18 Burst results for "Lou Hamer"

"lou hamer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:46 min | 4 months ago

"lou hamer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Just like the civil rights movement. We wanted to make sure that minorities had the same rights as everyone else, that they weren't being targeted or discriminated against. We want to apply that same civil right inside the womb. He draws a parallel between his law and the work of civil rights leader Fannie Lou Hamer, who in the sixties fought for voting rights for black Americans. Is this America? The land of the free and the home of the brain. Alive be threatened daily. Because we want to live if Ethan human beings in American when this bill came up, you talked about Fannie Lou Hamer. Can you walk me through that? Why bring her into the conversation of this bill? Well, because family murder is one of our civil rights activists in Mississippi history, and she actually was the victim of a forced sterilization back in 1961. So what you had back in the sixties were instances where black women when they went to the doctor to receive needful operations or surgeries without being told Many African American women were just paralyzed by the physicians, of course, who were white at the time. And, of course, she spoke out about that, in terms of civil rights, you know that bike women Obviously we would never be treated that way. But African American women in Mississippi were treated that way. What you're talking about with Fannie Lou is really different from abortion. Like what? Happen to Fannie Lou Hamer was horrible. It was a forced sterilization that was done without her consent. What's happening in Mississippi with black women going to get abortions? Is that they are opting to do this surgery that they have. Full agency to make the decision of their bodies. And so it's like two completely different things that you're wrapping into one and I would also say that Fanny is revered because she fought for the right for black people in Mississippi throughout the country to be able to vote. And no. If you think about voting is really about choice. I don't want to put words in to Fannie. Lou Hamer is mouth, but I would say that someone who works as an advocate to give people choice. I find it unlikely that she would be for a bill that was about taking choice away from a black woman. Well, I guess it depends on which black woman you're talking about is that the mother that seeking the abortion is of the black, unborn child that is being aborted. For Michelle. Twisting civil rights history into Joey's law is a part of a wider strategy to broaden the anti abortion movement. So it's inconvenient play because it's never played, But that's like we apologize. Let's have a truth and reckoning. Look at what we did. We are so sorry in what we did to you. It's never that, but instead it is then this rhetoric around abortion, she says. This rhetoric and the laws that inspires have been key in limiting access to abortion. Because the anti abortion movement is one that while we've seen the efforts to do way as a whole, for the most part to play book has been To chip chip chip chip away such that Roe v. Wade doesn't need to be overturned. Instead, there will be the million blows and strikes where the right essentially becomes meaningless for the majority of Americans who don't live in New York or California, or can't get onto a plane to go to Mexico or Canada. Abortion opponents don't just want to chip away at Roe. They hope that is these laws get challenged. One of them will go all the way up to the nation's highest court. So the U. S Supreme Court had a chance to hear a case about this from Indiana. But they let a ruling stand that tossed out the ban on abortion based on race. Do you hope the Supreme Court will have another go with this? I would love that. But we've been arguing for all along There's in the pro life community is that this ought to be a state State decision. We're not claiming that all abortion should be banned out, right? We're just simply saying that the Roe v. Wade put a one size fits all across the whole country, not to be the case. The argument you just made was that this is like, basically states rights, and whenever I hear state's rights, it sets off an alarm bell to me because You know, I mean, at the root of the state right question comes slavery. The idea that, like different states can put different values on different lives, and that with the federal government is supposed to do is maintain a fair balance for everybody. I understand the argument and you're going to continue having that I think until and unless the Supreme Court says, Look back in 1973 we overstepped. This is really an issue better reserved to the state to Maria. Let 50 states determining the territories determined how they want to handle this particular issue of When life begins and to the rights of the mother outweigh the rights of the unborn or vice versa. And it's a very sticky issue, and I certainly don't envy the judges or justices that will be hearing these cases. That's state. Senator Joey filling gain from Mississippi Way also spoke with U C. Irvine law professor Michele Goodwin. Our story was produced by the roly price. This idea of whose rights matter more. The mothers or the fetuses isn't just about abortion, and as courts weigh in on it, there could be big consequences for pregnant people. So we have cases of women.

Fannie Lou Hamer Mississippi Fannie Lou Supreme Court Roe Senator Joey Wade America U. S Supreme Court Michelle murder Ethan federal government Fanny Indiana Michele Goodwin California professor
"lou hamer" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

01:59 min | 9 months ago

"lou hamer" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"Appreciated or anything you have to say the show you can email us this day pod at shemale dot com. There's also a contact form at this day pod dot. com. My name is Jody Avirgan thanks again for listening and we'll see Then Day as a matter. To own a town a beautiful to register. The become first class. And Up to Democrat Party is not tweeted now. Artwork. The landlord. Of. The brain. means. Telephones. Karlsruhe threatened..

"lou hamer" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

04:27 min | 9 months ago

"lou hamer" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"Like after nineteen sixty five. Okay. The work has been done but that is a really important moment for Johnson because he continues to show. A responsiveness if not a not in complete responsiveness or responsiveness to the calls for justice from black activists and he's not the driver of it, but he's the president and he makes it happen. So, as we start to wrap up here I, mean, maybe we can talk a little bit about just conventions in general and showdowns at conventions. Obviously this year I don't know what kind of lessons we draw from their conventions given how much of helping when Asterix, there is next to it but you know I think Nicky, touched a little bit of on this about how the nominating process has become much more. Buttoned up parties have become had much more control. So you know my instinct is to look at a moment like this and say, Oh, we don't get these kinds of big fights happening all at convention anymore convention is no longer the place where the big fishers of a party come clashing together. Nevertheless, I was there in two thousand, sixteen at both conventions where did feel like, oh, my gosh, there are real. Voices that are clashing here. So I'm arguing against myself I suppose but I'm asking I'm asking do these kinds of moments still have a place at conventions and will we see sort of hammer versus Johnson showdown anytime in the future? So there are still meaningful fights conventions they tend to have to do with lines in the platform which are indications of the direction that the party is heading. You see these over abortion. And need one, thousand, nine, hundred, and one, thousand, nine, hundred and the Republican Party. But even in two thousand sixteen, there were a lot of fights and the Democratic Party over what the platform was going to look like and you also see in conventions where they're actually delegates you do see booing in hissing and and fights that come out on the floor when delegates who supported opposing candidates clash with one another but. You know a lot less than you used to the nineteen fifties and nineteen sixties these first televised conventions. Who is going to become the nominee is still up in the air, and so these battles have much more meaning because they have a much more immediate consequence like who is the nominee going to be that I think is well in the past and if we continue to do these virtual conventions, I mean basically the only thing that they're going to be our messaging events. Watching the DNC this past week it felt like a really big PR move to show we're united. We're all things fried. We all support biting at felt like it was necessary in these unprecedented times to sort of create solidarity as much as possible, and so when you had all of or good portion of the DNC contenders are possible candidates all coming together and having these conversations and telling their Joe Biden moments and I was kind of like. Not. All candidates actually got to show up there. Wonder. That was curated to all of that was curated. I was like wow. I mean, when you when you attend to convention, even you know in the last couple of cycles, which has Nikki's describing is still a very buttoned up affair. There's a moment where you can tell like, oh, the TV cameras are here Oh this is the primetime stuff and it gets buttoned up and this year it was just. That everything was those two hours at previous conventions that made for TV where. No nothing and you know just by nature ethic of the medium and potentially serve nature of the moment you could tell that everything was going to be that it's hard to hard to pipe in booing and hissing through. Soon. Motivation. That would be amazing stuff. The spirit of conventions. Zun to say booting and storming out of the room. Thumbs down. We'll see. All right. We're going to leave it there. This has been great but Thank you, Nicole Hammer, as always. Thank you dirty and thanks Kelli Carter Jackson of Wellesley. Me This Day in political history is a proud member of Radio Topa from PR X. Researcher and producer is Jacob Feldman. You could follow some social media riposting a bunch of stuff on twitter and instagram everyday moments big and small find us at this day pod. Thanks everyone has been reaching out with comments and potential topics. They're very much.

president Kelli Carter Jackson Republican Party DNC Democratic Party Nicole Hammer Wellesley Nicky Joe Biden Johnson Nikki twitter Jacob Feldman instagram Researcher producer
"lou hamer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:08 min | 9 months ago

"lou hamer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Uniting America Tonight is all about leadership. This unprecedented moment calls for leadership, steady, inclusive leadership, driven by people who understand that our democracy is based on the value of each and every one of us being treated. With dignity and respect leaders who respond to the needs of hardworking Americans who, right this minute are unable to pay rent, put food on the table and keep their loved ones safe. As a black woman. I find myself at a crucial intersection in American politics. For far too long, black female leadership in this country has been utilised without being acknowledged, or valued, but We are turning the tide. Hello, Kamilla. Her nomination is historic for anyone who believes in we, the people like Senator Harris and many we saw in the keynote, Today's leaders emerge from communities that have long been underrepresented there charting new paths in the spirit of Shirley Chisholm, Charlotta Bass, Fannie Lou Hamer and John Lewis. They get in good, trouble necessary trouble. They call things out otherwise ignored, elevating our nation and changing the course of our lives for the better With every vote we cast for forward thinking, honest leaders we chip away at in green Systems of inequity, and we've been the arc of justice. True leaders make sure that policy is informed by all of us. West, Bridging our burden passed to a safe, equitable and even joyful future. Joe Biden and Kamala Harris are that bridge heating voices from within the movement for racial justice, listening to the people and acting with empathy and compassion to reflect our shared humanity. Tonight, we'll hear from a number of American leaders, including former acting U. S. Attorney general. Sally Yates, who refused to defend an unconstitutional travel ban and paid for it with her job threat to this nation for our democracy is really clear his prison watch the president for years. Look what he's doing, instilling fear, not joking, Silly fear so individual stroking racial division. 100 cutting every institution was designed to check the abuse of power. Are the president or anyone else. All this? For what reason all this in order to solidify his face and his power Good.

Senator Harris president Fannie Lou Hamer America Joe Biden Shirley Chisholm Sally Yates John Lewis Charlotta Bass Attorney U. S.
"lou hamer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"lou hamer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Was wondering on doing a voter education and I guess I'm going to freedom summer like out of local Mississippians are responding over comic terrorism and their fears of us to work with folks like almost so you had it's a great so when you say it so you mean how did African Americans in Mississippi got especially if we see like Liz Allen and like hurriedly Fannie Lou Hamer out of Mississippi been reading right yes okay good Fannie Lou Hamer says when you get sick and tired of being sick and tired you know there comes that moment where you just won't take it so not everybody stood up but you have enough folks in Mississippi you had like Vera piggy down in Clarksdale Mississippi who was using her independent business she was a hairdresser she was using that as the spot where people were organizing and because she did black women's hair and she only her shop she wasn't dependent upon anyone else for her financial well being that economic independence allowed her now wasn't like she didn't get harassed her daughter didn't get harassed but she was just yes you have folks who just we're sick and tired of being sick and tired and we're ready to put it on the line for a better future and I and I'm in when you think about it that's what we keep talking about it in the movement we don't have everybody standing up we have enough people standing up okay thank you okay yes Alex what was Bobby Kennedy up to well order education it just wasn't happening in Mississippi it's a great question I'm not quite sure except I know that they weren't getting the protection that Bobby had promised and that lack of protection that he had promised was then sending Moses into a direction that Bobby really didn't think this thing was going to go to backfire yeah okay thank you lecture in American history from late October from Emory University professor Carol Anderson talking about the nineteen sixties efforts of African Americans in Mississippi.

Mississippians Mississippi Liz Allen Fannie Lou Hamer Alex Bobby Kennedy Moses Carol Anderson Clarksdale Emory University professor
The unstoppable Fannie Lou Hamer

Retropod

05:10 min | 1 year ago

The unstoppable Fannie Lou Hamer

"She walked with a limp. She had a blood clot behind her eye from being severely beaten in Mississippi jail. Her name was was Fannie Lou Hamer. She was the youngest of twenty children born to black sharecroppers in Mississippi and in late nineteen sixty four for president Lyndon B Johnson was absolutely terrified of her why she was about to make make an appeal before the credentials panel at the Democratic National Convention. The potential implications were profound. Hamer represented the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party a racially integrated coalition of delegates Hamer wanted to challenge the seats of the current aren't all white democratic delegation from their state saying that they were in violation of the party's rules because they had systematically excluded excluded black citizens according to Time magazine. Johnson was worried that Hamer speech could offend the Southern Democrats whose votes he needed for reelection he wanted her silenced but Hamer had a following that rivaled that of Dr Martin Luther Author King Junior and she would not go unheard. Hamer was born in one thousand nine hundred seventeen in the Mississippi Delta. The share cropping system kept her parents in debt and without enough food to feed their twenty children in the Winter Hebrew tied rags on her feet because she often didn't have shoes. She started picking cotton when she was six years old. Aw Hamer started her civil rights work in nineteen sixty one after she was sterilized without consent during what it should have been a minor surgery she tried to register to vote in one thousand nine hundred sixty two but was turned away after she failed illiteracy literacy tests which were used in the south to discourage black people from voting the clerk asked Hamer complicated questions like interpreting the state constitution after she failed the test. She told the clerk she'd be back when Hamer returned to the plantation in that day. She was fired from her job but she wasn't defeated. Hamer became a student nonviolent. Coordinating Committee a community organizer and helped found the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party in reaction to the lack of integration in the state's Democratic Party party as a candidate from the party. She ran for Congress in nineteen sixty four against democratic incumbent Jamie L whitten at that year's Democratic Democrat National Convention. Hey made her way to the stage through a crowd of men who refused to make space for her other members of the civil rights movement including Martin Luther King Junior spoke but all eyes were on her. She then talked for thirteen minutes Mr Chairman and to could dentures committee. My name is Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer. She called for mandatory delegation an integration and recounted her experience trying to register to vote. It was the thirty first of all the night being the eighteen of US travel. Put the six miles the county courthouse in in the normal tried to register to become first. I player Hamer describes being arrested in beaten in Mississippi jail after white waitress at a rest. Stop refused her service. That's how she got the blood clot. All of this is own account. We won't be registered to become first-class. NFL Freedom Democratic Party is not beating not after her testimony humor and other other Freedom Party members discovered that Johnson a wildly tough politician had held a news conference so that national television networks could he cover her testimony live. She was livid but Johnson's efforts to silencer didn't work that that night in a hot Atlantic City Hotel Room Hamer and the rest of the country watched her testimony broadcast in prime time on the evening news news less than a year later. Congress passed the Voting Rights Act and at the nineteen sixty eight convention in Chicago. He became team the first African American to be seated as a delegate. She received a standing ovation.

Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer Mississippi Freedom Democratic Atlantic City Hotel Room Hamer Mississippi Hamer Lyndon B Johnson Freedom Democratic Party Freedom Party Stop Mississippi Delta Congress Martin Luther King Dr Martin Luther Author King J Time Magazine United States Jamie L Whitten President Trump
"lou hamer" Discussed on With Friends Like These

With Friends Like These

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"lou hamer" Discussed on With Friends Like These

"And she and I have I won't say argued, but definitely like I'm still in my like, I want my marriage bat. Badge for being woke phase. I'm still trying to get trying to get my double secret super good merit badge for woke nece in a white woman. So when she talks about that. I'm like, oh, no, no, no. I can't. I know we shouldn't we shouldn't. We are so bad. Right. So I would like to hear from you more about this. Because the quote that I'm thinking of I'd fallen in love with provoking white folk this is when you were in college, which really meant at fallen in love with begging white folk to free us by demanding that they radically love themselves more. Yes. So I mean, this is I think of as a lot of black riders go through particularly down south is that I was at a really conservative college. And I started writing these things that were really critical of white supremacy and a lot of the people including the president and administrators did not want to be provoked in that way. In a lot of things that I was saying it was like we need to really think about what it means to be on a college campus where Greek men run the campus and never get held accountable for anything. Right. Is that a loving healthy campus, and I was trying to say right that kind of stuff in statistical ways, but then I just became addicted. Like, I like there were things like this is what I always say. Like, I couldn't talk about at that time stuff. I was learning about in women's studies. I couldn't like practice that. Because to me that wouldn't have titillated white people that wouldn't have got white people to like be mad or the change or whatever. And then I got kicked out of school in our damn y'all like they wouldn't listen to Fannie, Lou Hamer. Some of them were. Listen to Baldwin was like why was that spending so much time trying to get these people to change when I couldn't use it my ink to do something else. And so for me heavy is a book. I don't know if it's a marvel or anything, but for person who found so much pleasure in critiquing the policies and practices of white people to move from that sort of work early in my career to what that book is doing. And there's critiques definitely in there. But when I'm also trying to say as make explicit is that like we spend a lot of our time trying to correct white people because like it hurts to have the y'all foot on our next. I should doesn't feel good. But there are a lot of black nationalists out there that we've read about who've gone die trying to do that exact same thing and never reckoned with their in ability to love themselves. Never reckon with their homophobe. Never reckon with their hetero. Patriarchy never reckon with the trans antagonism. And I'm just trying to say we have a limited amount of time on this earth is artists until we can get we could spend all of our time trying to correct white folk, but at the expense of what us do you know what I'm saying? So I'm not saying it has to be either more. But in my lifetime early on. It was like you right? And my mother liked that kind of right? And she wanted me to write the kind of writing mate white people want to change. And I was like, but, but there's a lot of things we're not talking about if we do that, mama. Can we I want to do some else? And so that's what I tried to do. I think I would have split out sort of where we got there because you definitely make clear in the book that that's a phase..

Baldwin president Fannie Lou Hamer
"lou hamer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"lou hamer" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Good afternoon. My brothers and sisters, and I will be brief I want to host the eight myself with all the words of my colleagues, but let me say the two most important words, I can say to you this afternoon. And so you ever Al thank you. Thank you to the national action network. Thank you to a room full of advocacy workers for champions of civil rights. Thank you for being here today at a very unique tan. You see when things are wrong, in my opinion is the granddaughter of a Baptist minister somewhat above has a way of taking care of things. Well, this election is the beginning of taking care of things you say when the members of the Congressional Black caucus leadership went to meet with forty five he said to them to black people. What do you have to lose? Well, we gave him and so back, and I want to echo it today. It was one word everything you say, we understood as people who have been in the movement, and who have been in the fight that civil rights was on election. We understood that healthcare and education was on the ballot. We understood that freedom is not free. There is a cost for and Fannie, Lou Hamer and John Lewis and Reverend Al sharp. And Jesse Jackson in many of you all thought so we could sit here.

Reverend Al sharp Al Jesse Jackson Lou Hamer John Lewis
"lou hamer" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"lou hamer" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Guy okay you have sixty seconds to sell me on moving to the south here i am a born and bred new englander so pretend you want me to move will tell me why should move why do you love the south i mean you obviously do you know i love this place because place which came where i was born i love this place because it's it's complicated is any region a might imagine living in a feel like i can never exhaust my curiosity about this place and i feel like the the problems of this region are clearer than they are in other places like we recognize that the horrors of our past and the best of us are working to address them and when you have that charge when you have that burden on your shoulder you can do better work you know your purpose and that drives me you know i work at the university of mississippi you can see if i lean out my window i can see looking left and right where two people died on this campus integrating this university a come from trouble place that shows great promise and a place of great trial to you know the horrors of a moment like that and scribe on our campus are balanced are redeemed by the beauty of someone like fannie lou hamer the video max act fist an agricultural activists i come from a place of beauty in redemption come on down.

fannie lou hamer university of mississippi sixty seconds
"lou hamer" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

I Think You're Interesting

03:20 min | 3 years ago

"lou hamer" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

"You know this is a place where fannie lou hamer this civil rights activist was arrested at a bus station taken to jail and nearly beaten to death and that's a story that a lot of people in town in known no about it's not something that is commemorated anyway in the town but there are certain memories and lived experiences in the town that really do play a role in how people view law enforcement today how they've you what is happening in the curtis flowers case want to return to the white people within the tone hud reactions to you i'm thinking about this in terms of there is this real in rural white communities i grew up in one like there's this real suspicion of the media and a lot of ways and you've now done two seasons in white law in rural communities that have large white population so let's say season one was much more heavily skewed in that direction so like what is that reaction to like here comes the media to like overturn some of these rocks like what are those reactions like you know it's interesting because as a reporter i have seen that somewhat but i also think that not as much as you might think i mean i think that a lot of there's a lot of reporting on politics but when you go and you report on something other than politics and you show up in a town and you're there for a really long period of time and it's clear that what you're trying to do is actually find something out that you're sort of doing your work as a reporter to build trust with people and so you get to a point where you're not you know a generic reporter that stands for all reporters that they think have done something wrong but you're like this reporter who's being careful who's talking to people whose talked to some of your friends and they felt like that reporter was fair you know is spending the time moved onto one ona for the better part of the year tell me we'll bit about about making that decision in like getting people to trust you like getting them to know yes we're going to be a part of the community for this this point in time in like building those relationships yeah i mean for us it was we couldn't have done the story if we hadn't moved there i mean the story was too complicated iroquois too much reporting so it required a year plus of reporting but a year you know solid of of being there so that was just kind of a basic level thing it's like if we're gonna do the story we're gonna move there in terms of building relationships i think it's like anything else you know sometimes we're forced into situations where we just show up and we ask questions of perfect strangers and we hope that they respond but when you have long longer periods of time like this you can do things that you know allow people to get to know you i trust you i for example in winona you know we were invited to people's churches we are invited to like all kinds of different community events we are invited into people's homes i mean people many people were very very welcoming to us and got to know us i mean we got to know them they got to know us over this course of of such a longtime of reporting and i think that that has allowed us to better understand the town in ways that i don't think we would have been able to if we even had been there for you know only a few months so look give me a sense of what it's like to like drive into i know like it's a small town obviously but there are lots of different kinds of small towns so like what's it like to be in wino share so it is right off the freeway so it's right off a fifty five which is like the north south freeway mississippi so if you're going like memphis south you're going to hit the onoda exit you turn off the freeway and as you drive when you see this this very large white cross that is eliminated at night that's next to a.

fannie lou hamer
"lou hamer" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"lou hamer" Discussed on Reveal

"Form of reparations and a way to monetize white guilt we live in a country where everybody is paid for their work or is supposed to be but what's been historically an issue is that black women have been the forefront of every single black revolutionary movement and all of these black women that you know ella baker fannie lou hamer died destitute this work is not a game you're supposed to do this work that puts your life on the line that prevents you from from getting other work that has you in scenarios were white supremacists are doc seeing and putting your family's information online and we just don't believe that the solution to problems that arose out of slavery is doing another form of slavery so let's just say in an imaginary world i'm a white person i see somebody acting really racist towards another person of color and i feel like i need to do something and maybe i don't do anything in my regular life to change anything but but this thing like really makes me uncomfortable in feel like i need to step up and do something what would you say to that person while i would say the the core goal i hope in that is to ensure the safety of whoever's being harmed in the situation and part of how you'd wanna do that as to deescalate the situation you can go up to him and be like y'all the seahawks had a horrible game or did you watch that super bowl or you know what did you think of this movie there's always different ways that you can you know try to distract this person right that will ccomplish the same goal it's felt like in the previous conversation that you were saying that people should not get involved in those situations unless they understand specifically how to be a good ally i think when people say oh i got to do something it's not necessarily driven by their actual capabilities to help deescalate the situation it's driven by their discomfort of being faced face to face with this person being belligerent racist.

seahawks ella baker fannie lou hamer
"lou hamer" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"lou hamer" Discussed on Toure Show

"Them and ten percent us but we're guilty of it too we don't conduct ourselves as if we want to govern for everybody is it that the coal mining with black lung disease who spent thirty years in a mine trying to keep the lights turned on for americans who voted for trump and doesn't like black people and scared of muslims counts to that i want that person yes with now changing their vote or changing their mind to have a dignified and decent life and i'll fight alongside them or even against them to get them that that's who we are that's what makes us the left the progresses not just a bunch of interest group complainers but people who deserve to govern a country and so you know that's for me the dignity of the obamas the grace of men della the incredible spiritual chief of dr king and eligible baker amping lou hamer that's our tradition and i'm just not gonna let trump take away from me so deepening on this question this moment 'cause it seems that several moments in your life you have stepped back and you've said i don't like the way things are going i need to make change and that's really hard and then you went out and did it how do you change your life not easily or well and not in a linear way you know it's a it's a it's a waiver relying with lots of backsliding and you know it's not it's not easy thing to do but i think honestly becoming a dad was was a big deal listen i'm a spiritual person i meditate i pray have gone to you know buddhism hinduism landmark forum hofmann institute i mean there's no self help self improvement thing i haven't tried i've never tried drugs or alcohol but but there's nothing like that i have at least tried because you know the end of the day i you learn very quickly quickly as a grassroots organizer the limit of your campaign and the limit of your ability to do good is never your opponent it's always you it's your ego is your attitude is your procrastinate.

trump obamas dr king lou hamer thirty years ten percent
"lou hamer" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"lou hamer" Discussed on 1A

"Chips is wrong what can i actually due to be an advocate for black women how can i help make the feminist movement a place for all women and especially for black women amber i wonder if you could help answer that as were were winding down particularly maybe more broadly of sam whites particularly white women can or should or maybe should not be doing if they want to be helpful in this regard yes i just in listening to that clip realize what bothers me around this this savior ideology being attached the black women in this idea of not calling us is that actually yes it's time y'all have done a lot you've been in power for a long time and this actually time to call on black women and our political leadership because we have them darrow organizations like the electoral arm justice project the movement for black lives is putting together and threepoint point strategies the right now putting together a whole plan led foreign by black women about how we can win political power and then i won amid nef any lou hamer died broken penniless then it's because this movement never went back to call on her and to put her in positions of power where she too can have a monument where she too can have legacies of families that are taking care of because of her contributions that then turning material wealth and financial stability for her in her legacy so i think what what i love about this question that this young person is having a someone who works where young people is that i will ask myself every day how am i making the lives of black women easier whether that's eve even if you're leading the meeting it's calling on them whether you have some fun you have funds to put together a student of me you work with the black student union to put that together whether or not you're bringing in black women to consult on the work that you're doing around our communities in allowing us to not only bring our voices in our folding chair to the table but our strategies on our plans entrusting that leadership to turn out our folks.

lou hamer black student union
"lou hamer" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"lou hamer" Discussed on 1A

"Delta you would mention how there's this disparity between black political activity and white political activity were one seems to be more kind of uh on one track and and the other can be more 5050 because this conversation came up as a result of the election of a democrat how does this conversation in your view apply to people who might be conservative republican i mean since the beginning of time black people have been used the cosign white supremacy so and i think that's what we look at what we see black conservatives and we're talking about such a small percentage of not love the voting block so i think there i honestly believe that you know folks like i'm arrests are out you're trying to survive in a world where she sees it going down she she knows so i think amoros of all the foreign aid to the press so yes i i just want to say that black folks have being used as tools for white supremacy as well so i don't really think about that because one is not where my time in into armed there's so much work to do with people who are on our side when i think about my black community not just here in washington dc but my family i have so many com there's still so many conversations we need to have about this acceptance of lgbtq people there are still so many conversations and black spaces that we need to have about gender arm and transpose are much rather dive into that and then worry about way the six percent who voted for this six percent of black women who voted for donald trump like i'm not going to win them over but i can't start to dig deeper within my community to make sure that we have even more what we deserve wanted to make sure we had a chance to talk about who some of the standardbearers or today that that you were looking to as it relates to the political lives a black women here's the voice and a name that i think you should know if you have never heard of her feni lou hamer who was a political activist who spoke of the need for everyone to recognize themselves in the struggles facing.

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"lou hamer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"lou hamer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Dick gregory came from the urban north as a professional comedian he was used to saying provocative things in front of crowds another powerful voice in the 1960s emerged from a very different place the fields of the deep south loop cure convicted granted community my name is visit plan a new name and ali over six two six east lafayette trail slippery final hamer was a leader in mississippi voting rights movement in nineteen 64 hammer went to the democratic national convention in atlantic city mississippi's delegates were all white she demanded to be seated as a delegate along with fellow members of the mississippi freedom democratic party television cameras rolled as hamer told democratic party officials how she and others were punished for trying to register blacks to vote added kunar and put in the book them room they left some of the people and the book the movement began replace often fails i will of with a young woman called must be best the from outside will place the messiah lab again zahir found of let and green i could hear the found and i i'm here somebody say can you can you said yes and i would say or the horrible wood said yes i can say yes but while pray she said i don't know her well among the thing that's really important to remember about finding lou hamer is it fanny who hamer with a sharecropper historian james horton she was poor she was under educated she was a woman and she was from mississippi and in mississippi during the time that she lived african americans had virtually no rights in it hey man came from us fail wannabes of state highway patrol the acne wow will thrown and i told me veil he said we are going to bailout mass fell in one who long before they came back he said you if like me all right in.

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"lou hamer" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"lou hamer" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"Ebita book crisis in fact now but terminal prices of american imperialism that there will come a time and they all thought let fifty boys of baldwin or see a large james or fanny lou hamer martin luther king junior malcolm that at some point the unity of white full fractures when white folks are disu nine two black people have greater possibilities to unite and advance and agenda which is in the interest of the entire nation i think that's what is coming forward at this time i think we radicals have opportunities that we have not had in over forty years to impact the direction of our people we see a decline in the legitimacy and influence of the al sharpton of the congressional black caucus of the oprah winfrey you will but at the same time we see the bass was the people listening attempting to hager what they only a few years ago would have thought was outlandish and unworthy of consideration un likeminded activists in philadelphia can spend much of the coming year celebrating the life and work of w e b the boys and how are his long long life and deep political uh researchers relevant to today well you know this year is one hundred fifty of anniversary of his birth which is an important occasion and we are going to celebrated here philadelphia's going to celebrate it the city council is going to pass a resolution declaring vis the year of w e beat wars.

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"lou hamer" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"lou hamer" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Should all come together in air guard and was not about coming together for peace it there was no justice nothing that needs to be very very clear in anything that is said about her and short change all columnist for the intercept a welcome to democracy down once again could you talk about your your relationship with erica how you first got to meet her and her importance first off the peace kirsten road was just beautiful i don't think any peace will lose more thoroughly accurate there was a lot of inaccurate stuff there was said about her and kirsten's piece was just i read it again this morning it was it it really echoed my sentiments in heart and so i'm thankful that she wrote it um we started we started talking all the way back in 2014 just threw a twitter direct message and uh it's funny that you you get to know people through text message indirect message uh sometimes without seeing them for months or years and i didn't actually see erica face to face until we both started campaigning for bernie sanders but um she was probably maybe my my greatest defender and friend i i felt like we old her uh to to put ourselves out there to defend her and there were many thais where she came to my defence and uh i miss her already i mean there was a uh a just a fierce nature that she had a curse says something that i i said as well she was a on unball in on boss i think in a lot of ways she was she was our fanny lou hamer she was ivan compare her to uh uh hosea williams and to someone who spoke truth to power um when she loves you you knew it to you didn't have to guess how she felt about you good bad or ugly uh she was just an unvarnished voice and uh she was a friend to a lot of people there is there are a lot of people heard right now and uh we are already we're gonna go to break when we come back here more from erica garner herself this is democracy now we'll be back in a minute as we remember eriko going his anna.

erica kirsten road bernie sanders lou hamer hosea williams erica garner twitter ivan
"lou hamer" Discussed on Gastropod

Gastropod

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"lou hamer" Discussed on Gastropod

"Nature boxes offering our fans fifty percent off your first order when you go to nature box dot com slash gaster pot that's nature bucks dot com slash gastre pod for fifty percent off your first order before the break we mentioned a woman named fanny lou hamer jonty is a huge fan danny lu was born to sharecroppers in nineteen seventeen in mississippi one of twenty children she started working in the fields at six and dropped out of school at twelve even without formal education though she became a major force in politics after she attended a protest meeting in nineteen sixty two she eventually helped found the mississippi freedom democratic party it was an opposition to the states all white delegation to the democratic convention so many of us know fairly lou hamer is the voting rights act with a who listeners know failures of rights act was i think of her is one of the boldest and most radical of southerners and she fought for access to the ballot in the nineteenth sixties at a moment when that was one of the most dangerous things oblak mississippi and could do yet i think oftentimes we lose a threat of her story a really important threat of her story is that fanny lou hamer recognize like dr king recognized that the next step after acquiring the right to vote was acquiring economic independence and fannie lou hamer a mississippi delta native thought that if black suthers win a acquire economic independence they should rely on that agricultural knowledge that they had developed over generations and so she began the freedom farm cooperative in the mississippi delta.

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