32 Burst results for "Lou Large"

Source: Seahawks CB cut after hotel guest sneak

The Stephen A. Smith Show

01:46 min | 1 d ago

Source: Seahawks CB cut after hotel guest sneak

"Tom Powell Sarah the NFL network just tweeted this that the seahawks cut rookie cornerback chemists sovereign this week. After he was caught on video trying to seek a female visitor into the team hotel per team espn is not reporting this. This is Tom Pal Cerro of the NFL network but a clear message said, and he followed that up saying the woman was wearing seahawks gear in an attempt to skies as a player he is told did not work. So we'll wait and see if that ends up being true but even if it's not my God, what an unbelievably rookie thing to try and do if there is one word we've been talking about show that Manson grace. He put the effort in he with the effort into trying to get her disguised this. Like believed this thing that we're worried about in all of this like well, we're going to laugh at this like this is the kind of thing that torpedoes everyone's efforts. In all of this we're joking about it, but the real aspect is it's the rookie. Younger. And hopefully. The will hold. Hold him accountable especially because if you want a successful season you have and we have to say his name in the public unfortunately because that's what made the NBA players I believe stay on point after seeing what happened to. Lou will so yeah no that the public accountability and it's almost public shaming of it. We talked so much in the NBA they had that chatter line everyone called snitch line, but. Sometimes calling people out like that in the midst of the bubbles the difficult thing but you want to do what's right in terms of health and safety on this absolutely wants you and I think it's no joke when it comes down to it, we understand that everyone has needs and this is why we're joking about the guest list and who's who gets in WHO's not. But the reality is that we've got to play it safe, and if you want to be successful in order to play, don't risk your self or others and don't try to play it. Cool by dressing her up and your team's apparel just to get around come on come on.

Tom Powell Sarah Seahawks NFL Tom Pal Cerro NBA Espn Manson LOU
Miami - Florida man charged with stealing from PPP funds

The DeMaio Report with Carl DeMaio and Lou Penrose

00:46 sec | 2 d ago

Miami - Florida man charged with stealing from PPP funds

"Florida man is suspected today of stealing thousands of dollars from the U. S government program. Aim that helping small businesses impacted by the cove it 19 pandemic Evan Brown reports, The Paycheck protection program is supposed to be helping business owners continued to make payroll even if they were closed due to Corona virus. But now a 32 year old man from near Fort Lauderdale is charged with getting 60 grand in loans from the program just for himself. Prosecutor Seo Jeong. Do we falsified information on the application used stolen Social Security numbers. And had the money deposited in two accounts he controlled. They called him when he tried withdrawing cash at the bank. Louis was already awaiting trial for money laundering,

Seo Jeong Evan Brown Fort Lauderdale Florida Prosecutor Louis U. S
The Strange Myth About Oxygen And The Yin-Yang Gases With AJ

My Seven Chakras

04:37 min | 3 d ago

The Strange Myth About Oxygen And The Yin-Yang Gases With AJ

"Ever since which urine witold that we need a lot of oxygen to survive were to breathe in deeply so that we can get enough oxygen oxygen has been touted as life giving gas that US earthlings can art survive without but is this entirely true or is there more than meets the eye on today's episode we're going to explore this very interesting and profound dodig, and by the end of this episode, you will actually understand in a very simple and easy manner how you're breathing translates to more energy deeper relaxation. Oh mind and better hilt. But before I, continue our request you to please hit the subscribe button on your phone especially if you're on an iphone. Something to the podcast algorithm that ensures that people who wouldn't normally see this episode Ashley come across. So please hit the subscribe button right now. All right. So before we dive deeper I, think we need to take a few steps back and understand how energy is produced in the body from a scientific perspective and this is really interesting when you breeden. You're taking oxygen which goes down your throat into your lungs and into your bloodstream. The oxygen then binds to the him global in your blood cells. Now, the oxygen is then transmitted into the mitral. Contra. And if you remember lessons from school, you'll remember that it is the powerhouse of your cell and through a chemical reaction the Oxygen Burns with the glucose in the cell to form Energy Carbon Dioxide and water vapor, and then when you breathe out. You exist the governor dockside along with the water whip. The energy is then transmitted to wherever it is needed in your body. Isn't that amazing? All of this happens between your in him. An exile. Now oxygen can be likened to fuel that Burns to release energy too little fuel and you really can't start a fire and what happens when they're stu much fuel. Well, there could be a fire or literally an explosion. So what do you think happens when for some reason, you inhale too much of oxygen. You can't be good for you. Right. It turns out that it actually isn't just like when you expose I n to air for long periods of time, the oxygen in the atmosphere reacts for the through a process that is called oxidation to cause rust in the same way when you breathing too much oxygen or a period of time that can lead to oxidative damage in your body. In your disuse in your muscles in the form of inflammation and cell damage. Now, this can be tricky. Because on one side, I'm saying that we need oxygen to produce energy but we're also saying that or exposure to oxygen can lead to inflammation and cellular damage and the key to understanding this lies in a process guard bores effect. Be. Or are bores effect when you breathe in Oxygen Surf. The oxygen binds with your haemoglobin in your blood and a member the oxygen needs to get released from your hemoglobin and has to reach your mic Andrea, which is a powerhouse of yourself for the energy to be produced. So if there's a high level of oxygen. Did remain bound to your hemoglobin and over a period of time this can cause tissue damage and what happens is the free radicals actually start attacking your own system. This can lead to depression Lou Energy Fatigue and immune disorders does this sound familiar the solution to the challenge lies and somehow decreasing the level of oxygen which leads to the hemoglobin releasing or ejecting the oxygen, which can then go to the Powerhouse, off your cell the Mitochondria for energy production. And the UNSUNG hero over here is Garvin Dioxide in other words for cellular hilt optimum energy. You don't just need oxygen, but you also need carbon dioxide for your body to be able to produce energy

Oxygen Surf Garvin Dioxide United States Andrea Ashley Breeden
Politically charged 'black-ish' episode gets belated home

Dave Ramsey

00:40 sec | 4 d ago

Politically charged 'black-ish' episode gets belated home

"News Radio, an episode of a popular sitcom, once thought too controversial to air is now seeing the light of day. But on who? Lou Moore from ABC, Jason Nathan Seuin in 2018 on episode of Black ish that took on President Trump divisiveness in America, racism and other subjects was mysteriously pulled before could never air BC and BLACKISH creator Kenya. Barris said at the time that they made a mutual decision not to run the episode because of creative issues. But now you can see what the fuss was all about The episode. And most importantly,

Jason Nathan Seuin Lou Moore Barris ABC Kenya President Trump BC America
Irish general election: Who is Mary Lou McDonald?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

01:21 min | 6 d ago

Irish general election: Who is Mary Lou McDonald?

"It is easy to overlook. This past February, when citizens of the Republic of Ireland voted in a general election. They voted in unprecedented numbers fishing fine. The party long known as the political wing of the IRA from one, thousand, nine, hundred, three until two, thousand, Eighteen, Shin Feigns President was Gerry. Adams also a long serving senior. IRA commander notwithstanding his long maintained fiction that he was never even a member of the organization shouldn't find will lead into February's election by a new president. Mary. Lou McDonald. This week's guest on the foreign desk. Mary Lou McDonald is also a new kind of Xinfang president having had no involvement with the IRA and hailing from the Republic of Ireland rather than Northern Ireland or as she and other. Irish Republicans prefer to call it the north of Ireland while McDonald clearly represented enough of a break with the IRA to reassure Irish voters who gave Shin finey largest tally of first preference votes. It was not enough to reassure Ireland's of the political parties. The establishment rivals of fina foil and Finna Gale agreed an unprecedented coalition to keep Shin Fain out of government and thereby confine McDonald's ambitions for the moment at least two leading the

Lou Mcdonald Republic Of Ireland Mary Lou Mcdonald Northern Ireland Shin Fain President Trump Shin Finey Adams Shin Feigns Finna Gale Gerry Commander
A Lebanese judge says 16 port staffers have been arrested over this week's deadly blast in Beirut

The DeMaio Report with Carl DeMaio and Lou Penrose

00:40 sec | Last week

A Lebanese judge says 16 port staffers have been arrested over this week's deadly blast in Beirut

"In Beirut. At least 16 people are now in the custody after this week's deadly explosion. Those arrested work at the port where tons of ammonium nitrate was stored in a warehouse Officials believe that's what decimated the city with more than 100 people dead and some 5000 injured. Eragon spokesman Jonathan Hoffman says it's still unclear what the exact cause was for the deadly explosion. The president and secretary of both been consistent that we've reached no definitive cause for The explosion on that information is still coming in. We're going to continue to assess it. About 300,000 people in Beirut or homeless, including 80,000

Beirut Eragon Jonathan Hoffman President Trump Secretary
Hanging with Nache Snow

Craft Hangout

05:18 min | Last week

Hanging with Nache Snow

"Hey. What's up and welcome to craft. Hang out I'm. ELISA CAPITAIN I'm Jesse Cats Greenberg. And I'm Lou Thatcher and let's hang up. Loop Lee. Now we're not gonNA, she's on mute. She wasn't. Here. Stupid. I. Wish I had a cow bell or something fun like a slide whistle. Lou. We've got to. Invest. tweets we. GotTa we gotTa have old school sound sound makers in the attic. We have from my own, Omega the nineteen in the nineteen fifties. They had these like New Year's Eve noisemakers. Those would have been great. was. Groggy. From there like the sound makers that. Yeah. Fun fact all right. Everybody. Last year, as you may remember, Jesse and I attended the makers conference craft -cation in California. And we met so many new friends. So one night, there was a bit of an east coaster meet up. and. I met a really cool crafter and fellow podcast with a show called studio seventy eight podcast, and she is fabulous and finally hanging with us right now. So please everyone. Let's give a warm craft hanging out. Welcome to New Shea Snow Welcome. So excited to be on your pie gas. You guys. Interviewed so many amazing guests on like I feel like honored. Show big time. Stop. So, let's just start off with the basics. Can you tell our craft? Reno's a little bit about who you are and what you do? Absolutely, my name's initiates now been a crafter for life since elementary school. My mom is a crafter to end up going to school for graphic design and my nine to five is billy me dealing with you know designers and web designers and all of that good stuff. Stuff. But on nights and weekends I, just loved to podcasts. Do My side hustles and I've had many many side hustles through the years. But I like making stuff just creating stuff and I'm just like you guys. I just love talking to people in sharing their stories and inspiring women to like pursue their passions be at full time or part time or all the time. So yeah, that's me in a nutshell. So. That podcast, you get to have lots of conversations with creatives and how does that inspire you? Oh. My goodness I mean, you know sometimes I feel like when I get off of an interview with him, like I need to step it up. Just. Wait a minute like, but it inspires me because you can throw around ideas because a lot of times you know people tell me like what marketing tips worked for them or how they ended up making connections in in order to get their Khumbu show line off, you know just started or maybe how they weren't. Initially, artists didn't go to school for design. But now they're like selling design in the narrow inspiring people to like just do what you love. Love in. So for me, I, feel like with each guest. I just pick up like a little tip a little trick, and it just inspires me to want to do more. You know some, that's super rats. I feel the same way with some of our guests. But okay, who's your favorite guest and Y ou? That's that's a hard one. That's a heroin. So if if any gas listened to listening to this and I don't name, you don't get offended. But I actually had her on for a second time. Her name is Nicole crowder. and. She's in the DC area with knee to, and recently she's actually just blown up but the pillow one. Yes. Mention Pillow, right? Yeah. Because she she does the meditation pillows and you know she first started out where she was, you know doing upholstery and teaching people how to upholster their old furniture in an her story. You know she talks about like working a nine to five. Then trying to do her love full-time, it didn't work out, went back to a nine to five, and then she started again when I first interviewed her and man she like learned from all the failures and then took what she learned and she's just being going going going and. And even when I interview her few months ago is wow. So just talking to her, I was so inspired, I love seeing her Kinda like blow up the last couple of months, and even how she did the meditation pillow, she initially was just giving them out for free because of cove nineteen everybody was going through a hard time and she was like, Hey, pay what you can, you can't pay anything. I'll I'll give these to you right analysis set, and this has become like heart of her business. So yes, she's like amazing.

Lou Thatcher Nicole Crowder. Jesse Cats Greenberg Elisa Capitain Reno Heroin Billy California DC
Plug it in: Electric car charging station numbers are rising

HouseSmarts Radio with Lou Manfredini

00:32 sec | Last week

Plug it in: Electric car charging station numbers are rising

"His car makers continue to manufacture electric vehicles. They're running into a little concern, not enough public charging stations to handle the numbers of their building. There are 26,000 public electric vehicle charging stations across the US with more than 84,000 places You can plug in. When the country is gonna need thousands more for drivers who accept vehicles that are powered by batteries alone. Companies are struggling to raise the numbers now because they're investing before that demand climbs

United States
Chicago Man Shot to Death, 4 Hurt at Austin Neighborhood Party

HouseSmarts Radio with Lou Manfredini

00:31 sec | Last week

Chicago Man Shot to Death, 4 Hurt at Austin Neighborhood Party

"One man dead. Four other people wounded. It was a shooting early this morning on the West side to details from WG ends Tonia Francisco. It all started around 12 30 this morning and the 100 block of North Le Port Avenue. The city's Austin neighborhood. Police say the five we're in a backyard party when someone started shooting into the yard. Officers in the area heard the gunshots and caught two men who were seen fleeing the scene. A weapon was recovered and the two suspects are being questioned before wounded said to be in good condition at area

Tonia Francisco Austin
9 Year-Old Child Fatally Shot On Near North Side, Chicago

HouseSmarts Radio with Lou Manfredini

00:41 sec | Last week

9 Year-Old Child Fatally Shot On Near North Side, Chicago

"Have identified the nine year old boy who was shot and killed on the near North side last night, his nine year year old old Gennari Gennari Andrex, Andrex, Chicago, Chicago, police police say say Clearly, Clearly, he he was was not not the the intended intended target target of of the the gunfire. gunfire. WG WG ends ends Judy Judy Wang, Wang, the the nine nine year year old old boy boy was was playing playing in in a a parking parking lot lot at at the the former former Cabrini Cabrini Green Green housing housing complex complex in in the the ninth. ninth. Under Under black black of of North North Cambridge Cambridge Avenue. Avenue. Police Police say say the the shooter shooter walked walked up up and and fired fired several several rounds rounds in in the the boy's boy's direction, direction, hitting him in the chest. The first officers who arrived at the same perform CPR until the paramedics got there. The boy died about an hour later at Lurie Children's Hospital. If you have any information, you could leave an anonymous tip it CPD tip dot com.

Police Police Gennari Gennari Andrex Judy Judy Wang Cabrini Cabrini Green Green Chicago Lurie Children's Hospital
Episode 15: Managing Behaviors During COVID-19 (Part 2) + A New Partnership with SeizureTracker - burst 01

TSC Now

05:31 min | 2 weeks ago

Episode 15: Managing Behaviors During COVID-19 (Part 2) + A New Partnership with SeizureTracker - burst 01

"Database looking rather retrospectively your medical records and clinic visits where errands or patients saucer telling their doctor about past events at sometimes it's hard to recollect what happened or what was the trigger something that seizure truck provides is a patient reported outcome almost in real time shoe, the US alliance we record of what event occurred when in sequence of events medication was you'd provides a much finer level of detail that may be important for researchers looking at or relation kinetic years or medication yours or gain a lot more. Year that will be relevant for analyzed some important epilepsies, such a pervasive issue in the DNC community in Rabat's who were saying about. People with GNC who have seizures is a subset within that subset. There's so much diversity in the types of seizures and the triggers, and so beginning this deigned to drill down even further I think it could really open the door to understanding what sorts of options are out there for people who are struggling with seizures. Yeah and I think though as a community and thing because we think about research as an participating researching something that way think will help future generations and our contributions might not be necessarily apple. Now I think as we think about learning system and the. Way that they'll loops between clinicians, researchers, and patients are for me to share this data. We can really make an implant or we can understand location of our therapy decision faster. We can share that information with researchers and clinicians after and ideally create that Lou that come back and provides different therapies decisions that are validated through as data exchange a. so ideally, what we'd be thinking about research on participating in these data share project and the way enable researchers to get therapy changes and advice to our clinicians much faster and actually hopefully participating research double impact of direct did. And the juicy community have experienced that with past therapies have come to market in a much more rapid pace by mining the data is really going to open the door for more a better understanding of how these infect worked together. So you must have talked about how work that the science has done recently has really empowered more people to get involved in research. You know you don't have to go to a natural history. Data by site in order to participate, you can do consenting remotely and you can even have a mobile bottomless come to your house to Collect Your Bio Samples Gabrielle. Can you tell me a little bit more about what that consenting looks like in how people can get started on that cross? Yes. The first way to get involved the email me at G. Rushing at yes. Alliance stopped work in from that email I will. Get a phone call when the gentle participant or Guardian in phone cost only take about twenty to thirty minutes and I can set you on the phone. Right men there you are celebrities in in purchase meeting it will require you to sign a document that I mail to you. But right after that, I submitted a request, your mobile lobotomy company, they will call you to schedule an appointment at a time and deep of. this home in a one simple in I also will send a little emailing where it will click through where to connect their seizure data. If they aren't already, your razor conveniently will pop up with ability to create a seizure tucker without start using that data, and of course, if they are already in or natural history database or not seen at USC clinic, we will need to get medical records that have information on gist. So you do request that those medical records are either fax to US or veiled. And enter that data all those costs will be covered. So you don't have any additional clinic appointment necessary now insurance ills it's yes. Alliance will cover the cost of sending those medical records to us and as far as follow up after the initiation of project may do ask that you Bolos. Annual blood sample it's not required but as she symptoms do change over time in his medications change, it would be great to get up once or one year in any medical record update for any new tests or imaging or things like that. would be relevant important for research. So all in all the whole process shouldn't take more than thirty to forty five minutes on the back end and mobile's lobotomy appointments. He stopped twenty minutes. So a little over an hour of your time to commit to research, you try to make it as easy as possible if you're interested in learning more about any of these projects always visit gs lions website on page there's an interest form provide your information right on top of the page in I will be up to shortly after midday. Rob You've kind of touched on this seizure tracker benefit from this type of partnership. Really. I think with the partnerships and relationships and Your community building on the database and making it or powerful. I think we can really come together as organizations to better understand see. So we zero Tucker benefit of the community, but the whole community that from the data that you collect and store and share one of our most exciting projects now is something that in a partnership with multiple advocacy organizations. And we have a family realize that at blessed is not just

GNC United States DNC Rabat Usc Clinic Tucker LOU Apple G. Rushing Gabrielle ROB
DUI suspected in deadly Vista head-on collision

The DeMaio Report with Carl DeMaio and Lou Penrose

00:31 sec | 2 weeks ago

DUI suspected in deadly Vista head-on collision

"Hair. The sheriff's Department says it believes alcohol was a factor in a deadly head on crash in Vista last night it happened and an intersection. About 11. Investigators say a woman driving an infinity sedan was going westbound and collided head on into a hatchback going eastbound. A 51 year old man driving that hatchback died at the scene is passenger has serious injuries. The sedans, 22 year old female driver has serious injuries. Her passenger had minor injuries, and they believe alcohol was a

Sheriff's Department
Hong Kong's new security law explained

BTV Simulcast

04:38 min | 2 weeks ago

Hong Kong's new security law explained

"Has denied attacking free speech after biting a dozen candidates from Legislative Council elections scheduled for September. The decision really does come a day after police arrested four youths over social media Post chief North Asia correspondent Stephen Angle has investigated the ramifications of this national security Lou in a new hour long documentary airing later. Friday. In fact, just over half an hour's time is hunger on aged to Steve joins us now with a look at what's in store for the opposition. After these latest move, Steve Well, Obviously, it's a big blow to the opposition if they have 12 of their candidates and potentially even more to be disqualified because, according to the government here, they do not necessarily meet the qualifications of supporting the basic law as well as the new national security law. So it is a blow. I mean, it is one of the biggest disqualifications. It is the biggest disqualification of candidates. Because four years ago in 2016 6 candidates were disqualified and I'll let you decide of the merit on those disqualifications in this slice of Hong Kong on edge, too. I honestly feel that at the end of the day at the moment, we're on like an airplane with a lot of turbulence. Everybody's holding on waiting for the plane to land. But in most cases the plane land safely or waiting for it to crash or waiting for it to crash, But I honestly feel that this airplane is not going to crash because China needs Hong Kong. They needed open Hong Kong. They're not gonna change the mode here. They just want to keep it safe. You want to make it stronger? Fei Jing Shirley, though, doesn't want a stronger pro democracy campaign. Before the passage of the national security law. Pan Democrat lawmakers have been accused of using disruptive and filibustering tactics while fostering anti China sentiment playing cards similar to those the U. S government put out in Iraq during the second Gulf War. I've circulated here, singling out the faces of pro democracy advocates, including the human rights lawyer, Albert Ho, the ace of hearts, There will be a lot of scaring tactics. Many people are being scared away. You know, they want to defeat you without using using any force or even waiting at a war that is That is the way that the Chinese play. You know the game. If I sit here and say no, I will never be arrested. Emily Lau. Were you born yesterday? You live under Communist rule. How dare you say? I've never said that even in 1997. But neither did I predict that. Oh, I will be arrested tomorrow. No, we live under Chinese rule. So anything everything that happened. It would not surprise us, because that's the way they behave to their own people. But we will stay and fight. I don't think I'm going to leave. Even though I know I'm facing imminent risk being put in jail because you know if I become scared All the other people were also more become u know where is scared that then the whole community to be stifled. Have? Nope. Random with Hong Kong and we need to fight until the last minute, according to the anti subversion regulation before the Nationalists created lot implement in Hong Kong. This in the field is legal. But after the national security law implement in Hong Kong, this interfere might be illegal. And not only arresting me even arrest you. Freedom of speech is limited by the new that made me The freedom to ever Uncle Independence freedom to advocate overthrowing the Chinese Communist Party. I omit that there is some limitation and freedom of speech is freedom of the press. Under threat. No, no, no unless they involved in succession, subversion or not terrorist activities. But do people have to be worried about what they post on Facebook? What they post on social media, nannies and their employees? Post war? Yes, I don't think you have judicious obligation for what you are. What criminal ofthings your stuff meets the department is if you are not involved with them. You have no intention to carry out succession, subversion and terrorists X Then what? What have you to fear about?

Hong Kong Steve Well Chinese Communist Party Legislative Council Albert Ho Fei Jing Shirley Emily Lau Stephen Angle Facebook LOU China Iraq U. S
No charges for ex-police officer who killed Michael Brown: prosecutor

The DeMaio Report with Carl DeMaio and Lou Penrose

00:22 sec | 2 weeks ago

No charges for ex-police officer who killed Michael Brown: prosecutor

"Louis County's top prosecutor will not charge a former police officer who shot and killed Michael Brown. That is a decision that could reopen old wounds amid a renewed intense national conversation about racial injustice. It was nearly six years ago, A grand jury declined to indict Darren Wilson, the White police officer who shot Brown. A black 18 year old

Michael Brown Officer White Police Darren Wilson Louis County Prosecutor
Superintendent Explains Why Philadelphia School District Scrapped Plans For Hybrid School Year

KYW 24 Hour News

01:13 min | 2 weeks ago

Superintendent Explains Why Philadelphia School District Scrapped Plans For Hybrid School Year

"The latest proposal from the school district of Philadelphia is an all virtual start to the school year. It's the change of heart after Superintendent William Heights initial hybrid plan that had students in the classroom two days a week. Is also heavily criticized. Kois W's Tima Mendez has more from district headquarters. The district's proposing that when school starts in September 2nd students would learn remotely five days a week during the first marking period. period. Lou Lou Fantini, Fantini, a a teacher teacher at at Franklin Franklin Learning Learning Center, Center, says says he he was was relieved relieved hearing hearing about about this, this, he he says says the the main main concern concern is is and and always always has has been. been. Everyone's Everyone's safety safety We've We've got got to to think think about about is is not not just just about about ourselves about about our most vulnerable colleagues and our colleagues that go home to young Children or parents or people who are immuno compromised. Teachers union surveys showed 74% of members saying they would feel unsafe, even going into school buildings and 78% feeling that student's safety would be at risk. Fantini says most parents that he knows we're on board, but He knows Many have legitimate concerns. Well, how am I going to go to work? Where's my student will be doing this virtual learning Those types of things are totally valid, he says. The district really needs to get those families. The resource is they need in this proposal. If circumstances are all right, then there would be hybrid learning after November 17th school board has scheduled a vote on this plan tomorrow at school

Lou Lou Fantini Franklin Franklin Learning Lea Superintendent William Heights Philadelphia Tima Mendez
NBA Restart: Which Teams Have the Advantage?

ESPN Daily

02:20 min | 2 weeks ago

NBA Restart: Which Teams Have the Advantage?

"Jackie is good to hear your. Voice. Meena, are you today you trust me on around worn. Almost stalker it. I'm almost over. It's okay. You beat me many times at this point. EILLY. You're the Lakers and suns. Jackie macmullan is a senior writer for ESPN and frequent around the horn panelists where she has earned two hundred and forty four wins compared to my own forty. She also happens to cover the NBA for nearly forty years. Speaking of the Lakers and suns, the NBA returns, tomorrow night, and amidst all of the craziness in major, League Baseball, the NBA, but seems to be mostly working, but the league is not without some coronavirus related drama. Thanks to one Lou Williams who's sanctioned trip outside of the NBA's clean site included an unsanctioned visit to a certain establishment. Can you explain for everyone? What happened? Well Lou, Williams left the bubble for a funeral for a very close family friend in Atlanta. And he has said many times. It's documented on social media that his favorite place to go eat the magic. Or another left to forgive me I'm not someone that goes interest clubs often or ever if I'm truthful although I did go once to the Butterfly Lounge against my will in Washington DC. But that's a whole nother story that we don't have time for. So. Lou will claims said he went there to have the wings which are named after him. There's some lemon pepper wings named after him and that he went there simply to eat and then he was on his way with his mass and so on and so forth. And Meena by the way I believe him I. Don't think he went to see your stripper. You probably was hungry. But my goodness. What was he doing there? What he did after the family gathering is the center of an NBA security discussion. A rapper who was at the club took pictures of him and tagged him in the photo used the poster child of what not to do. The sample out of what glue will be. It it it. BOGGLES my mind. You. Just clearly did not think this through.

Lou Williams NBA Jackie Macmullan Lakers Meena Suns Butterfly Lounge Espn Washington Dc Baseball Atlanta Writer
Some NBA players sit out the season

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

02:08 min | 2 weeks ago

Some NBA players sit out the season

"Okay, Let's talk about the MBA there beginning this week in Orlando in Florida, which is a co vivid nightmare at this point. Some players air sitting it out, or they just saying I'm not going to play because I'm afraid of getting covered. Yes, Some players were sitting out because of family members that are at risk. Some players were just sitting out because they're not going to do it. You got key members of Seems like the Clippers, you know mantra. Is Harold sitting out Patrick Beverley sitting it out. You know, these are key elements of members of a lot of teams are saying, Hey, I need to Protect my family and protect myself and that's responsible. But then you've got other members of the Clippers like Lou Williams, who actually went back to Atlanta for a funeral. And then was photographed at a strip club with a rapper. He posed the rap, proposed it to his instagram, and then he quickly deleted it. And then he came out and said, Hey, that was an old picture of me and Lou Williams. I love him so much. I want to do it. But in the picture Lou Williams was wearing an N B a sanctioned mask. You know the way people were Matt five years ago that the MBA sanctioned know that he got busted in this thing. So now the Williamses basically quarantined for 10 days. He can't play in the first couple of games back. He just can't play in the 1st 2 games, one of them against the Lakers. So it affects the team and what the N B A is saying, you know, they had a squeaky clean record. They just recently tested everyone and had zero positive tests inside the bubble, But some players have to leave the bubble stars Ion Williamson, who's the big stars Big rookie star from the New Orleans Pelicans. He had to leave for a family emergency. A health emergency if you and they ask for permission to leave, if you ask for permission to leave than you have Ah, four day quarantine when you come back into the bubble and you get tested, But if you leave and you violate the rules, it's a 10 day quarantine and this is going to affect games. As we move forward as we're trying to set up, you know the best possible scenario where the teams are playing at full strength. This is going to affect

Lou Williams Lakers Clippers Matt Ion Williamson Florida Orlando New Orleans Pelicans Patrick Beverley Harold Atlanta
Kelly Reichardt  First Cow

Filmspotting

05:54 min | 3 weeks ago

Kelly Reichardt First Cow

"Welcome to film spotting back in early March one of the most anticipated films of the year for US Josh Kelley, records first cow finally came to theaters, and then less than two weeks after its release the COVID nineteen pandemic force, the nation's movie theaters to close along with just about everything else meeting that most people never got a chance to see it. It it wasn't quite the last movie I saw pre pandemic. The penultimate I think I fit in birds of prey, just after I scout, that sounds right and man, my so grateful we were able to get first cow, because to have to sit for a few more months without seeing it as many people had, that would have been tortuous. Yeah, the pandemic. Records plans to come to Chicago when we were scheduled to sit down with her for an interview fast forward now to July first cow is now finally available to rent on demand, and we got a chance to talk to Kelly Reicher by phone later in the show will revisit our first cow review from back in March and hopefully more of you have had a chance to catch up with it now that it is available to rent I though it is our conversation with Kelly Reichardt in addition to first cow. Films include 2016 certain women that starred Kristen Stewart Laura, dern and her frequent collaborator Michelle Williams before that she offered us night moves that was about a trio of radical environmentalists, one of those played by Jesse Eisenberg and she gave us of course meek's cutoff. Which I think is still her masterpiece in Oregon trail set. Film that yeah, a lot of people consider among the very best of the last decade Wendy and Lucy was the film before that one. This was a doomed road trip movie again with Williams, and then the first film that I saw of Hers Atom I think you as well two thousand six's old joy, that one like I call centers on male friendship records debut film river of grass that came out back in nineteen, ninety four for first cow reichert return to the Pioneer Era Pacific northwest setting of Meek's cutoff. Cutoff for a tale of unlikely friendship capitalism, and yes, oil leaks in the movie, a cook from the east to play by John McEnroe joins a group of for trappers Oregon there. He meets Orion lease King Liu a Chinese immigrant, the to become friends and set out on a risky business venture together. Also, there is a cow. It's the first cow in the area. Josh indeed floating down the river in one of the movies more memorable images I'd say absolutely. Let's get to that conversation with Kelly Reicher now. Call me cookie. Mother died when I was born, and then my father died. I never stopped moving. It's a good thing stopped at the puzzle. No way for women to stop. have account cow in the. same place for cows. That's no place for white men. He's A. Since virginity here. Kelly thanks so much for coming back on spotting. It's great to have you nice to be here in virtually exactly so josh and I have both spoken very very favorably of the film, actually our favorite film of the year so far between us, and we both talked about it as almost a parable, a movie that in a story that seemingly very simple, the kind that maybe could even be passed down orally, and without any heavy-handedness or easy moralizing impart. Truths are we on the right path? Do you see I cal that way? I'm. A visual person so. Making it is a audible story I. How came from Jonathan Raymond's novel? The half life. I I'd have to think about it. I haven't thought about it in those terms of course moist thinking about it in images. Yes, so When you say. It's your favorite film. I don't know why you have to qualify it and say so far to stop watching other things. But seems fair. That seems fair. I'm sure you're like A. I think all those qualities topping out exist? I just yeah. I haven't thought about it. In terms that of course I I think maybe a better way to phrase that would have been if if you think about it and I know that this sounds almost like it's simplifying, but whether or not you think about this project, or any other is in terms of imparting kind of lesson, or is there. Is there some? Is there something you were trying to teach to the audience? No No. No I don't think so. I mean I. Know I would not want to think in those terms I mean I hope it has. Layers to it that there's things to think about and Questions to ask as far as. I mean ultimately I think like to focus on the friendship and kept blake quote in the beginning. That's in John's. Novel to remind myself that ultimately are making a film about friendship, and there are these teams of capitalism and You know running through out the new the but It has to be considered like just figuring out how to do seem sort of. Where the power lies in a scene, so it's not like I'm not thinking about those things, but I'm Only, in terms of how they relate to cooking, King Lou not in terms of. Some world message or cheek I World should not be being taught from me. That's for sure.

Kelly Reicher Josh Kelley John Mcenroe Kelly Reichardt Meek Michelle Williams Oregon Jesse Eisenberg King Lou Chicago Kelly Kristen Stewart Laura Jonathan Raymond Wendy Pioneer Era Pacific Blake Dern King Liu
"lou large" Discussed on Sagittarius Today

Sagittarius Today

02:29 min | 3 months ago

"lou large" Discussed on Sagittarius Today

"Good Morning Sagittarius. Today is Tuesday. May Nineteenth Two thousand twenty the moon in Aries Squares Pluto Jupiter and Capricorn. This creates cosmic tension a day of astrological push and pull your inner and outer worlds may find themselves at odds this his Sagittarius today a cast original. Today's episode of Horoscope today is brought to you by Philadelphia cream cheese. You don't need a horoscope to tell you that Philadelphia cream cheese is the SCHMEAR. That's perfect for spreading your morning bake call made with only the freshest milk and cream Philadelphia has been doing this since eighteen seventy two Philadelphia schmear perfection. Let's begin your day. You're playful. Fifth houses alight making this a day of Creativity Conception Passion. Relish things that excite. You spend some time exploring the hobbies. You rarely make time for now. Take a moment to reflect on your relationships. You may gain a deeper understanding of what you want in a union or perhaps settle on a match. That suits you. This doesn't mean it smooth sailing ahead however it might take some time to iron out all creases. Consider the work you do and your career. Despite this need to indulge your amorous side responsibilities Lou large. You won't be able to shrug off work or outside commitments without ruffling feathers. It's not likely worth the risk Sagittarius. Today is a daily podcast. Follow on spotify to make it part of your morning routine if you're interested in learning more about your sign. Download sanctuary up from the Apple. App or Google play stores get your first reading today and follow sanctuary. Its sanctuary world on instagram. That's essay in C. T. U. A. R. Y..

Philadelphia Apple Google Lou large spotify T. U. A.
"lou large" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

10:38 min | 5 months ago

"lou large" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"L. Washington he is called upon by his country to crack the enigma code which the Germans use of beginning with the U. boats but then the use of the airforce and the army and he has to create a machine a computing machine that can solve the unsolvable code to find the key to read the the German codes at the same time that machine is part of the thinking about turning turning the on a computable numbers document that he publishes in nineteen thirty five thirty six into a machine in America that can contribute to the program that we now know as the Manhattan Project who is it that makes that link is a fun Norman or is that a large group that makes the link from Turing's uncomputable numbers into building the early version of them the maniac called the anzac who'd who makes that break surcharge well if it is a very complex story with lots of people of both sites both American and British side so the media acquisition was really a quite independent American project it had nothing to do with all but was a very powerful computer and one by Norman who was familiar with police work when he saw the he almost immediately saw how it could be used as as what we would call a universal story you have written a book with an enormous amount of data all the their notes and they're at their their diaries you mentioned there are periods when touring comes here and for Norman goes to London their periods in which we can't know about their dialogue this is forty two forty three do I remember that correctly yes very interesting dark but I expected it to be a part of it right here on the next page what happened we don't know so we can we could gas that what was going on at Bletchley Park about a naked man what's going on in Philadelphia and then averaging about the ENIAC there is some sharing and cooperation between these two allies yes a lot a lot everything with war and there was you know we were on the same side corporate respond however what was going on a Bletchley Park about conquering the enigma machine in order to anticipate the blitz on London and where the wolf pack's would close on the American and the allied convoys coming from America what's going on at the any which is the pre disaster to the maniac mansion of post war period is that that's part of the Manhattan Project and this is also very secret fun Norman and the brains at at the I. A. S. they get caught up in the mid Manhattan Project which is so secret no one can talk about it although you know it strikes me now that we there were two there was no secret it's hard to solve so what they were doing so how do they get that leap from the ENIAC two in order to know that we've got to model a thermonuclear explosion who makes that breakthrough George right you know they built the atomic bombs really doing the computed by hand and the question of whether we could build the hydrogen bomb which would be a thousand times more powerful that took much more computer so they needed a totally different kind of machine for a moment to build that started building it in the war during the war right after the war really that day in fact for the days that we dropped the second nuclear weapons are not exactly that's the day they they start running welcome to the W. sixteen couldn't make them look this spring start working on those codes so the first two bombs that are dropped in Japan are not modeled by a machine there model by human beings will there be other models for by the old fashion Lou large people using punch card counting machines that they don't they don't have the computer yet and what they now understand is that the H. bomb for the thermonuclear explosion needs computer modeling and now we bring Clarion because as you establish George Claire is always been elbowed aside as a person who just did rope work who didn't understand the physics and she was one of the early coders I think at one point you say they're only three coders on the planet what is the culture well there were people who you know took the mathematical problems that was a mathematical language and translated into two strings of ones and zeros that could be understood by that but it's very proficient right and and they had to invent everything we now call operations and applications they were inventing right they have known I mean there was no language I think if we you don't take for granted today three one zero seven two into a rough open memory what was was five kilobytes at speeds you know that's about half a second of of low quality MP three for the maniac now a detail wonderful chapter in your book is called Monte Carlo what is Monte Carlo how does it fit in with what they were doing and after nineteen forty five with the media right right Carlos was it you know on the Mediterranean and with crazy enough is where clarity and Johnny beat again he's invited current gambling there with her I was tired of this is before the war before the war yes Johnny has a M. for beating the roulette table that sales well it's funny clarifies drink spark of their romance starts six but then during when they have to solve this hydrogen bomb problems it was enormously complex problem was a Polish refugee has the with a healthy happy it's the idea that you could do this sort of like a gambling game follow generate some random numbers and instead of being able to follow the hundreds of trillions of neutrons three exclusions just follow a few of them at random well at the end that works very well it's still probably the most successful computer code difference in other words instead of grinding it out physically through every possible combination when neutrino either can be absorbed or explode or become part of what they call the census not as part of the explosion they came up with the idea that if you did it randomly you would come to a solution faster than if you're grounded out and you connect that to how we understand today the random search of that we do on the computer how to how does it connect well yeah you don't have to follow every particle you just need to sort of take a representative sample the same way we serve would do a political polls if you know they always tell you well it's with your tooth possible five percent you know with and that's a good enough he was a significant exposure so if I typed in Alan maniac I A. S. on my search engine it'd probably come up with Alan Turing institute for advanced study and the atomic bomb something like that because it would have it would have searched randomly and put those things together yeah moreover it's interesting strange twist of fate the way three Google yelp maps the entire internet in a way it is somebody called from a random search random act of a random search is what clarity and fun Norman are doing from what nineteen forty seven forty eight in that period they yeah they run the first smart eco code forty seven first the running the by hand because we don't have a machine it's actually incredible charge when I consider how much of the world it depends upon their work their hard work those those years they were together with the I. S. aware of this at the time because they were they were creatures of the I. S. or was everybody cut off the they were aware of that but Clarion Johnny weir through the oddballs they were they were out traveling around all the time you know half the time they were advertising or somewhere else through the computers being built but you know and and one would have to acknowledge that there was absolutely very similar efforts going on in England and other places yeah they were not the only people working on these problems with it there was a computer and I ask that I A. S. where was it if they started building it in the basement yes we were given a room next the boiler room and then they were allowed to build a building serve across one of the fields at the very bottom into that golf course this is Alden road yes the end of all of what is actually the building is now at a daycare center for children will you ever in that building as a child it was off limits to children so long as the you know I've been in there since that's the time we you know some of the kids whose dad worked there I think maybe what if there were rarely but you were it wasn't if we start off with and when they close down in nineteen fifty eight I think you're right that large pieces of it were transferred to institute some of the Smithsonian some overseas to the Weizmann institute so they're pieces of it everywhere yeah Rome the magnetic drone went to Israel and the rest of the core of it went to the Smithsonian where it still is one of the patients there and the building is now a daycare center so they haven't exactly preserve the site there's no plaque up there is a there is now the Hungarian government came and put up a plaque in memory of our beloved added so half of it is a day care center the other half of the fitness center with you know what all it is is our unity yes I have thousands if not millions of hearts the computer itself I'm speaking to George Dyson the book is Turing's cathedral the origins of the digital universe nineteen forty seven forty eight there's three coders on the planet here we are in the twenty first century and the coders.

L. Washington army
"lou large" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

10:35 min | 10 months ago

"lou large" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"A patriot and when he gets back to a in fact he writes a correspondent I'm sure when I get back they'll be eight foot trenches in my backyard he very much wants to contribute to the war effort he is called upon by his country to crack the enigma code which the Germans use of beginning with the U. boats but then the use of the airforce and the army and he has to create a machine a computing machine that can solve the unsolvable code to find the key to read the the German codes at the same time that machine is part of the thinking about turning out turning the on a computable numbers document that he publishes in nineteen thirty five thirty six into a machine in America that can contribute to the program that we now know as the Manhattan Project who is it that makes that link is a fun Norman or is it a large group that makes the link from Turing's on computable numbers into building the early version of them the maniac called the and sack who'd who makes that breakthrough George well it's again it's a very complex story with lots of people on both both American and British side so the ENIAC was this was really a quite independent American project that had nothing to do with correct at all but was a very powerful computer and one by Norman who was familiar with work when he saw the key almost immediately how it could be used as as what we know would call a universal story you have written a book with an enormous amount of data all the their notes and their their their diaries you mentioned there are periods when touring comes here and for Norman goes to London their periods in which we can't know about their dialog this is forty two forty three do I remember that correct yeah very interesting dark right click the eighty minute bike on the right your what happened we don't know so we can we could gas that what was going on at Bletchley Park about enigma and what's going on in Philadelphia and then averaging about the ENIAC there is some sharing and cooperation between these two allies yes a lot a lot everything with war and there was you know we were on the same side Crawford graceful however what was going on a Bletchley Park about conquering the enigma machine in order to anticipate the blitz on London and where the wolf packs would close on the American and the allied convoys coming from America what's going on at the any which is the pre disaster to the maniac mission of post war period is that that's part of the Manhattan Project and this is also very secret fun Norman and the brains at at the I. A. S. they get caught up in the mid Manhattan Project which is so secret no one can talk about it although you know it strikes me now that we they were too they were so secret it's hard to solve so what they were doing so how do they get that leap from the ENIAC too in order to know that we've got to model a thermonuclear explosion who makes that breakthrough George right yeah they built the atomic bomb really doing the computing by hand and the question of whether we could build the hydrogen bomb which would be a thousand times more powerful back much more computing so they needed a totally different kind of machine one moment to build that started building it in the war during the war right after the war really that day in fact for the day that that we dropped the second nuclear weapon on August sake that's the day they right code on the fixed couldn't make about this spring working on those codes so the first two bombs that are dropped in Japan are not modeled by a machine their model by human beings well there be other models for by the old fashion Lou large teams with people using punch card counting machines that they don't they don't have the big computer yet and what they now understand is that the H. bomb with a thermonuclear explosion needs computer modeling and now we bring Clarion because as you establish George Claire is always been elbowed aside as a person who just did wrote work who didn't understand the physics and she was one of the early coders I think at one point you say they're only three coders on the planet what is a culture people took the mathematical problem that was a mathematical language and translated into two strings of ones and zeros that could be understood by the but it's very primitive machine right and and they had to invent everything we now call operations and applications they were inventing right they had known I mean there was no language I think that we take for granted today three one throws into a raw open memory that was was five kilobytes you know that about half a second of of low quality MP three for the maniac now a detail wonderful chapter in your book is called Monte Carlo what is Monte Carlo how does it fit in with what they were doing in after nineteen forty five with the media right right Carlos with it you know on the Mediterranean and with strangely enough is where clarity and Johnny beat again in Mount Carmel gambling there with her gambling tired of this is before the war before the war yes Johnny has a system for beating the roulette table it failed clarifies drink spark of their romance starts but then during when they had to solve this hydrogen bomb problems it was enormous we call but the problem room with the Polish refugee he has with a healthy happy it's the idea that you could do this sort of like a gambling game follow generate some random numbers and instead of being able to follow all the hundreds of millions of neutrons explosions follow a few of them at random and see where they go and and that worked very well it still probably the most successful computer code different in other words instead of grinding out physically through every possible combination when neutrino a either can be absorbed or explode or become part what they call the census not as part of the explosion they came up with the idea that if you did it randomly you would come to a solution faster than a few grounded out and you connect that to how we understand today the random search of that we do on the computer how to how does it connect well yeah you don't have to follow every particle you just need to sort of take a representative sample where we serve would do a political polls you know they always tell you well it fits your could possibly five percent with and that's a good enough whether the figure sport or not so if I typed in Alan maniac I A. S. on my search engine it'd probably come up with Alan Turing institute for advanced study and the atomic bomb something like that because it would have it would have search randomly and put those things together yeah more or less interesting strange twist of fate that that the way free Google yeah maps the entire internet in a way it is Carl a random search random act of a random search is what clarity and fun Norman are doing from what nineteen forty seven forty eight in that period they yeah they run the first party color codes but first the running the by hand because you don't have a machine it's actually incredible charge when I consider how much of the world it depends upon their work their hard work those those years they were together with the I. S. aware of this at the time because they were they were creatures of the I. S. or was everybody cut off they were aware but but Clarion Johnny we're through the oddballs they were they were out travelling around all the time you know half the time they were Aberdeen somewhere else being built but you know and and one would have to acknowledge that there was absolutely very similar efforts going on it England and other places yeah they were not the only people working on the problems with the there was a computer and I asked that I A. S. where was it they started building it in the basement that we were given a room next the boiler room then they were allowed to build a building serve across one of the fields down at the very bottom into that this is old and wrote yes end of old ladies it's actually the building is now it's daycare center for children we you ever in that building as a child it was off limits to children so long as the you know I've been in there since but at the time we you know some of the kids whose dad worked there I think maybe one in there were rarely but you were it was if we start off with and when they close down in nineteen fifty eight I think you're right that large pieces of it were transferred to institute some to the Smithsonian some overseas to the Weizmann institute so they're pieces of it everywhere yeah that roam the magnetic drum went to Israel and the rest of the core of it went to the Smithsonian where it still is one of the patients there and the building is now a daycare center so they haven't exactly preserve the site there's no plaque up there is a there is now the Hungarian government came and put up the plaque in memory of what edit so half of it is a daycare center the other half of the fitness center with you know with all that it is our duty yes I have thousands if not millions of hours at the computer I'm.

"lou large" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

12:15 min | 10 months ago

"lou large" Discussed on KGO 810

"This is the John about social George Dyson's rich anecdotal history of digital universe Turing's cathedral the origins of the digital universe circles around the two men for Norman the Hungarian mathematician Alan Turing the English Cambridge mathematician and there too their ability to see into the future but their practical man and the second World War collapses on your touring is a patriot and when he gets back to a in fact he writes a correspondent I'm sure when I get back they'll be eight foot trenches in my backyard he very much wants to contribute to the war effort he is called upon by his country to crack the enigma code which the Germans use of beginning with the U. boats but then the use of the Air Force and the army and he has to create a machine a computing machine that can solve the unsolvable code to find the key to read the the German codes at the same time that machine is part of the thinking about turning out turning the on a computable numbers document that he publishes in nineteen thirty five thirty six into a machine in America that can contribute to the program that we now know as the Manhattan Project who is it that makes that link is a fun Norman or is it a large group that makes the link from Turing's on computable numbers into building the early version of them the maniac called the anzac who'd who makes that breakthrough George well it's a very complex story with lots of people on both side with the American side the acquisition was you're quite independent American project that had nothing to do with but was a very powerful computer and one by Norman who was familiar with his work when he saw the he almost immediately how it could be used as as what we know would call universal you have written a book with an enormous amount of data all the their notes and they're at their their diaries you mentioned there are periods when touring comes here and for Norman goes to London their periods in which we can't know about their dialog this is forty two forty three do I remember that correctly interests are well I really like on the right your what happened so we can we could gas that what was going on at Bletchley Park about enigma and what's going on in Philadelphia and then Aberdeen about the ENIAC there is some sharing and cooperation between these two allies yeah a lot a lot I mean we were in there with us you know we run however what was going on a Bletchley Park about conquering the enigma machine in order to anticipate the blitz on London and where the wolf packs would close on the American and the allied convoys coming from America what's going on at the any which is the pre disaster to the maniac mission of post war period is that that's part of the Manhattan Project and this is also very secret fun Norman and the brains at at the I. A. S. they get caught up in the mail a Manhattan Project which is so secret no one can talk about it although you know it strikes me now that week they were too they were so secret it's hard to solve so what they were doing so how do they get that leap from the ENIAC too in order to know that we've got to model a thermonuclear explosion who makes that breakthrough George yeah they built the atomic bomb really doing the computed by hand and the question of whether we could build the hydrogen bomb which would be a thousand times more powerful back much more computing they needed a totally different kind of machine one moment to build that started building it in the war during the war right after the war really that day in fact for the day and that we dropped the second nuclear weapons are not exactly that's the day they right welcome to the W. six couldn't make a Buck working on those codes so the first two bombs that are dropped in Japan are not modeled by a machine their model by human beings will there be other models by the old fashion Lou large teams with people using punch card counting machines they don't they don't have a computer yet and what they now understand is that the H. bomb or the thermonuclear explosion needs computer modeling and now we bring Clarion because as you establish George Claire is always been elbowed aside as a person who just did wrote work who didn't understand the physics and she was one of the early coders I think at one point you say they're only three coders on the planet what is a culture they were people took the mathematical problem that was a mathematical language and translated into two strings of one zero six could be understood by the right and and they had to invent everything we now call operations and applications they were inventing right they had known I mean there was no language with nothing we take for granted today into a rock open memory was was five kilobytes you know that about half a second of of low quality MP three for the maniac now a detail wonderful chapter in your book is called Monte Carlo what is Monte Carlo how does it fit in with what they were doing in after nineteen forty five with a maniac Carlos was it you know on the Mediterranean and with crazy enough is where clarity and Johnny beat again there you can buy the car okay was there with her gambling house tired of this is before the war before the war yes Johnny has a system for being the roulette table it fails the card five three three mark of their room and start but then during when they had to solve the sides and bottom problems it was enormous we call but the problem room with the Polish refugee he has with a healthy happy it's the idea that you could do this sort of like a gambling game follow generate random numbers and instead of being able to follow the hundreds of millions of veterans explosions follow a few of them at random well at the end that works very well it still probably the most successful computer code different in other words instead of grinding out physically through every possible combination when neutrino a either can be absorbed or explode or become part what they call the census not as part of the explosion they came up with the idea that if you did it randomly you would come to a solution faster than a few grounded out and you connect that to how we understand today the random search of that we do on the computer how to how does it connect well yeah you don't have to follow every particle you just need to take a representative sample where we serve with the political pull if you know they always tell you well it fits your could possibly five percent deal with it and that's a good enough you ever think it could explode or not so if I typed in Alan maniac I A. S. on my search engine it'd probably come up with Alan Turing institute for advanced study and the atomic bomb something like that because it would have it would have search randomly and put those things together yeah more or less there is a strange twist of fate to fit the way free Google yeah map of the entire internet in a way it is a random search random act of a random search is what clarity and fun Norman are doing from what nineteen forty seven forty eight in that period they yeah they run the first sporty color codes but first the running the by hand it's actually incredible charge when I consider how much of the world depends upon their work their hard work those those years they were together was the I. S. aware of this at the time because they were they were creatures of the I. S. or was everybody cut off they were aware of that but Clarion Johnny we're through the oddballs they were they were out travelling around all the time you know half the time they were every two years or else being built but you know in them one would have to acknowledge that there was absolutely very similar efforts going on it more than other places they were not the only people working on the problems with the there was a computer and I asked that I A. S. where was it it art of building it in the basement that we were given a room next the boiler room and they were allowed to build a building server costs for the fields that at the very bottom into that this is old and wrote yes end of old ladies to actually do the building is now at a daycare center for children would you ever in that building as a child it was off limits to children so long as food you know I've been in there since that the call and we you know some of the kids dad worked there I think maybe one in there rarely but you were it was it was a rough one and when they close down in nineteen fifty eight I think you're right that large pieces of it were transferred to institute some to the Smithsonian some overseas to the Weizmann institute so they're pieces of it everywhere yeah that roam the magnetic drone went to Israel and the rest of the core of it went to the Smithsonian were still is one of the patients there and the building is now a daycare center so they haven't exactly preserve the site there's no plaque up there is a there is now the Hungarian government came and put a plaque in memory of what and half of it in a day care center the other half of the water with a you know what I that is what is irony that the have thousands if not millions of the computer itself I'm speaking to George dice in the book is Torrance cathedral the origins of the digital universe nineteen forty seven forty eight there three coders on the planet here we are in the twenty first century and the coders are out there writing wonderful call of duty games right now because that's where we're traveling social media when we come back however of the coding that they do for the thermonuclear explosion Lisa success and failure and the relationship between computers digital computers and the bomb I'm John batch this is the John Batchelor show this is the John Batchelor show KGO eight balance of nature changing the world one life at a time I've been taking them consistently over at a reasonable time I walk you through me I think differently and it's been gradual but it makes me wonder like man I was in rough shape and then this is going to be my super weapon again you know my usual misery in the winter why this is so exciting thank you I don't know anything I just while we're complete company and I feel better it's amazing truly it seems like the.

"lou large" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"lou large" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Rozan is Monday, December the seventeenth is always to have your long everybody. We comment not infrequently on this program about market forces. And how once it set in motion. It takes a whole lot to turn them around it applies to the coal industry in this country, which is losing out to cheaper and cleaner natural gas. It's showing up in the trade war American soybean farmers looking for new markets for their products. Just for instance. And also it is showing up in healthcare the Affordable Care Act ObamaCare in the macular is back in the news as you've heard thanks to that ruling down in Texas on Friday night. It is gonna be a while. Anyway, before the courts, and possibly congress are done with this round of fighting over the ACA, the marketplace Zandi Euler reports that it has brought some lasting changes that law has to American healthcare that will likely survive. Even if itself might not, you know, how fast food joints, no have on the menu. How many calories are in the burger and fries, you disordered labelling requirement was part of the Affordable Care Act. Another thing the ACA did was changed the way doctors and hospitals. Get paid Michael McWilliams is a professor of healthcare policy at Harvard. He says the ACA tried to push the industry away from fee for service payments to a system in which the financial incentives are more aligned with actually reducing wasteful spending and improving health outcomes. He says the ACA put a heavy focus on an explicit connection between reimbursement and quality of care jury still out on whether it's worked Scott Harrington healthcare management, professor at the Wharton school of business says ObamaCare changed the way the insurance industry thinks about its role companies have. Invested a lot of resource to think about how they can come up with products that will provide access to care for people. But do so at a lower cost us helping to keep premiums down. Of course, that's not really happening right now. The also led us some changes in the pharmaceutical industry. Rena Conti Boston University says the ACA expanded Medicaid reverts on drugs, making some drugs cheaper for state, Medicaid plans, but whether or not individual payers or individual consumers could have the same impact on the industry that the federal government choosing to implement these changes into federal law could have we don't know we also don't know what will ultimately become of the ACA in the courts. But whatever happens the Affordable Care Act will remain part of our healthcare future. I mean dealer for marketplace. The economic future of the biggest city in this country is looking more tech than it did a couple of days ago. Google confirmed this morning, it's going to double its footprint in New York. City billion dollars for new digs in lower Manhattan and a Big Apple workforce of fourteen thousand in the next decade or so you take the Amazon HQ to news a couple of weeks ago. Twenty five thousand new workers in Long Island city queens of the next decade and one can only wonder in this era of cloud computing, and hipster coffee shops in virtually every town, why are tech giant's expanding in the biggest and most crowded and most expensive of American cities. Marketplace's Megan McCarthy Korea has that story when we think about famous origin stories for today's tech, giant's, the suburbs. Lou large says Margaret O'Meara attack historian who teaches at the university of Washington Steve Jobs in his garage, the research park or the corporate campus has really been the native home for American high since the nineteen fifties. There are reasons for that. She says when the defense industry was investing early tech during the Cold War. They purposely put the facilities outside major cities which could be in path of nuclear bombs, but the suburbs back then. Also where people wanting to live today, not so much young college educated skilled technical professionals in their twenties and early thirties. They wanna live in places like Manhattan and downtown Seattle. And San Francisco mayor says over recent years, we've seen the migration of high tech industry into cities, but not just any cities. Well, apple recently announced a new hub in Austin. Most companies are heading to wealthy coastal urban centers or talent is already concentrated. You're getting the self-reinforcing phenomenon which would Florida is an urban studies professor at the university of Toronto. He's tracked the consolidation of wealth and high wage jobs in what he calls superstar cities, like New York, and San Francisco, I think it's because talent wants to be around other talent and talent wants an exciting diverse environment. And once the talent is their companies pile on. But that exacerbates the growing tech divide between the coasts and the rest of the country. And even in those successful cities rising costs can force out the very cultural vibrancy that made them attractive in the first place. I. Megan McCarthy Carino for marketplace. Aren't here's another glimpse of market based reality last Thursday and into Friday wind energy companies outbid each other for the right to build wind farms off the coast of Massachusetts and get this. The winning bids were higher than the latest auction prices to drill for offshore oil. Translation, a lot of people are betting on America as the next big emerging market for offshore wind Scott Tong has that one. From the sustainability to ask the federal government auctioned off three blocks of water starting in Thursday morning. The first bids were a quarter million dollars each. And then they saw one hundred mil on Friday. Stephanie McClellan heads the off shore wind program at the university of Delaware. You really say, okay. Here's a four or five companies that are going to fight this to the death. Eventually each winner paid a record hundred and thirty five million. That's triple the price of an auction two years ago. What blew most of us away was the significant investments that these companies were willing to make what's behind. Bets on American offshore wind power. Well, many Atlantic states offer subsidies and offshore wind energy is competitive. The prices plummeted seventy five percent in four years when huge efficiency is turbine blades as long as football fields says veteran engineer walled Muzio at the national renewable energy lab. We never expected machines to get this big. So I I really have stopped predicting how big they can get these are some of the biggest machines ever built by humans. He predicts offshore wind farms off, the west coast, the Gulf Mexico and the Great Lakes as well as in Europe and Asia and this option to other winners are oil companies with offshore drilling experience shell and Ecuador the former stat oil Chris car is in the energy practice at the law firm Baker Botts, the oil and gas majors do not have ideological commitments to one formative energy. There's no sort of purity requirements. They just see green in green energy. I'm Scott Tong for Mark. Replace Wall Street today the opposite of green one word five syllables. It's a noun a tendency to change quickly and unpredictably any guesses vol till t-. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. We spent a whole lot of time this year on a project that we call divided decade, how the financial crisis in the last ten years in this economy changed things a lot is the short answer. Right. There is more inequality. Now more people are insecure about their financial futures and workers in this economy who were just getting set to retire. When the bottom fell out are still trying to get back. Marketplace's Eric barris reports. Cathy Stevens shows me around your place in Riverview towers, a high rise for seniors in Pittsburgh, her apartment has a small kitchen and living area. Some people. There's also an accordion door she can pull to close off the space with her bed. If you have company or something you can do that. Some of the.

ACA professor New York Scott Tong San Francisco apple Rozan ObamaCare Megan McCarthy Korea Long Island Manhattan Google Scott Harrington Texas Megan McCarthy
"lou large" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:44 min | 1 year ago

"lou large" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The seventeenth is always to have your long everybody week comment not infrequently on this program about market forces. And how once it set in motion. It takes a whole lot to turn them around it applies to the coal industry in this country, which is losing out to cheaper and cleaner natural gas, it showing up in the trade war American soybean farmers looking for new markets for their products. Just for instance. And also it is showing up in healthcare the Affordable Care Act ObamaCare in the binoculars is back in the news. As you've heard thanks to that ruling down in Texas on Friday night. It is gonna be a while. Anyway before the courts, and possibly congress are done with this round of fighting over the ACA. Marketplace Zandi you'll reports that it has brought some lasting changes that law has to American healthcare that will likely survive. Even if the law itself might not you know, how fast food joints now have on the menu. How many calories are in the burger and fries, you disordered labelling requirement was part of the Affordable Care Act. Another thing the ACA did was changed the way doctors and hospitals. Get paid Michael McWilliams is a professor of healthcare policy at Harvard. He says the ACA tried to push the industry away from fee for service payments to a system in which the financial incentives are more aligned with actually reducing wasteful spending and improving health outcomes. He says the ACA put a heavy focus on an explicit connection between reimbursements and quality of care. Jury is still out on whether it's worked Scott Harrington healthcare management, professor at the warden school of business says ObamaCare changed the way the insurance industry thinks about its role companies have. Invested a lot of resource to think about how they can come up with products that will provide access to care for people. But do so at a lower cost us helping to keep premiums down. Of course, that's not really happening right now. The ACA is also led us some changes in the pharmaceutical industry. Rena Conti at Boston University says the expanded Medicaid reverts on drugs, making some drugs cheaper for state, Medicaid plans, but whether or not individual payers or individual consumers could have the same impact on the industry that the federal government choosing to implement these changes into federal law could have we don't know we also don't know what will ultimately become of the in the courts, but whatever happens the Affordable Care Act will remain part of our healthcare future. I mean dealer for marketplace. The economic future of the biggest city in this country is looking more tech than it did a couple of days ago. Google confirmed this morning, it's going to double its footprint in New York. City billion dollars for new digs in lower Manhattan and a Big Apple workforce of fourteen thousand in the next decade or so you take the Amazon HQ to news a couple of weeks ago. Twenty five thousand new workers in Long Island city queens over the next decade and one can only wonder in this era of cloud computing, and hipster coffee shops in virtually every town, why are tech giant's expanding in the biggest and most crowded and most expensive of American cities. Marketplace's Megan McCarthy Corinna has that story when we think about famous origin stories for today's tech, giant's, the suburbs. Lou large says Margaret O'Mara attack historian who teaches at the university of Washington Steve Jobs in his garage research park or the corporate campus has really been the native home for American high-tech since the nineteen fifties. There are reasons for that. She says when the defense industry was investing in early tech during the Cold War. They purposely put the facilities outside major cities which could be in path of nuclear bombs, but the suburbs back, then we're. Also where people wanting to live today, not so much young college educated skilled technical professionals in their twenties and early thirties. They wanna live in places like Manhattan and downtown Seattle. And San Francisco says over recent years, we've seen the migration of high tech industry into cities, but not just any cities. Well, apple recently announced a new hub in Austin. Most companies are heading to wealthy coastal urban centers or talent is already concentrated. You're getting self-reinforcing phenomenon. Richard Florida is an urban studies professor at the university of Toronto. He's tracked the consolidation of wealth and high wage jobs in what he calls superstar cities, like New York, and San Francisco, I think it's because Alan wants to be around other talent and talent wants an exciting diverse environment. And once the talent is their companies pylon. But that exacerbates the growing tech divide between the coasts and the rest of the country. And even in those successful cities rising costs can force out the very cultural vibrancy that made them attractive in the first place. I'm Megan McCarthy Carino for marketplace. All right. Here's another glimpse of market based reality last Thursday and into Friday wind energy companies outbid each other for the right to build wind farms off the coast of Massachusetts and get this. The winning bids were higher than the latest auction prices to drill for offshore oil. Translation, a lot of people are betting on America as the next big emerging market for offshore wind Scott Tong has that one. From the sustainability to ask the federal government auctioned off three blocks of water starting on Thursday morning. The first bids were a quarter million dollars each. And then they saw to a hundred mil on Friday. Stephanie McClellan has the offshore wind program at the university of Delaware. You really say, okay. Here's a four or five companies that are going to fight this to the death. Eventually each winner paid a record one hundred and thirty five million. That's triple the price of an auction two years ago. What blew most of us away was the significant investment that these companies were willing to make. What's behind the bets on American offshore wind power? Well, many Atlantic states offer subsidies and offshore wind energy is competitive. The prices plummeted seventy five percent in four years when huge efficiency is turbine blades as long as football fields says veteran engineer, Walt Muzio at the national renewable energy lab. We never expected machines to get this big. So I really have stopped predicting how big they can get these are some of the biggest machines ever built by humans. He predicts offshore wind farms off the west coast, the Gulf Mexico and the Great Lakes as well. As in Europe and Asia and this auction to other winners are oil companies with offshore drilling experience shell and Ecuador, the former Statoil Chris car is in the energy practice at the law firm, Baker Botts, the oil and gas majors do not have ideological commitments to one formative energy. There's no sort of purity requirements. They just see green in green energy. I'm scott. Song for marketplace. Wall Street today the opposite of green one word five syllables. It's a noun a tendency to change quickly and unpredictably any guesses vol till? We'll have the details when we do the numbers. We spent a whole lot of time this year on a project that we call divided decade, how the financial crisis in the last ten years in this economy changed things a lot is the short answer. Right. There is more inequality. Now more people are insecure about their financial futures and workers in this economy who were just getting set to retire. When the bottom fell out are still trying to get back. Marketplace's Eric barris reports. Cathy Stevens shows me around your place in Riverview towers, a high rise for seniors in Pittsburgh, her apartment has a small kitchen and living area. Some people. There's also an accordion door she can pull it to close off the space with her bed. If you have something you can do that..

ACA professor New York apple San Francisco ObamaCare Megan McCarthy Corinna Scott Harrington Texas congress Long Island Manhattan Google Zandi Megan McCarthy Harvard
"lou large" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"lou large" Discussed on KCRW

"Tuesday, December the seventeenth good as always to have long everybody week comment not infrequently on this program about market forces. And how wants it set in motion. It takes a whole lot to turn them around it applies to the coal industry in this country, which is losing out to cheaper and cleaner natural gas had showing up in the trade war. American soybean farmers looking for new markets for their products. Just for instance. And also it is showing up in healthcare the Affordable Care Act. Obamacare is back in the news. As you've heard thanks to that ruling down in Texas on Friday night. It is gonna be a while. Anyway before the courts, and possibly congress are done with this round of fighting over the ACA. But Mark Zandi you'll reports that it has brought some lasting changes that law has to American healthcare that will likely survive. Even if the law itself might not you know, how fast food joints now have on the menu. How many calories are in the burger and fries, you disordered labelling requirement was part of the Affordable Care Act. Another thing the ACA did was changed the way doctors and hospitals. Get paid Michael McWilliams is a professor of healthcare policy at Harvard. He says the ACA tried to push the industry away from fee for service payments system in which the financial incentives are more aligned with actually reducing wasteful spending and improving health outcomes. He says the ACA put a heavy focus on an explicit connection between reimbursement and quality of care. Jury is still out on whether it's worked Scott Harrington healthcare management, professor at the Wharton school of business says ObamaCare changed the way the insurance industry thinks about its role companies have. Invested a lot of resource to think about how they can come up with products that will provide access to care for people. But do so at a lower cost us helping to keep premiums down. Of course, that's not really happening right now. The ACA is also led us some changes in the pharmaceutical industry. Rena Conti at Boston University says the ACA expanded Medicaid reports on drugs making some drugs cheaper for state, Medicaid plans, but whether or not individual payers or individual consumers could have the same impact on the industry that the federal government choosing to implement these changes in federal law could have we don't know we also don't know what will ultimately become the ACA in the courts. But whatever happens the Affordable Care Act will remain part of our healthcare future. I made the Euler for marketplace. The economic future of the biggest city in this country is looking more tech than it did a couple of days ago. Google confirmed this morning, it's going to double its footprint in New York. City a billion dollars for new digs in lower Manhattan and a Big Apple workforce of fourteen thousand in the next decade or so you take the Amazon HQ to news a couple of weeks ago. Twenty five thousand new workers in Long Island city queens of the next decade and one can only wonder in this era of cloud computing, and hipster coffee shops in virtually every town, why are tech giant's expanding in the biggest and most crowded and most expensive of American cities. Marketplace's Megan McCarthy Carino has that story when we think about famous origin stories for today's tech, giant's, the suburbs. Lou large says Margaret O'Mara attack historian who teaches at the university of Washington think Steve Jobs in his garage. They've researched park or the corporate campus has really been the native home for American high-tech since the nineteen fifties. There are reasons for that. She says when the defense industry was investing in early tech during the Cold War purposely, put the facilities outside major cities, which could be in path of nuclear bombs, but the suburbs back, then we're. Also where people wanted to live today, not so much young college educated skilled technical professionals in their twenties and early thirties. They wanna live in places like Manhattan and downtown Seattle. And San Francisco says over recent years, we've seen the migration of high tech industry into cities, but not just any cities while apple recently announced a new hub in Austin, most companies are heading to wealthy coastal urban centers, where talent is already concentrated. You're getting the self-reinforcing phenomenon. Richard Florida is an urban studies professor at the university of Toronto. He's tracked the consolidation of wealth and high wage jobs in what he calls superstar cities, like New York and San Francisco because Allah wants to be around other talent and talent wants an exciting diverse environment. And once the talent is there companies pile on, but that exacerbates the growing tech divide between the coasts and the rest of the country. And even in those successful cities rising costs can force out the very cultural vibrancy that made them attractive in the first place. I'm megan. Cardi Carino for marketplace. Right. Here's another glimpse of market based reality last Thursday and into Friday wind energy companies outbid each other for the right to build wind farms off the coast of Massachusetts and get this. The winning bids were higher than the latest auction prices to drill for offshore oil. Translation, a lot of people are betting on America as the next big emerging market for offshore wind Scott Tong has that one. From the sustainability to ask the federal government auctioned off three blocks of water starting on Thursday morning. The first bids were quarter million dollars each and then they soared to a hundred mil on Friday. Stephanie McClellan heads the offshore wind program at the university of Delaware. You really say, okay. Here's a four or five companies that are going to fight this to the death. Eventually each winner paid a record one hundred and thirty five million. That's triple the price of an auction two years ago. What blew most of us away was these significant investment that these companies were willing to make what's behind the. That's on American offshore wind power. Well, many Atlantic states offer subsidies and offshore wind energy is competitive. The prices plummeted seventy five percent in four years when huge efficiency as turbine blades as long as football fields says veteran engineer Walton Muzio at the national renewable energy lab. We never expected machines to get this big. So I really have stopped predicting how big they can get these are some of the biggest machines ever built by humans. He predicts offshore wind farms off the west coast, the Gulf Mexico and the Great Lakes as well. As in Europe and Asia, and this auction two of winners are oil companies with offshore drilling experience shell and Ecuador, the former Statoil Chris car is in the energy practice at the law firm Baker bats, the oil and gas majors do not have ideological commitments to one form of energy. There's no sort of purity requirements. They just see green in green energy. I'm Scott Tong for marketplace. Wall Street today. The opposite of green one word five syllables. It's a noun a tendency to change quickly and unpredictably any guesses vol till t-. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. We.

ACA Scott Tong professor New York apple Mark Zandi Megan McCarthy Carino Scott Harrington Long Island San Francisco Manhattan Google Wharton school of business Harvard
"lou large" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:08 min | 1 year ago

"lou large" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"School of business says Macaire changed the way the insurance industry thinks about its role companies have. Invested a lot of resource to think about how they can come up with products that will provide access to care for people. But do so at a lower cost us helping to keep premiums down. Of course, that's not really happening right now. The also led us some changes in the pharmaceutical industry. Rena Conti at Boston University says the expanded Medicaid reverts on drugs, making some drugs cheaper for state, Medicaid plans, but whether or not individual payers or individual consumers could have the same impact on the industry that the federal government choosing to implement these changes in federal law could have we don't know we also don't know what will ultimately become the ACA in the courts. But whatever happens the Affordable Care Act will remain part of our healthcare future. I mean Euler for marketplace. The economic future of the biggest city in this country is looking more tech than it did a couple of days ago. Google confirmed this morning, it's going to double its footprint in New York. City a billion dollars for new digs in lower Manhattan and a Big Apple workforce of fourteen thousand in the next decade or so you take the Amazon HQ to news a couple of weeks ago. Twenty five thousand new workers in Long Island city queens of the next decade and one can only wonder in this era of cloud computing, and hipster coffeeshops in virtually every town, why are tech giant's expanding the biggest and most crowded and most expensive of American cities. Marketplace's Megan McCarthy Corinna has that story when we think about famous origin stories for today's tech, giant's, the suburbs. Lou large says Margaret O'Meara attack historian who teaches at the university of Washington think Steve Jobs in his garage research park or the corporate campus has really been the native home for American high since the nineteen fifties. There are reasons for that. She says when the defense industry was investing in early tech during the Cold War. They purposely put the facilities outside major cities which could be in path of nuclear bombs, but the suburbs back then. We're also where people wanting to live today, not so much young college educated skilled technical professionals in their twenties and early thirties. They wanna live in places like Manhattan and downtown Seattle. And San Francisco says over recent years, we've seen the migration of high tech industry into cities, but not just any cities. Well, apple recently announced a new hub in Austin. Most companies are heading to wealthy coastal urban centers or talent is already concentrated. You're getting the self-reinforcing phenomenon. Richard Florida is an urban studies professor at the university of Toronto. He's tracked the consolidation of wealth and high wage jobs in what he calls superstar cities, like New York, and San Francisco, I think it's because Allah wants to be around other talent talent wants an exciting diverse environment. And once the talent is their companies pile on. But that exacerbates the growing tech divide between the coasts and the rest of the country. And even in those successful cities rising costs can force out the very cultural vibrancy that made them attractive in the first place. I'm megan. Mccarty Carino for marketplace. Right. Here's another glimpse of market based reality last Thursday and into Friday wind energy companies outbid each other for the right to build wind farms off the coast of Massachusetts and get this. The winning bids were higher than the latest auction prices to drill for offshore oil. Translation, a lot of people are betting on America as the next big emerging market for offshore wind Scott Tong has that one. From the sustainability desk the federal government auctioned off three blocks of water starting on Thursday morning. The first bids were a quarter million dollars each and then they soared to one hundred mil on Friday. Stephanie McClellan has the offshore wind program at the university of Delaware. You really say, okay. Here's a four or five companies that are going to fight this to the death. Eventually each winner paid a record one hundred and thirty five million. That's triple the price of an auction two years ago. What blew most of us away was these significant investment that these companies were willing to make what's behind. Bets on American offshore wind power. Well, many Atlantic states offer subsidies and offshore wind energy is competitive. The prices plummeted seventy five percent in four years when huge efficiency is turbine blades as long as football fields says veteran engineer Walton Muzio at the national renewable energy lab. We never expected machines to get this big. So I I really have stopped predicting how big they can get these are some of the biggest machines ever built by humans. He predicts offshore wind farms off the west coast, the Gulf Mexico and the Great Lakes as well. As in Europe and Asia now and this auction to other winners are oil companies with off shore drilling experience shell and Ecuador the former Statoil Chris car is in the energy practice at the law firm, Baker Botts, the oil and gas majors do not have ideological commitments to one formative energy. There's no sort of purity requirements. They just see green in green energy. I'm Scott Tong for market. Place Wall Street today the opposite of green one word five syllables. It's a noun a tendency to change quickly and unpredictably any guesses vol till t-. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. We spent a whole lot of time this year on a project that we call divided decade, how the financial crisis in the last ten years in this economy changed things a lot is the short answer. Right. There is more inequality. Now more people are insecure about their financial futures and workers in this economy who were just getting set to retire. When the bottom fell out are still trying to get back. Marketplace's Eric barris reports. Cathy Stevens shows me around your place in Riverview towers, a high rise for seniors in Pittsburgh department has a small kitchen and living area people. There's also an accordion door she can pull to close off the space with her bed. If you have something you can do that. Some of the places actually have a separate room Stevens who sixty seven pays eight hundred and forty dollars a month in rent that includes utilities and dinner every day. She says the apartment is fine. But it's not what she expected to be at this point in her life. She has an MBA from Harvard and spent her career in financial services at one time she had about a million dollars in a retirement account. I did all the right things. I saved my money. I didn't waste it on a big big house or big car or whatever. She also raised to foster sons and supported them into adulthood, using some of your retirement savings to help them go into business. She was hoping to send her grandchildren to college. Then the financial crisis hit and now all of a sudden like thirty five percent of my money. It's just gone like vanished. It was really bad. It was shocked. There's no other word for it was a shock. The economic collapse was a shock to nearly everyone. Millions of people lost their jobs in their homes for many, it would take years to recover if they recover it at all. But for those closest to retirement in meant that you never had the time to make that up. That's Teresa Ghilarducci and economist after new school for social research. She says the reality for nearly half a generation of newly minted seniors and millions more on their way is that you are downwardly mobile. In fact, the number seniors filing for bankruptcy has nearly doubled since two thousand and seven to a high of twelve percent. The financial crisis was a big part of that. So is mounting that for things like medical care mortgage loans and credit card bills. Bankruptcy can be a fresh debt free start. If you're still working says, Deborah Thorne with the consumer bankruptcy project. The pickle is for older people. That's highly. Unlikely ancest- thorn on top of the financial crisis seniors were also confronting another fundamental shift in the economy, professionally managed pensions were giving way to 4._0._1._K's where individuals are responsible for their own retirement savings. It's a skill to know how much a person is supposed to save. And when they're supposed to withdraw, and what amount this is the generation where we're really seeing the fallout from the transition to individuals being responsible for that take Larry testament, he seventy three an air force that he had a successful career in marketing and put two sons through college in the early two thousands. He was laid off from his eighty five thousand dollars a year job and got divorced. He was also caring for his ailing mother probably was not able to look after my investments in my retirement accounts, as I should have been and perhaps should have just sold them all out promptly when things started declining. Chesterman lost half his savings. He went back to work stocking shelves that grocery stores, but eventually he could no longer make his mortgage payments and his condo went into foreclosure. Now. He drives a shuttle bus at a Utah ski resort for ten sixty an hour and spends part of the year in employee housing. The space that I'm living in is a room that has a bathroom and a set of bunk beds in it with me sleeping on the bottom and other persons sleeping on top. Testimony is part of a fast growing clip of seniors who work part-time low wage jobs and worry about how long they'll be able to continue. I don't know how long I can do this to just stay afloat. Until I can't stay afloat. That's all I have to look forward to is reaching a point that I can't stay afloat. And that larger reality is something the entire country will need to confront as a generation of people who thought they were better prepared for retirement find that they have.

New York apple San Francisco Scott Tong Manhattan Google Medicaid Long Island Cathy Stevens Amazon Megan McCarthy Corinna Rena Conti School of business Steve Jobs Macaire
"lou large" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

06:07 min | 1 year ago

"lou large" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Of Pittsburgh, NewsRadio ten twenty thirty K. Mangino? The shooting that we all woke up to this morning out in Los Angeles. It seems at least for me to hit a bit harder than the shootings that we've had the report on and deal with and we've all been paying attention to that have led up to what took place in squirrel hill not two weeks ago. Prior to squirrel hill, the shootings that we heard about you feel horrible for the people that are going through. But it took on an added dimension. When it was so close to home, and now with the being so close to what we just endured as a community to hear about thirteen people being killed in a shooting where just a bunch of young people out at a at a bar and join themselves on college night doing much of anything except for what kids young college kids do on a regular basis in someone that has a military background for whatever reason seems to have just snapped and went on a shooting spree with amazing proficiency and took the lives of a total of. Thirteen people including himself. Here's a little bit from. KCBS TV reporter Randy page in LA about thirty rounds were fired according to with authorities now every single person that he shot, including himself died with the exception of one person. According to the sheriff's department who did receive a gunshot wound. So thirty shots thirteen dead, including himself, incredibly lethal combat marine veteran and the question now is what drove him to this mine. Mo what what happened? That would bring about this. We know that veterans that have served overseas and have PTSD NFL seen just absolutely horrific. Things are very prone to hurt themselves. For we have what twenty one twenty two suicides a day that take place with veterans. But and I realize at times with that. There could be some aspects of some more minor violence would bring about this. I don't know. I don't know. And before we found out who this individual was in the background, the one of the things that was going through my mind was how do you address this problem because you know, what's going to happen? Very soon is there will be talk about needing more gun control. And then there will be talk about no, no, more gun control. What we need is more guns in the hands of more. People more good guys with guns to then deal with bad guys with guns. And I don't see either one of these as being the answer. Nine millimeter man, who was very proficient with that. So we're not talking about an assault style rifle here able to throw out Lou large capacities of ammunition. With much more devastating force then oftentimes a nine millimeter deliver. And then. So what what what what law? Do you pass to deal with that? And then the idea of more guns in the hands of more people doesn't make any sense to me either. Because can we just go back in our thinking too wild west because many people oftentimes bring up while you just want to go back to the wild west as well. Let's talk about that first second more guns in the hands of more. People does not mean people are safer. How many of you would want to go back and live in what we believe to be the stereotypical image of the wild west days. Was it safe? Did all the good guys with guns? Kill all the bad guys with guns. Did the bad guys ever get an opportunity to kill good guys? And did we ever get to where we just killed off? All the bad guys. No, eventually civilization took over and the idea of everybody running around with a firearm strapped to their hip ready to shoot somebody else in a moment's notice went by the wayside. And then the wild west got a whole lot more team. I don't know what the answer is. In fact, as each one of these shootings takes place. And he was we hear each about each of these. I am growing more and more convinced that this is just how life is in America. It's almost a resigning ourselves to the idea. This is what it is. This is the norm it stinks. It's horrible. That. That's what it is. But if that's I I don't know what else to look at how else to look at this. I can't find the, you know, the the the the magic wand that you just kind of like wave at it. And that fixes it. I think it's a whole lot more reflective of where we are as a society collectively. And we are so divided right now on so many things I can't think I just can't see us getting unified on what would fix that. Either your reaction I like to hear it sent me a text on the right automotive. Text line right automotive the best deal in Pittsburgh. Here's the number for you. Eight six six three nine one ten twenty only way you can take radio with.

Pittsburgh squirrel hill Los Angeles K. Mangino NFL reporter assault Randy page America Lou ten twenty thirty K two weeks
"lou large" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

10:36 min | 2 years ago

"lou large" Discussed on talkRADIO

"And the time is twenty past seven. Well, it is ten years since that financial crash. My goodness. How awful was just seemed just pile on and on and on. Did it really fast though, we went downhill, so we're just doing a little health check on the economy, and it does seem to be showing signs of recovery following a slow start to the year. Let's talk more about this with Graham, sandy said of business banking at C, the B J good morning to you. Morning Graham, and this is the latest quarterly SME health check index from BG which is their nerve Clydesdale and Yorkshire banks, and it seems to suggest that we've we've got a little bit of. Well, I was gonna say green shoots because it was a there was a stage wasn't the one that was all we ever taught about green shoots in the economy. What would you say they were just tiny little just looking along the earth and seeing a few little sprinklings of shoots. Yes. As you think we know exactly what to make of this quarters SME checking that so. On one hand we saw with quite considerable economic uncertainty looming. We might have seen the me score back substantially. Very slightly by percentage point, no more than that. Point six hundred forty seven point one. So that's really not too bad on the other and just to balance a little bit is one of the lowest scores we've seen since we started recording twenty four so there's no really going backwards. But it's not really getting better. What does that actually mean? For people living in the round the country. Is there any impact on their everyday lives? Yeah. I think there is. So what we do is we aggregate together major economic indicators. And you're against each other. And Kamala store would be right. What does that mean for people that will I think it means wall poignant point seven million businesses in the are small and medium sized enterprises? The responsible for sixty percent whole private sector employment together combined turnover as one point nine trillion tones. So when these businesses are doing well, the economy's doing well doing well people Elizabeth. Elizabeth more money in the pocket and most of his like that. But how many people work in the? So is it forty percent work in the state then? Companies that are connected to the state. Sixty sixty percent, private sector employment is driven by what you mean? Yes. I did get confused with percentages attack me very much. So so how many people work in the public sector amny people work in the private sector in Britain? I. I think it's also a number of people work in the public sector or something. Right. Okay. So what about it's a difference between whereabouts in Britain, you live where people are feeling perhaps a little more confident little more secure. Sure. So we the UK off into live in regions six regions and for once flat. So I mean just looking at a couple of the regions, but very well. In most recent syrupy, originally eastern England and Yorkshire number did pretty well in their index scores and fight. Very well. I released those particular regions of employment roles is continuing to increase. So what we've seen over the last four years. The overall employment stories dude across the UK. Unemployment's nowadays its lowest level since nineteen seventy five reachings done back in this quarter. They've been able to sustain. And read in employment. I think you can begin to see as a couple of things. So perhaps just a house in London in the southeast. There is simplistically just the notion that we are beginning to run people employed. We ride there is still available growth story in some other country. That's a huge deal. Isn't it Graham? I mean early signs potentially and also a little bit of looking into things and to a certain extent, maybe pressing your own spin on it. But if employment figures a down year on year in London that we we haven't gotten enough people to fill the jobs. That's a huge issue. Isn't it? There is an employee groups in employment is reducing in London and southeastern is quite noticeable. I'm the where a couple of regions where overall actually fail the northwest of England being being one of them. Weird. Elizabeth perhaps to. Impact the transport disruption that people in northwest England, Manchester experienced that you're in second quarter of the year. Also, of course. Brexit. So I said that quite clearly. I said, it's just Brexit, question-mark dot dot dot. Connections. We saw we would see in the confidence indicator which is par for index. We thought that we would see a substantial fall in business competence. Brexit begins to Lou large in business owners mind, we we we haven't seen in confidence indicates that we see a rebound in confidence in just about every single region. And the rebounding across the UK as a whole saw a little bit hard to explain. Because there is uncertainty in businesses always businesses. And and and we've heard from the the CBI saying don't shoot the messenger. The which was what they said to to the government when they warned of a no deal saying that you have to listen to us because we a nobody knows. But we do we do have a major inkling that that it will be not good for us. If we don't actually sort this out does seem do you think that does the does seem to be a feeling now that maybe things are moving in the right direction. In terms of us on picking ourselves from Europe. Well, I mean, it seems. Any business owners are beginning to feel little bit more. The first thing is that we live with this level of uncertainty for a couple of years on stage if they could be own and run small businesses simply. To one side and focus on the challenges in front. I think mostly for small business owners decided to. Yeah. Thank you very much. That's grown sans. Ahead of business banking at CYP J. Now, I should also mention that Raul coli has come in good morning to you morning. How will you look like you'll wrapped up for not tick expedition is it that cold outside left. The huskies on the pavement. We had a heatwave the summer has gone, and I'm just feeling a little bit more. I also think that's why pops yesterday in business confidence or a little bit further up than we expected to some was out. There was a World Cup. As did the rest of the economy from the sounds of oh, you say it was the World Cup. There was one day. When it was I went I went shopping. Everybody was what it must have been England playing one of the how far did we get again semi finals. So yeah, that's right. We did do really. Well. So was it the semifinal when everybody was one of those glued to their television sets. I went shopping that day was great. Quiet and the fantastic. I was stuck in the pub having a good time affairs, which then slowly slowly unraveled. Yeah. Evening was horrible evening. What happened? Was it? Well, we lost going one nil up. We're gonna go through. You have been looking through the papers. And just give us a headline. A headline teas that we might be looking forward to hearing a little more about later on as a comedian iheart to focus on this one. I calmly written by a woman reaches the stage four hundred years late. Well, she I bet she's thrilled. Sorry. Carry the one sixteen hundred and sixteen sixteen eighteen then. Yes. So for is actual sixty nineteen four hundred years. Yeah. Exactly. If he's exactly that sixty nineteen. I've forgotten who was on the throne, buddy. You think that that translates into twenty eighteen? Well, we shall find out. Later, rare. Just just gives a tease with one of your with one of your stories vegetable giants are heavyweight champs of the growing weld and the images that go with this. Oh, yes. Yeah. Brazen. Love those exactly do you think that if you grow a giant vegetables decent Yuga joyous locks coming in do you think there's a slog that starts off really small at the top of the top of you. Vegetable. And then by the time, it's got to the other side. It's. It's the size of a baby's arm. If you leave enough out there, if you think rats on the tube or anything to. If you leave enough food on the cheap. I see. I see the little tiny mice number freight. I'm quite fond of them little black. The massive rats on the cheap. I mean, some of them I mean, I might be after being exaggerating here, but some of them have seen them. Now. A rattler said, Doug, that's huge. A gun to drill down into this a little bit more. Entire slice of pizza. Really? Did you? Yes. I think I've seen whole hats and gains and everything that dogs..

England UK Graham London Yorkshire Elizabeth Britain Brexit Europe northwest England Kamala CBI Manchester sandy Doug Lou sixty nineteen four hundred ye Sixty sixty percent
"lou large" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"lou large" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Just your opponent could be decided as students tonight teddy guys taking the time to consider where you have the advantage over the warriors or the pelicans not at all we talked about it all the time it's about us it's about so we will just night tonight james harden chris paul are indeed moving on chris paul fortyone points second most in a series clinching win in rockets history second only to calvin murphy's forty two in nineteen eighty one and the rockets move on they were the early game of the two games on tuesday so yes they do know who they will be facing in the western conference finals the warriors able to close out their series as well espn analyst pj carlesimo with our stanford we've been expecting this in the western conference finals and here it is you get the first crack on the case of the series i think the case series because who's going to play better defense stand because the two of them are so good offense they have so many weapons and the good news if you're a golden state fan golden state right now is defending better than they have any point this year they're also healthier steph curry looks good but houston is cooking houston has the homecourt advantage you know we've been expecting her for a long time stamp and now it's time to sit back and let's enjoy it because it's going to be great basketball in the western conference final we know about the stars each team loaded with stars got chris paul hard you got the four all sorts for the worst give me some xfactor factor players who could lou large in this series why times in a match up like this when you have two teams so similar and so close inability it's the other players who stepped up the x factor high coach to put you on the spot who wins and why i think golden state because i think they've been here before they they know the way to win in may and june even though they don't have home court i also think they have a few more weapons there a deeper team than houston i think they're slightly better defensively houston is a much better defensive team than they were last year they're much better rebounding team particularly on the defensive end but i think golden state will find a way.

chris paul rockets pj carlesimo stanford houston basketball james harden chris paul fortyone calvin murphy espn analyst steph curry lou
"lou large" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"lou large" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Your conference just your opponent could be decided as soon as tonight ted you guys taking the time to consider where you have the advantage over the warriors or the pelicans on at all congratulations guys james harden chris paul are indeed moving on chris paul fortyone points second most of a series clinching win in rockets history second only to calvin murphy's forty two in nineteen eighty one and the rockets move on they were the early of game of the two games on tuesday so yes they do know who they will be facing in the western conference finals the warriors able to close out their series as well espn analyst pj carlesimo with our stanford we've been expecting this in the western conference finals and here it is you get the first crack on the case of the series well i think the case that a series of who's gonna play better defense stan because the two of them are so good offense they have so many weapons and the good news if you're golden state fan golden state right now is defending better than they have any point this year they're also healthier steph curry looks good but houston is cooking houston has the homecourt advantage you know we've been expecting it for a long time stamp and now it's time to sit back and let's enjoy it because it's going to be great basketball in the western conference final we know about the stars each team loaded with stars you've got chris paul and hard you've got four all sorts for the worst give me some xfactor factor players who could lou large in this series while it's interesting steve kerr's changes his lineup so much he's he went with the death lineup in this series i don't know against clint cappella if he's not going to have to have javale mcgee is up on the floor a little bit more so it's going to be interesting to see who comes off the best shaun livingston house guy so we're used to seeing andrea dollar normally coming off the bench he's often an x factor for the warriors i'll tell you the guy like not just because of his name pj tucker i think is x factor for houston he's playing so well he always makes things happen with his aggressiveness he comes up with rebounds he's physical but he's shooting the.

javale mcgee andrea shaun livingston lou steph curry analyst espn calvin murphy chris paul fortyone chris paul steve kerr basketball houston stan stanford pj carlesimo rockets
"lou large" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"lou large" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"A break what is good about the democratic party today i was a democrat till reagan i was when it was liberal now it's left wing if it's so it's so naive the race in virginia were the next week is the is the race now things are tilted towards gillespie because they put out some hispanic group put out such a disgusting had about home of hispanics being racist that it's even ticked off a lot of people who were in the middle but that's what they all believe of the left believes america is gummy country that's what the left thinks k why you would vote for a for a sick view would like that that one of the most decent countries in human history is a despicable place why would you vote for people who peach their to their children read the new york times columnist my first recommendation being charles blow my second being shown goldberg's newest one they're the review the i don't know how you live in a decent place and consider to be so despicable i don't know i can't i a true i really can't wrapped my mind around the left mind how do you live in a place that is decent among largely decent people and have such utter contempt for them kinda you know i i i i meet the middle america means seeing people lou large extended good folk and and then i am i hear them the described by the left wing of the we meet the same people we'll be back one eight prager.

reagan virginia gillespie america charles goldberg new york times lou large
"lou large" Discussed on BizTalkRadio

BizTalkRadio

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"lou large" Discussed on BizTalkRadio

"Good step benefit to mind body sole and of course the environment they savor the simplicity and first year products made him a spot that's is but people that do you know really care about their creation simply put if that the forward it's making up to lifestyle after notable fun and easy you know carrots pleasure have yet to show we see a lot about the sutter tell us a little bit more about your company a fabulous franny either way made it all the key points of what we are you know where it with potential a own with a top of the around and we'd have a really lou large person next using potential as i've eight along with other all natural one interior so we have a really large line that we are able to get a lot of market plan and with everyone commanded going back to living living natural and is a great behind the having an offense oil digna and one a personnel caroline eight well i guess and and you guys and all the planes did everything but because so you did so what will be someone asked is is it we're worse or just to be sure right now ha ha reselling their business up product basically we are all on the line glad that illustrate may dot.

sutter franny lou