25 Burst results for "Louis Armstrong"

"louis armstrong" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

01:40 min | 2 months ago

"louis armstrong" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

"After rainy night, the skies are blue on 103rd street, Corona queens. When a pass Mexican bakeries, I can smell the sweet bread. On my way here, I stopped at a club in cafe to buy a large cup of coffee. And just a few blocks away is the Dominican barbershop where I always like to get a nice haircut. Today I live ten streets away from 103rd street. But this is where I was born and lived until I was 6. The houseware grew up still stands, seemed two story house, saint porch that I used to play on. Across the street is the same laundromat. My mom worked at before I was born. Back in the late 1980s, after she came from Mexico. Back in the early 90s, I was into Power Rangers and Selena. And even though I ran around the neighborhood, I had no idea that I was growing up just four blocks from the home of a legend. So wonderful. This has really been people that tune the way I did it when I felt it. Because it's so much in one of world that brings me back to my neighborhood where I live in Corona, New York. I'm in a little Morales and this is Atlas obscura. A celebration of the world's strange incredible and wondrous places. Today, we're visiting the Louis Armstrong house museum in Corona queens. We'll go inside and hear more from the legend himself. I saw a three.

Corona queens Power Rangers Selena Mexico Corona Morales Louis Armstrong house museum New York
"louis armstrong" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:32 min | 4 months ago

"louis armstrong" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Right parts at the right prices 122 million of them can't imagine stalking that many parts We want to get all those shelves eBay motors Let's ride WGN radio arm Raleigh James and yes it goes on in Louis sings in it as well Louis Armstrong.

eBay motors Raleigh James WGN Louis Louis Armstrong
Louie Anderson, Emmy-Winning Comedian, Dead at 68

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:28 sec | 5 months ago

Louie Anderson, Emmy-Winning Comedian, Dead at 68

"More sad news. Louis Anderson, the longtime comic and game show host, he's died at the age of 68, he passed here in Las Vegas after being treated for diffuse large B cell lymphoma. So sad news, he's the guy with the big space between his teeth and kind of a large, funny guy, Louis Armstrong, died at the age of 68 here in Las

Louis Anderson Las Vegas Lymphoma Louis Armstrong LAS
"louis armstrong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:41 min | 6 months ago

"louis armstrong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Night in Harlem by the great Louis Armstrong Now we'd like to play a piece that was actually written for Louis Armstrong That you Santa Claus Another Victor goings arrangement It features knocking on the door drums different sounds stop times breaks that you Santa Claus Is that you That's somebody wondering about it and we have to sing it the wonderful miss Renee Marie She brings the right type of sauce to it Is that you Santa Claus Santa Claus Is that you Sounds like If some preparing for some Christmas sharing but I pause be good I'm in my stocking I can hear an I can is that you Santa Claus show is dark out in the slightest fuck out on my slack in jail oh who that who is it Is it that you Santa Claus are you bringing up present for me something pleasantly pleasant for me if it's just what I've been waiting for would you mind just slipping into the door old ones howling or maybe that's growling my legs feel like my mom made my honey would you reply that you Santa Claus Is out of cloth Is my new Santa Claus won't now sign up you gave me a scare.

Santa Claus Louis Armstrong Victor goings Renee Marie Santa Claus Santa Claus Harlem
"louis armstrong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 7 months ago

"louis armstrong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"He was a huge cultural icon In fact he unseated The Beatles from the number one spot in 1964 with a show tune hello Dolly This is Luis dollar It's beyond the horn playing beyond the singing There's also Louis Armstrong and the storyteller There's this part where he says and you have to forgive me the imitation but he says when out on the lawn there are such a instead of clatter he says and then he rhymes it with and I went to the window to see what was the matter It makes me smile every time But I only arose such a clatter I sprang from my bed to see what was the matter There's a quality of real genuine joy to it It was his onstage persona but as folks told me this was who he was off stage too He had a broad face and a little round belly that ship really left Like a bowl of jelly It's not saccharine It's just sweet and in genuine kind of way It's something I've enjoyed for years And I was raised Jewish And it's a classic in my house And I hope more people take a listen to it and can appreciate it Happy Christmas to all And to all good night a very good.

Luis dollar Louis Armstrong
"louis armstrong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:52 min | 7 months ago

"louis armstrong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That his musical ideas broke the mold Then later career he became this humble colossus He was a huge cultural icon In fact he unseated The Beatles from the number one spot in 1964 with a show tune hello Dolly Hello This is nice It's beyond the horn playing beyond the singing There's also Louis Armstrong and the storyteller There's this part where he says and you have to forgive me with the imitation but he says when out on the lawn there are such a instead of clatter he says clatter And then he rhymes it with and I went to the window to see what was the matter It makes me smile every time But I don't know such a clutter I sprang from my bed to see what was the matter There's a quality of real genuine joy to it It was his onstage persona but as folks told me this was who he was offstage too He had a broad face and a little round belly that shook really laugh Like a bowl of jelly Yeah yeah It's not saccharine It's just sweet and in genuine kind of way It's something I've enjoyed for years And I was raised Jewish And it's a classic in my house And I hope more people take a listen to it and can appreciate it Happy Christmas to all And to all good night a very good.

Dolly Hello Louis Armstrong
The Short and Difficult Life of Billie Holiday

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:41 min | 1 year ago

The Short and Difficult Life of Billie Holiday

"About one of the most iconic jazz singers in history. She let us short and difficult life filled with trial and tragedy though. She had no formal musical training. She had a natural gift for jazz musically and emotionally connecting with audiences. Let's talk about billie holiday. Ellinora fagin was born in nineteen fifteen in philadelphia to teenage parents clarence holiday and sadie fagan soon. After eleanor's birth clarence left the family. He would go on to become a successful guitar and banjo player. But would be largely absent. In eleanor's life cd and ellinora moved to baltimore to live with savings older half sister. Eva miller and eve as mother-in-law martha eleanor would often be left with martha as her mother. An aunt worked jobs that took them out of the house for weeks at a time ellinora. Meanwhile began skipping school at just nine years old ellinora was brought to court on truancy charges and was sent to the house of the good shepherd. A reform school after nine months. Ellinora was paroled. But her homecoming was far from idyllic. Shortly after she returned home she was sexually assaulted by a neighborhood. Man ellinora was taken back into state custody this time for nearly two months upon her release. She dropped out of school at barely. Twelve years old. It was at this time that ellinora still a child store covering from trauma and working as a house cleaner. I heard records by the likes of louis armstrong and bessie smith in nineteen twenty eight. Sadie eleanor's mother moved from baltimore to harlem. The next year ellinora joined her sadie began working as a prostitute for their landlady out of a brothel on one hundred and fortieth street. I some accounts. Elenora ran errands for the brothel by others. Ellinora herself was a sex worker at barely. Fourteen years old over the subsequent three years ellinora began developing her singing. Act eventually landing a performance slot at a harlem nightclub though. She had no formal music training. Ellinora hadn't a neat sense of musical structure and theory jazz and blues genres. Who song rely on a singers. Well of pain and sadness or a natural fit for ellinora though just seventeen. She had already lived and survived a difficult life. She adopted the stage name. Billy after billie dove a favourite actress and started

Ellinora Ellinora Fagin Clarence Holiday Sadie Fagan Eleanor Eva Miller Martha Eleanor House Of The Good Shepherd Billie Holiday Baltimore Clarence Sadie Eleanor Philadelphia Martha Elenora Bessie Smith Louis Armstrong Harlem Billie Dove
"louis armstrong" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"louis armstrong" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Steel on and they play that happen, Do you? They played it as part of the blues right guy from a whip will up on a hill leg grab the new note. They pushed it through a hard until it was born into a blue note. Yeah, and they nursing reversed And then they gave out the new so flat. Gave birth to the blue, the nurse in it, and then they reverse it got out that you gave to the blue. And it was so natural with the iconic Louis Armstrong..

Louis Armstrong
"louis armstrong" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"louis armstrong" Discussed on 710 WOR

"One from the movie. Louis Armstrong, Avian rose I may close in will be the Magics Bill. Okay, This's love the on road When you kiss me in front size, Ondo, I lose my love. No contest. Louis Armstrong owns that song. What do you think? Just Yeah, I agree. It's so much more striking. Yeah, I have a couple aren't just I'm glad to hear you have a couple. The problem is, we're running at a little time. I'll tell you what, Why don't we take a break? We come back. We'll continue for everybody out there. Listening. This is always in fashion Tonight. Anything goes, I'm talking about whatever it is. I want to talk about. I'll be back in a moment, Always. In fact, this's more quiver. Of all things I'm thinking about fashion. But a very specific part of fashion. I'm working from home like most of you. And I'm wondering what I look like when people see me on the screen. I think it's important to still look my best. I believe it's important to still look professional. I'm watching television so many people around the country, all the reporters all the commentators late night people everyone's considering how they look. We haven't added element. When we're in business. You have to feel relaxed..

Louis Armstrong
"louis armstrong" Discussed on Speak Out World: Arts, Activism & More!

Speak Out World: Arts, Activism & More!

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"louis armstrong" Discussed on Speak Out World: Arts, Activism & More!

"Welcome welcome to another episode of speak-out world. S. This devoted to artists and activism and more. August quote, right. Everybody knows that have quote right? So The quote is if you have to ask what Jazz. You're never know that's what Louis Armstrong said. Catch. Out In our guest today. We have. The. Legendary. Musician and founder of jazz matters at went in Janice Williams..

Louis Armstrong Janice Williams founder
What Have We Learned From Elijah Wald's Escaping The Delta

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:02 min | 2 years ago

What Have We Learned From Elijah Wald's Escaping The Delta

"It's time to let it roll. This is your host Nate Wilcox and we're doing a special. What have we learned episode once again with my friend and colleague Dr? Larry Campbell Yuri welcome back. Good to be here can't get good so today. We're GONNA. Look back on. Elijah Wald's book escaping the Delta and my interview that we did with him. and. We picked us up this book in that episode because. Other than Ed. Ward who basically taught me everything I. Know about analyzing music is a cultural history. Elijah Wald's books, this one and how Beatles destroyed rock and roll, which we'll talk about the next episode of what have we learned. Really expanded my mind because it took. It's a revisionist take on what has been disagree romanticized history of Robert Johnson, and the Delta Blues and found walls attempts to reevaluate Johnson. From the perspective of his peers and contemporaries, basically the black African that African American Blues Fan of the Nineteen Thirties and. Rather than from the perspective of generally white blues, fans of the nineteen sixties to now so it just totally blew my mind I tried to capture that to great interview. But the main point that the book put across that Robert Johnson was just a human being who sang and played beautifully. He wasn't a mythical figure. That probably wasn't really devil at the crossroads he wasn't. A country Bumpkin? He was a sophisticated sharp-dressed cat who travelled widely who listen to all kinds of music, not just what he heard live in the delta, but listen to the radio listener guards and learn so having said all that. How do you think we did did did I get that across in the interview with walled? Yeah, I think the book and the interview with Wall. You know Really, helps a flesh out. You know the the basic ideas that you were just talking about. And really helps to make it clear. that you know the blues artists of the late Twenties and early thirties in the early twenties really. Physically people that they were professionals. That they were participating in You know the creation of. New Cultural forms new sort of musical expressions. While at the same time. trying to freeze their audiences. Who had know? Fairly sophisticated demand and varying labs. Right so that the artists themselves as you suggested had to have A. Wide ranging set of skills, they had to have been aware of those sort of traditional musical expressions, and you know like in the case of the blues, things like Hollers and loans, and that sort of thing well also being aware of of popular music. Which by the nineteen thirties you're talking about. Artists like Duke. Ellington and Louis Armstrong and and People that are appearing in films on the radio, etc.. And so the picture of Blues. As this sort of backwater expression. Rural Culture Coming from people who were simply oppressed and trapped and you know on some level were expected to the ignorance. And poverty stricken just didn't hold you know I mean. You couldn't can be successful blues artists if you travel the country and rags. showed up at. Various venues unable to relate to modernizing audiences. And I think I think the book captures that really well. and. I thought your interview with Wall. Made that clear.

Robert Johnson Nineteen Thirties Elijah Wald Wall Larry Campbell Yuri Nate Wilcox Ward A. Wide Louis Armstrong Ellington
"louis armstrong" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:33 min | 2 years ago

"louis armstrong" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The Louis Armstrong house museum in queens New York he died last week at the age of sixty six Armstrong did have some pretty powerful things to say during the civil rights movement what are what are some of the statements he made perhaps the most famous one is when the little rock crisis was unfolding Lewis was out in the Boondocks in North Dakota and a local reporter knocked on his door to interview the famous Mister Armstrong who's in town Louis at that time was watching the television news broadcast about little rock and he let loose with both barrels he said that president Eisenhower was two faced and have no guts he called governor Orville Faubus an uneducated plow boy he said the way they're treating my people in the south of government controlled a hell the reporter wrote to stop took it back to his editor the editor knew exactly what he had and and shoulder to Lewis and Lewis approved it wrote solid at the bottom of the sheet got published I got picked up by the Associated Press and went out all over the world that's the most famous statement Lewis made about civil rights but in his dressing room tapes and his manuscript you can tell that Lewis as a rule felt that he could do more for the civil rights struggle by being Louis Armstrong by performing by knowing his fans by traveling around the world and that's that's the tact he took he also wrote about you know his pleasures in his journals and one of the pleasures that he wrote about was smoking marijuana which he did from the age of twenty six on and when he started smoking weren't any laws against it he wrote it puzzles me to see marijuana connected with narcotics dope and all that kind of crap it's actually a shame well it's true he was he was a lifelong pot smoker and having said that Lewis was also the consummate professional he was always on time and ready to play and one of the most creative people this century or any other century he he would speak about his pot smoking in in his writings and in the tapes you know just in casual references it was no secret that he he smoked marijuana I I think one of the most amusing things that comes to mind there was a buy Jada fee of Armstrong published that mentioned in passing that mezze mezze role did arrangements for the Louis Armstrong orchestra in the thirties and I and other people read that and say Gee that doesn't sound right I mean mesmas Rowe was part time clarinet player but he didn't have the technical facility do arrangements for a for a big band where on earth did that come from well a couple of years ago we acquired a copy of an Armstrong letter from the library of Congress a letter that Lewis wrote to medicine as role in the nineteen thirties and he says and essence dear men as we're doing a tour of Europe and I need some arrangements now you have to understand that mess Mastro was Louis Armstrong's pot dealer he says mess I need some arrangements I need enough for Rangers the last six weeks and I need some really good arrangements and I'm wiring the money to the American Express office in Paris and you dig Daddy I know you'll understand so apparently the biographer had seen this letter and not not really understood what Lewis was saying one of Armstrong's big hits in the mid fifties was Mack the knife which is you know the Kurt vile brutal Braxton from the Threepenny opera and with Armstrong it became this big pop hit there's a recording that he made with Lottie lanyard of the song and then yeah by this time was was the widow of of Kurt vile and she of course was in the original production of Threepenny opera her style of singing is singing is is much more of a theater music style not the kind of behind the beat jazz style of Armstrong and on this recording it seems to be Armstrong session and he's coaching her in the kind of rhythm that he wants and I think it's really fascinating to listen to him control the session and coach Lenya so I thought we could give this a listen anything you want to say about this track well we have tapes of this in the Armstrong archives it is fascinating a lot to learn your has come by this recording session and Lewis is coaching her on on the coda on the tag to Mack the knife and she just can't get that final syncopation and Lewis is so gracious and so patient whether it is really a great example of of these two together Michael because well a good luck with your work with the Armstrong house an archive thank you so much for talking with us thanks for your interest no we the right he now that he back then yeah that was was right now she liked it dot com Matt Slocum he mmhm that came down good back in one to three hello just read is out now he but that's our guess that masses of straight line rental yeah not bad man bone back into one through three yeah that not a great vocal right from the planet right okay hello hello the shark that's what I thought I was right now okay so now that Matt is it's already taken care of all the way all the same sure good job he that's Louis Armstrong coaching singer lady Linda from a recording archived at the Louis Armstrong house museum Michael Cogswell was the executive director of the museum he died last week Cogswell spoke with Terry gross in two thousand one his final project is a twenty three million dollar education center across the street from the Armstrong house to hold the archives and exhibition gallery and a jazz club the construction has been halted because of the.

Louis Armstrong house museum New York Armstrong
Learning How to Forgive

Criminal

08:59 min | 2 years ago

Learning How to Forgive

"I don't subscribe to the idea people a- bad and I I don't subscribe to that because I believe that these inherent good in everyone. I think that crime It's all to be honest with you. Very relative What might be criminal in. Some communities are excused in other communities. Delia Muna was born in London and raised in Nigeria. Her mother is Nigerian and her father is from Sierra Leone. She went to college and Law School in the United States and then she became a public defender in Washington. Dc main motivation for me is that throughout my time as a public defender. I and as a Christian I operate from the presume that if Jesus swear on earth today he'd be a public defender. He was always defending people who were accused of various Nefarious activities Tax Collectors and you know Prostitutes and and and people that we will consider unsavory but as a public defender. I got to learn and appreciate that. Each person has a story and that my role as an advocate was to tell that story in a way that will shoot to the lead experiences to give voice to them I learned to appreciate the fact that but for the grace of God Right. and fat Human beings have the capacity for change today. We're talking about forgiveness. I'm phoebe judge. This is criminal I'd like to ask you about where you grew up in Nigeria and and how growing up. You saw forgiveness injustice Criminality in differently than than we do here right. So we're very very communal society and so compared to to the US where It seems that we exist in silos and a very much individual pull yourself up by your bootstraps sort of mentality in Nigeria we. It's sort of those mentality that if one person is going astray we all collectively are going astray. And so the idea is You know we rally people will rally around you to make sure that That you don't go astray and that if you do that there are resources particularly human resources to help you Sorta recalibrate Your life trajectory And that's really critically important. I guess it's kind of a flip the whole idea in on the head which is in other communities when someone does something bad it it looks bad upon the community. Exactly as opposed to here. Where if someone does something bad when this person must be intrinsically bad or evil and let's remove them from the society? Oh yes absolutely. You absolutely correct here. It's you did something you something that you did and in other communities. It's like well what? How did we fail? How could we have prevented this? And now that you have indeed some done something. What can we do to restore your humanity? What can we do to make sure that you become one of us The question becomes. When is enough enough? When is punishment enough? When can we say you have paid your dues? It's time to welcome you back into society because we still think you've got value. We still think there's much more that you can add to being a productive member of our community in two thousand eleven a twenty five year old woman Nimble Shonda Armstrong drove her car. Into New York's Hudson River with her three children inside later. Leshan to Armstrong's neighbors came forward and said they knew she was in trouble. The often heard yelling. Her landlord leader said that she asked him twice in six months to change the locks on her doors. Delia Luna wrote about Louis Armstrong and other women who'd committed similar crimes she asks how is it that American society bears no social responsibility to support. Its most vulnerable members. In raising their children she proposes that we watch out for each other not just watch each other but really look out and offer help as she says communities in Nigeria. Often do she writes. It's imperative that the legal system take steps to foster a sense of communal obligation towards the most vulnerable members of our society single mothers and their children in two thousand fifteen delia. Muna was made clinical professor of law at Harvard. The law school's first Nigerian professor. She's also the deputy director of Harvard's Criminal Justice Institute where Third Year Law Students under supervision. Essentially work is public defenders. We asked her to tell us about the cases that stay with her the most and she says it's the ones where children are charged with crimes. She told us about representing a nine year old girl and she was charged with assault with a dangerous weapon and she was charged because while Throwing ten from classroom. She picked up a book a textbook and threw it at a teacher. Miss the teacher. The book hit the wall The child was promptly taken to a The principal's office and when she got there she was then arrested put in handcuffs. She was transported at the back of a police car and brought to the courthouse. She had to be placed in isolation so in solitary because she was nine years old and I went into speak with her so she is tiny little person and I was trying to explain to her. What my role was as her attorney and advocate and she had no idea Just even process in what that meant and she looked at me and she said where's my grandmother. And when can she take me back to school and then she said to me? Do you have any food? I'm hungry and so there. I was trying to figure out how to advocate for this child. In light of the very serious thing that she'd been charged with I mean assault with a dangerous weapon. book But clearly this child at other issues that we're contributing to Her behavior in class that day and he really will have been a very cruel and capricious thing for the legal system to continue. Its prosecution of her. It's easy to forgive a child and to consider all the social factors in play in their behavior. It's not always so easy to forgive adult. Well that's correct I it's easy when you paint a picture of a very vulnerable child but what about those evil adults and evil men and women who do such terrible things well. The truth is A An an an evil adult or terrible adult just didn't You know pop from just didn't become that way. They've had most likely a terrible childhood A childhood where they will likely abused likely neglected. And so you have children who wants. That's happened to them will indeed grow up to be adults who then Commit crimes I don't ever believe that an adult just takes actions without something being the catalyst for whatever it is. They that they've done and so it might be easier to forgive a child but if you delve deeper into the experiences the lived experience of an adult I think it makes it easier to forgive them once. You understand what it is that they've been through The prism through which they view life and sort of. What's happened to them?

Nigeria Delia Muna United States Assault Sierra Leone Shonda Armstrong Harvard Delia Luna Hudson River London Washington New York Louis Armstrong Leshan Deputy Director Principal Attorney Professor
Marsalis jazz family patriarch dies of virus complications, son says

Morning Edition

02:55 min | 2 years ago

Marsalis jazz family patriarch dies of virus complications, son says

"Ellis Marsalis the pianist educator patriarch of the most celebrated family in jazz died Wednesday in New Orleans he was eighty five his eldest son the saxophonist Branford Marsalis said his father died of complications from the coronavirus Ellis and his wife Delores raised six sons four of them became jazz musicians including Wynton del fail and Jason he was also a mentor to Harry Connick junior and generations of other musicians when Tompkins is host of the program music inside out which airs on W. W. and in New Orleans when I mean this is just such a huge loss it is a tremendous loss for us in the world and for music lovers everywhere actually Ellis Marsalis was committed to being a teacher and she wants to be a musician so he can help people all over the world and Louis Armstrong we appreciate modern and you know the Ellis park center here in the night or are they called him a master educator you know he came up in the nineteen forties and the nineteen fifties when modern dress had no money in the world nothing there were no schools but by the end of his life you know nearly every jazz musician who's from here or the study had a story to tell about how Ellis Marsalis inspired we're talking about Terence Blanchard thank you your contact book now thank you for that finally Nicholas Payton list goes on and not including of course Marcella they have wonderful careers at I was gonna ask I mean how much did he pressure them to go into into music and jazz in particular well you know what I spoke with him he you know he said that he never rule breaking news out of it you know he said he would wait at if the music and if they wanted to learn to keep with that by wanting them I know pointing out certain artists that they should be listening to and he was also very good at keeping brutal but very useful advice to players you know and that runs an internet connection here but always remark on that in interviews you know come quite famous explain elements helps with with top but but you know but they were the better for it and and obviously carry on again and my fellow spokesman center named Ellis Marsalis center for music named after the great teacher you know Ron you know every great jazz musicians have one thing in common and that is that the person is equally our front continue elsewhere what's that and you know if you ever

Louis Armstrong Nicholas Payton Harry Connick Wynton Del RON Ellis Marsalis Center Marcella Terence Blanchard Ellis Park Center Ellis Marsalis W. W. Tompkins Jason Delores Ellis Branford Marsalis New Orleans
The Harlem Globetrotters

The Past and the Curious

09:20 min | 2 years ago

The Harlem Globetrotters

"The Savoie ballroom was a jewel of jazz age. Chicago theatre opened in the nineteen twenties just before people in the United States were hit by the Great Depression which left many Americans poor and hungry throughout the difficult time. The Savoie was a place to find joy on the south side of Chicago. The building was regularly filled with residents from the largely African American neighborhood. Who gathered to dance to some of the biggest stars of the day count basie Duke Ellington Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong? Were just a few of the people who banged out. Tunes as people jibed across the giant DANCEFLOOR. Dancefloor was so big that it actually doubled as a basketball court for the Savoy. Big Five in the late. Nineteen twenty s the five-man team hosted games to fill the slow nights in the ballroom. A young man in cab. Calloway would sometimes seeing during halftime but back then basketball wasn't very popular people cared about contests like horse racing and boxing baseball. Not The five on five game that depended on getting a ball through a hoop. It was a long way from the sport. We know much slower and much lower scoring than today. This team from Chicago would eventually work to change that. But they're Savoie audience could never have guessed how at some point. There was a dispute among the players of the Savoie five and they broke up. Three of them led by Tommy. Brooklyn's start a new team and rename themselves. The globetrotters it was an era of barnstorming. And when not at the Savoy they set out from Chicago to tour the Mid West region of America there were no organized leagues of teams and players in the Nineteen Twenties and thirties. Instead semi professional teams would travel from town to town and earn money playing teams from whatever town they were in sometimes. Businesses might have a team of employees so a barnstorming team like the globetrotters might play against some guys who had spent the whole day assembling cars canning vegetables or even driving taxi caps. Other Times barnstorming might play a team made up of members of a religious group. The House of David. Those guys never shaved so they played basketball with beards down to their bellies. Making James Harden's beard look like a five o'clock shadow soon. A young Jewish immigrant named Abe Sapper. Steam entered the picture with the globetrotters. Abe was a terrible basketball player but his other skills were valuable. He knew a lot of people who did bookings and many of these towns and more importantly he had a car these five teammates and their manager. Abe would pile into his model t like sardines attend camp and hit those cold slick winter roads. It was the nineteen twenties and they understood that random people in random midwest towns might be surprised to find that all five members of the team coming to play their local guys were African Americans. There were very few professional sports comprised of African Americans at this point so they decided to alter their name to help people know what to expect at the time. The most notable and best all black basketball team was known as the Harlem rent which was short for the Harlem Renaissance in the Nineteen Twenties and early thirties. The New York neighborhood of Harlem was an epicenter of black culture and it was a time referred to as the Harlem Renaissance. People knew about these incredible artists and musicians. Who lived there along with the writers like Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston so the globetrotters who were very much from Chicago? Ask themselves how do we make ourselves sound dignified worldly and clearly a team of African Americans the Harlem Globetrotters? Will it matter that? We're not from Harlem that we've never tried it around the globe new super nope cool. Let's pile into a small unheeded car and go beat some people in basketball and they did just that it was remarkable. How good they are. They beat nearly every team from Wisconsin. Illinois Iowa anywhere else they went then they pile back into the car and head on down the road to the next game throughout the nineteen thirties. The team built up quite a reputation. They might have been the best basketball team in the world. No one agrees on how the famous tricks came into the game. A popular explanation is that they'd slip into the fun and flashy dribbles and drives after they safely put plenty of points on the board against their opponent. This did several things one it entertain the audience. Once the actual threat of competition was gone. No one wants to watch a blowout so a fun. Show of tricks kept the locals entertained but also no one wants to watch their local fellas get trounced a group from the city coming in and wiping the home team can really anger a local audience and the Harlem globetrotters new. This trick plays would thrill any crowd and win them over. The focus slowly became not about the final score but about how much fun it was to watch these incredible athletes and their astonishing an often humorous approach to the game. I we win. And then we cloud Abe Saperstein once said now most people agree that the real clowning didn't start until a man named goose. Tatum joined the team. Goose was an incredible athlete. Who could put the basket ball through the hoop with ease? But he also had a keen eye for comedy he found inspiration and funny movies and carefully watched the acts of clowns and other entertainers his favorite gags would show up on the basketball court. Sometimes goose would tiptoe over and pretend to spy on the opposing team's huddle all while making sure the audience in on the joke other times he'd hand the refs at trick ball after a timeout upon dribbling the ball. The referee grow angry because the ball never bounced back up. It just plopped devoid of air on the ground. Sometimes goose would disappear from the court altogether while the game continued only to be found in the audience eating popcorn. He even had a bit where he would pretend to be knocked unconscious on the court. The refs in his teammates would try everything to wake him up. But no amount of shaking or poking prodding would open his eyes. It was only the smell of his own Stinky Shoe. That would get him back up on his feet again. Much to the disgust delight of the audience in Nineteen forty-eight Abe Sapper Stein was with a friend who just so happened to own a basketball team called the Minnesota Lakers. The Lakers were the best team in the brand new professional basketball league which would soon become known as the NBA. The League did not allow black players on any of their teams regardless of League affiliation and regardless of the color of the player skin each man believed his team was the best in the world. They'd never meet in a league as it was so the natural solution was to stage an exhibition game between the Lakers and the globetrotters. It didn't seem so to the men at the time but game between an all white. Nba team and an all. Black semi pro team would prove monumental. Eighteen thousand people came out to watch which was easily twice. As many people as most professional basketball games would attract the time. And despite the fact that the Lakers star center who stood six speed and ten inches tall was seven inches taller than anyone else. On the court. The globetrotters one on a last second shot. It was a powerful moment. The next season those Lakers would go on to win the National Championship. But when they played the Harlem globetrotters a second time for a second exhibition between the two teams. The globetrotters came out on top yet again. The following year the NBA ended segregation and three of those same Laker Whooping Harlem globetrotters Chuck Cooper Nat Clifton and hang designee. Became three of the I four African Americans to join the League and play professional basketball. This was nineteen fifty three years. After Jackie Robinson had broken the color barrier in baseball the globetrotters still continue their entertaining shows today. Keeping the spirit of barnstorming alive. They get a lot of credit for how they support communities and bring joy to so many and educate kids about health. But it's easy to forget about how important they were in integrating professional basketball. They now tour and play with just one team often known as the Washington generals according to most sources the globetrotters have beaten the generals over sixteen thousand times. How many times have they lost though? That question is harder to answer. But it's just a few. The most recent globetrotter loss was way back in one thousand nine hundred seventy one when both teams lost track of the score when clock expired. The generals were ahead. That was not supposed to happen. And people expected the GLOBETROTTERS TO WIN. And it's usually agreed that they will today. It's all about the show the fun and the love of basketball not the competition. This is what made that loss. So shocking reports from nine hundred. Seventy one SE. The stands were filled with silent shocked faces and even a few crying children. Luckily it's been smiles for all since then

Basketball Harlem Globetrotters Harlem Chicago Nineteen Twenties Minnesota Lakers Savoie Savoie Ballroom NBA Harlem Renaissance Chicago Theatre Abe Sapper Abe Saperstein ABE Ella Fitzgerald United States Baseball Abe Sapper Stein James Harden
"louis armstrong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:46 min | 2 years ago

"louis armstrong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Original Louis Armstrong I've got a right to sing the blues right Charles before that with Betty Carter cozying up to cocktails for two the song which is maybe better known at this point for its satirical rendition by spike Jones something that you might have caught if you grew up with the doctor Demento radio shows well outside the original era of the nineteen thirties and forties oriented tune Paul Cavalcanti paging through the song book it's W. NYC new standards dot org this is not just another somebody done somebody wrong song is and so we never learn.

Louis Armstrong Charles Betty Carter spike Jones Paul Cavalcanti NYC
"louis armstrong" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"louis armstrong" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Hello how you doing is new to from down the street I was calling to see if I could just ask you guys to have your company stop parking in front of my house I don't get this fall how you think I got the phone number I don't know if you've got the ball now but but you I'm just asking you to stop parking in front of my house but I said maybe what you want me to do you want to come down there I'm not I'm not I'm not okay I'm sorry maybe I came into Rome okay well I apologize I'm saying this if you got your own spaces Avery on a park in front of my house because the next time I see one of your card in front of my house I'm going to break the windows out one what what about the park in front of my house but not alone what what address till you know where job market there's a lady that was my granddaughter the phone if you want to argue on here are because I'm not that I don't want to go get them with a Louis Armstrong would you but what so I guess I'm not trying to strong arm nobody knows you right I pay my way and I don't want no repercussions I don't want nobody coming after me if you could put your granddaughter back on the phone I like to apologize to the did you hello I just wanted to tell you I just spoke with your grandmother and I told you we we weren't certain things out and I just wanted to get back on the fall with you just to let you know that if you ever talk to me like that again I'm one is how the next so his name is that that is active number seven women have the eighty yeah in the when an I. ninety we got a lot that's the the.

Rome Avery Louis Armstrong
Your Favorite Historical Figures

Chompers

02:19 min | 2 years ago

Your Favorite Historical Figures

"On one side and make little circles with your brush around each tooth three to Kennedy sent us our first historical figure. It's a Lisa Alonzo. alesia Alonzo is a ballerina from Cuba and her beautiful dancing made her famous around. The world. alesia is Kennedy's favorite. Because even after she became partially blind that she had trouble seeing continued to dance and perform as a Ballerina onstage in stage Switzer brushing to the other side of the top of your mouth but don't brush too hard. Our next storm figure comes from Halley. And it's the Queen of the Nile Cleopatra. Cleopatra Cleopatra was the leader of Ancient Egyptians and became queen when she was only eighteen years old Cleopatra spoke several languages led Egypt's armies. He's a man with leaders from land's like Julius Caesar back then. It wasn't so common for a woman to do all these things. That's why how he likes Cleopatra she was a fierce. The male leader switch. You're brushing to the bottom of your mouth in brushed the inside the the outside and the chewing side of each tooth our next Oracle figure is baseball player. Jackie Robinson Andrew Loves Jackie Robinson because he was the first african-american to play in. Baseball's major leagues. Jackie Robinson is such chin important person in baseball at the major league. Honored Him by saying no other baseball player can wear a uniform with the number forty two on. That's the number. The Jackie War swim rushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth. Don't forget your front teeth. Are last historical. Figure comes from Lindsey. And it's the famous trumpet player. Louis Armstrong

Cleopatra Cleopatra Jackie Robinson Baseball Lisa Alonzo. Alesia Alonzo Jackie Robinson Andrew Kennedy Julius Caesar Louis Armstrong Cuba Switzer Oracle Egypt
"louis armstrong" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

03:52 min | 3 years ago

"louis armstrong" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Scare you. screen or screens dot org. I heart radio goes one on one with Josh in Tyler from twenty one pilots to ask because he described the musical cell. way to answer that question yeah let's just kind of some of it we just cut it off here next question yeah people who know exactly what we got we've been asked before describe our music in the words of the great Louis Armstrong there are two types of music there's a good time in the back and we believe it was a good time keep listening to I heart radio for more of twenty one pilots and all your favorite artists. thank. feel. stopping. they made you. can't. you know I have to. first thing honestly. so. KTLA injured ten no one is focus a little bit on the Inland Empire because there are some spots what's a little bit busy could be because this fifteen northbound side of the two ten you know it's just a stall it is actually out of lanes but they want to get it off the freeway you just have to be aware that it's here sixty west of Phillips ranch road that's a new location for this stall okay I think it was an assault was Kartika size why by another vehicle but one vehicle ended up taking off and so there's a lot happening here and the seven ten north right about a larger Boulevard at the offramp a lot of people calling the CHP talking about what they think is a fire here in the same but the five north at.

KTLA Tyler Louis Armstrong Phillips ranch Inland Empire Josh assault
"louis armstrong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:33 min | 3 years ago

"louis armstrong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Lives very. so stop. this. tions and set. okay. good. you. who can tell. you. what is the new. where the new. look at. Nancy Wilson makes an offense of the songs that she takes on look at me now and Louis Armstrong for fats Waller's I'm crazy about My Baby the song book on W. NYC.

Nancy Wilson fats Waller Louis Armstrong W. NYC
"louis armstrong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:23 min | 3 years ago

"louis armstrong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Stevie Wonder songbook begins there in the fall of nineteen sixty five with the tune that would be the first co composition. He got credit on. And it came after a summer of being on tour with the Rolling Stones Stevie wanted to up the ante on. I can't get no satisfaction. And his answer was up tight, which is one of the most exciting records ever made in any category of music, certainly credit due to the driving bass and drums that propel the song James Jamerson. And Benny Benjamin the songbook on WNYC. Here's a relaxed take this is the polar opposite of what we just heard but artists as much in their own element. And having their moment. Louis Armstrong, Jack, tea-garden hoagy Carmichael 's rocking chair. Oh. Rocketship? Gotcha, paul. Cain vets. Doing water you want all the ten. And what Kevin Shokhin fall? Going to wear. Grabbing? Rounded rough rocky. Harry. How you have. Get did chip. Days. Diggers? Rocketship got father Jillette beaten. Came lame by. Pick that up. I got no water far better. Start running. You're going to damn. You can't get from the cabin. But you going. You sit up grab it crabbing. Rocking chair bothers. Ramble, and Harry. In heaven. She. Charito cherry. The time. Get it. Yeah. Rocketship judgment. Does your. Jay. Some time. Happy. Sometimes. My disposition. Deep. Penzone. From lescoe. Sense. Some times. Some times. Twin? Hey. It's calls. That's how. I do. Man, I say. Some time. The. Hey. But. You. It's cold. That's how. She happy win. Lena.

Rocketship Stevie Wonder Harry Charito cherry Benny Benjamin hoagy Carmichael James Jamerson Louis Armstrong WNYC Kevin Shokhin Cain Jillette Jay
"louis armstrong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:59 min | 3 years ago

"louis armstrong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Louis Armstrong up a lazy river, and I hope that your Sunday is going as convivial they just lounging maybe floating, and maybe just kind of unplugging from everything you have to worry about Monday through Friday, even Saturday. Another busy day in this life. Nice that we have this time to catch up with the song book and make conversation with music on Paul Cavalcanti here at WNYC till four o'clock this afternoon about a half hour from now we're going to get back to the topic of NAT king Cole because it is his birthday anniversary his centennial and John pitzer Elliot's as NAT king Cole loving a fellow. Is there is out there? Is the as there is is you is or is you ain't anyway, he'll be here. That's all I need to say. Oh, and this here is a song that stands at its own space an artist who is really only known for one song. And yet she worked for a song factory. It was the Motown music machine with its teams of songwriters and production line of music. My guy Mary wells spotlight on a brief. But spectacular diva moment. Nothing. Stop. Skin. Not. Two. Disney. Muscle. God. Good. Home me. But. Carla Bono fruit that tune in Linda Ronstadt.

NAT king Cole Louis Armstrong John pitzer Elliot Paul Cavalcanti WNYC Linda Ronstadt Carla Bono Mary wells Disney
"louis armstrong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:19 min | 3 years ago

"louis armstrong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Louis Armstrong on the sunny side of the street. Somebody loves me before that. But he is words or even better than I reverse wants. How 'bout that? Thank you to Mahatma. Kane Jeeves of lompoc for pointing that out Nancy Lamont takes it from here. She'll tell you the story of why this song is very apropos at this moment is the seasons change no matter what hemisphere the songbook on WNYC. There is a region in Brazil. Just thought I'd bring that up. There is there is a region in Brazil. I am told where they only get rain once a year. And it's interesting time for the people who live there because they look forward to the rain all year round because it only rains during the month of March and. They're very happy to see the rain come as a time of great joy. There's also a time of great sadness because with the rain comes flooding, and death and destruction. So it's a real dichotomy for for their feelings of the people who live there this great joy in this. Great sorrow at the same time. Now believe it or not somebody's actually written a song about this. Go figure. Antonio Carlos show beam. Stick us the end of. The scum. It's a sliver of last. The sun. He's nineteen is death trap. A fox. The song. Fall. This. It is nothing at all. The window is the end of though. No riverbank dogs the waters of March. It's the end of the strain. He's the the foot the. Stoned. A fight the range of the well the end of the line. Of a spear point. The end of the truckload of. In the morning. Dead. Thrust stuff. Ryan. Doc. Offloaded? A hall. The promise of spring. Bankok the waters. The. John. It's a thorn in your hand cut in your tall appointed grain be up. Sodden stroke. Needle hosting. Over. In the distance the sellers wrote. Riverbank dog salvo waters. The life in your heart. Stick stone. The end of the semester. Lonesome sliver of glass. Devin, the end of the riverbank dog salvo warriors. Omar nobles screening..

Louis Armstrong Antonio Carlos Nancy Lamont Brazil Kane Jeeves lompoc Omar nobles WNYC Devin Ryan John
"louis armstrong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"louis armstrong" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From Faust too inconvenient date. That is our stock in trade right here. The symmetry the book ends in Judy Garland's career Arlen harbored. From over the rainbow to I could go on singing Judy Garland's passing fifty years ago, a half century ago will be noted undoubtedly with a lot of fanfare in New York. At the end of June as it coincides with stonewall, and and so many other things that have settled into become part of history and culture in this town. We're just headlines news stories on that. Steamy morning in the early summer of sixty nine Judy Garland. Louis Armstrong now with an eye towards spring. There is a thing that used to happen. If you grew up at a certain time that we used to think of as a regular part of the weather pattern doesn't happen anymore whether cycles change, but the idea of a January thaw there was a stretch of the month where you might even see a crocus pop up. We're close we're getting there. Louis Armstrong's monumental record of. Let's do it every word and all of his brilliant sly inflections unique and different from each other. This is one of the canniest performances of his spectacular career, Louis Armstrong. Let's do it the songbook on ninety three point nine FM WNYC..

Judy Garland Louis Armstrong WNYC Faust New York Arlen fifty years
Why Youre Bad at Fact-Checking, Reducing Anxiety with Horror Movies, and Why Urine is Yellow

Curiosity Daily

07:57 min | 3 years ago

Why Youre Bad at Fact-Checking, Reducing Anxiety with Horror Movies, and Why Urine is Yellow

"Today. You'll learn about an illusion that shows how your brain processes information white peas yellow and how watching horror movies can help reduce exile eighty but satisfy some curiosity on the award winning curiosity daily. We've got three trivia questions for you. Are you ready question one? How many of each animal did Moses take on the ark question to what's the nationality of Thomas, Edison? The inventor of the telephone question three. What were the first words uttered by Louis Armstrong when he set foot on the moon? Let's recap and see how you did. How many of each animal did Moses take on the ark you said to? But Moses didn't take animals on the ark. That was Noah for number two. What's the nationality of Thomas Edison, the inventor of the telephone? You might have said American, but Thomas Edison, didn't invent the telephone that was Alexander Graham Bell. And what were the first words uttered by Louis Armstrong when he set foot on the moon? Your answer might have been one small step for man. But that answer is a giant leap. Louis Armstrong is a legendary trumpet player whose name is actually pronounced Lewis. Well, he he pronounce his own name Lewis. Yeah. Let me go. Neil Armstrong was the first man in the moon. So why did the questions fool you? It's all in how your brain processes information. This bit of trickery is called the Moses solution, and it shows how bad you are at picking up on eyars in your everyday life. Researchers I came up with it in one thousand nine hundred eighty one study where more than eighty percent of participants missed the problem with the Moses question studies show that illusions like this can lead people to pick up false information about the world's. Fortunately, there's one way around this. When people are asked to play facts checker and correct errors as they read their much less likely to pick up false information than people who just read what they're given. The takeaway is that if you assume anything you hear or. Or read could be wrong than you'll be more likely to notice when it is. But you can rest assured that we check all our facts on this podcast, the award-winning curiosity monthly we all see the same sky and ask why is the sky blue? But we also all go to the bathroom. So how can we never ask? Why is our P yellow lucky for you? We're science nerds. So we've got some answers, and they might tell you something about your health long story short urine his yellow because of a chemical called euro billon or euro chrome. Here's the deal. Your body has a massive amount of red blood cells. But they don't last very long before the need to be washed out of your system. Even after they've passed their expiration dates red blood cells contain iron, white blood cells gobble up that iron to keep it in your body. And then they did that ex red blood so rapper that's called Bill Rubin. Some of that Bill Rubin heads, dear kidneys, your kidneys. Suck out valuable nutrients and transform that Bill Rubin into a molecule that happens to be yellow the. Mount of water in your body can dilute that chemical which is why are urine can means from crystal clear to a deep amber color, so very generally speaking. That's why the more clear your urine is the more hydrated. You are if it's deeper yellow or amber or Honey coloured, then you might want to hydrate a little more, and if it's neon yellow, then you might have excess riboflavin in your system, which means you probably just popped a multivitamin or you drink and energy, drink, really. Yep. Other non yellow colors or possible. And we are not medical professionals. So don't panic, but you might want to see a doctor if it comes out brownish pink or reddish, orange or even blue in green. That's actually a thing that can happen with certain rare genetic diseases and fizzy nece or foaming this can happen sometimes too if it's just fizzy once in a while, then it's probably a harmless hydraulic effect. If it's regularly foaming than it could be kidney problems or excess protein in your diet. say a good horror movie to stimulate your next date night.

Moses Louis Armstrong Thomas Edison Lewis Bill Rubin Neil Armstrong Alexander Graham Bell Noah Eighty Percent