25 Burst results for "Lotte"

Getting Ready for the 2020 Emmys

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:19 min | Last week

Getting Ready for the 2020 Emmys

"The Television Academy has just unveiled the nominees for this year's edition of the Emmy Woods Nichols Fernando Augusta per checker and colossal rebelo went through the list and brought us the highlights. Let's have a listen. Pelada. Lovely to have you here. Let's talk about the AMI's but first of all, I mean, you have quite an experience with the amas right while I was very lucky last year while working out of our Los Angeles Bureau to attend the ceremony last for the seventy first. Edition of the Emmy Awards it is amazing. It really is a celebration of all things television not only of course, you're able to see the ceremony yourself and how it all unfolds that the Microsoft Theater in downtown Los Angeles, you get to sit right next to some of your favorite stars as they celebrate you know a year worth of work you get to watch as some of them lose some of them when at last year was quite. Special because it was of course, the last year that game of thrones was nominated the end of the saga of game of thrones, which was, of course, a really big deal and one thing that I really liked about that was also how they marked the series that were coming to an end last year by bringing all the cast in the production team that was attending the ceremony on stage and kind of acknowledging any TV show that's on. Air for. A few years it is a bit sad one. You know the last time modern family was also the last. So it yeah, it is. It is quite an experience. I mean we are still a few months to go until this year's edition. Hopefully, we'll be able to have it in person by then by September the television academy still hasn't exactly unveiled the plans for that. But yeah, it just feels as much as it is A. Celebration of television it feels very different to watch it in person than on. TV. Sets and if he's going to be a special year because I mean we've been watching lots of television during lockdown effing and one of the things don't you grieve me. Colada that I like about the Emmys they are. You know what they are actually fairly diverse compared to the film awards and that just shows TV can be actually quite progressive away. Absolutely I think. The nominations this year as well. Reflects that diversity is well and yeah it does show how TV has been able to catch up with only momentum that has been happening in Hollywood about asking for change when it comes to diversity. But even if you look at the shows that are nominated or even just a shows that we're watching now they are reflection of different stories that are a reflection of different themes it's not as standard I would. Say, for example, with the Oscars and I think that's what makes it quite an interesting and exciting. Well, let's talk about some of the favorites I did like sheets Greek being nominated for comedy series of things surprise it started as a very little Canadian series but then apparently people saying that my win actually because the critics love it oh, it is a fantastic show I definitely has been one of the ones I've been watching this year and I was very happy to see it getting nominated for the outstanding Comedy Series Award another one on that category that it was really happy to see their it's the kaminsky methods. This is a Netflix show and yes, it is very lovely with Michael. Douglas starring in it and it is very funny as well and it was so nice to see you know it. They're in the category as well and I just I was very happy I. Think. As we were saying the nominations this year do justice to the TV. We've been watching I mean drama succession I know we're both big fans and you know Brian Cox and Jeremy Strong both be nominated for best actor in a drama series very well deserved extremely well deserved and it is, of course, we're talking here about a big categories. As if you go down the list, there are more awards being given to all the shows we've been mentioning. Not Awards, nominations I mean. But yes, I was very, very happy to see succession I think personally, it has been one of my favorite shows over the last few years I can't remember being dad excited about a show in succession was already nominated for Fiore's last year. I. Know that Nicholas Brutal do who composed the sound score for at won an emmy last year. For. For the score, he composed for succession that would be nice to see it how it's catching momentum and that fans quite disappointed that due to coronavirus sat filming restrictions. The third series did not come out this year as planned but this is a recognition of TV done very very well, there's been other recognitions for example, the morning show had quite a few nominations. And again, it was a show that it was not like loved the beginning by tics but I think people kind of were said, you know what actually was a good series especially the last episode of series. So another one I'm very happy also have very significant for apple as well as the morning show was you know the show that apple try to use as? To make its mark as someone that could compete with the network giants and streaming giants as well. So not only is a very good sign for the a seeing Jennifer Aniston Steve Carell nominated but also to see apple when they've been investing into the right series hiring great actors, great writers, Great Producers, and that it actually pays off and Collado. So what if Jimmy Kimmel? This time I mean, as you rightly said, we don't know how ceremony is going to be, but you know what bt awards they did try and they did like a special ceremony. Names might have to do that because it's happening on the twentieth September. That's very the as the television academy has said that the creative emmys, which you know the creative emmy is usually happen a few days before the Primetime Emmys and they've already said that those are happening on an online platform a few days before didn't haven't clarified yet for the AMI's themselves. We still don't know exactly what are the plans now? What is interesting about Jimmy, Kimmel here hosting I think it's his third time hosting is that he is nominated as well. His show Jimmy came alive is on the outstanding variety talk series, and there's always very endearing one. You know one of the host sometimes even people introducing the award end up being nominated. So yeah, I'd be curious to see exactly how that's going to pay out I don't know. was there any surprise nomination here on this list for you? Fernando as F- in the morning show was A bit of a surprise for me and also in the drama category I mean, we saw men hurriedly having quite a lot of nominations itself Jeremy Pope for his role in Hollywood for a best actor on limited series or movie because Lotte I think competition program should go again to Rupo's drag race. Oh Yeah. His love rapport figured they will he would win again just shows how you know when Ru Paul's drag race started. It was a very Niche not known at the public, and now they've been doing this for over a decade now, and there's just shows how you know there is an appetite for a show like that that it is mainstream, there's no way you can't say that anymore and is so empowering it is, of course, one of my personal favorites as well. It was really nice last year to be there when they won and to see Europol come on stage with a lot of the. Of the show as well and some of the judges when we look at that category I'm partial to and I would love to see them winning again on that category.

Television Academy Jimmy Kimmel Emmy AMI Fernando Augusta Hollywood Apple Emmy Woods Nichols Los Angeles Bureau Los Angeles Ru Paul Microsoft Amas Netflix Jeremy Pope Kaminsky Nicholas Brutal Europol Fiore Douglas
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov 3: Russian Operas

Classics for Kids

03:58 min | 3 months ago

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov 3: Russian Operas

"The flight of the Bumblebee has become much more famous than the opera for which Nikolai Ski Korsakov routed today. Bits of other Russian operas that have become better known in the concert hall then on the Opera Stage they call Me Kyle. Glinka the father of Russian classical music you hardly ever see Glinka opera Muslim and Ludmilla but you hear the overture. All the time well at least loosely. Ludmila has been performed. That's more than you can say for some operas. Lada flopped twice the first time a Russian theatre asked four different composers to collaborate writing combination. Opera Ballet. That Malaysia was never performed. Then rimsky-korsakov who was one of the four composers recycled the music he'd written into a melodic of own. That Lotte lasted all of six performances. Malaga is a funny title. Sergei PROKOFIEV program called the love for three oranges. The love for three oranges is about a prince who finds the princess? He loves inside. An orange one of three oranges. Love is a big problem for the title character in an opera by Tchaikovsky. Called Eugene on Yagan. A girl named Tatyana falls in love with gene on Yagan. But he doesn't fall in love with her until it's too late and she's married to someone else. The two of them always seemed to be meeting up at a ball. So Tchaikovsky put plenty of dance music including this waltz into his office part of Modesto Missouri Skis Opera. Boris good enough takes place in a Polish court where they do a Polish Vance the pullen his another Russian opera with famous dances in it is by Alexander Barra. Dean. Borodino was a professor of chemistry. Who only got to write music in his spare time. His only opera was prince eager in which the prince eager gets captured. While fighting the pile-up Ziems the best known. Part of the opera is when the Pelosi enslaves entertain prints e core by singing. Dancing Borodino died before he could finish prince eager but two of his friends who knew how he wanted it to sound finished it for him. One of those friends was Nikolai. Rimsky-korsakov whose flight of the Bumblebee is far more famous than the tale of our Sultan. The opera for which he wrote

Modesto Missouri Skis Opera Opera Ballet Borodino Tchaikovsky Nikolai Ski Korsakov Yagan Sergei Prokofiev Rimsky-Korsakov Ludmilla Tatyana Lada Ludmila Lotte Malaysia Malaga Alexander Barra Eugene Professor Of Chemistry Boris Pelosi
Marco Polo introduces premium version

Talking Tech

05:04 min | 3 months ago

Marco Polo introduces premium version

"Turned to the nerds at Nerdwallet Dot Com so Marco Polo is a great way for people to connect with each other anytime of day. They don't have to be on a live session. Descent live video back and forth and it's become really popular right now during the pandemic and big question that philosophers Bortnik from Marco. Polo's always gotten is how you GonNa Make Money Valetta. Well she's GonNa tell us today because she is come up with a plan haven Lotte how you doing. I thank you so much for having me. I'm so excited. It's great to see you again. Tell us about what you what you've got in store Well as you mentioned. We've got a question quite a lot and we've been thinking about How WE'RE GONNA make sure there are businesses sustainable for awhile and we have so many mark. Appel of fans you know people who relying Marco Polo as the primary way of communicating sending us a Diaz over the years. And now we're ready to release releasing a new version Skull Marco plus. That's going to have a lot of those benefits The people who again rely on multiple as the primary way of communicating will really benefit from. So how much? What are the benefits? So the Christ. is still subject to change We're starting with five dollars a month with an annual subscription and there's a whole the benefits. I will say my favorite material ones be the first one as there is additional control for speeds so somebody who gets a lot of Mark Appel messages. There are some people who are very quick communication there people who tend to drag their message out a liberal longer. Now you can control how fast I can consume their Their polos great and other one. Is You know one of the beauties of our Kepala is that you can talk uninterrupted. But that's also mean somebody can talk uninterrupted which can make it for very long follow and before I'll have to remember what are all the questions. I asked me to make sure that I actually answered them We are releasing an option called sketchpads. So as a person talking announced to yourself so when it signed free to respond you'll remember to hit all those points. Those are just two of my favorites windows. This become effective. It's coming soon later. The swamp is the latest heard from the team. We're all on the edge of our seat waiting waiting for it to happen and fill me in. The last we spoke. What was it five weeks ago? Six weeks ago you had seen massive uptick of the APP and that was before the before all the crisis happened in the United States when everything got closed down. So what's been like since what's what's your been your March and April. Yeah so and Marsha think we're ended up staying sixteen x increase in sign up some three x increase in research which was just amazing to see. And what are the resemble excited about? What's coming out? Is that means that. All those people will get the benefit of this offering Sooner in their lights lifeline of ORCA. Follow Mexico Marco Polo. And then we're continuing to see great is. Were not just continue to see sign ups and engagement also folks who have been resurrecting coming back to the platform because they're seeing their more more of their friends and family are joining. The group is all sixteen nets in March April was able been like April continues to be really strong. And the part that's really exciting retention and the engagement numbers continued to be really really high. What's it been like running accompanied from? Home you clearly. You're not in the office today. Also our whole company has been remote since two thousand twelve since we've started so that was the one part of the business that didn't feel like that completely changed because everybody in fact was grateful. We have appreciations over week in one of the things that kept being appreciated was the work piece of. It doesn't feel indifferent. We still get up. Get dressed get a couple of Sierra Fan. We joined a call The big difference for me has been having kids at home in answer figuring out how to Juggle having kids all the homework that needs to happen making sure they're now just playing video games all day long thing doing that. While Riding Company has has definitely new challenge to replace the greatest thing for me about working home during the pandemic. Is that our day? Did I save of not driving? This is like only wasted time right. Yeah absolutely and environment is benefiting from that to. There's there's so much goodness from not having to great photo weather. Yes anyway. Valetta Nick for Marco Polo. Do we have a name for the premium? Version is at Marco Polo premium knockabout Plus Marco Polo plus debut in sometime in May right. Yeah

Marco Polo Mexico Marco Polo Mark Appel Nerdwallet Dot Com Lotte Sierra Fan United States Kepala Marsha Diaz Nick Riding Company
"lotte" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

The Emma Guns Show

09:32 min | 11 months ago

"lotte" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

"Hello Hi and welcome to another episode episode of the Emma Gun show. I'm your host and we're gonNA wardner and in this episode I'm joined by award-winning writer Creative Director and author not Jeff's Lottie he has written the l the Evening Standard Sunday Times and the Guardian to name a few but our conversation in this episode centers around her book how to be a gentlewoman with the subtitle title the art of Soft Power. In hard times now we've had this conversation on the Pokonos previously with Allison Hog and Mary Portas About Successful Oh people traits and how there's a trap of thinking aggression and being strong in the workplace or indeed socially is a good thing and also somewhat masculine hidden and how actually that's nonsense and being successful doesn't require being aggressive strong over the topic sector and success is non binary. What I loved about looks book is this notion of soft power being very centered grounded and sure of oneself in order to radiate confidence authority in and kindness in this conversation he shares with me how she came to create this guide being gentlewoman how her own experiences have shaped her and the book how to overcome hey become or come to terms with someone not liking you and how to find the sweet spot of putting yourself first without being selfish the link. Lottie and the book will be in the show. SONOS which can be found wherever it is that you are streaming and downloading this episode but for now please join me in welcoming not jeff's the gun show hello. I'm so glad to be speaking to you because you have all the answers this well. I don't know about that. I can make some suggestions yes so together talking about your new book how to be Gentle Woman and and from the second I opened it. I just thought I feel saying Oh. That's so nice to hear. Thank you saying that and you have have described it your background as a magazine journalist yet creative consultant and I think what I found interesting about listening to you talk about this book and other places exist saying. I always knew I was going to tell the story. I maybe just didn't know the format in which it was going to come out. Yes that's exactly right I feel like I had a quite unique. Set of things happened to me over quite a short period of time which which I always felt were things I wanted to share with other people I guess because I learned a lot from them so the death of my a cousin then my other cousin becoming quite famous and then my parents divorcing when I was an adult than being in a controlling relationship thing that was there and then related work stuff as well like if felt like some really challenging things that also happened one after the other and I feel like I finally found my way through the mall to a place. That's a lot happier which in some ways it's circumstantial sure because bad things stopped happening which is a great help in making you feel better about stuff when you're actually not in the white hot center into over drama but also. I now feel better equipped to deal with whatever life throws at me next because one thing we can know is that they'll always spe- stuff that we control yes and actually that brings me to something that you said about worrying. I've spoken on this podcast before about how it was very a- As a child that I probably had what you would now call anxiety. There's such a warrior and I thought that it was future proofing. I was troubleshooting all oh potential scenario so I'd be okay if anything happened and actually when you were talking about it and you it the Mexican Loreto how do you do you know the ones I mean like these tiny tiny me little thread dolls that have got a Mexican costume on if you know you know basically and they come in this tiny wooden box and you tell each one to worry and then you put it in the books and put it under your pillow and you sleep in the morning you why we have gone. I mean I could actually actually cry thinking about myself telling these. Dole's anyway yeah so with worrying that thing of actually if you're in a place where maybe flip that and instead of thinking about worrying about you think about things you're grateful for then when circumstances do happen happen. You're in a much better. You're in much better shape to handle it totally yeah just and I think that's a choice you know you choosing to see the good things and you're choosing to see the positive things and you're not dismissing the difficult challenging things the things are taking up the majority of your head space good and I think that was a real turning point for me was kind of allowing doing myself to be happy and to enjoy the good things and to not feel like we're longtime. I felt like I couldn't be happy in a moment because I was worried that something bad would happen. Yes and that I get if I just allowed myself to relax into feeling okay. I wouldn't be resilient enough all geared up for a the next trauma the next bad thing to happen to me so I never could quite relaxed in situations because I was just worried the they wouldn't last and I think that what I've learned to do is just be in the moment a bit mourn born think this is fine. This is good right now and that's enough. Did you ever think I'm projecting onto you because I think this is where I and I even still affects me wear if I'm feeling good and I think today's a really good day where it's going to really work I am I inviting something about. What's going to happen here. Last Title I think I've I've really stopped thinking that and I really think kits something that we should work hard to not feel because it just negates all of the good stuff in life. You just don't ever allow yourself to just feel and be in that moment. You know what a shame what a loss loss of potential happiness and I think it's a choice a lot of the time I think if you're suffering from mental health issues and it's something deeper it's not necessarily a choice in the same way you can't just choose to not be depressed but if you don't have clinical depression and you're just suf- navigating the ups and downs of life in a in a sort of balanced mental health sort of way than I do think you can choose. He's the glass half full pathway yeah and you have said this is and I want to make sure I get this right. This is part memoir and part self help and and I don't know about you but I sometimes self-help is something that I want my tag my podcast on the Internet. I put self help but it's also a term that I find ended a bit. Yeah definitely have read some self help books that make me feel really irritated like I don't like the tone one of them. I feel like they're seeming something of the reader. The I don't identify with I think a lot of self-help books seem that the person reading it is a bit of a hot mess this gal bed in the morning and I often would read this bit books being like actually no. I'm not this this fragile weak person that it doesn't know how to deal with the things that life throws at me. I have things that I want to learn that I won't feel inspired by but I don't the writer to make me feel like I don't have my life together. That's maybe quite personal to me because I'm maybe quite like competent in myself in that way and I know a lot of other women aren't like that and do look to books to sort of guide them specifically no sort of things but what I was conscious of with my book quiz seeming certain intelligence of my reader and hopefully not coming across as too prescriptive. Tiv- redacted like I read did you did you read Jordan. Peterson's the rules the twelve rules. It's like the most so heterosexual I mean. He's like an bit of an all right. pinup isn't a which. I only realized like halfway through listening to the audio book I kind of connected did he was in his politics and was like Oh. I feel really like dirty having listened to this but his tone is like Oh my God he just it's like everyone's depicted hid apart from him and it's quite aggressive and I think a lot of self help. Books can actually come across quite aggressive to the point of like. It's a fight life. It's a fight you've got to win and these are the things to always kind of achieve chief the next thing and get better and I feel like I wanted to write something that felt in its whole tone just a bit softer and more welcoming and and.

Jeff Lottie writer Creative Director Pokonos Mexican Loreto Mary Portas Allison Hog consultant Dole Tiv writer Peterson
"lotte" Discussed on Ctrl Alt Delete

Ctrl Alt Delete

15:38 min | 11 months ago

"lotte" Discussed on Ctrl Alt Delete

"Hello and welcome back to another episode of control out too late really excited that today's guest asked is Lottie Jeff's. She is a writer and author of the new book how to be gentlewoman the art of soft power in hard times which is out now. I really loved the premise of this book and that's why I wanted to get to on the cost to talk about it. In a world where women to be harsh and tough and thick skin I really liked this idea of slowing down own and leaning out and nurturing relationships and creating a space that you love is being described as the gentle antidote to a brutal weld so if you're interested you can can't buy that now it is currently out in Stolz came out this month and a bit more about Las Vegas she was the acting deputy editor of ES magazine. She's written so many different magazines and worked in so many incredibly exciting roles but just to narrow it down she was acting deputy editor of ES magazine before joining L. L. in two thousand and fifteen before becoming the deputy editor there and she covers really interesting topics from fashion to sexuality gender social trends and observational humor huma pieces as well as writing columns. She also writes cover profiles for celebrities such as Christians Jewett Lana del Rey and Victoria Beckham to name a few says has really fond sit down with not talk about her new book. We chatted about career pivots. we spoke about learning from failure and it was just a really interesting chapped. I thought Cyprian joy it and if you did please leave a rating or a review. Thanks for tuning in and see you next week..

deputy editor Lottie Jeff ES magazine Lana del Rey Cyprian Victoria Beckham Stolz Las Vegas L. L.
The Vienna Woods Killer AKA the Poet of Death

Serial Killers

08:12 min | 11 months ago

The Vienna Woods Killer AKA the Poet of Death

"We begin our dive into the notorious. Austrian serial killer Dr Johann Jack Survey Ker known as the Vienna Woods killer and the poet of Death Jack Hunter Vaguer was always a sadistic and violent man but for years he was able to mask dark side by presenting himself as an author of poet and journalist in one thousand nine hundred seventy six. Jack was convicted of murdering Margaret Shaffer and received a light sentence by the Austrian courts. Margaret was Jack Second Victim. However charges were never brought for his first suspected murderer but while he was in prison Jack took the time to educate himself he began to write short stories and poems it culminated in his bestselling memoir purgatory. His memoir caught the attention of Austria's elite and petitions soon wet around begging for Jack's release in one thousand nine hundred fifteen eighteen years into his sentence. Jack Vega was set free and his celebrity continued to flourish but just four months into his freedom. Jack's urged to kill sex workers revealed itself and for the next year Jack Prowl the streets of Vienna Prague and Los Angeles strangling sex workers with their their own underwear and dumping the bodies in the woods he was caught in nineteen ninety-two leaving behind him a trail of twelve bodies though there is speculation that he killed even more women who have never been identified Jack Interviewers life even at its beginning was marred by violence when World War Two ended in nineteen forty-five allied forces from the US Britain France and the USSR remained in Germany and Austria. The allies occupied the two countries as they began the long process to rebuild the occupation lasted for ten years ending in one thousand nine hundred fifty five during those ten years the German and Austrian birth rates spiked the procreation wasn't entirely between German and Austrian citizens instead many young women found themselves pregnant with the children of allied allied soldiers many children born during this time period had no idea who their fathers were in Germany roughly four hundred thousand babies had allied light fathers and in Austria that numbers around Thirty Thousand Jack Vegas would be counted among those thirty thousand in nineteen fifty fifty two ratio owned travailler. A young beautiful country girl took a trip to Trieste Italy while on this trip she met an American soldier hurt named Jack Becker. Unfortunately we know very little about their relationship but we can make some guesses based on the time period the aftermath the war forced many women to engage in survival sex work in order to make ends meet even worse. Many of these women were sexually assaulted by Allied soldiers. Either of these could have happened to Theresa. It's possible that Theresa was forced to engage in sex work to survive but it it is also possible that her time with Jack was simply a passionate fling one that resulted in pregnancy while pregnant to ratio returned to Austria and struggled to find work. She turned to petty crime like fraud and theft as a way to provide for herself in the weeks before giving birth to Jack back to ratio was arrested for fraud however for some unexplained reason Teresa was released. She then travelled to Yudin Burg Austria and on August Sixteenth Nineteen fifty gave birth to Johann. Jack faker named after his American father. Please note that much of what is known about Jack's. It's life comes from his memoir purgatory or the trip to jail report of a guilty man and it must be taken with a grain of salt written while he was imprisoned during the nineteen eighties. Jack's writing was solely intended to garner sympathy from those who read it Vanessa's going to take over on the psychology here and throughout the episode assode please note Vanessa is not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist but she has done a lot of research for the show. Thanks Greg as an adult it. Jack Unterweger was diagnosed with narcissistic personality disorder. A couple of aspects of narcissistic personality disorder are exaggerating achievements mints and talents as well as having an exaggerated sense of self importance much of this comes through in the way. Jack describes the harsh upbringing. He faced as a child wild. Jack claims that his mother was a sex worker but nothing has ever been found to confirm. She made her living as one. The general consensus is that she worked as a barmaid and waitress Chris. It is possible that while she worked as a barmaid she engaged in sex work from time to time or that she told Jack that's how he like so many others at that time was conceived saved or it could be pure fabrication it could when Jack was two years old. Theresa was arrested once again for theft and sent to jail. Jack was then sent to live with his grandfather fair demand visor in Carinthia South Austria from this point on Jack claims to have had a terrible childhood. According to Jack Fernand visor was an abusive drunk who forced him to act like a quote court fool a slave. We've educated by grandfather to be a fraud accomplice injects version of events he was barely given enough food to eat or enough clothes to keep warm and according to Jack he had no mother figure around instead a rotation of sex workers in lovers frequented the tiny hut decades later Charlotta. Our Ferdinand stepdaughter would protest that all of Jack's claims about his grandfather were a pack of lies Charlotta had lived with Sheridan ad in the same house a decade and a half earlier in the late thirties. Charlotta never disputed that Fernand had a rough exterior a product product of his country upbringing but she believed the rest of Jack's descriptions. Were fabrications according to Star Lotte her own mother. Maria Springer lived with Jack and Ferdinand for about six years beginning in nineteen fifty two Maria helped raise the boy disputing the claim that only sex workers unfair demands random lovers around as Jack got older. He became something of a burden. He was very stubborn and manipulative. Charlotte claims that he would come up with clever schemes to get whatever he wanted. Jack's attitude soon proved too much Maria Springer and she left in nineteen eighteen fifty eight when Jack was about eight two months later Austrian child services took Jack Away from fair to net and placed him with Fernand sister. Mr The exact reasons why jack was taken away from Fernand are unclear. It's possible that Jack's delinquency and fair demands inability to control troll it were responsible or it's possible that fair. Dan was a little too rough with check now that Maria wasn't around to contain him. Charlotta our does believe that it was during those two months alone with Fair Dinette that the myth of the overly abusive grandfather began in addition to genetics a child's child's environment can play a key role in person forming narcissistic personality disorder or NPD according to the Mayo Clinic in most cases a child who was pampered or received excessive praise could develop the disorder however a consistently negative environment can also lead to NPD. If Jack Really did face the emotional and physical abuse from his grandfather as he professed. It's possible that the

Jack Faker Jack Fernand Dr Johann Jack Survey Ker Jack Hunter Vaguer Jack Unterweger Jack Vega Jack Second Jack Becker Jack Vegas Jack Prowl Jack Away Austria Theresa Yudin Burg Austria Charlotta Fraud Germany Margaret Shaffer Vienna Woods Theft
"lotte" Discussed on This Week in Machine Learning & AI

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

12:39 min | 1 year ago

"lotte" Discussed on This Week in Machine Learning & AI

"So in soccer accu your final context so you know like when a game with the ball foster due to the other half they we know like this is a different situation than <hes> when will wasn't minute also very slow. Oh attack so it's kind of things that we try to to account for but <hes> yeah we don't have these boys locations not yeah yeah it does seem like there is potentially an interesting element of player contribution that is you know being in the right place at the right time can't be captured in your car model does through through but we're also looking at <hes> where play receivable and it will show already tells a lot about his positioning but yeah so if you often receives the ball all in <hes> in the opponents books that says a lot about positioning we've seen and so back to that positioning question. Are you like you can have split the field up into zones or you know meter by meter squares or something like that are you using. I'm kind of absolute positioning. We we get like in meter by meter. It's actually also will be using it. Actually you entertainment as one hundred one hundred <hes> a bitch and normalize it to like the <hes> the normal pitch is is in the in europe or like. I think overall the world <hes> so that's how you kind of meet a media or so. You've got this contribution. Did you bution data and that becomes the that's another one of the inputs to your choke or sign. Model actually is the is that the contribution that's trying to predict whether <hes> point will be scored in ten actions or is that that's going to be so actually it's the contribution is the difference in scoring a goal before your action an after action <hes> got it so if bef- so for example if you have it on your own half the jones of scoring a goal with internet and actions will be very low and then if it often action is very is higher than it's the difference between those and if you lose the boy oh you get negative contribution ratings and so then you're taking this and as an input <hes> and then using this too two. I'm trying to get back to the the joker side model. How does your contribution play into the mental pressure model so <hes> we'll actually do we investigate the moments in which the <hes> well actually investigate how normal contributions i shouldn't shouldn't player so in is what we can identify dennis for example so we did for the m._l._s. for example we sold at <hes>. Let's be names davies. <hes> barco and edham started adams were in two thousand eighteen the season when actor plays highest contribution ratings in <hes> in the last two or three actually do we have to contribution ratings for action and if we gordon <hes> so my oldest these ratings for shouldn't player and madame normalized is spur <hes> burn ninety minutes of play we can actually say like what is his efforts contribution russian for four-game an emory looked at for example davies when <hes> the pressure was normal belongs to the best players in the league but but actually when fresh is getting high he longs to like more like an average player even below f rich okay. I'm still kind of incited three. Were looking for <hes> to see mccollum <unk> players perform. When is this precious normal or high or low sexually been a the pressure levels. We had actually vince then. That's how we identified this <hes> and because we we saw like okay we see this contribution engaging with we want also to know like why is this is. This changing never came up with the idea like <unk> contribution rating player. It depends actually onto things so contribution of an action depends on the choice. I wish that you made and also in how you execute this action so the choice can be two to play table to your striker as a defender but if you don't execute it well you will never get the high contribution now the hand if you make a wrong choice <hes> but you execute action in a good way then it's also will give you a high contribution bidding so that's where we're kind of looking forward so to see why these ratings are chasing <unk> players so it's actually what we did <hes> and we also looked into more like tactical analysis so for example manchester united's tend to dribble <hes> lettuce dribble. Oh more precious getting high but actually contributions from the bills is decreasing so choosing dribble been. It's not a good decision to <hes> so it's kind of two inside a tweet and we were looking at and so were you able to arrive at the decision making and execution as were these <music> outputs of this model or these inputs to the model. I can put to the complete model yeah so these are also based on the date another got. You have this this data. That's telling you if a pass is made and then is execution just telling you if the pass was completed or if it was not completed needed and so does it it doesn't really take into account defense contribution at all notice this now it is focused on <hes> <hes> on the difficulty of the action so if you <hes> falls along <hes> you admitted to it you will get a higher execution writing but also like a tech okinawa so <hes> so tackles defensive action it can also be unsuccess- successful where you can also make a fall into your own books <hes> so does does take into account defensive actions but what we know that that using event data it's hard to <hes> to raise players on the defensive actions goes well more things having trouble in offense to that's yes one after the election the data and is the data <hes> is there is it labeled or rated in terms of the intended target for a pass or is it just that a pass pass happened in the next event is whether the you know the pass <hes> was received or if someone intercepted it yeah that's actually you know we know the end location of the passover noted action of it and in that way we can kind of predict where i was going to yeah. Okay no indication all right so tell us a little bit about the process of coming out with the this model. How did you start and what were some of the things that you tried ride so while we actually started with like having lots of discussions and the law thinking of how we want to want to measure this so <hes> well success as i said before we work together to to people from the university so day visit the us and <hes> kosovan is in is in belgium said if visit uh-huh set at our office and we just won't be just discussing <hes> no programming discussing how we wanted to do this and that's how we came up with <hes> different models that we want to capture and our main thing was you also wanted to try as much as possible and get see how before we got in all those aspects and we we know my <hes>. Some things are hard to capture with the evidence that we have <hes> so we i started with how to already had this contribution ratings so we tried to improve does a tornado more day down. Try some different models for that <hes> <hes> and <hes> the main folks in beginning on how to measure this mental pressure <hes> so for the pre-game meant berkshire modal we want to well <hes> we needed some kind of ground food to to chinese model so that's why we year <hes> while talked assume so-called socor experts we call them so shoka players. <hes> trainers coaches <hes> scouts from clubs amulet <hes> while we may like to record like ah rank games and gave him information about this game so <hes> was the beginning of the season. What is the ranking of the the league was the goal team that kind of stuff <unk> drink those those teams so <unk> ranking and we use this <hes> them to train a to pre-game <unk> pressure mobile so in this model we make use of different features so as before a four <hes> the ranking of the team how how long this season is already being played so wherein a season ari <hes> and also like multiple paul days so if they are playing for your sports then the pressure will be higher than when they already medicated for example <hes> so that's actually how we we started by making this tool and collecting <unk> input as possible also talking to <hes> to the people to to ask him until you think is important now now but do you feel the pressure. It's actually how it started. An enemy <unk> kept him improving. It's with that the pressure the model were you training against subjective labels of whether a game was high pressure or not yeah so actually the rank labels by the buyer experts yeah okay so so that's the pressure the model <hes> and then what kind of model did you use for that so pre-game pressure me use its gradient boosting to ranking trees and for the for the in game <hes> <hes> mental pressure modal and so for that model we want to <hes> predicted every time so every minute in a game <hes> <hes> december of two goals what the number of goals that both teams score and you could like predict the properties of winner roy and loss after this model we made use of an utter the french stationed variation inference there by mc treat <hes> and between his his own now go on a date at it. We had <hes> up until the two thousand seventeen to eighteen season <hes> so yeah. That's actually how we yeah between these two models combined combination of those two pressure model so the in game in pre-game. <hes> makes us the special power. Are those combined yet so that's what we had the well difficulty what difficulties like it's very hard to <hes>. I think i think it's <unk>. Many areas within sports is kind of hard if you don't forget that ground truth <hes> so in the end and we we decided to <hes> to multiply two numbers so it's the in game and the pre-game so when pre-game precious high but in in a game it's quickly gets to retrieve three zero scores so there's no three d. High-pressure any more than the total pressure will be <hes> will be no as well and that but we wanted wanted to do you want to do more investigation this should just collect more more information on it you mentioned some of the kind of surprising findings from looking got some of the m._l._s. players. Were there any other kind of interesting surprises. In when you started applying these results <hes> <hes> yeah there were lots of <hes> <hes> results three or some that we already expected for example casino and auto ferry constant johnson a pressure so what does not nothing new. Maybe the they'll still gratuity c._d.'s <hes> but for neymar so <hes> when your sister playing at by brazil now he's <hes> his performance <hes> goes down under pressure so then he's like more like an average player <hes> whilst whilst when the brushes no or he belongs to the best of the league <hes> yeah and then.

soccer europe bef brazil mccollum dennis vince johnson emory adams davies belgium madame roy paul ninety minutes
Measuring Performance Under Pressure Using Machine Learning

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

13:25 min | 1 year ago

Measuring Performance Under Pressure Using Machine Learning

"Lotto. Welcome to this week in machine learning and a._i. Thank you happy to be here yeah. I'm really looking forward to chatting with view. You are in the enviable position of having combined a couple of your life's passions. You've been playing soccer since the age of i five and now you get to study it and apply machine learning to <hes> the analysis of that sport and and others there's as well or are you permanently focused on soccer right now. I'm just focusing soak right now yeah. So how did this all come to be well. I she already mentioned conventions. I <hes> i place from home life. <hes> and i did a bachelor's in mathematics and while studying <hes> i find out of this company gold size i sports that will say oh using combining mathematics and the and soccer to get insights in a while what players clubs to buy i indicator the company in company bac dennis just to run by three students and just getting company surround five years ago and <hes> i kept in contact. I worked like one day a week and then i started doing masterson econometrics and at the end of a masters i could could could work at the company as a scientific research so in a total started and companies based in amsterdam. It's based in it started antedates. It's like in the in the east of the country. You're very small country so it's around two hours from amsterdam and we also have an office in amateur right now celek in the middle of <hes> of nelson's and from the time you started working there when it was just the three students <hes> it's grown to what now to around fifty people right now selling just six years big road talk a little bit about before we dive into the specific paper that will be <hes> speaking about talk a little bit about your general area of research. They're so so we are at size. We <hes> <hes> well. We hope multiple different lights with a main focus is on the recruitment part for clubs so <hes> both actually yeah oklahoma want to find new you knew players to <hes> for teams and that's where we help and in our team our data analytics team we built all new models many using machine learning earning to get insights from this data that we get <hes> and it's how we while we hope to clubs and we have like an online forum where <hes> while <music> our clients can find around nineteen ninety thousand nine zero <hes> players from all over the world and can find our strengths and weaknesses. Loda take away helped him okay at what are some of the main data sources that you have access to for the various <hes> analytics that you do now. We got the access to to match event data as scold though you get us from our partner why scouts and data is like many entertainments. It's like every action that occurs on the bitch so <hes> an boss dribble across an data to which player performance action from got to wear a what time in the match that's going to be revealed with the day okay and so the data is <hes> it kind of a set of time series events or or yeah yeah yeah okay and are there other data source providers that are doing things as with <hes> more imagery video based data or is that not <hes> prevalent in soccer yet it is we have a part of our accompanies working on now on that special team at school the ball games team and they don't working on a screamer system which currently hangs in three stadiums <hes> <hes> and it is like using the computer vision to attract the players in the boa to each moment each diamond game so that's also what we're doing so we're also collecting data with my team is primarily focused on event data for clips because well to scout players. You have to know a lot about all these players around the world and video data is not yet <hes> provided for a lot of leaks. That's why make sense make sense <hes> <hes> so the paper that we are going to dig into one that you presented <hes> earlier this year at the <hes> the sloan sports analytics conferences called coke or shine quantifying soccer players ability to perform under mental pressure. Tell us a little bit about the motivations for this paper super yeah so well. It's it's about quantifying. A shocker place. Ability to prefer momentum pressure and actually want to do is <unk>. <hes> what we sold a lot of research in natural granted extra currently it's growing fast but there's never any research wanted to flee done about a helpless as performance under pressure and now i've also as a soccer player myself <hes> i also feel the pressure sometimes to actually how we how who became a well with the topic so we wanted to measure the performance of display <unk> pressures getting high so we had extra data for this and that's actually how we started this research <unk> <hes> to <hes> to people from the laser the pizza and jesse another colleague of mine young we did the survey research and is applying some kind of machine learning or analytics to mental pressure i sure is that something that you've seen done in other fields as it you know prevalent in some other fields and it's something you're trying to bring to a soccer or is it something that we don't really do a lot of now. In sports. It is tasmania investigated in some other sports but not extensively yet so i think it's still a field that needs to be investigated more. We also want to do more in research this and spoken to quite so memento coaches that work different clubs ups and they always though is that there is like <hes> it's hard for them to to show improvement of certain players on wall certain aspects of the mental mental game gene and i think <hes> well <unk> its will in all sports <hes> from important that you demand <unk> correct sola well <hes> you can perform uninventive pressures. That's the point. Sarah are being mate sola yeah yeah and so. How were you in your research defining mental pressure. How're you characterizing it. In the games that you're looking at yeah so actually what we what we did we defined to expect with mental pressure so the pregame at pressure and in game pressure so you can imagine that before a game starts already some pressure on certain games for example when wanna <hes> <unk> playing game for championship like burger leaks like <hes> i think it was ten years ago something that's maybe less when the city and units <unk> united both could be the champions <hes> well then rushes getting high and we also so investigated in game pressure and it's based on an in game marine probability model so at each point in time we predict <hes> while the the <hes> the win for both the teams and when a change in go as being scored when this engaged impropriety would change a lot sack the pressure is high so for example when it's like a one one in las minutes then precious really high spring score a goal to mai- mainly mainly changed the winner of the game the finish <unk> three zero score on the board then it doesn't matter anymore and so you've kind of characterized is games <hes> by this low pressure high pressure or at least the the pre-game is the the the pressure is not the level of the game but the in game. That's <hes> an attribute. You're applying to the games. Is it minute by minute or event by event or i guess it's just whenever the score changes yeah so that's actually whenever detroit is actually manned by minutes so it's suv <unk> affected this model and it takes into account like the current score also like a red guards guards and the kind of stuff and also like <hes> vinaplast team is attacking a lot naples or comfort winner in game win probability model so yeah. That's that's <hes>. That's it for the pre-game show. It's like a fixed a set number burlingame yeah and those two combined make like active pressure at a certain event in a game okay and you're you've got the you've got the pressure on the one hand and you're trying brian use that to predict what so we actually have to pressure on one end and liotta and we have <hes> actually three performance metrics and so so e for every action that we have dispose a baltimore dribble we compute three things so contribution of this <hes> this action mm-hmm so by contribution we mean <hes> the increase in scoring a goal in the near future so actually from every action <unk> <hes> the failure of the game before the election and offered action and the difference in those two makes <hes> the contribution of an of an action and next to that we also <hes> <hes> decision won't if the titian and the quality of execution and those three for three we can see like how does it play perform infrastructures like a normal normal states when it's getting high getting lower and this more or less prescriptive display this contribution contribution element. It sounds like that saying that at a given time in the game given all of the player positions and some event that just happened. You're able to come up with some metric. That captures kind of the relative advantage of the the different teams that in and of itself sounds like a hard problem. Yeah it is yeah so it was actually how this all started so i think a year before his paper her <hes> we worked on a model to measure this contributions for other players so this was actually doses for each <hes> <hes> each game state <unk> hobby record of every game state is like <hes> characterized by <hes> old actions that have been played until abend position of the player with the ball the the diamond match the score difference an forever game state. We predict <hes> the jones had written. <hes> connections goals being scored by one team so it's actually like a binary <unk> education program and we also nope. We also a predictions. That's the older team will score with intonations and this way we can measure like for every action recommissioned offensive and the defensive contribution so for example when a player falls to bowl from his own through his striker. We'll have a very high contribution offensive offensive contribution without <unk> noland into -ceptable in your own box. You will also have a defensive contribution and that's what we <hes> well. I worked on and and this is also something that'd be already show to our to our clients in written they can find like players that have like for example high pulse contribution <hes> each each year spoke dylan's before their authors new with that original work on contribution of a couple of questions here one <hes> when you're looking at player position like do you quantify that in some way or is it kind of continuous position position in the field position where where the players with the ball or even look at where the players are that don't have the ball it. That's a that's a good point. That's one of the wall of the van data so <hes> it is event data. We only have old actions that the tape with so we have to pass dribbles but we don't know all the other will send you on players are so that's <hes> well that is good and advantage or a disadvantage this band advantage because it makes no problem easier. Well no no i would really lot this. Data's will guarantee don't have that <hes> but we also captured tried to capture this with by adding information about out your tax so <hes> we we add information about speed of the game so <hes>

Soccer Amsterdam Oklahoma Partner Masterson Tasmania Dylan Sarah Nelson Detroit Noland Jones Jesse Brian Liotta Baltimore Five Years Six Years Ten Years Two Hours
A world without bees would wipe out many staple crops, UN warns on World Bee Day

UN News

06:30 min | 1 year ago

A world without bees would wipe out many staple crops, UN warns on World Bee Day

"And welcome to Haagen zero hung up a putt costs that explores the food challenges and solutions of our time. Brought to you by the food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations on your host show. Lotte Lomas may twenty marks will be day. It's a day to highlight the importance of bays and the threats they face most of the fruits and vegetables, we ate wouldn't exist without bees and other pollinators. They're essential to our food security, and to conserving, the world's by diversity, but base face a very serious, existential threat to learn more. We're joined by FAO's Abram Bixler an agricultural officer with a passion for pollinators. Welcome abram. Thank you very much. Pleasure to be here. So how Di is the state of bays in other pollinators right now the figures are not looking very good for bees in, in pollinators. And we talk about pollinators a lot of. People think of, of honeybees, which is really important part of Edgar Coulter. But there are many, many diverse wild pollinators as well. So about twenty thousand from be species insects, and other vertebrates other animals, like bats, and hummingbirds, and even monkeys can be pollinators. And so when we look across pollinators, there are many threats facing pollinators and globally. They're, they're facing a real decline managed honeybees, the number of honeybees are actually increasing, but the wild pollinators across the world are decreasing in even the honeybees are facing many threats. And there's a lot of issues facing those as well. Let's talk about those threats for what's killing pollinators could use run through the full list threats facing. So it's really company of, of factors kind of all come together all of which are driven by by human. Activity. So climate change is a factor. Habitat loss is a factor. The overuse of pesticides is, is a big factor. But also, there are many diseases in pests as well that are affecting our pollinators. And so when those are taking together pollinators really facing a hard time. How severe is the existential threat to base, and should we be worried. We should we should very much be be worried where the data is especially North America in Europe. There is major declines happening, not only on these, but other insects, especially in, in general, one of the big things is that we still lack most basic data on a lot of pollinators in other parts of the world, Africa Asia, and also, South America, and one of the big fears is that with habitat loss and destruction along with global climate change. We can't even in summer. Regards know what pollinators are out there. So our best estimates are about twenty thousand different beast species alone, but of those only about ten thousand have actually been identified. And so we're worried that we are losing species that we don't even know could you paint of a wealthy bees and just sort of give us an idea of the range of fruits and vegetables that we would lose a world of bees and other pollinators would be very bland in very scary Biesen other pollinators are are essential for pollinating about seventy five percent of the leading food crops that humans depend on for food, particularly when it comes to fruits and seed crops, that, that we need. So if you can imagine a world without raspberries, a world without peaches, apples, melons, and members of the, the squash, family. That's what we'd be dealing with what he's doing to protect. The wills pollinators. We're doing a couple of things to protect the world's pollinators one is that we're raising awareness, just much like this podcast just trying to bring to the forefront, the threats facing bees and pollinators and the, the, the dire state that they're in one is that we work with policymakers. And so we're, we're providing advice the policymakers on pollinator-friendly practices in agriculture especially, but pollinator-friendly practices, such as ecological based farming systems, such as the reduction of hazardous pesticides promoting ecology as a away for sustainable food, Negra cultural systems. We also work at the ground level as well in terms of, of projects and trying to better mainstream the importance of biodiversity like these pollinators in food and agriculture systems, but also delight. Hoods because many people depend on, on supplemental income from the products of these Impala maters. And so what about us ordinary citizens? What can I do to help ensure the future of obeys? You know, one thing that you can do is. I think you have a respect for bees, pollinators in what they do and they killed them. Don't heal them. Don't feel frayed of them, but you can also do simple things like if you have a garden, reduce the pesticide in your garden plant different be friendly flowers and other nectar sources for them, you can create an insect hotel for them. What's, what's it insect, Hato insect hotel? You can find out more on the ethical website, but it's a it's a very simple. It's a it's a box or pieces of wood, and hollow openings that, that insects beyond beasts can use the nest in b but the big thing is promoting their habitat. You can also talk to your policymakers and share about the importance of bees in pollinators for for food security for reducing poverty, and also for the production of the products, we love beeswax, and Honey. That was Abram big slow and agriculture officer at the food and Agriculture Organization in Rome.

Abram Bixler Agriculture Organization Officer Lotte Lomas FAO Edgar Coulter United Nations DI North America Rome South America Africa Asia Europe Seventy Five Percent
"lotte" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"lotte" Discussed on WEEI

"Jim covert MAC, speedy everyone, the senior bowl stands a better chance of being forgotten that ever getting a bus and Ken. We had a motor program lets you remember when he was on here. He said he was frustrated by the process that was his word, and that it was pretty incredible. Again, his words quote, pretty incredible. How he played against some of the best quarterbacks and running back and played them at a high level eight degree and be as a member of the senior committee. Are you equally frustrated by the process, we don't cycle enough people through we should be talking about a lot of these guys? And we're not now let's take a look at why he didn't play in the playoffs. Why didn't you take a beaver, janitors? They played division with Denver San Diego. And the raiders the raiders are winning Super Bowls nine hundred eighty s the Broncos were going to Super Bowls in the nineteen eighties and the charged with air coryell probably should have gone to Super Bowl too. So they're competing in division to fame quarterbacks Elwin phones. Joiner Winslow Jefferson Chandler large at the three amigos Denver elite passing teams yet. They put four defensive backs in the Pro Bowl. Lewis should have been discussed by now, the hall of fame Deron cherry should have been discussed been off the whole thing. But right now without a Ren thing along shots. So I guess I gotta ask you, you know, when when when I think of cherry, and when I think back to them, and you saw more than I did. Of course, I did see it. You know, when you saw Ronnie Lotte easily in my mind, you thought about hall of fame player. I don't know that Terry rose that sort of you know, almost automatic, you know, you is tell you. How important is that that sort of Edry had read enough to watch.

Ken Deron cherry Ronnie Lotte raiders Broncos Jim San Diego Denver Terry rose Jefferson Chandler Edry coryell Lewis eight degree
How Streaming Changed the Sound of Pop

Switched On Pop

09:17 min | 1 year ago

How Streaming Changed the Sound of Pop

"Exiling that has overtaken pop music in the last six months, which which one I feel like we're poppas of anxiety. So according to many the economics of streaming is changing music. So significantly right now that pop me literally never sound the same again. And today I want to investigate these claims by seeing how musicians are altering their sounds to make it in today's streaming economy and to do this. I've recruited Aishah Hassan, and Dan, cough who have written about how streaming is affecting the sound of pop for courts in a piece called the reason, why your favorite pop songs are getting shorter Asia. Dan the show. Yeah. Thanks nice to be here. This is exciting. Yes. Okay. So in the recent guardian interview mega pop producer. Mark Ronson said that all your songs have to be under three minutes and fifteen seconds because of people don't listen to them all the way to the end. End. They get into this ratio of non complete heard which sends your Spotify writing down and song writers are forced to churn out hits at short order. So I can you untangle Ranson's gripe and explain what is causing so much concern that many music streaming services work as that songs generate money per play. That means every time that there's streamed they generate a certain amount of money, and that's very little so it ranges between zero point zero zero four dollars to zero point zero zero eight dollars. And then if you don't play it to the very end that rating goes down, meaning that people don't listen to the song through as much then the song is less likely to make it into Spotify really lucrative playlists which them streamed more, and because the amount of money so little volume is really important. So this is obviously extremely different from how artists were paid in the past. Right. I think it's important to note that artists right now. According to a report. In two thousand seventeen they're only getting about ten percent of the music industry's total revenue, but streaming so important because that's how they're going to break out. Right. And they're not going to be heard by audiences then less people are going to buy their tickets for their concert. People are going to buy their merch so to be visible. It's really important to sometimes game the streaming system. So more people listen to their stuff. Okay. Gaming, this drinks. There's some sort of sort of perverse incentives going on here and just sort of get sort of order magnitude around this a CD used to cost fifteen to twenty dollars. And how many songs do you have to stream in order to make the equivalent on an old record so thousand streams quivalent of six dollars. So we're talking about fifteen hundred streams to get nine dollars. An and of course in artists probably is only making a fraction of those nine dollars. That's exactly right. The music services tend to take thirty percent of that revenues Spotify or alpha musical, whatever we'll take around thirty percent. And then even though you've got the rest of the money going to artists depending on the deal that they have a record labels and the amount of people who have contributed to the track that money, which is very little at the beginning is split up. Even more so artists are actually getting a very very small amount of money. Okay. So this is interesting. We have two different issues at hand. Now that we have to deal with one as you mentioned this question of our songs getting shorter and sort of why? And then also are there. Certain like time markers are boundaries that you have to fit within is that changing the way that perhaps people are writing music, and so let's take them in that order. So our songs are songs any shorter. Yes. Definitely. Around two thousand the median length of a billboard one hundred songs was well over four minutes about four minutes and seven seconds. And in two thousand eighteen it was just over three and a half minutes. So we've lopped off more than thirty seconds off the average billboard hot one hundred songs. So that's that. So Mark Ronson anxiety that that Charlie quote at the beginning of this episode is is perhaps warranted songs are getting shorter. Yes. And there's also these extreme example. So there are a bunch of songs now that are under two and a half minutes long. So in the two thousands there were virtually no songs under two and a half minutes that made the charts and in two thousand eighteen about six percent of them were less than two and a half minutes, and some even just two minutes, you documented this in your piece, and there's like a hockey stick graph basically starting in. I don't know like twenty fifteen twenty fifteen all the sudden there's all these songs that are now two and a half minutes or shorter you pointed to Connie west and little pumps. I love which comes in at just over two minutes. How correct. So the question of where's the music going curious in in your investigations how much? This is intertwined with the dominance of hip hop as the main form of today's popular music. So it's a coupla hated thing to answer because hip hop has seeped into all genre. So even when you listen to country as you've pointed out in previous shows country now has a hip hop effect. But if you look at every genre. They've all phone Rb rock country. All of them have taken a big dive over the last two decades wrap the most. So it's definitely the biggest phenomenon there. But it's not just a hip hop thing. So on the one hand, we have some different incentive structures set up and just to be clear about them. Minor sending we have songs are getting shorter. Because the way that you get paid with streaming is personal and it used to be since the I don't know the age of album oriented music that the Elbe was the main way that you made a major money. So now, if you're getting paid per song, it makes sense to have like twenty really short songs that might actually run shorter than an album length. That would be ten songs that are twice three times as long, and so you're you're gaming can I get as many songs in. It's possible. Is that is that an accurate description of how some people understanding this? I just want to complicate things a little bit. So yes, we are pretty confident that streaming matters. But this is actually a pretty long term trend. So if we look over the twentieth century, you'll see that songs were quite short in the forties and fifties. And then they got way longer through the latter half of the twentieth century and then starting around the late nineteen ninety s all the way up today, we see songs shortening. So it's definitely got to be more than just dreaming. But we're confident that sort of the effect that we're seeing over the last several years is a result of the desire to make more money from having shorter songs. And if somebody listens to an album repetitively, the artists will get more money, but there's definitely more going on there than just streaming. Okay. So Spotify actually put out a press release about this phenomenon and said that in the world of digital consumption are narrow windows of free time are the object of fierce competition by the seemingly limitless choices streaming platforms present short songs represent solution to an. Audiences abundance of choice alongside endless opportunities for diversion. So there's sort of a question of like our audience is also driving this perhaps. That's that's what they're suggesting. I think what we need to do though is examined the music and see is this really going on. And I'm particular interesting looking at like if psalms are getting shorter what's being put on the chopping block. And so we really established it hip hop is. Most dominant form of pop music right now, go on the billboard sixty seventy percent of the charts are going to be hip hop. And if you also look at the songs, which tend to be shorter, especially these sort of two minute, two and a half minute songs. Lotte hip hop lungs in there as well. And I think there's a there's a part of this which makes sense because in have you don't necessarily have as rigid structure of pop song. You don't necessarily have to have for example, a pre course or post chorus or bridge you can just have hook verse hook verse and you're out. And so when you look song like s and low pumps piece, they're doing exactly that. As you steal. I try. Sparkler one came out. Such a. Sick. Like the quick I'm a sick. Like, let's you to verse piece instead of you know, you go back to nineties hip hop. You might have had three four five versus a song. So it's easy to just you can chop it down make more songs that makes sense to me. I think we're things get more complicated. Are when songs are using sort of more traditional verse chorus song form. So if we look at song like he side that's on comes in two minutes and fifty four seconds, which is pretty short pops on and I wanted to look at where's the extra music going? So let's listen to Benny Blanco's east side. And we're gonna listen to just what happens at the end goal. They side.

Spotify Mark Ronson DAN Exiling Aishah Hassan Benny Blanco Asia Hockey Producer Ranson Sparkler Connie West Charlie Two Minutes Thirty Percent Four Minutes
There’s an EpiPen shortage — and parents fear for their allergic kids

Born To Win

00:40 sec | 2 years ago

There’s an EpiPen shortage — and parents fear for their allergic kids

"Albinger parents across the country are starting to get their kids ready to go, back to school and some of them are dealing with. A major problem ABC's, Janai Norman says they can't get a potentially lifesaving drug that those. Children may need I went to the pharmacy as I always do whenever I need an epi pen, and they said we, have no epipens Rachel Hamasaki kindergartner has a. Severe nut allergy she says she called thirty four, pharmacies near Denver searching for the critical medicine before finding one, forty minutes away epipens help treat allergic reactions to things, like, insect, stings medications, food my land the company that sells epi pen says they're actively exploring several options that would help stabilize the

ABC Robert Muller Perjury Donald Trump Giuliani Nbc President Trump Janai Norman Rachel Hamasaki Joel Arana Laura James Comey Mr. Ronnie Lotte Marci Gonzalez Denver FBI California Special Counsel Mexico Director Forty Minutes
"lotte" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"lotte" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Many here is mardi buffalo. No accidents Lotte slowdowns though because of construction, let's start with I ninety four where, east and, westbound it's closed Connor to I seventy five until five. O'clock Monday, morning and, that's causing some slowdowns use during the start slowing down, westbound I ninety four from around Chalmers the ramp to Connor slow and Harper westbound. Slow too because people are using that, as an alternate and as if there isn't enough work going on ninety four m dot has, now informed us that the left lane is closed on eastbound I ninety four from Shaffer to I seventy five it's moving workgroup 696 eastbound. Closing telegraph to loss Excuse me. From telegraph to I seventy five and you've got slowdowns on I seventy, five northbound approaching that, ramp to, six, hundred ninety six eastbound and Southfield freeway between Ford road and mcnichols we have just one. Lane open and you're stop and go from about welfare. About mcnichols in the rather from the idol Dom motor group twenty four hour traffic center I'm Marty buffer Leany w w j NewsRadio nine fifty and updating. The AccuWeather forecast us now, it's meteorologist. Steve Travis good morning Steve good. Morning and a. Pretty nice morning out there now and I think overall c pretty nice day sunshine some clouds the humidity will stay low so feeling comfortable out getting up to a high of seventy nine and a comfortable. Night tonight as well just a few patchy clouds around low down to sixty three tomorrow looking great also we'll see sunshine mixed with a few clouds eighty two for a high but the humidity still quite low so still feeling pretty comfortable. Monday we'll see a mix of sun and clouds. Eighty one for. A high, and then some rain Returns Tuesday and Wednesday some steady. Rain Tuesday high seventy eight and a few showers, Wednesday high right around eighty right now. Pontiac it's sixty four bet your airport sixty six downtown sixty five going up to seventy nine I'm AccuWeather. Meteorologist Steve Travis on w. w j NewsRadio nine fifty dates of traffic. And. Weather together every ten minutes on the h. around the clock our next update, is less than ten minutes away. At nine eighteen traffic and weather. Together every ten minutes on the as has the brake thanks to work, conceal home in the W.. W j news time nine ten hundreds. Of runners and walkers will converge on Belle isle today. For the minority. Organ tissue transplant education program better known as MO tap your organization is hosting its yearly life walk run to increase awareness about the. Need for people to become organ donors here's mod chips director Ramona chap much you aside into watch you cannot steal over we'll have a. Table that we get signed you up Your driver's license or your. Driver's license number that's the most important thing is. So we encourage.

Steve Travis AccuWeather Connor Shaffer mardi buffalo Lotte Steve good Belle isle Harper director Ramona Pontiac ten minutes twenty four hour ninety four m
"lotte" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"lotte" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Has been well cared for and it is in relatively good shape so the film restoration lab limousine ritual vodka and bologna italy was able to make a new beautiful copy of the film with the score intact it was released by milestone films in two thousand one and it's now available on home video so a whole new audience can discover this very haunting imaginative artistry it's a really fun movie i have not been able to find it i saw a note somewhere that someone said it had been on film struck if you subscribe to that service and you wanna see it but i can't find it on those struck currently so i don't know if it's like netflix where something's come and go but it is available on home video if you're looking for it over the course of her six decade career lottery negar made almost sixty films this is a woman working in intimate shin directing all of these films which is why people call her a trailblazer but she was so under the radar i think particularly for us consumers that nobody realized like oh there's this mazing woman director making all of these really beautiful films about twenty of her films unfortunately have been lost and i wanted to close out with a quote from lada illustrates just what she preferred to focus on the art of her work rather than analyzing the technical aspects of it which is you recall we've mentioned kind of more her husband carl's domain and this quote is again from the nineteen thirty six essay that she wrote for sight and sound magazine quote there remains a good deal to say about the problems of this type of film about its future and about its value but i am content to leave these matters to those people whose profession it is to bother about such problems i feel that i do better to concentrate on making the films and on making as many as my good luck allows each new film raises new problems and questions and i can only hope to live long enough to do justice to the mall.

netflix director lada carl bologna italy sound magazine six decade
"lotte" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"lotte" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Frame to complete this gesture painstaking yes but to her so simple there's a really good video that i will include in the show notes that was made kind of later in her life that is a little bit of a mind blower because it is that thing where it somebody that goes it's so easy and you see her cutting out a character from one of her things and she draws the most rudimentary guide before she starts cutting but then she's really fast and then it comes out and it looks perfect and then she doesn't even draw she's cutting legs and arms and putting it all together and she looks like a sorceress lee none of it seems like a human could be assembling it all at bringing it to life that quickly again she was clearly very skilled it's why people marveled at her as a child but in nineteen eighty a lotta made her last film which was called the four seasons and then she died on june nineteenth nineteen eightyone of having just turned eighty two in recent years the adventures of prints off men has been restored and this was a painstaking process as we mentioned earlier there was no existing camera negative and none of the original german print survived either but the british film institute has a colored nitrate positive of the film with english enter titles those are those transition cards that appear in older film so the audience can read exposition or character dialogue this is a copy that is meant to be used to create other copies because of its delicate nature because they realize this is an important thing to preserve three black and white duplicate negatives were made of that nitrate positive over the years one in nineteen fortyfive when in nineteen fifty five and one in nineteen sixty nine and then those copies were the ones that were used to make a digital copies of the film but the nitrate positive has.

lee british film institute fortyfive
"lotte" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"lotte" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"I was brought in to compose the film's music and because film didn't have embedded sound at this point it was common for an orchestra to play live with the film's frames with hughes for the conductor were spliced into the adventures of prints akkhmed so that the score would perfectly compliment the visuals on screen yeah the score was one of those things that a lot are really felt like would provide this support structure for the story and like just give it that extra little something that it might need so that was also a kind of ambitious thing in the midst of of early animation and we'll talk a little bit about how she timed that out in a bit there were also financial challenges that happened during the three years of film production so the german economy of course was still in a period of recovery from the first world war and as the country tried to stabilize there were times when it looked like there backer haagen might not be able to keep paying for the project but he was really quite dedicated even though in the end he never made any money off of this investment but he really was devoted to it and they managed to pull it through and they finished the film in early nineteen twenty six but even once the film was complete there was a problem no theaters wanted to show it they felt like it didn't look like a complete film so a lot of inner team took on a second project which was staging premier in may of nineteen twenty six the adventures of prince augment was shown in a small theater in northern berlin who had delighted audience with wolfgang zeller himself conducting the orchestra yeah apparently he got his usual orchestra to kind of do it as a favourite because they were basically doing this whole thing on a shoestring and this screaming turned out to be something of a comedy of errors ryan iger and her team had asked everyone they knew in the arts community to invite people and they did that and they were thinking oh it's on a sunday afternoon no one's gonna come anyway but it turned up that way more people showed up than they were expecting so many so that there were arguments among attendees.

hughes wolfgang zeller ryan iger berlin three years
"lotte" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"lotte" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"To route mon headed up this special effects creating the fire in the volcanoes and the magic and berthold bartoshuk created a sea storm for the film alexander carton and walter turk worked as lettuce assistance since her workload was huge via and these were people that had come out of that same institute of animation so they were all friends and collaborators and they had decided early on in the process that they were going to adapt something from the arabian nights then the idea was that they wanted to select a subject like we were saying above that could only be done with the unique opportunities that ladas shadow puppets offered the team poured over the stories of the arabian nights and they finally selected the elements that they felt would be perfect for the film style that they were planning and then they assembled those elements into a narrative and the refined their script until prince ach meds story emerged of the team worked they were really breaking new ground the idea of making a film in stop motion with silhouette puppets was new they didn't even know what they were filming would work and until they had the film developed so they were working with the knowledge that all the effort they were putting in could turn out to be for nothing yeah nowadays when people do stop action they can look back at it on digital and like go yeah that one we're oh no we gotta go back it'd be like we spent twelve hours setting up these shots we have garbage ono it'd be a heartbreaking way to to do it and this was understandably really stressful for lotte there's a lot of talk anytime you're reading about the production of prince automated about how she was having some very real anxiety issues in addition to the unknown nature of the outcome the addict studio that haagen set up wasn't very tall to set up the.

berthold bartoshuk walter turk alexander carton twelve hours
"lotte" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"lotte" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Prince akhmed predates disney's snow white by more than a decade renegades film came out in nineteen twenty six while disney's movie had a nineteen thirty seven release whether that discrepancy is due to film being smaller release or simply having been foreign and not picked up by the english language press isn't that quite clear yeah we'll talk about it in a bit but getting distribution for that film was a little bit tricky so that may have been part of it but also i think some of it too is just the disney engine of pr like at that point in the nineteen thirties disney was wellknown he had already done steamboat willie of course it happened and he was already seen in the the us as really a visionary and so i think that story kind of ballooned poor ladas work was left a little behind in terms of historical record as an aside too we should mention that there's actually a third film that sometimes comes up as a possible precursor to both snow white and prince akhmed as a feature length animated and that is a project completed in argentina in nineteen seventeen titled l apple stall and that film was created by cary no christiani and the problem in this one lies with verification because while apple still may have been the first animated feature no prints of the film survived so we don't actually know whether it was long enough to qualify for the title of first feature length animated film we're gonna talk more about the specifics of the adventures of prince akhmed and hal it was made but first we are going to pause for a spot to break.

disney us argentina apple Prince akhmed cary
"lotte" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"lotte" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Yeah it was you know that unique time that throughout europe i think in any of the the sort of capital cities there was a lot of really interesting art happening post world war one as everybody was kind of recovering just the way people looked at the world had changed and so a lot of really interesting stuff was going on louis haagen was another important male figure in ladas early career haagen was a banker and he saw a lot of potential so much so that he provided his own money for her to make her first feature links film he had also invested in film stock at the time and this was actually a pretty unique situation because a lot of wasn't pitching a movie potential investors or anything it was only she said i have a project that i mean someone to fund it she'd like other animators was making short fund films at the institute and at the time a ten minute animated film was considered long so when haagen saw ladas work and then asked if it was possible to make a feature length shadow puppet film it was pretty visionary on his part although the initial reaction amongst most people was that it was a terrifying idea because it was so ambitious but ryan iger coke and the collaborators they worked with all that it was a really interesting idea and they decided to try it the adventures of prince akhmed was the result and this is often cited by film historians as the first animated feature film rather than snow white which is the what in the popular memory was the first one.

europe louis haagen ladas ryan iger prince akhmed ten minute
"lotte" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"lotte" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"History of my own life i never had the feeling that my silhouette cutting was an idea it so happened that i could always do it quite easily as you will see from what follows i could cut silhouettes almost as soon as i could manage to hold a pair of scissors i could paint to and read and recite but these things did not surprise anyone very much but everybody was astonished about the scissor kits which seemed a more unusual accomplishment she also as she said enjoyed the she loved to put on plays well into her teams and at one point she described her early attempts at staging plays in her family's small apartment to be a little bit chaotic because of the space limitations but then when she started using her silhouettes to put on shows it solved the problem she made herself a small little shadow theater and she staged among other things shakespearean plays in it when she started studying under theatrical director max reinhardt she would watch all of the plays staged the theater from the wings and she was so taken by the actors as seen from that angle that she started cutting out silhouettes of them while she was watching the shows you it really was like one of those things it's almost how if you know someone who mitts and they take their knitting everywhere with them and they'll have full long conversations with you all they're banging out of sweaters something very similar she would just this paper all the time she started her professional career at seventeen when she was hired i to make title cards and then to make rat puppets for director paul vega those rats were for the film the pied piper of hamlyn and a lot of had actually been inspired to study with reinhard at the theater after attending a lecture by which had led her to the decision to become an actress vega had i tried to use live rats for his film but they panicked and they ran everywhere except after the actor playing the viper which is what the action called for so he ended up having to go with the wooden rats which had earlier but dismissed his two time consuming possibility.

max reinhardt paul vega reinhard director
"lotte" Discussed on NFL: The Dave Dameshek Football Program

NFL: The Dave Dameshek Football Program

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"lotte" Discussed on NFL: The Dave Dameshek Football Program

"Cole right the feel i mean i would say eight berle make a lot about this or we can just dismiss it and laugh about it and say huck come september who's gonna remember any of that but there was a lot of smoke in december and january now this is lingering to to now lotte t a lot of guys on the patriots are saying it outright or at least insinuating the bella check costume the super bowl by benching malcolm butler the think that the patriots i guess the best trae trouble in paradise are the patriots the best team in the afc going into twenty eighteen absolutely is i don't know until they prove to me that they're not they're the reigning afc champions man i mean they have to be dethroned wouldn't you agree i mean by definition i mean i know ate your logic get your logic there but spaghetti do you i mean just practically speaking this is a team now that was scrambling so mightily to find anybody to put in their defensive front seven that they had to go and get james hairs in the doing and give him actual reputations out on the field it wasn't like hey let's just throw them out there he was actually out on the field playing in big moments for the new england patriots they were ramblin sprit scrambling so hard that they made it to the super bowl and i happen to know that the eagles in as they evaluated the patriots on film in the run up to the game by super sunday before kickoff they were they were of the they weren't just ready they were of the mind that we should take care of this team we should we should definitely win this game because outside the number twelve there twelve is covering up awful lot ugliness or mediocrity at minimum i don't know i forty one forty two we talk about it all the time trouble in paradise at minimum i don't know exactly how you resolve this either this tom brady is whatever he wants about wanting lamar jackson that the end of round one i don't do i am i might behoove the patriots to find a successor i don't like brady we've already heard from jimmy garoppolo we already know from that time malt that he doesn't like brady.

Cole malcolm butler patriots eagles tom brady jimmy garoppolo berle huck lotte t lamar jackson
"lotte" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"lotte" Discussed on AP News

"Me good progress the casualty insurance company and affiliates pricing covered not limited by state law a b radio nearly i'm jackie quinn authorities are still looking for a motive in the school shooting attack and parkland florida the nineteen year old gunman is described as a loner and a weapons enthusiast his mother recently died a vigil was held to honor the fourteen students and three staffers who were gunned down fred guttenberger shared his heartbreak over the death of his 14yearold daughter told me is no such thing as done by lotte's it happened in parkland president trump addressed the nation on that topic speaking slowly and deliberately at the white house a somber president trump said the nation has a heavy heart while pray for the florida victims and families he says nobody should ever be in danger at an american school and that will be the focus of a meeting this month with state and local officials we're making our schools and our children's safer will be our top priority the president did not mention guns during his remarks but promised to tackle the difficult issue of mental health after earlier tweeting the suspect was mentally disturbed saga remain magoni washington police say that a more manager has been killed by gunfire in birmingham alabama it's after a shootout erupted between two groups of young men it occurred at the western hills small if you have a dog there is a tainted food concern the jm smoker company is pulling back some of its shipments of gravy train cables embiid skippy an old roy they may be accidentally tainted tainted with a drug that is used to youth an ice animals so far the company says that the problem only occurred at one manufacture during facility a california state senator suspended over a sexual harassment investigation is suing to be reinstated senator tony mendoza questions if race is a factor in his dismissal he says another accused.

jm smoker company senator tony mendoza harassment senator california birmingham washington florida jackie quinn alabama president american school white house trump lotte fred guttenberger nineteen year
"lotte" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"lotte" Discussed on AP News

"Necessarily looking for the healthiest option because you're choosing fast food he could choose something different if you really are looking for that the highfat foods are still available they're just not being promoted with a happy meals a federal appeal court in maryland has declared president trump's travel ban unconstitutional this matter will go before the us supreme court in april jackie quinn ap radio news radio news i'm jackie quinn authorities are still looking for a motive in the school shooting attack and parkland florida the nineteen year old gunman is described as a loner and a weapons enthusiast his mother recently died a vigil was held to honor the fourteen students and three staffers who were gunned down fred guttenberger shared his heartbreak over the death of his 14yearold daughter told me there's is no such thing as done by lotte's it happened in parkland president trump addressed the nation on that topic speaking slowly and deliberately at white house a somber president trump said the nation has a heavy heart while pray for the florida victims and families he says nobody should ever be in danger at an american school and that will be the focus of a meeting this month with state and local officials we're making our schools and our children's safer will be our top priority the president did not mention guns during his remarks but promised to tackle the difficult issue of mental health after earlier tweeting the suspect was mentally disturbed saga or magoni washington police say that a more manager has been killed by gunfire in birmingham alabama it's after a shootout erupted between two groups of young men it occurred at the western hills mall if you have a dog there is a tainted food concern the jm smoker company is pulling back some of its shipments of gravy train cables embiid skippy an old roy they may be accidentally tainted tainted with a drug that is used to youth an ice animals so far the company says that the problem only occurred at one factoring facility a california state senator suspended over a sexual harassment investigation is suing to be reinstated senator tony mendoza questions if race is a factor in his dismissal he says another accused.

jm smoker company senator tony mendoza harassment california birmingham washington florida jackie quinn senator maryland alabama president american school white house lotte fred guttenberger us trump
"lotte" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"lotte" Discussed on WLOB

"Levin david's it three wow now died now our here's 1992 whitney houston starts a 20week run at number one twenty weeks at number one on the album chart with us album and what's the name of that album rich navy album in ninety two namely album i bet it's the album from that movie lotte the bodyguard the name that was on thing was the soundtrack think found track from the bodyguards bodyguards alex rae after they've i'll agree okay guess what if he said the uh from the movie bodyguard you are coal rat the let's hear it let's hear it was named saw that west's long skull i'll always lionel butler witness the shore at the two thousand six forty eight in the morning and it's snowing and writer portland right now we're getting as we like to say a wintry fairyland out right now as it is pretty okay feed two thousand seven is the year a copy of john lennon's book a spaniard in the works which contain the lock of lenin's hair was sold at an auction for how much rich two million dollars about a day anew thousand two two hundred fifty thousand fifty thousand yukon closest forty eight thousand know why aren't a lot of couple of millions of niagara lock of hair and dna that's going on there a a full year calling him in clo melt a lenin gave the book and the hair to betty glasgow and of course are often the head of her name writes she was why their hair draft she was the hairdresser during their heyday right and she he wrote in the book to betty lots of love and here john lennon x x key who is that heartwarming reports of this all right i now i'm bronze on for natthin 1998 a seven inch single recording by the quarrymen who were the quarrymen rich oh quarrymen uh elvis perkins no no no that is the million dollar will come to europe richer yeah i know you're gonna say of the feet of i know you're gonna the coralina the riedel beatles before they will handle uganda's anchor john paul and george and the which named school as the rarest was named as the rarest record of all time because only fifty copies were made of this record by the quarrymen what was.

Levin david alex rae portland john lennon lenin betty glasgow uganda john paul whitney houston lionel butler writer niagara elvis perkins europe george two million dollars one twenty weeks million dollar seven inch 20week
"lotte" Discussed on Outside the Lines

Outside the Lines

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"lotte" Discussed on Outside the Lines

"Tonight will have the final two hours of our espn thirty for thirty films celtics lakers best of enemies the chronicles the rivalry between these two story franchises culminating in the epic battles of the eighties and after on wednesday night game between the yanks in angels on espn catch sports center at night with neil stand are they're gonna have everything major league baseball's best including the latest us open as well from erin hills everything you need check it out oh a banner day for homers yesterday fifty one left the yard leaguewide and that's great for the game everybody loves the long ball right but the most talkedabout check is seal weeks why because after rounding the bases that's what he did flipping the fans a double burt mind explaining that one you feel people were talking to me before and after them run the kept talking reacted to level sleep please just trying to channel his inner mr met but i guess that's called fam relations in queens but in japan they taking it to a whole new level this is the chiba lotte mariners anglerfish mascot check them out he emerges from beyond the centerfield wall this to leggett fish just trotting around in those were known colored pants and you're wondering what is up with this guy well we don't know either but then watch breaks into a sprint and he pukes out his own spine not deboned fish before but nothing like this he looks terrified the crowd looks dumbfounded now the cheerleaders they're still in mid routine seemingly unaware of the onfield horror unfolding beyond behind them but in the end he does that little polls nice and then the mascot just jumps right back in and that's fam relations for your japanesestyle mr metten guess he'll plea learn thing or two from our friends overseas.

baseball japan mr metten celtics espn neil chiba leggett two hours