to attend the games. And then how he was able to inject the community into the team and then the team into the community. The guy's a genius when it comes to this stuff to see how he's able to sort of take the politically correct super soy boy liberal of culture of Seattle and then Mel VAT in there with the hockey fan. If you've noticed when it comes to the NHL, the players don't kneel and the fans stand up and cheer and yell. Even though most of the players air from Canada, there's still saluting the American flag. Will Seattle will some of that sort of identity politics hate yourself because your white sort of stuff seep into the eight NHL here in Seattle? Or will it be inoculated from it? And will it still just sort of be the typical NHL hockey fan experience watching almost everybody being white play hockey? Well, I mean, the diversity is actually growing in the NHL, but you're right. I mean, they're they're far fewer, You know, black players and you you would expect, but that that's growing. There are a lot of, you know, floorboard, a lot of Europeans playing, but, yeah, I mean, it's hard to save me. The players are going to be the players. I mean, when you come into town, or you got to embrace the town, you're going to kind of get into it. Live there and kind of, you know, let the local You know, color kind of wash over you and you know, kind of take over some of that. Or you just going to kind of be the same person you were. I mean, who you can't answer that question. But I mean, I hockey is hockey. I mean, I absolutely love the way you write that down yet. Me a bumper sticker that says that exactly Hold on. You're actually right, Felix. I'm glad you called him out. You don't just come out with that. And just move on that That is what one more time Hockey is hockey. It's a different thing. People are not used to it. Ah, lot of people here are you and those that are that. You know the diehard tips fans, the diehard Hawks fans, you know, they get it. It's It's a fabulous game. If you've never been experienced in person, I mean, that's really the only way to see it is in person on TV. It's Lattis. You could follow the but you know the whole Sights and sounds. I made it to the old spectrum back in the day to watch the fliers like Louis Leakey seats I was in the way of talking No, is called view reserved behind half a post. That's how high I was. You know, I've been to the old barn in Chicago to watch the Blackhawks I I love hockey. It's a great sport, even though he never grew up playing it. And so I It is. It is the best sport to be in the arena and watch. I agree the drama. I don't whether it's the way they have the lighting on the ice and the speed. There's nothing else like it, and it is the best. I'm sure in Seattle, it's going to be driven. But in Philadelphia, the leaky seats for the ones were at the very top of the They're the spectrum and the H Vac system would lead down. Horrible yellow drops on you threw the game, but not enough to be continuous, but just enough to be like, Oh, wow. Wow right down my face, and then you go right back game and like 20 minutes later, another sort of leak of yellow stuff would come down on you, but not enough to make you want to move, but just feel like you were aware that it was up above you the whole time..

hockey Seattle NHL Felix Seahawks Centurylink Field NFL Canada Louis Leakey Imean John Tampa Wicky Chicago Philadelphia H Vac Hawks
Jane Goodall: The Woman Who Never Gave Up

BrainStuff

04:07 min | 2 years ago

Jane Goodall: The Woman Who Never Gave Up

"Some people just don't quit. It's okay to quit occasionally, it's best to, but let Dr Jane Goodall be an example, to us, all sometimes you have a far fetched dream and instead of dismissing it, you do it anyway. And when you've cheered what you set up to do, just when you're at the top of your game, your dream might change based on what you've learned along the way your knee dream is bigger and more difficult to realize, but you do it anyway. Repeat into old age never slowing down. And you might even get nominated for a Nobel peace prize. The key to Dr Goodell's persistence, seems to have a lot to do with knowing what she liked from a very young age. And then just insisting on doing it. Her father gave her a stuffed chimpanzee when she was a baby. And she took it with her everywhere, even though it was by all accounts terrifying. She grew up loving to observe and catalog animals, and dreamed of one day living with African, animals and writing books about them for a living. Her mother, who was a novelist herself told. All that, that seemed like a perfectly reasonable idea, even though it was the nineteen forties and not at all. But middle class English girls were expected to do after she finished school. Goodall couldn't afford to go to college. So she worked odd jobs in London for a few years until a friend, invited her to visit her family's farm in Kenya at which point Goodall, immediately quit her job, and waited tables, until she made enough money to pay for the price of boat fair to Africa. While in Kenya. Her friends, justed, she contact the paleontologist, Louis Leakey curator of the corn did museum in Nairobi to discuss. Primates Aliki was interested in studying primate behavior in order to better understand early human species leaky hired Goodall as his field assistant on a paleontological dig and later asked her to return to England to research primates and raise money for a long-term observational study on wild chimpanzees, the gun base stream, national park in Tanzania into live nineteen sixty twenty six year old Jane Goodall began setting up her field station at Gumby, which would become the site of the longest running. Wildlife research project in history. British authorities initially balked at the idea of a young woman doing this kind of work on chaperoned. So Goodell's mother van accompanied her for the first few months Goodall observed, the chip head See's daily for two years before she earned their trust. Her method was just to watch the animals, and imitate their actions, recording everything that happened in a field journal. Two of Goodell's most important discoveries during this period, had to do with what chimps eight and how they went about getting food Goodall was the first to observe chimpanzees killing and eating the meat of small mammals prior to this. They were thought to be vegetarian and perhaps her biggest contribution to our understanding of primates was the revelation that chimps used collected and modified grass stems and sticks as tools to fish, termites out of their nests Goodell's discoveries were so significant Leakey said, now, we must redefine tool redefine, man, and he arranged for her to write a dissertation at Cambridge University on the behaviors of wild chimpanzees. It was accepted and she became one of only eight people ever to graduate from Cambridge with her PHD without first earning her undergraduate degree in nineteen sixty four Goodall married. Hugh on, Loic a Dutch wildlife photographer who leaky sent to record her activity in the field. They had a son in nineteen sixty seven who spent his early life with his parents at Gumby after Goodell in Loic divorced in nineteen seventy four. Good. All Mary, Derrick Bryson in nineteen seventy five who was the director of Tanzania's national parks during this time Goodell published books about her experiences in research at gone BEI, including in the shadow of man, which was criticized by scientists because of good old habit of naming subjects of her research. She called her most famous study subject, David greybeard, but the book was Beilby popular and has since been translated into forty eight languages as she lived and worked in Gumby. She began to notice changes to the chimpanzees habitat deforestation and mining practices forced the animals out of their homes and into spoiler in smaller areas. More than one million wild chimpanzees lift in Africa hundred years ago. But today, only a fifth of that population exists Goodall saw the writing on the wall. Which is why in the nineteen eighties Goodall changed her focus from observing chimps to working to protect their habitat.

Dr Jane Goodall Dr Goodell Africa Louis Leakey Gumby Kenya Tanzania David Greybeard Nairobi Cambridge University Aliki Beilby Hugh London Cambridge England Director Mary Derrick Bryson
"louis leakey" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"louis leakey" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"And I'm going to be the person to say, so it would have been a lot easier. Not to do any of that stuff. Have you ever wondered where that nerve came from? Well, it wasn't quite like that. I loved animals from the time. I was born people say what triggered you'll love of animals while I was born that way, I had a very supportive. Mother on this is key to my success. So when I went with you the first time didn't she not to Africa? I went to Africa on my own. I saved up money the wasn't enough money for university. So I had not been to college, and I went to Africa because my dream when I was ten was to go to Africa live with wild animals and write books about them women didn't didn't have women's scientists back then not in that sort of life and everybody said dream about something you can achieve. But my mother said if you really want something you're going to have to work extremely hard take advantage of opportunity, but don't give up, and that's the message that I take around the world now, particularly in disadvantaged communities, and so many people have come up to me and said, Jane, I want to thank you because you taught me that because you did it I can do it too. So I went to Africa wanting to live with animals and write books about them any animals. It was Louis Leakey the pale. Alien tala gist anthropologist, it was he who wanted me to go and study chimpanzees because he felt would help him have a better feeling for how stone-age men and women might have behaved. So if chimpanzees wanted to motivating Embiid once you initially encountered them, did you feel an instant affinity with them. They ran away. Instant affinity with you fill weeks. They'd never seen a white pick four. They would just take one look and run off an honestly by that time. My mother had come because the authorities. It was British then was the remainder of the crumbling British impose Tanga ten. Yeah. The authorities said they wouldn't take responsibility. It was ridiculous. Have a young girl going off on her own into the forest. So it was hard work to get the money in the first place. No degrees street from England. Then eventually, they're authorities said well, all right, but she has to bring a companion and so mom volunteered to come. And it was she in those early days. She boosted my morale United get back every day. I was up in the mountains before light and back just around dusk being depressed run away. Again, they'd run away. She said, but Jane, you know, with your binoculars you found that peak and your observing how they make nests night you learning about that called see the kind of food set eighteen. You see that sometimes it traveling alone. Sometimes it'll family group sometimes many of the small groups coming together when those delicious new fruit available. So.

Africa Jane Louis Leakey England
"louis leakey" Discussed on Animal Radio

Animal Radio

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"louis leakey" Discussed on Animal Radio

"I mean, as young story Anderson used to hide behind the hand house to to watch the hymns to see where chickens where the eggs came from. I, that's why I hid in a small stuffy in house waiting for a hand to come in. I waited for hours apparently which I think most full year old probably wouldn't have that. I guess that was bone. You know, curiosity and fortunate to have an amazing mother who supported my interest. And although she was really worried because I was lost before our, she didn't get angry when finally rushed towards the house all excited and you know, different kind of mother might have crushed that a curiosity and I might not have done what I've done. You know back when you went to Africa, that was kind of unusual for a single woman to go. So you were you ordered to bring your mother. Did your mother volunteer to go with you on this trip? What a great mom? Well, the first time I went, she didn't come that when I met Louis Leakey, I went on my own and I was invited by school friend. I was out there for about one and hoffy is, and that was when Leakey ASTA if I would do it, and then then there was a yet to wait while he found the money and I hadn't been to college. You see? So it was hard to. Find anyone who had faith in this crazy idea. And then the British authorities in what was then Tanganyika the crumbling remains of the British empire. They refused to meet to go on my own, and that's when mom volunteer had I think leaky to our alma bit because he wanted someone who wouldn't compete with me or, you know. So anyway, she came for four months. Amazing. What an amazing mom. Gene Jane. I have a question about kind of the preservation of different species when I was a kid. I, I had a grade school teacher that was very opposed to zoos. And when I was in her class that year, she wouldn't allow me to go to the zoo. She wouldn't let her class go at all and wondered how you see the role of zoos as either partners or do you see them more as problematic in preserving primates in the wild on the fleet? Depends on the, you know, there are some cleats that I would never do like Wales adults, and fortunately that's beginning to to get through to people elephants shouldn't be into either because you know that that big in the who isn't a place for them, but they're all getting better and better that educating people. They have great education programs. The putting money and people actually into conservation in the wild am. I know so many people now in conservation who say, well, when I was small, I went and so these animals in the sue and watch them for hours a new I had to grow up and help them. It depends on the sue and the animal, and I've seen exhibits where chimpanzees have large appropriate groups. They have lots of enrichment, which is the main problem with us. You know, the animals get bold, kept people who understand the needs and you know, I think they have a pretty good life. We got to take a quick break..

Gene Jane Louis Leakey Leakey ASTA Anderson school teacher Africa Wales four months
"louis leakey" Discussed on Animal Radio

Animal Radio

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"louis leakey" Discussed on Animal Radio

"Jane Goodall is joining us Dr. Welcome to the show. Thank you very much for inviting me. You know what I, first of all you're speechless because I have so many questions. So many things that I want to talk about as a youngster. I've always wanted to. I loved primates. I still do, but there's really no way for me or the general population to interact or really get to know primates what are you suggest from from somebody who spent a lot of her life living and and really learning primates? How can someone like me get interaction with a primate. Well, I, I believe that Europe primate and so am I. You'll be fairly easy, but I think you mean non-human primates. Anyway. Well, you know that all some really, really good chimpanzees. If it's ensues on the row also centuries, you know where chimps rescued from bad zoos from circuses and from medical research. Lots of people go down to South America and our trips ice and go and t- various monkeys out in the forest. So threat different ways that you can learn about cousins. Your first experience with a monkey or chimpanzee should I say was actually a toy, right? That's right. It was given to me by my father and my was one and a half years old and it the a few of them made when the first sympathy to be born in London, who in the whole of England, I think until his name jubilee because it was the jubilee year. The king and Queen. Everybody thinks that it was because of that toy. I ended up studying chimpanzees, but of course it wasn't because I wouldn't, you know, nobody knew anything about them. They were exotic. I wouldn't have thought it possible. I went to Africa with the goal of living with any sort of animal out in the wild and writing books. That was the goal and I met Louis Leakey and he's the one who suggested chimpanzees. So it was like a kind of strange. I don't know. Could've been any animal for you..

Jane Goodall Louis Leakey South America Europe London Africa England
"louis leakey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:54 min | 3 years ago

"louis leakey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Reason Goodall Galdikas made so, many groundbreaking discoveries was simply the. Amount of time they spent with the primates. They studied Goodall lift at Gumby in Tanzania. For fifteen, years Galdikas stated her campsite in Borneo for more than thirty years this was not, the way male biologists had typically done. Their field, work basically it's get in there get the. Data and get out and I think, women have a different attitude the data is not necessarily everything to them I mean I don't want to, give the wrong impression that all male scientists are, like this and I'll female scientists are like that but. Basically I think we're speaking about different acculturation processes I've noticed that the male scientist frequently we'll get the data and, it will almost be like a trophy Almost. Be like a scalp and, Louis Leakey really zeroed in on. That difference will you tell some remarkable stories. About one rang a tan whose name was. Unnatural from, saying this right sue Gaito told my first ex captive wellpoint ex captive who just clung to you all the time no. Matter what, you were doing whether you were taking a. Bath whether you were trying to change, your clothes in bed when you were sleeping at night that's right That was exactly what he did around, town funds like all primate infants, are very needy and they have, to be on the body of their mother and he would urinate on you throughout the. Night yeah As I. Was covered by tropical ulcers my body was covered with tropical ulcers wasn't a tug years later that I figured on the reason I had all these tropical ulcers was because I. Was, always wet with. Here you write. That your relationship with sukey toe became so intense. That it really was the most important relationship in your life with the possible exception of your relationship with your husband oh that's very true that's very. Town And in fact I think the intensity is what caused problems in the relationship with my husband my. Then husband and I would think it would be hard I mean here you have this this baby clinging to you at night you know here in your husband is is sleeping. Beside, you and he. Couldn't touch me Veto didn't especially like you're you're No it. Was he was just insanely jealous and I, mean relationship was that in towns there was something else that set both Galdikas Goodall apart from their male counterparts. Both became mothers during the years they spent field and they. Raised their children. Alongside the apes they were studying do you think your experience as a mother helped you as a scientist, as you're trying, to Yeah I understood. Like for example when a chimpanzee Martha is approached by another one and she gets all angry child's asleep or something I've thought exactly, the same that the surges irrational anger if something happens that you think is going to harm or disturb your. Own child and so I. Could much, better understand the mother chimpanzees when they. Behaved in what seemed to. Be the same, way and then. You had a child of your own. And you were raising him out there at Dombi as your doing these field studies I raises the, question of whether you learned. Anything about raising your own. Son from the chimpanzees you were studying I'm, quite sure I did I mean I really looked on flows role model she. Was patient and supportive she was. Protective but not overprotected she could impose discipline when she wanted. She provided a. Is secure base for her kids and she supported them if they got into difficulties that's the Hallmark of a, good human mother well there was another convention, as well. In science I mean to some degree it's still there but I'm sure it was. Even more prominent back in the early sixties when you were just starting out and that's that scientists were not supposed. To get emotionally involved with the subjects they studied and it seemed that that you kind of violated that rolling in your study of, chimpanzees let of course I didn't know about when I began I hadn't got any degree of any sort of. Just done biology in high. School that's, why Louis chose me he says you. Know watched animals all my. Life long before, I watch chimpanzees. And I think that having empathy with. The creature you're watching isn't immensely powerful tool it gives you a platform from which you can start. Asking questions I think when you do field work you, basically not only experience the science. And the animal that you study you also get to experience yourself If you don't understand yourself You can't understand the animal that you're.

scientist Goodall Galdikas Louis Leakey Galdikas Goodall Tanzania Borneo sue Gaito Dombi Martha thirty years
"louis leakey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:31 min | 3 years ago

"louis leakey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Today Jane Goodall is one of the. World's most famous scientists she. Showed us that chimpanzees, like humans have very different personalities. And Jamaica several revolutionary discoveries She found that chimps are toolmakers she. Observed them hunting other animals and she also southern wage war on rival, groups of chimps But what maybe. The most surprising piece of the. Story is that when Goodall started, her field study in nineteen sixty she had no scientific training Didn't have any num-, I was at school and left school at eighteen I got a course of training as a. Secretary got a job in London, with documentary films and then decided I had to get to Africa when I was, invited by a school friend so, left my job in London which didn't, pay very well when Thome worked as a waitress saved up my. Wages my tips a return to, Africa and there I met Louis Leakey well I have to say that is. Remarkable when you think about it I mean back in nineteen sixty you? Seem to be the most unlikely candidate to revolutionize our understanding of chimpanzees why do you think Louis Leakey picked you to do this field study Lee told. Me later afterwards that he deliberately picked somebody with no scientific university training because he wanted to send somebody into the field with an unbiased mind and of course back then, in the early sixties the Logist of Europe very reductionist. Humans with the only animals with personalities minds enough of feedings and of? Course I hadn't learned any of that so I went narrowly a hidden gave the chimpanzees names which was pretty should've had numbers and described as vivid personalities. And described many examples of clearly intelligent behavior and, emotions Obviously similar to sometimes the same as us about five years after. Jane Goodall went to Africa peruta Galdikas got the idea that she wants to study a different grape the arena ten which eventually led to. Her own meeting with Louis Leakey when I was nineteen I was sitting in a very large psychology class and the prophets just sort of mentioned the woman living with chimpanzees and I, just knew that this is what I wanted to, do, around the towns. Had not really, been studied in the wild very. Well and there was started this history of people going out and looking for wild around the towns and not being very successful at finding because of this over the years There was the sort of mythology that had arisen in academia and this mythology basically washed it couldn't be. Done how did you first meet loosely I met him again electric CLI and I just went up to him after the end of the lecture started talking to him You told? Him that that you, are the person that he should send to to study rang itunes well I didn't quite say that forcefully I told him that I, wanted to? Study around the towns and asked him for help well he had a whole. Theory of why women would be better field biologists didn't he he was absolutely convinced that he felt. Women were much more patient than men he felt that women. Would not excite the. Aggressive tendencies of the great apes as. Much as men and he really. Believed that women? Were more perceptive than men he deliberately chose women he felt that women made better observers he liked working better with? Women, was he right do you think Well if you look at. Women in an evolutionary perspective you find that an I compare them with chimps to mothers. Human, mothers that a mother would need to have been patient otherwise children wouldn't, do very? Well and they don't chimps woman needed to be able to understand the need. Of a nonverbal creature that's our children before they can speak and also women traditionally if they'd been. Subjugated have been very quick to recognize the little communication signals. In a household so. That they can prevent arguments happening before. They blow up keep children out. Of the way? Of irreparable men You know I think he may be right at. Least a, women in our society and the tests repeatedly show that. Women do. See details, that men don't see saw. Giving example. Experience, I had I was once at the home of internationally known Primatology just happen to be a. Man, and I was looking at pick China's wall and, I said oh so these particular Primate's you know engage in, male male competition final on and he said what do you. Mean, I said well look you, know the finger of one of the one of the males is missing and he looked and. He'd been studying these primates for year I mean there's. A, picture of them on, as well to me that's funny he said I never noticed that before that's amazing yeah he had never noticed that part of the. Finger of one of this study animals was missing These, were revolutionary discoveries I mean. For instance. When, you saw a chimpanzee using a tool can you describe.

Jane Goodall Louis Leakey Africa Jamaica London China Secretary Lee Europe Thome five years
"louis leakey" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

04:40 min | 3 years ago

"louis leakey" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"And he asked me lots of questions and because I had read and read and read about Africa unanmous because I spend hours and the natural history museum in London I could on so many of his questions. So when I left school aside said, we didn't have enough money for university, but I, we had enough money for Secretario. Franks had to get some money, right? And it was boring, tedious light and enjoy the tool. But when I met Lewis and he'd taken me around us meal, these questions, he then imparted the information to me that. His set could free had suddenly left the week before and he needed secretaries. His me done this boring, secretarial dumps it co, terrier jobs, pretty good secretary. And that got me in, I mean, doesn't it show how strange life is that? Things are meant to be totally believe things meant to be central saying, and I believe it's the case that he also, you know, in some ways people, I don't know if people necessarily recognize the connective threat here, but he also helped to spark the careers of the unfussy right with the gorillas in Rwanda and Barut go Deka scall- rang attains and I was number one. You're the first? Yes. But I wonder, you know, I've I've gone back and read a lot of other interviews that you've given things that you've written some of the books and articles and the way it sounds. I know what the times were different, but it sounds like he was also to some degree a little forward. You were twenty three year old girl and he was a fairly aggressive pursuer of you, wasn't he? Even though he was a married man, I wouldn't call him aggressive. He was complicit captivated. Sure. And there was a time when you know, because he was talking about may study the chimpanzees and it was nothing explicit, but a feeling that, well, I know that leaky really would like to, oh, let's be explicit. Take me to bed. I don't want to do that. And and it, it bothered me that Pepsi fi say no l. be denied this open -tunities to do what I've always wanted to do, but I must say up, -solutely leaky, never EPA. He never pushed this never. So you just kinda knew it was there, but it was never indicated, but it was never. He was never never ever aggressive about it. Never. Okay. I'm glad to cleanser hair was important to make that. Apparently I'm told that because I wasn't interested in this sexual side of it that he approached somebody else. Fortunately, for me, that person nothing to do with sex approached her because he thought she might also gun study chimps. But fortunately she said, no, and she didn't want the 'isolation. This was after you've now been working as his secretary for a little while so. But I guess the big thing we should have the sizes. This meant that you had decided you're not going back to England, right? So you stayed, how did your state? But I had to go back while he tried to get money for me to study the chimps. He'd been. She got money from a wealthy American businessman who had a tool factory and was interested in Louis Leakey's were with fossil humans that early to losing stone-age. And because of that, he decided six months money Jane to go. And we'll see how she does chronologically. So you go there to visit your friend, you meet leaky, you work for him as a secretary for several months, but sit over six months. I saved up enough to come out. So she comes to visit you. He now says, it might be interesting for you to go and get. Dential essentially so that you can do more academic sort of work for us or that only came later where later that was. So after six months, what happened was up to six months..

Barut secretary Franks l. Africa Secretario Louis Leakey Rwanda Jane Lewis Pepsi EPA England six months twenty three year
"louis leakey" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

05:14 min | 3 years ago

"louis leakey" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"My father gave me too early and mole. My parents friends that you can't give a small child. I was one and a half years. She'll have nightmares, and jubilee became. I mean, I took him everywhere and I still have him by the way. That's great. Still have him. He doesn't have much have partly of love you take him, but partly moth, I think so put he has this assumption that because of jubilee, I was fixated on chimps, and that's what. It's not true because back then thinking about chimpanzees was so exotic? Yes, I wanted to go live in Africa and live with wild animals and write books about them because of Dr. Doolittle does nothing to do with usually read the Dr Doolittle could do little yeah. Where Dr Doolittle is taught to speak animal language ways, parrot Puneja and hope by goodness. How I wanted to parrot to teach me on. So you know, when I finally got invited to Africa, stay with a school friend, I had no, no dream of studying chimpanzees. They exotic. They were way beyond anything that we could possibly imagine. It was just Chanz that Louis Leakey wanted somebody to go and study. Chimpanzees fun. Me one one last thing before we get more into Louis Leakey Tarzan is this legend or truth that you were quite an emerald with Tarzan as when I was ten years, old war was still raging and I don't think children's books even printed back then we didn't have any money, but I used to spend hours in a second hand bookshop, and on this occasion in ISIS, save up my few pennies pocket money. And I just had enough of this little book toss. Anna, the this is pre television. Pre Johnny Weissmuller. And I took the book comb and Koos fell passionately enough in his glorious Lord of the jungle was incredibly jealous when he married the wrong Jane. That is true. Did you ever go to the movies as well where it was? My mother say, we had very little money. She saved up when the first Johnny Weissmuller movie came over to the UK England. It was then. And after about five minutes, I burst into noisy tears. She had to take me out chain. What's that wasn't toes on. This is important for one reason which people don't think about back then there was no TV and you read a book and it was your imagination. So I imagined the Tarzan I was in up with and it wasn't Johnny Weissmuller. And you wanted him to pick another different Jane. But you know today kids don't have that opportunity to imagine everything's on TV or the internet. And in fact, they mostly even bother to read books. They see it on TV so stunting the immagination of future generations, which is tragic. Most of your social and economic peers. I would assume we're not going off to Africa at the age of twenty two, twenty three as you did in nineteen fifty. Seven. Can you share what was going on in your life at the time? You got an invitation to go there and then also what brought about that invitation? Well, only schoolmates, you know, in those days, women didn't really have careers. You messed about. You could be an air hostess, or you could do secretarial, which is what I did because we couldn't afford university, but expect. To get married, that was it. So husband would come along and you'd raise a family. That was that was how it was back then to about the early fifties. And so when I was invited to Africa by school friend, whose parents had moved to Kenya, I went there and that's when I heard about the late Louis Leakey and went to see him at the museum, and he took meal around in that history museum in Robie, but you just called called him right discount called him and said what I said. Can I come up and see to talk about animals? And did he say, who are you know he didn't. He, he just said, all right, he hated the telephone to thirty birth. He said, yes, if I'm here, I'll see you basically that was it and he was quite famous, right? I mean, as Zola's paleontologists. Absolutely. But I didn't know that I was, you know. I was just told if you care about animals, you should meet Louis Leakey. So bring up Louis Leakey and say, I want to meet you talk about animals and when you met him, what happened? So when I met him Tappin does he took me old around the museum?.

Louis Leakey Louis Leakey Tarzan Johnny Weissmuller Africa Dr. Doolittle Jane Puneja Koos Anna Zola UK Kenya Robie England Tappin five minutes ten years
"louis leakey" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"louis leakey" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Hi, everyone. Thank you for tuning into the children. Thirty fifth episode of awards chatter the Hollywood reporter's awards. Podcasts. I'm the host Scott Feinberg, and this very special episode is presented by the prime original series. The marvelous MRs Mazel now nominated for fourteen EMMY awards, including outstanding comedy series and outstanding, lead actress in a comedy series for Rachel Brosnahan's performance as midge, Mazel, considerate, marvelous in all categories. My guest today has been called the most recognizable scientists in the world. And one professor has said of her quote, what Albert Einstein is to physics. She is to the behavioral sciences close quote for fifty eight years now, she has been traveling to Gumby a jungle in the western Goma region of Tanzania to study chimpanzees her research. There has resulted in numerous landmark discoveries most notably that chimps like humans. But unlike any other animals construct and use tools and also are not as had been widely believed that. Djiboutians as Louis Leakey the world renowned paleo, anthropologist and archaeologist, who I center out into the wild telegrammed in response to these revelations quote. Now we must redefine man redefine tools or accept chimpanzees as humans. Close quote in recent years as she has devoted more for time to traveling the world to educate people and inspire them to protect chimpanzees and save the planet. Her fame has only grown. She was made a commander of the order of the British empire in nineteen ninety-five and Dame commander of the order of the British empire. In two thousand three, she was awarded the French legion of honor in two thousand six. And today at eighty four, she is the subject of a massively acclaimed documentary Oscar nominee Brett Morgan's Jane which had its world premiere broadcast on National Geographic and NAT..

MRs Mazel commander Scott Feinberg Albert Einstein Tanzania Rachel Brosnahan EMMY reporter Louis Leakey Brett Morgan Oscar professor Dame Djiboutians midge Jane fifty eight years Thirty fifth
"louis leakey" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"louis leakey" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Didn't know you can night women is it called night is that a night that's the cut the car spun ding to sir i guess but for women no it's not dame it's more like damn thank you so i soon you agree that this everything she described there in her profile is is what makes good scientists accepting what goes wrong curious to the point of risking your health and the concerns of all others who care about you well back in the nineteen sixties a jane goodall with no formal training in science at the time i mean holding aside her four year old exploits the fact is in the real world people look at what your resume which you'll get your degrees in science she had no formal training and science and she went alone into the tanzanian juggle to study chimpanzees which by the way had never been done before so i asked her how and why she found herself on that path without having any science background at all certainly not anthropology let's check it out so the nineteen sixties there's of course we're in the cold war we're going to the moon and you're thinking about chimps i'm desperately trying to get into their world and find out about them if no one had really done that before then you're not following in anyone's footsteps now and my mental dump to louis leakey paleontologist spent his life searching for the remains of the earliest humans in africa it's not even hughes looking for chimps or he's looking for something on route to humans if his argument was okay about sixty million years ago this an apelike human like creature and.

jane goodall louis leakey africa hughes sixty million years four year
"louis leakey" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"louis leakey" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"University so i had not been to college and i went to africa because my dream when i was ten was to go to africa live with wild animals and write books about them women didn't you know didn't have women scientists that milton that sort of life and everybody said dream about something you can achieve but my mother said if you really want something you're going to have to work extremely hawed take advantage of opportunity but don't give up then that's the message that i take around the world now particularly in disadvantaged communities and so many people have come up to me and said jane i wanted to thank you because you told me that because you did it i can do it too so i went to africa wanting to live with animals and write books about them any animals it was louis leakey the paleontologist entrepot logist it was he who wanted me to go and study chimpanzees because he felt would help him have a better feeling for house donate men and women might behaved so if chimpanzees wanted to motivating ambition once you initially encountered them did you feel an instant affinity with they ran away we'll to instant affinity with you fill weeks they'd never seen a white tape pitfall they would just take one look and run off an honestly by that time my mother had come because the authorities it was british then was remains of the crumbling british impose ten content yeah the authorities said they wouldn't take responsibility was ridiculous have a young girl going off on her own into the forest so it was hard to get the money in the first place no degrees straight from england then eventually the authorities said well all right but she has to bring a companion i'm so mom volunteered to come and it was she in those early days she boosted my morale unite get back every day i was up in the mountains before light and back just a brown dusk being depressed they'd run away again they'd run away she said but jane you know with the open culas you found that peak and you're observing how they make nests night you learning about that.

england africa milton jane i louis leakey
"louis leakey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"louis leakey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Craig federighi one of the most famous scientific experiments of the 20th century was a series of pioneering fields studies of the great apes many studies were all done by women there was jane goodall studying chimpanzees diane fossey was mountain gorillas and brutal galdikas with a rang at hands and these three women the so called trimbe aides were personally chosen by the legendary paleo anthropologist louis leakey and leaguie had a theory he thought that if we could get really detailed field studies of the animals most closely related to us we might discover and how our own ancestors evolved he also had another theory it should be women not men who did the research steve paulsen as our story today jane goodall is one of the world's most famous scientists showed us that chimpanzees like humans have very different personalities and she made several revolutionary discoveries she found that chimps are toolmakers she observed them hunting other animals and she also southern wage war on rival groups of chimps but what may be the most surprising piece of the story is that when could all started her field study 1960 she had no scientific training n had any nonly was at school left school at eighteen i got a course of training as a secretary got a job in london with documentary films and then decided i had to get to africa when i was invited by friend so left my job in london which didn't pay very well when tone worked as a waitress saved up my wages of my tips gotta return fares were africa and there i met louis leakey well i have to say that is remarkable when you think about it had been back at 1960 you seem to be the most unlikely candidate to revolutionize our understanding of chimpanzees at wh why do you think loosely keep picked you to do this field study lee told me later afterwards that he deliberately pick.

Craig federighi steve paulsen jane goodall secretary lee diane fossey trimbe louis leakey leaguie london africa
"louis leakey" Discussed on Radio Motherboard

Radio Motherboard

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"louis leakey" Discussed on Radio Motherboard

"Take away from the film and i think that's what makes more effective you see sometimes when you make social message from see only go to the the only preach to the choir and so it's it's very frustrating because you make these great films but the only people are going to go see them or the people who who already support you i believe with this film because of jane because jane sort of transcends politics i believe transcends politics and chimpanzees everybody loves i think it's a great way to engage people without them feeling make it's a liberal there didn't get over their heads i i do think that the film is is moral and almost a political emac contacts of this is a moral issue not a political issues so to speak that's on display totally apolitical via and i have to be a political that in another at times when you come the time to new literally have to speak out against policy center so terrifying for a buck grandchildren and they're probably okay but what about their children i think that really struck me watching this footage was that this was such a sort of nontraditional way of going about an experiment like i feel like this would maybe not even be something that would happen the east asian of send a young woman in the jungle delivered the chimps than like let's see what happens do you think that we're losing in tight louis leakey sent me for a very specific purpose he was searching for the fossils of stoneage men and women and you can tell a lot from the fossil about what the creature looked like what it was eating from twos where the tools on the living slow but sort of tools leg day but you can't tell about behavior doesn't feel slice so he felt as his now believe generally let us post trump needs in it but anyway rational people do that we had a common ancestor about six million years ago.

jane louis leakey six million years
"louis leakey" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"louis leakey" Discussed on Science Friday

"But at the time when you first went into ghamdi um you you word in emmett her you you did not have training uh how do you think that that helped you do the work that you you and hugo did together that you were both new to this and that you didn't have the scientific training of be others who would have taken the voyage it will perko if nobody who critic queenmakers nobody had done it before that with the luck was sort of out of faith and louis leakey deliberately chose me because he said he won could somebody who's mind with uncovered by the and his opinion sometimes uh not good scientific thinking and you know i completely agree with him who when i got cambridge a phd because he insisted i with code i couldn't talk about competitive having personalities mine capable of thinking and hackney not emotion in i was guilty of antwerp promote his him but fortunately though i was really in in the day could by these clever clever um professors at cambridge i had this one depote culinary for triumph read that in this respect they were wrong and that with my dog you know you crunch hey life in a meaningful way with the dog a cat a bird at cow i didn't care work and not no of course we note the only being personality mine ima you you said earlier that is you look back in this film you you notice all the things that you wouldn't have done now ways in which we've learned how to interact with chimpanzees the obviously no one knew at the time what are what are some ways in which is you look back at this film jane that you see something that you do completely differently with all the knowledge that you have today.

cambridge hugo louis leakey antwerp
"louis leakey" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"louis leakey" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That you you and hugo did together that you were both new to this and that you didn't have the scientific training of may be others who would have taken the voyage yeah well perko nobody who critic queenmakers movie of government that would allow for the out that fifth and louis leakey deliberately terrorist me because he should be one could somebody who mined rip uncluttered by the in his opinion from behind i'm not good crime could include and you know i completely agree with him who unlike aren't cambridge could phd because he unfair i would kodak coca by competitive having personality mine capable of thinking i'm not in my you know i was guilty of and to promote his him but fortunately though i was really in in the day could buy these live at clever man and professor at cambridge i had one depote killing i refer child we've got in this respect they were wrong i met with my dog you know you karn shale knife it in a meaningful way with the dog a character back a cow i didn't care work and not no of course we not the only being personality mind couldn't emotion you said earlier that is you look back on this film you you notice all the things that you wouldn't have done now ways in which we've learned how to interact with chimpanzees the obviously no one knew at the time what are what are some ways in which is you look back at this film jane that you see some thing that you do completely differently with all the knowledge that you have today well the anything that we do differently to have more sophisticated way he recording the data at you know you can use in a chronic gadget uh when i began notebook and pen or pencil in the wet season and hyping it up at night buried in wrong day and then we graduate who hitting alert duckpin on kqed and paper quoted by ina anything really different today and that we no longer have the banana feeding we no longer have any incorrect tune wicket tim contains but other way that the really gone on very much the same i'm john and costly and this is signs friday from pri public radio international and we're talking today was oxygen good all if you.

cambridge professor hugo louis leakey kqed tim
"louis leakey" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"louis leakey" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"And she was with you at this point am i right i first went to africa or by open and that's when i met louis leakey and then he decided i was the person he been looking forward to go and study chimpanzees it took a year for him to get the money because he knows straightout from africa henny mean college finally found wealthy american businessman who said okay will give have money for six months and then the authorities in what was then tanganyika remained the british crumbling empire the authorities didn't want to take responsibility for this young girl named said no but leaky never gave up so in the end they said well she has to have somebody with her and so my mother volunteered to come and once you were kind of on the ground there you you didn't find it tremendously easy to interact usually they're they're interested in in directing beaten find it so easy it first hour at first state never seen anything like this whitegate before and they would take one luke kuhn and vanish into the forest so it was getting more and more and more worrying so there're was my dream i was in my dream and yet i knew if i didn't see something exciting before the money ran out that would be the end but you did in in the end you saw quite a bit there was interesting added head of at player it played out at and and i again have to acknowledge that it was my mother who boosted my morale in those early days pointing out what i was learning even though they ran away i was still from hype vantage points learning a lot fight them.

louis leakey luke kuhn africa six months
"louis leakey" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"louis leakey" Discussed on WSB-AM

"They cooked them in know restaurants when it cook lobster it has to be alive and a put it in hot water but no this judge says that's cruel so rather than keeping lobsters and other press stations refrigerated the court said it was already common practice in highlevel restaurants and even superbug keep then in oxygenated water tanks at rome temperature shane to be i think that's news we can lose whoa whoa ow the piece of news you're going lose democrats oh god to do way peak in in the senate they are basically upset that the senate republicans are trying to craft the healthcare bill they say behind closed doors so they're gonna do a they're gonna plan a day of speeches in the senate what a waste of time behind closed doors not the speeches are they said behind closed doors at that oh old bernie he's gonna blow a gasket oh via he would know they are saying that the republicans of in a bill behind closed little but they are gonna louis leakey and on before the senate with a series of democrat senators just talk and incompetent takagaki iave abbott jaba ioseliani well that sounds like a good time to be a dad worked the chamber will be empty nobody is gonna be listening coming out while the wall calls it a seven seven three one zero toward one hundred day.

shane senate highlevel rome louis leakey one hundred day