36 Burst results for "Lotta"

Fresh update on "lotta" discussed on Symphony Financial Group

Symphony Financial Group

01:06 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "lotta" discussed on Symphony Financial Group

"Thing to help position you'd achieve that retirement. Go that we have set down and you have for yourself. In our final portion of this show today, I thought we had kind of changed things up a little bit, and we're gonna talk about retirement. I recently came across an article in Kiplinger. And Tony. The headline of that one was if retirement planning sounds great to you, you are on the right track, and I thought that's kind of interesting. I think that that like That got my attention anymore. So retirement planning sons Greek to you into a lot of our listeners out there might, But does this mean you're gonna hit us with some philosophy? Maybe. So, you know, uh, to certain degree, that's exactly what we're gonna do. You know, Tony, I don't really consider myself to be a philosopher or a philosophy scholar. Um, but I'll try to keep this is Lotta's I can. You know, the article notes that there's three ways that Aristotle's teaching can help you get a fresh perspective. On your financial strategy they like Wow. When I read that, um, you know, particularly as we continue to deal with the fall out of this covert stuff, I asked the same question that you might be asking right now. Just what does that her startle have to do with building a strong retirement? The answer is more than you might think, Tony his concepts of ethos pathos in logos. Have been around literally for thousands of years, and they can still be very beneficial today. Wow. Well, first of all, Michael and mostly thinking two things right now. First. I'm not sure where you're going with this. And second. I can't wait to find out where you're going with. So let's get going toady. So let's look at ethos, which means character. That's the first thing when it comes to building your retirement strategy. You need to have absolute faith that your plan has complete. Credibility for Aristotle. The article explained that the purpose of the ethos was to inspire trust in the audience that he was addressing..

Tony Aristotle Lotta Michael
How To Start a Terrarium - Little Set up, Lots of Fun

Your Gardening Questions

01:43 min | 1 d ago

How To Start a Terrarium - Little Set up, Lots of Fun

"Easy to set up Little little cares a matter of fact the less carrier give it away the better off because when you get it planted you should water it sparingly. Just things are moist then. You can cap the jug or can or canister or vase that you've put it in and or you can leave it open either way if you leave it open. There'll be some evaporation. You may have to water just a hint but this this is going to be an an enclosed environment for all practical purposes where everything gets recycled and it's just a real joy to watch it grow The one thing i would recommend s we quit doing was to turn the jug every week or you can have so that the light was hitting the plants them all the way around and i. I don't know how long that was in her bedroom. But long enough to climb a wall out onto the ceiling So you can have a great amount of fun or you can be more cautious and keep it small in the first place Any vessel clear and clear the better. It is to see what's happening inside but any vessel like that that I know if i start what it'll be in a super sized peanut butter jar that i have cleaned out. Its plastic but i can still see through it very easily so i can tell what's on inside and I don't not sure. I'll get around to it because i have a lot of indoor plants in the wintertime but a terrarium can be a lotta fun for children and adults and then even people in care centres. That don't have much space. But if they've got a window they can do terrarium and watch it grow so it's a lot of fun.

Business Lessons with Michael Teoh

My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

07:39 min | 3 d ago

Business Lessons with Michael Teoh

"Michael is served fortune. Five hundred companies across forty one countries. Michael take a minute and filling for the tidbits about your law. Thank you so much andrew into all of you listening to this podcast and watching our interview right now lonzo doctrine that's a piece greeting from where i'm from kuala lumpur malaysia nestled in the heart of asia. Just in between singapore and thailand. A little bit tidbit about me is that i'm very grateful. Where during one of my productivity trainings. That i deliver to leaders around the world. It happened in malaysia. On one fine day. Web president barack obama actually visited my training. The president came for half an hour and it left me pleasantly surprised. Though i was shocked and i didn't know what to say for the next one minute. It was an awkward silence but the president gave his signal that i could carry on and then i carried the session on for the next thirty minutes and then the president came up took the stage gave his speech and we had a great time to connect with each other he gave a very very kind testimonial to the work that i was doing for the valla people because at the end of the day andrew really. I believe it's people like us many hardworking people out there watching this interview right now. Who's listening in. We are the ones that make the world goes round. We are the ones that put food on the table and we are the ones that really the movers and shakers many of us unsung heroes again. Thank you again andrew. And that's one of the reasons why i wanted. I was so excited to agree to be given this opportunity even to appear on your show again. Thank you andrew fantastic. You know. it's an interesting thing. Michael that as a financial guy. A lotta times. I spent my and i've spent my years during the performance of companies. And you know what. I've come to learn over. The years is that financial success has to do with two things number one the leader of the company if it's a bad leader in a bad direction that they choose. It's very hard to have strong. Financial success true so number one is the leader and the number two thing. is that what i've learned. In my opinion you don't need superstars. You need good qualified people but what you need is coordination amongst the management team. That's if you have a good leader and coordination amongst the land management team. That is the secret sauce. And so for all those people listening out there. If you think you're gonna find it in a financial statement. It's not there. Because remember as i always teach in my teaching of people in management i always say and particularly to my finance students finance adds no value. And what i mean by that is that finance is a mirror it is a reflection it is a way. It is a feedback mechanism for management team to judge the impact of their decisions. So i like people to understand particularly financial people. I know a lot of financial friends. Listen to this podcast. I want financial. People always keep in mind. That finance is a supporting function. Just as much as human resources and others and if you go into business only with a focus on finance you'll never get there but if you go into business with focus on management leadership strategy in building a team. That works together. It's unstoppable spot on andrew spa and also. I think you know the other thing about i. I often say to small and medium-sized businesses. Never fear giant businesses. Yeah they are so messed up. They can't easily coordinate. The activities of their management team and of the different business units a very difficult thing to do and they've also fallen prey to the the idea of. Kpi's in the sense that everybody has a key performance indicators that they're pushing and all the sudden you have everybody working hard in their own area but few people thinking about how to coordinate that effort and that's why the coordination of the management team is what really can said a small medium sized business apart and make an impact anyways. Those are those. What's your i mean. You've you've done a lot with large as well as small and medium-sized businesses. What are some of the takeaways. Let's just say there's there's listeners here to do have small and medium-sized businesses. What are some of the things that you've learned over the years. I believe one of the things. Andrew that i've just had the fortune to work with is with fortune. Five hundred companies as you mentioned across forty one countries and i agree with you spot on and you mentioned some of these large companies. They have a lot of challenges when they're not coordinated or even if the global headquarters is shoes a directive but when it comes to a localization part if they do not work or respect local partners to work with it doesn't work and one thing i find having coach one hundred fifty. Sme's during this pandemic because it is during this time where truth be told andrew if you would ask me. Is it my first preference to work with sms. Truth be told. It's not reason being because during this pandemic when it hit malaysia we ran into a lot now immediately all out. Huge corporate clients decided to freeze training. Funds decided to freeze employees development funds. And i realized that s my business was suffering yet. I didn't wanna give up so what i felt was. Hey if the big boys or the big corporates are not able to pay me. Where else can i bring my company. Where else can pivot. And where else can i add tremendous value. Because i'm a believer if you wanna get paid in. Whatever you're doing do not ask us of what people could give you but instead ask what you can give people so i started asking myself. What value can i give. And that was. When i realized that a lot of sme's struggling they were shutting down. And then i realized that. I coach i train. I guide a lot of bit. Corporates on sales marketing on how to happen entrepreneurial jal thinking and i thought i'm just going to bring all this formula that i've learned from all these big companies and i'm going to localize it personalized to sme's and that was how we help them generate five to six figures revenue during the time when everyone was closing shop independent lockdown that hit malaysia. And then people heard about us across the region and that was how we got invited across south east asia and part of the united states to do trainings consulting and even some mentoring virtually. But if you were to ask me what i really respect from. Sme's that were willing to at least fight. During this pandemic is their willingness that openness to be jal and to be nimble and to assure a-team that things are going to be uncertain. They're going to be uncertain if physician change of a drop of a hat. They must have be emotional audacity the strength to cope with it and to just have that faith that better things will come

Andrew Lonzo Malaysia Michael Andrew Fantastic Andrew Spa Kuala Lumpur Barack Obama Thailand Singapore Asia JAL South East Asia United States
Help! My Wife and I Disagree on Co-Sleeping

Parenting Great Kids with Dr. Meg Meeker

01:54 min | 4 d ago

Help! My Wife and I Disagree on Co-Sleeping

"Doctor meg. My wife. And i have four kids recently. We've had a lotta disagreements about how to parent and it's driving us apart. My wife allows our four year old to sleep in our bed. And i moved to another room. It just feels like we're not compatible anymore. What should i do. Well i want to tell you. K b just gonna use your initials instead of your name. Your wife needs to get your four year old out of the bed and you need to be back in your bedroom. This is really inappropriate and very unhealthy for your marriage. Not only that. It's bad for your child sending your child a terrible message. I feel that you guys need to come together on some big parenting issues which you know and tackle these long before you consider separating or getting divorced. I know you're considering divorce. But i think this is at this point. This is much more harmful for your kids. Here's what i would do. I would tell your wife that. There's some parenting things that she's good at and that you want to be sure to support as your kids get older then i would ask you to write down four five parenting issues. That she feels are most important to her to Succeed at as your kids grow older. Then tell her you will support these but that you need her to support your four or five most important parenting issues. In other words you have to negotiate with her. And i talk about this a lot. But it's very important for parents to do or not the same page with discipline co-parenting And many other issues. I really encourage you to find a marriage. Counselor as well to work through your issues and honestly. I'm not so sure that these much parenting issues as either personality ones or merita ones.

MEG Merita
Migration chief calls for all displaced to be included in national COVID-19 vaccination plans

UN News

05:17 min | 5 d ago

Migration chief calls for all displaced to be included in national COVID-19 vaccination plans

"Head of the un migration agency iom is strongly advocating for governments everywhere to respect the fundamental right of healthcare when it comes to ensuring vulnerable migrants in the displaced get equal access to covid nineteen vaccines in an interview for us news antonio vitorino once migrants to be included in all plants regardless of their legal status adding that im stands ready to provide practical support to countries who need help battling the pandemic iom's. Greta began by asking the right. To general to outline the overall impact of the pandemic on migrants and the displaced coming matinees had an enormous impact on people on the move first for most that house impact because usually migrants leaving very crowded lively places households and of course they are prone to be infected. And secondly we've lockdown with travel restrictions. There are almost three million migrants blocked stranded all over the world so there are also impact and also social economic impact very serious ones that Underline the vulnerabilities tyrants everywhere in the world. It seems that there's not really going to be back scenes for everyone immediately. And i was wondering if you could tell us i o n recommendations regarding the prioritization and the inclusion of migrants in the various vaccine plans that national governments are putting in place. We've telling me advocate to have and refugees internally displaced people fully include in the vaccination plans you respected their legal status because as the secretary general of the united nations are very clearly. No omni safe a delivery body safe so the reasoning for the interest of the host communities. He's also to guarantee that the migrants irrespective of their legal status have access to national vaccination plans. And what does that mean exactly. Are you asking for a special treatment. No not special treatment to follow the criteria they used for nationals being applied to non nationals. Which means recognizing those wanting more vulnerable positions where co mobility's who have because of their age take risks extra risks of being community so it's an equal treatment but in these equal treatment. Everybody's were getting greedy then. Do you feel like governments around. The world are receiving got message. They're understanding the importance of facing their privatization on public. Health principles rather than immigration status principles. I think that other quite a number of countries worldwide presence texas State of texas in the united states or portugal are even countries in latin america like ecuador. Why are accepting the presence and the excess of migrants to not just the testing mechanism. Put also through the vaccination mechanisms. But i still think that there are a number of countries that have not realized that it is the interest of the entire community to have migrants fully integrated in the vaccination plans. So that is worth to back. Many migrants are finding themselves a nine irregular situations and may fear. That could be arrested or deported. If they show up to get vaccinated. What can the government do in order to preempt to that. I think that there is a green simple which is the respect for the fundamental riley for healthcare. And that's why the show. And i supports the claim for universal health coverage and we know that a difficulty there because sometimes migrants especially the ones we ne- regular situation reluctant to have recourse to the national health system. Because they are afraid of being detained or deported. The key issue is to get into the trust and mutual confidence with those migrants and to guarantee them that there will be no law enforcement implications for having access to healthcare and especially to the vaccination process. And those who feel that maybe The vaccine has not been properly shot. There's a lotta vaccine hesitancy going around not just on the curve the vaccine on other vaccines as well. What is your message to migrants displaced persons around the world regarding covid nineteen vaccine. I think that the vaccines always f- some risks. But at the couldn't situation. After current moment i think there is sufficient evidence from the scientific and technical point of view that the vaccines that will be available are safe and they guaranteed the protection of the person's against the virus. So my message is very clear. I think that it is absolutely necessary that each one takes get off feels out house. Eckenroth congress possibly using the mosque washing the ants but at the same time every score recourse to the vaccines that is a tool medical put at their disposal to protect them against these very aggressive. Fire that we are confronted

IOM Antonio Vitorino UN Greta Omni Texas Ecuador Latin America Portugal United States Congress
Common Facebook Ad Mistakes: How To Avoid Them & Save Money with Emily Hirsh

Online Marketing Made Easy with Amy Porterfield

09:43 min | 5 d ago

Common Facebook Ad Mistakes: How To Avoid Them & Save Money with Emily Hirsh

"I feel like there are two types of people when it comes to facebook ads those who love them and are excited to learn more and improve how they use them and those who are intimidated by them and would rather go organiz their fridge than learn more about them but then again. I love organizing my fridge. But that's beside the point what i'm trying to get at. Is that whether you're the first type of person or the second type. You're going to want to stay right here. Because i brought on my friend in facebook ad expert. Emily hersh and she's going to talk about the most common mistakes entrepreneurs make when it comes to marketing with facebook ads and how to steer clear of them and avoid losing money now for my friends who are listening. That haven't been using adds a lot. You're going to learn so much from this episode so that when you do really get into using more facebook ads. You're going to know the mistakes to avoid for those of you. Who have been using facebook. Ads may be dabbling or your seriously in the trenches. Still listen in. Because i think you're going to walk away with some insights that emily shares. That can improve in tweak. How you're using ads in order to get your biggest bang for your buck. Emily is going to share. Not only what these top five mistakes are. But she's going to give you step by step tangible strategies for avoiding them or course correcting if you might be making these mistakes. Be sure you stick around until the end. Because emily is going to get into how to make these approaches realistic for wherever you're at in your entrepreneurial journey along with exactly where start infact. We've actually work with emily's company hirsch marketing during some of our past launches to manage our facebook ads and they definitely delivered. Alright so please help me. Welcome my guest emily. Well hey there. Emily welcome to the show. Yea thanks for having me. Oh i'm so happy you're here and before we get started. Why don't you give just a brief introduction to what hersh markings all about. Yeah so hirsch. Marketing is an ad agency. We specialize in facebook and instagram ads. And we specifically help people with courses and coaches people selling online digitally their products or their services. And i've got a team of about twenty two people all over the us than we do. Both running the ads than also teaching how to do it in our in our other product. Twenty two people. Is that what you said. Yeah i've got twenty two employees and then a couple contractors that is impressive. I have about twenty as well and you're a lot younger than me. So i've been in business longer and it took me a long time to build up a team like that. I feel like you have grown so quickly so fast and like the best way possible. Would you agree. Yes and growing team is like and as you know twenty people it really pushes you to grow as an individual i share so yes does it. Humbly oh my goodness like if you wanna know all your fault as a leader in all the areas need to really strengthen go ahead and build the big team that will do it or you know yeah exactly going the teams the hardest thing i've ever done. That could be an imam. Okay hey manchester event. I hear ya okay. So we've got a lot to cover today and you have five of the most common mistakes that you see entrepreneurs make when they're growing their business with facebook ads now facebook. Ads is a hot topic with my audience. Whether it be my newbie students are going at it with their first launch and they might want to dabble with this book ads or those that are in their second third and beyond launch. That wanna go really really deep with ads and do a great job usually on their own to start out with and then they looked to an agency so i would love to dive into all of these mistakes. So why. don't you kick us off with mistake. Number one yeah so the first mistake is before you even get to the ads. Peace that so many people miss over whether you're of beginner and you've never run ads. But i've also talked to seven figure business owners who skip over this and continued to not do it because it's so easy to miss and that's not defining what success means for their marketing. So what that really looks like is. What's your budget and how much you're going to make from that budget and a lot of times people kinda pull out like i think spend thousand dollars in see what happens and what. I encourage in really want people to do it. Encourage you to do to get the most out of what you spend is say over the next. Let's say thirty days. I wanna make this many sales which equals this many dollars and then working backwards and deciding from that what your investment is because if you go into ads in your kind of just like picking a number and then seeing what happens what will happen is you'll start running ads in. You'll say things. Like i have no idea if this is working or not. I have no idea where to put my time in energy to get to work and then end up just turning your ads off in waiting. A few months in china have seen that play out so many times so before you even start ads weather. Like i said you're a beginner. You're intermediate your advanced. You need to go into it knowing this is exactly my budget is exactly my sales goals. So that when you start running ads you're able to kind of pick it apart in. See what isn't isn't working and you defined what that success is for yourself just like you've never tried to do something without maybe setting a goal of what that is like you say i wanna get healthy. What does that mean to you. Same with ads. If you wanna run ads what is a successful ad campaign. Look like for you and then it should be based on numbers. Okay so this is such a great place to start. Because i know what my students and my listeners are thinking right now especially if they've never ran ads they'll say okay me. I know how much money i wanna make with. Let's say my first digital course launch or even my second digital launch but they don't understand or know yet how much they should budget for ads. They're like well. How much is it going to cost me to get lead for my webinar. Like let's focus on that. That's the biggest reason why my students would be running ads. I know you can't get into every single number in detail. But what would you say to somebody. That's struggling with that. Yeah so let's walk through how we would how we would break this down. So i you decide that sales goal. So let's say you wanna make make it easy ten thousand dollars. You've got a thousand dollar course. You need to sell ten. So you have that number of those sales goals. Okay now you have to decide your after come up. With how many leads you need into your web. In our in order to get those ten sales so for simplicity sake the average conversion is like one to five percent of all of your leads in. It's going to depend on your audience and the price of your offer. Let's just say three percent of people that sign up for your webinar. The total registrants are going to buy that course so you need ten sales and three percent are going to buy than what would be that total number of leads and i can't do math really fast but i mean what are you whatever that equals i think it would be like one percent is three hundred leads so we will need hundred leads. I think that's right so there once you have your leads. Then what's your cost per lead and an average cost lead for a webinar is anywhere from like four to ten dollars and again it depends on your industry when you're targeting consumers you usually have a cheaper cost per lead where if you're targeting business owners usually pay a little bit more because it's just a more saturated ad space so let's say five dollars you multi that let's say we need a hundred leads. Okay your ad spends five hundred dollars and that's how you break it down and get there. Okay i'm glad that you walk through this in the way that you did. I think my listeners really wanted some concrete data and like a formula to us. So i think that was really helpful so i appreciate you taking the time to really drill. That went down. Yeah perfect all right so move us on to mistake number two okay. The second mistake that many people make is they. Don't do enough testing especially of your ad creative so your copy your images maybe test video and in my opinion when i see someone saying that their ads aren't working eighty five ninety percent of the time. It's the messaging because it takes a lot of work to really understand who your ideal customer is and how to speak to them and how to stand out in the feed especially this year. It's just gotten even more important to go deeper to take it to the next level with talking to your ideal customers fears and their dreams and where they're struggling right now and so a lot people mostly because ads can be a lot of work. But i encourage you to take the extra week if you need you know as you get ready for adds to have at least three versions of your ad that you're testing. Maybe it's a long form of copy in a short form of copy and then you have a video an image. Because i'll get this question all the time. People's will what works better video or image or what works better long or short and it i there is no concrete answer because it's truly different for every audience. A lotta times. I do see video work better than in some cases i see a static image with no tax work better for somebody so the more testing you can do and the more deep you can go with your messaging to stand out the better. Your results will be and like i said truly eighty five ninety percent of time when your ads are hitting that cost per lead goal or they're too expensive or they're not converting it's because of your messaging because as you know amy like so many years it takes so much time to really truly know your customer but the person who knows them the most and can talk to them. The best in the feed will always

Facebook Emily Emily Hersh Hirsch Marketing Hersh Infact Hirsch Instagram Manchester China United States
Starbucks closes New York City locations amid protest concerns

Fox News Sunday

00:18 sec | 6 d ago

Starbucks closes New York City locations amid protest concerns

"New Yorkers hoping to buy a lotta at Starbucks today were disappointed the coffee chain temporarily closed select stores in Manhattan. Due to the chance of protests today, according to an email statement from a company spokesperson. A slew of posts on Twitter and the company's online store Locator show the closures are

Starbucks Manhattan Twitter
The weirdest stuff at CES

Talking Tech

07:10 min | 6 d ago

The weirdest stuff at CES

"Joining us to talk about some of the most unusual stuff it's es this year is usa today tech columnist. Jennifer jolly a jennifer. Thanks for being here. Oh my gosh you guys. Thanks so much for having me. I love talking about weird tech. It's my favorite thing. All right so what was the weirdest thing you saw this slightly different. Cas where we all were covering it. Virtually yeah well we're just. It's it's going to be a tie between toews poop detective toilet. You heard that right and i mean please. Just start with the puns. Now i call it number two on my list healthier future based on what you leave behind get ready to be bulled over from the latest data dumb. I mean you can't you can't make this stuff up. What does it do. Tell me you you. You've you've peaked. You've peaked. My i can't think of a good pun around the top of my head so i'm going to give up. He's flushed with excitement about this. There you go there you go. Okay so todos newest ai. Smart commode is a sensor filled. Smart bowl aimed at detecting early signs of disease based on just imagine doing air quotes key outputs so it will analyze everything from how long you sit on the throne to The temperature of your skin as yours just sitting there to whether your stool contains enough fiber and then it will send you recommendations on how to improve your health via app on your smartphone showing gives you solid output. I caught up with you guys young so there we have it so that's got to be one of the weirdest last year. I talked about There was some gadget that analyzed your cats poop to let you know about your cats health so it was just a small leap to human health based on. You know looking into the future by what you leave behind. Yeah i'm gonna stop now it totally but you know it really it really make sense because you know how they've said. Some universities were analyzing waste on campus for covid spreading around so anyway so you mentioned it was a tie. So what's the other weird thing that you that at the top of your list. The bio breast milk. You guys remember last year when impossible pork basically got all the headlines plant based bacon that actually tasted really really good. Well this is again with the pun. The mother of all new high tech smart foods bio milk is a customized cultured breast milk. That is made from cells of a pregnant mother than cultivated in a lab to reproduce human milk. But it's personalized for that specific infant from that actual mother. So it's a way really. And i mean it sounds crazy but female Cell biologist female food scientists founded this company to create an alternative solution to formula to the packaged powdered formulas. We've been using forever because three out of four moms. Have some reason they have to stop breastfeeding before the recommended. Six months so it could be work. It could be health related. It's stressful any nursing. Mom knows it is one of the hardest jobs you will ever do. Toss in pandemic and working from home in teaching your kids. I mean it's really really hard in the best of times so that is just something i can't i couldn't believe it when i heard about it but i'm excited to see it. Come hopefully this year. So let's get to some of the really cool stuff that happened in the s one of the things that i've heard i'd heard about were these bionic contact lenses i think. Can you describe them. They sound really cool. Yeah it's called mojo vision. It's an a. Are embedded contact lens. That is as close to a bionic accessory as i could ever imagine. There's a teeny tiny display. It's half a millimeter in diameter. That's about the same size as a grain of sand that's actually embedded within the contact lends itself and then it projects images and information really subtly. You really take your attention away from what you're looking at but it projects that into your peripheral vision as you either. Walk down the street or cycle up a hill or even look up into the night sky. It's absolutely mind blowing at this. Was the winner of css last gadget standing. And that's an event that i have emceed for the past several years including this year i had not seen not mojo lens until video that the company played during the event and i had to pick my job up off the desk. I just cannot believe this kind of futuristic far out technology is actually here and the company told me they're going to launch this For people who are visually impaired. I and follow up with a consumer model. They have to go through all kinds of of fda and f. like all kinds of regulations because it is a contact lens. I e a medical device but they are looking at two three years out with these. Maybe less sounds like something. I am i on medically go to the goes. Terminator two were you. Were you got to see through the terminator's eyes and stuff was coming up on the side and you're like wow that if that could happen in the future yeah not only could is will. We've seen it. We also saw the music's glasses that do something very similar. But they're a pair of glasses so the difference is a contact lens and a pair of futuristic super cool smart glasses nice beyond products. Were there any trends or big takeaway. She took from the show this year. Jennifer there was a lot this year. You guys have already talked about this. A lotta pandemic tech germ killer. Everything's from target as new anti microbial backpack to special lights. I saw ub techs. Giant robot can rule through rooms shooting off giant rays of uvc. Light to sterilize a room so huge huge emphasis on clean tech mask tech. You guys wrote about the airpods mask. I have that with me where you know. There's a little disc on the front of it that connects with your smartphone and can give you all kinds of information about the air that you're breathing. How much your breathing. So that was a really really big trend and then also just comfort more comfort and this big buzzword this year delight at home figuring out ways to bring basically your whole entire world inside the walls of your home or even your backyard and have it be a lot better to hang out. There in the future will

Jennifer Jolly Toews Usa Today Jennifer FDA Giant
The (Beauty) Business of Philanthropy with Karissa Bodnar

Fat Mascara

07:25 min | Last week

The (Beauty) Business of Philanthropy with Karissa Bodnar

"Lot of people you know. They write gen generals and they say i wanna be in. You know this part of the business. How do i get there and to be really honest. I don't always know how to respond. Because you know. I know where i am in the business and i know the steps that i took but You know they might say. I wanna be a perfumer. I wanna start my own liner. I wanna be a makeup artist. And i don't always know how to respond How how would you respond to a question like that because for you. You didn't know how to get to where you were but you got there. What was the thing that means you get. There was just focus or asking around. Like how did you get to where you are. Oh it's such a great question just so specifically to being beauty product developer. I took any job. I could get in the beauty industry and ben was always looking at it through the lens of okay. I'm a makeup artist right now. But how would i create a product. Let me learn everything i can about. Let me google got ingredient. Means if i don't have access to expert and really a lot of it is just that passion coming through. And i think when i got hired on xtra. Sonic graduated from college. I got my foot in the door always with an eye. I wasn't directly to impact development. When i started but it was always expressing how much i wanted to be in product development so then when i finally got the chance i was like i am not gonna let this go by and i think just so many of the skills when you're starting out in your career or transferable whether it's product development or marketing and so at the end of the day when you're first starting out a lotta censure making power points on spreadsheets. You're you're doing a lot of a lot of tasks that you can. You can transfer But i would say a showing that initiative in the passion for whatever you want to do so for me. It was product development. I think people will pick up on that and they'll wanna mentor. You okay. that's really great advice. Okay thank you. plus your husband's a product developer. So we have to save his his advice matches up with choruses. I'm gonna ask him later. He jesse my husband. I meant chris's husband or something. Yes yes i. I just think it's interesting because i really do feel sometimes a little bit after somebody writes. I don't know how you feel john. Somebody writes us like why be x. Person i don't really know if i'm giving them the best advice I can just tell them how. I reached my thing but yeah like absorb as much as you can express your interest to anyone who will listen. I wanna be you know here and hopefully you know not everyone is going to care and take you under their wing. Unfortunately that's the reality but somebody will know somebody will hear what you're interested in that i'll tell you this person or that's and showing expressing that interest but i just think it's awesome that you did know that you wanted to do product development and you just kept on finding away you know that. Make up artists to product of outbursts. Such a cool trajectory. We don't always hear that on fat mascara t tell us more. Let's keep going. Let's keep going into your story. Yes well and and i do have to say like i recognize what a gift it was that i knew that when i was so young. And not everybody's past and so what i do want to say is that first of all. I don't have all the answers. Second of all you're never too young and you're never too old to be who you always be so you can always invites You know you can always change your mind and at the end of the day my wife and my driver is philanthropy that i get to do every single day. Our incredible employees in product development. Like i get to do the thing that i have dreamt of doing my entire life so i feel really blessed awesome. It's very inspiring. You're never too young. Says like twenty eight year olds for you when you when you started your company. Well that's that's the funny thing about the term ceo. I'm such a work in progress right i. i'm. I'm absolutely not oh come on to answer. The question pat started. I believe was twenty-five but please it's a person. Thank you so much. Yeah you know. it's funny. I have really long hair out saving. Cut it for over a year. Oh my gosh. Look the pandemic who and i have always had longer hair in one of the things i love to do as locks of love but i was actually just talking to some of our team members about it. I said you know to me when i when i started writing. Cosmetics is really tried to look older because nobody really took me. I like to wear that right Cut my hair shorter to look more mature. And look more like i could fit in manhattan and everything like that but So so now. Having longer hair is like. I'm by thirties. Now and i can have longer hair but you know it was the. I've made plenty of mistakes an absolutely a work in progress. But it's i've had a lot of grace From from people around me throughout this journey can can. I ask you about when you started this company. I mean from the very beginning you know. Social good was sort of baked into the premise. Right yes can you tell us about why that is if and do you think that's a necessity of every business. These days or was that was that unique. That the time that you did it. So i'm not here to say what other people should do for their business. But i can absolutely say that my y. End what has truly been in. The dna of thrive cosmetics from the very beginning is our philanthropy giving back that we do from the very beginning. When i started the business in two thousand fifteen that every time somebody bought a product we would be giving back and now it's grown bigger than i ever dreamed given over one hundred million dollars worth of products. Now it feels it feels so surreal to say it out loud dollars. Isn't that crazy. But honestly it's thanks to our customers. Our community are giving partners and our boys are are giving powered by our community which you know our employees have a say in who we give back to our customers have a say in how we give back and that's why it's when a say do have like vote. How does that work literally are if you want to tell us a charity that you want us to give back to. You can go on five. Cosmetics dot com and we have a giving page where you could nominate a giving partner. And then we do have internal giving committees. You know in the beginning when it was just a couple of us in a room working together and shipping product and everything like that we mer service all same time as worshiping product of everybody went to every single giving events and We're involved directly with every Charity and we want it now that our company has grown from an employee perspective. We wanna make sure that our employees are still involved so people do have the option of one nominating a charity that they want us to give to whether they're an employee a customer or somebody who's never bought from us but they just in our our community and then also we haven't internal Committee where people any employees no matter what department their engine joined the committee.

BEN Jesse Google Chris John PAT Manhattan
How to Choose a Safe Seat for Your Baby to Eat with High Chair Designer Kirsti Vandraas

Baby-Led Weaning Made Easy

07:07 min | Last week

How to Choose a Safe Seat for Your Baby to Eat with High Chair Designer Kirsti Vandraas

"Today. We're talking about the seat in which your baby learns how to eat. That's right highchairs. And when it comes to hide your design there is no one more well known for icon design in this space than peter obstacle of norway. Peter offset designed the trip trap highchair in one thousand nine hundred seventy two. When he looked around for a chair that allowed his son to sit in a natural way at the grownups table and because nonesuch chair existed he designed what is now known as the iconic trip chair basically so he could include his son in as he says life round the table. So many of you may have this chair that trip trap or recognize it. It's sometimes like to a ladder so the trip trap is a wooden chair with an adjustable seat and adjustable footplate and grows with your child so the company that peter designed it for which is called. Shutt- is headquartered in norway. And they've actually sold more than twelve million trip trap as so it is one of the. Most globally recognized chairs. Personally i love this chair. I have in us seven of the trip traps around the table for my seven children. They've really been fabulous investment wonderful. Especially if you have a smaller space where you're feeding your baby or babies or if you're feeding multiples it's wonderful because it has a much smaller footprints like not one of those highchairs. It's gonna take up your kitchen. So while peter fix trip trap was designed and launched in one thousand nine hundred ninety two when his son was little forty years later in twenty thirteen obstacle launched. Another chair called the nomi and this was really his realization of his vision for designing the next generation highchair one. That's dedicated to his grandchildren. So peter obstacles now eighty one at the time of this recording. He continues to work every day. And cures deep vandross is a physiotherapist and an ergonomic who works very closely with peter. In fact she's worked with peter object for the last thirteen years. So kirsty is going to be on the podcast today. Sharing peter's vision and philosophy about the chairs that he originally designed for his child and his grandchildren. Now that millions of families of used around the world. So if you have a trip trap or a nomi- or if you're in the market for a highchair that will continue to serve your family and your child long after these initial stages of starting solids. I think you're really going to enjoy this interview. Because the scandinavian design principles and the philosophies held by peter and explained today by st are so very different from what we may have in mind when we go to select a seat for our baby to learn how to eat so today on the podcast. Kirstin i are going to be talking about the difference in american and european safety standards. Why norwegian families do not actually strap their babies of their toddlers into the degree or the extent that americans may think is necessary. This is going to be very eye opening for a lot of you certainly was for me as kind of a control freak. Mom we'll be chatting about why the trip trap and the nomi were designed with the very obvious absence of trey and what that means. and then. How the adjustable foot rest is probably the most important safety and design component missing from most highchairs today. So i hope you enjoy this interview with cure. Steve andros from the peter obsta company. Kirsty thank you so much for joining us. I am so excited to have the opportunity to interview you. It's catching get now. If you can. Would you tell us a little bit about your background. And how you know the whole life story maybe. How did you get into product design. And then how did you come to. Work with. Peter ops vic. Oh it's a long story. I am a physiotherapist anais. I started working in our major hospital here in in ostler with people with back and neck problems you know. People came into the hospital more or less paralyzed with pain and never thought they would be able to come up and walk again and with a treatment lots of guidance we build them up again and they went home and they were fine and had a lotta for knowledge with how to behave to avoid back and neck problems then. I saw that it was difficult for them. To use to knowledge they had when they went back to back. So i sold our institution equivalent to osha would been interesting place to work to see if i was able to get other people to create positive working environments where you could work but still keep your health so i spent ten years in our show in charge of ergonomics and then i started sinking. What about getting into detail. The totality because their via opium much more than chair tables but share and tables reports on the totality and. I wanted to see if we could make chairs in such way that you didn't talk to have problems with your body after sitting. Who working so. I started working ritual. Company that developed sitting solution for the working person unlock was contested. Interesting period thomas there for six teen years and then i met peter ops week. One of a number of designers. We used not process another lost twelve years. We're solely read. Peter and peter's sir designs promoting them talking about taking part in the product development. So that was a long story. But you know the background and How i ended up here. And you're still actively working with peter. Is that correct. Yes yes wonderful. Can you tell us a little bit about the history of the design of the trip trap and then the nomi highchairs and especially with regard to promoting freedom and fellowship. The trick drop chair was developed in the beginning of the seventies piotre just had his son wounding sixty nine will sitting on an ordinary highchair s. You know the high chair has been around for for generations. you know egypt. They use highchair. the hunt. Chance in their mini is an pizza hut his son sitting in hijab but then when he reached a year and a half you know he didn't really need to sit with the sort of support all around his waist. He was looking for other chairs that he could place his son around the table together with the rest of the company that did not exist so he had to make his own amber trip chapels but one then in nineteen seventy two and i think he did something very clever back then because he did not make it to fit into what you call the design of the seventies he had the distinct bischel feature in the seventies and the result is that the chair still look quite Modern had he designed it giving it the visual design of what the kitchen look like. Back in nineteen seventy two. It would have been outdated very old looking chair today.

Peter Peter Obstacle Shutt Norway Peter Object Steve Andros Peter Obsta Company Nomi Peter Ops Vic Vandross Kirsty Kirstin Trey Peter Ops Osha Piotre Thomas Egypt
Interview With Tovah P. Klein

Doug Miles Media

05:19 min | Last week

Interview With Tovah P. Klein

"Joining us today in our book talk. Great to welcome the book that I'm sure there's got to help a lot of parents out there. it's called. How toddlers thrive what parents can do today for children ages two five to plant the seeds of lifelong success. Joined by my client from a new york today and dot com good to have a chance of chaplain for few minutes. How are you today. thank you for having me. i guess everybody says toddlers They're cute and everything but Those those are not easy time for for parents right. So this is a timely book. I would imagine. I hope i hope. So that's the goal. Because it can be. I think perplexing and quite a challenge. What is it about that age. Everybody goes through it. Obviously i guess some more than others. are worse than others. I should say that Is that is that the biggest issue parents have early on after maybe the first few weeks of an infant bring what happens. We have our infants and obviously we learned their communication and we comfort them. We feed them. We do a lot of holding them and taking care of them. But for the toddler who's up on their feet and certainly once they get language around the age of two. They're really separating and they're starting to realize. Hey my own person and i have my own ideas and they are not always what mommy or daddy wants but hey i really need mommy and daddy and i really love them and so they copy between this excitement about being out in the world and on their own and this real need to know that mommy or daddy are there for them no matter what and so i call it a push. Poll of the toddler years of is this their first attempts at becoming independent. And that's where you get. You know what people call wilfulness or defiance. It's really the that young child is still really baby. Saying hey i have my own ideas and that's where it starts to become a challenge for parents particularly for first time. Parents does the first child That's the first time they They have do disciplining right. Yeah i mean it's really about limits setting you know. We always talk about how much young children need from teens. Because if you have a routine that's like setting limit so for example. Mealtime we sit at a table. We eat our food at the. That's setting a limit when the child gets up. Oh you're all done. What it says to them is when we have a meal. We sit at the table. We don't walk around with food and you don't even have to go so far as discipline when you have a lotta routines routines around getting dressed. Bath time dinnertime. Anything that you do. Every day needs a routine. Because that's what helps children know what's going to happen and feel that they have some control almost a Security and they know what it's coming up next most exactly and they don't. They have no sense of time at this age. I think it's hard for adults any of us to really understand what it would be like to not have a sense of time because we look at our watches or we look at the day of the league. And we say oh. What do i do monday. Whereas young children have no capacity to tell time so those routines give them that organization right and you read. It makes them feel safe. All i know. What's next what what i was doing to remember when i was a little kid. Yeah you're right time As much slower than really an aspect of it to you know you know. That's what that's supposed to delight of. Toddlers is live in the moment so when you're in a joyful with their child they're right in know they're like you know playing with something and their joyous and sharing it with you but they don't think about. Oh i need to stop this in a few minutes and move on so the downside of living in the moment and not having the time is it's very hard to move from one thing to another like finish playing the weekend leave for school is very hard for them from your research talking to. I'm sure many many parents what what's the biggest mistake you see the parents dealing with that age group biggest mistake that any of us make particularly with our firstborns. But we can do this with any child is thinking that they're older than they are so our expectations become much more than what the child can actually do and part of that. Is you know once. Our children have language and can really talk and communicate better. First of all there's relief for us. I think there's relief for the child as well. I can communicate a little bit more but we start to think they're much older so one moment you're having a nice conversation saying remember when we go to dinner at that restaurant used to be quiet. Trust own yes. I know that the restaurant but then you get their now cancelled. Still can't keep quiet. That's because they're two or three or four and we think that they're much older than they are and so we kind of bring our expectations down a bit their level. We actually treat them differently in a more supportive way. And that's really what my book is valid. You understand something about how low development is but this is really also a really important crucial time kind of back off a little. Say okay. I understand what my child's doing and just switching parenting techniques. A little bit can really make life that much easier with a toddler.

New York
Unsung Heroes Presented by Claiborne Farm

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

05:47 min | 2 weeks ago

Unsung Heroes Presented by Claiborne Farm

"Have the privilege of welcoming in wesley per cell who is the claiborne. Farm brood mare manager. He is our very first person to be recognized on this new unsung heroes segment wesley. First of all good morning my friend and thank you for everything that you do. Thank you for having me on the show to obviously a privilege to do this. And i'm glad to be here talking with you so excited you know walker bernie other great people at claiborne. They they stepped up with the sponsorship of this segment. And i thought it would be appropriate that we start with a claiborne farm representative and there's when you think about the personnel name. You'd be difficult. It'd be difficult to find somebody that's more ingrained in the culture of claiborne than you. My friend you were raised at the in a farmhouse on the property and that name per cell is pretty much synonymous week labor. That's correct My brother and i we still currently work out here My father worked here for over close to forty years started. Here nineteen seventy. I've had numerous calls Actually on both sides of the family work here so you know clybourn and and the per sales of go back several several years probably starting in the mid sixties of one of my first articles Making his debut out here you know. I read an article that had a piece about your uncle. Don am i correct on that he was your uncle. Right don yes. He was a yearling manager for several years. Yup yup and Passed away in september. Unfortunately you will be missed. But he worked with secretariat riva ridge roundtable and even got to meet his favorite actor. John wayne at clayborn kinda interesting. When we we had visitation we We saw those pictures. And it's just it's amazing because you hear people talk about opposite. John wayne in these horses like secretary and river ridge and so forth but for family members to be associated with them and and have memorabilia pictures taken with them on both sides of the spectrum with horses and People it's it's it's just awesome. What was it like growing up in a house on the property there at clamored kind of second to none. Go out and you do your childhood thing. You know you're playing basketball or whatever may be in the yard but you've got these these thoroughbreds this you know front door back tour left and right Beside you ever day knowing that they're going to make an impact on a lot of people's lives As they you know these babies grow mature and it to the race track in the mayor's or the the stallion he'll come back for their secondary career. So you know growing up as a young child. You didn't really know the importance of that. But you you know your dad worked here in your uncles and you know there was a major significant taking place you know. Every kid likes to have a big backyard to go out and play in. You had acres and acres and acres to go play in if you wanted to. What did your friends and maybe some of the other students that you were in school with growing up. Think about you living on a horse farm like that. I remember my. I believe it was my first grade year. Our field trip was to claiborne farm. So i'm six seven years old and i'm so ecstatic. When they announced it we're going to claiborne farm. You know this is where i live and i can recall telling my classmates house. We rode the bus out here. You know i was. I was like the tour guide at six years of age. And we pass by my house. You know something special say. Hey i live there And all the kids stuff that it was very interesting but To do that as a young child. And you know that's one thing that's all people remember where you took your field trip bad you know in kindergarten first second third grade and so forth but to be able to say that i took a field trip to a place that i grew up i lived on still holds a special pricing heart. There as you were growing up and you're starting to get a little bit. Did you always think that you would find yourself working at kleber. You know from day one. You know the passion of horses and and that it's in your it's in your you know your father's coming home and he's talking about horses like swell in rough and i mean i can just sit here name. A list of horses easy. Go where we can go down the line but you know i wanted to pursue a career in education and that's what i ended up doing And i got a degree at the university of kentucky. But that was doing that. You know the back of my mind. I'm like you know. I've got this opportunity. Clyburn that there. And so. When i while i was away from it. You know that that's what you're supposed to be doing in this life. So what was your first job on the farm. When i was about fifteen years of age Had a weed eater. My hand wasn't the greatest experience with that something. He knows a young kid. You pay your dues. And i would go around. You know the pastures and the a lanes of the farm and we'd we'd and as a group of High school. You know kids that would do that. Every year and My second season out here. I did started working with the marriage. The baby's my father was the form and at that time So he gave me a lotta great guidance and how to handle yourself around a thoroughbred the presence needed And the relationships that you build with each individual horse and that's that's where it really started with my second season out here

Walker Bernie Wesley Claiborne Farm John Wayne Riva Ridge Claiborne River Ridge DON Kleber Basketball University Of Kentucky Clyburn High School
Dallas Cowboys fire defensive coordinator Mike Nolan and defensive line coach Jim Tomsula

Blogging the Boys

03:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Dallas Cowboys fire defensive coordinator Mike Nolan and defensive line coach Jim Tomsula

"Do have some breaking news on friday afternoon. The first friday after the dallas cowboys season ended an unfortunate start the new year for their staff. That dallas cowboys. Making some you know some obvious news in a bit of surprise news the dallas cowboys announcing that defensive coordinator. Mike nolan defensive. Line coach jim. Tom soula have been let go. Have been whatever you wanna call it fire to buy the team. They will not be back in two thousand and twenty one. Mike nolan obviously oversaw. One of the worst defenses to ever live ever played in the nfl. And so we'd heard. Rumblings obviously had been reported different instances over kind of the last month that it was likely he was not going to be back although mike nolan. If you're somehow unaware is is rather chummy with mike mccarthy dallas cowboys head coach mike mccarthy they go way back in case. You forgot mike. Nolan was the head coach of the san francisco. Forty niners in two thousand and five and mike mccarthy offensive corner at the time that was of course the year. The forty niners took alex smith with a number one overall pick. Ironically the quarterback that won the division that they were together here. This season with the dallas cowboys. Jim thome soula was a head coach of the forty niners at one point in time himself albeit for only a year obviously following in the footsteps of jim harbaugh who got an extension today of all days again with the university of michigan so lots of symmetry going on here and so. Yeah i mean my canola thing. I think everybody saw coming a mile away. The jim thome solo thing is a bit of a surprise austin on youtube. Says i thought it said mccarthy and was like whoa still good to get rid of nolan and this is how every cowboys fan feels. And let's be frank. Let's be honest. We don't enjoy talking about people losing their jobs. People getting fired or things like that but this defense was among the worst again in the history of this game. The dallas cowboys last week. With their season on the line against an offense that had been anemic for most of the season the new york giants that was incidentally again. You talk about all. The irony here led by former dallas cowboys head coach jason garrett in the giants offensive coordinator who again to go kind of crazy circle reportedly had an interview today on friday with the los angeles chargers for their head coaching vacancy. But the cowboys new york with their season on the line and they got run over. I mean the new york giants before last week against the cowboys. The previous four games. The giants had not scored more than three points in a single first half in each of the four games. The giants played before the cowboys. They went into the locker room at halftime with no more than three points. They put twenty up in the first half against the cowboys. And that was kind of what the season was for the cowboys right. This never ending display of imperfection this never ending run of records getting broken records getting set and i just you know this was inevitable. I mean shutout. Of course to the all encompassing thanos. I mean this truly was inevitable. Reality a lotta people myself. Included wondered what took so long this week. It's a pair at the mike mccarthy and his staff overall were evaluating things doing kind of the final walk throughs and assessments in whatever time just came for them to move

Dallas Cowboys Mike Nolan Mike Mccarthy Niners Tom Soula Cowboys Jim Thome Soula Alex Smith Jim Harbaugh Nolan Jim Thome New York Giants Giants Los Angeles Chargers NFL JIM University Of Michigan San Francisco Mike Jason Garrett
SolarWinds - The Gift That Keeps On Giving - DTNS 3943 - burst 04

Daily Tech News Show

33:27 min | 2 weeks ago

SolarWinds - The Gift That Keeps On Giving - DTNS 3943 - burst 04

"You're unique and so are your taxes. Turbo tax live has experienced tax experts. Who listen to you. Learn about your unique tax situations and answer your questions and on top of all that they can do your taxes from start to finish. Maybe you started investing and want some reassurance from an expert that you're doing things right maybe you're now self employed and needs some expert advice on what qualifies as a home office deduction or maybe it rather have an expert file your taxes for you so you can focus on what matters most no matter what. Your situation is turbo. tax live tax. Experts can answer your questions. Give tax advice review your return before you file or even do it all for you. Turbo tax live. Gives you confidence that you're uniquely you. Taxes are done right into a turbo tax. Live file with the help of an expert or let an expert file for you coming up on how to clone someone security key roku by some qube and we'll make the apple cars. This is the daily tech news for friday january. Eighth twenty twenty. One in los angeles on tom. Merit and from studio redwood on sarah lane from studio colorado. I'm shannon morris drawn the top tech stories in cleveland. I'm lynn per nine. The show's producer. Roger j we were just talking about a cas product that makes you ice cream and ninety seconds whenever you wanted and why roger never cries wider conversation join our expanded show. Good day internet at patriotair dot com slash dpd s. Let's start with a few things you should know. Amazon has discontinued its prime pantry. Grocery and household item service products previously available in pantry will now be available like any other products on amazon. So it's not going away to gather but the service itself prime pantry launched in twenty fourteen offering reduced shipping on up to forty five pounds of household goods for a monthly fee. Amazon node vied prime pant pantry subscribers about the closure in december and then issued refunds the. Uk's competition and markets authority launched an investigation into google's privacy sandbox. That would block third party. Cookies in chrome regulator received complaints from the marketers for an open web coalition saying the plan would abuse google's dominant position in online advertising. So the investigations going to evaluate. If the privacy sandbox changes would concentrate advertising spending market share with google samsung launched the galaxy chromebook to a cheaper version of the galaxy chromebook at launched last year so instead of four k it has a ten eighty p lcd screen with less storage fewer cameras less ram. It's also heavier and thicker overall but it also now starts at five hundred forty nine dollars instead of one thousand dollars. That has a thirteen point. Three inch nineteen twenty by ten eight hundred sixteen nine. Lcd touchscreen with the dual core intel seller on five twenty five you upgradable to an intel core. I three ten ten eleven ten one. one zero. You eight gigs. Ram and one hundred twenty five gigs of storage for six hundred ninety nine dollars a shortage of semiconductors affecting automakers. Volkswagen said last month that they needed to adjust first-quarter manufacturing plans around the globe because of the shortage. Now honda says it will cut domestic output by about four thousand cars this month at one of its factories in japan nissan is adjusting production numbers for its note hatchback model and ford has moved up previously planned downtime at a kentucky plant for its sport utility vehicle factory to the jin chips all right. Well we're talking about cars. Let's talk about the the apple car. Yeah a lot of rumors as of late will really over the last few years. But but but the rumors had resurfaced recently and hyundais. Now talking to apple about kerr's so says the company hyundai representative told cnbc quotes. We understand that apple isn't discussion with a variety of global automakers including hyundai motor as the discussion is at its early stage. Nothing has been decided. Korean economic daily said that apple suggested the arrangements and hundred was reviewing the terms that involved e production and also battery development hyundai has had his own battery platform called e. g. m. p. going into production later this year. So might be saying what you're doing. Reuters sources say that apple would like to produce a passenger vehicle by twenty twenty four however might not be that date bloomberg's mark gurman reports in thomas e. v. from apple is five to seven years away and michio recently said he wouldn't be surprised if it takes until twenty twenty eight. Yes what's probably going on. Here is apple and i think this significant part has decided to start investigating how they would build. Whatever it is. They're going to build whether it's a whole car or an integrated platform and they're going to different manufacturers and parts suppliers and folks like magna including hyundai. And saying what are you got. How can you help us with this. And is a great company for this because they make parts they make systems. They make full cars. There's all kinds of services in the conday company that could play a part with apple so it may not be. That apple knows what they want from hyundai. It may just be that they're going and saying hey let's talk. You do a lot of the kinds of things that we think we're going to need. I'm pretty excited about this. I just got my first hyundai ever this year and my perception of this story was weight but hyundai currently uses android auto and a lot of their their cars. So i would love to see. How apple would integrate Hyundai's current technologies into something that is very useful for that apple ecosystem not just looking at e itself but also the The the systems inside of it the controls in how they would manage that four a driver and a passenger in the car. Yeah i mean. I think that's one of the big questions that i have is okay. Let's say let's say it's hyundai that that applet ended up working with with clearly not set in stone at least from what we know at this point. But let's say it's the companies for kicks. Let's imagine that that's what it is. Yeah it is. It is an apple car that hyundai produces a lot of parts for the way that works with lots of other companies to produce other hardware for apple. I mean that that's the loftiest kind of goal that we're looking at and maybe that would take till twenty twenty eight at you know if if apple was lucky. I think it probably has more to do with like you said shannon not that you know android auto wouldn't still be prevalent in a lot of passenger vehicles but maybe at some sort of it's a special relationship. It's it's a special kind of os inside a car that is supposed to you. Know i don't know move some merch because What apple is providing on the software side is is. Is that much more interesting. I really don't know if you look at that. Bloomberg article mark gurman sources are saying that Tesla people that apple has hired are working on things like interior exterior. Drive train stereo. Desist the kinds of things. You need when you're building a car not carting a software platform so then the question becomes is it the apple car period. Maybe hendaye makes it. Maybe somebody else makes it. And you know they'll figure out how to distribute it or is it the apple car by sunday and you go to hyundai dealership to buy it the way you went to an. At and t. store to an apple iphone but it's really apples car in cooperation with sunday. Are there multiple partners. I mean that's all the kind of stuff we're waiting to see but it really does feel like we have gotten to the point where this is no longer just yeah. They're working on project titan. They don't know what they're gonna do to. They have an idea. It's more than just software and they're working out the details. Maybe they don't even know that yet. Well i'm interested to see what happens but we also have some other news. Security among the systems impacted by the solar winds attack is the electron filing system. Used by the us federal courts at investigation is underway to determine if confidentiality of documents filed with the courts was breached and as a result starting wednesday confidential documents filed with the courts will be stored on standalone systems. Not uploaded big difference so these are documents sealed from public access because they contain sensitive information like investigative techniques identities of informants and a lot more other. Us federal agencies affected included the justice department the state treasury and energy departments as well solar winds has engaged. The krebs stay most security consulting group to help deal with this attack. That firm was formed by alex. Stamos the former chief security officer at yahoo and facebook and chris krebs the former director of the us cybersecurity and infrastructure security agency or sisa. So krebs was fired last month. By the president after finding no evidence of with voting systems in the twenty twenty election. Yeah stamos first of all brilliant for those two to team up and smart for solar winds to engage them for what they say is Helping with transparency with companies that are affected But this we we are not done finding out how bad this is. There are reports that there may have been other ways that this whoever is behind this intruded beyond just solar winds. They're finding evidence of that. They have not been able to root out the people that got into this vulnerability from all systems yet. They're still in there in a lot of cases. And you know this. This kind of confidential information is exactly the kind of thing you fear that someone would get intruding into a government system informants investigative techniques that you can now learn from to evade being prosecuted or caught yourself. That's that's crown jewel type stuff it's it's very interesting. In fact krebs spoke on record saying that it could potentially take years to figure out how deep the solar winds attack actually went and how many different kinds of infrastructure. You know brands and everything that it might have affected so this is not something. That's going to die anytime soon. I'm glad that they are reaching out. Craig's and stay most though because that i agree with you tom. It's excellent. excellent team roku made a few interesting announcements roku says. Npd data shows that the roku s was the top selling smarter operating system in the us and canada in two thousand twenty thirty one percent market share in canada. Thirty eight percent in the united states That's pushed the samsung's tizen number two. At least we don't actually know samsung's ties and was number. One in two thousand nineteen also announced a wireless soundbar reference design that uses wifi for its roku. Tv ready program remember. Last year roku announced the program which had a designed for wired. Sound bars. The program includes tcl. Pokemon on an element has just announced. They'll join as well with two point. Two point one ready sound bars roku tv ready to expand internationally later this year as well. But here's the big roku news roku has agreed to acquire exclusive global distribution rights to more than seventy five Shows documentaries some of which had not been released before qube shutdown. So there'll be some new stuff that nobody's ever seen after their exclusivity deal expires. That'll happen in a bit more than a year. Depending on the show roku will still have the rights to show the content just not exclusively until thousand twenty seven the content will have to be presented in original increments of ten minutes or less. The deal doesn't let them stitch it altogether. The content will be added to the more than forty thousand movies and tv shows already available. In the roku channel shows include from Be anyway punked. Murder house. Flip and dummy which stars anna kendrick. I never watched the new punk. I heard had its moments. The whole qube thing. It's really interesting to me because it was sort of like. It crashed and burned so quickly. And there's a lotta shot and friday around folks in the industry about it. And i think that's not because qube was doing things wrong. It was because the company had raised so much money time. Because you know. They had meg whitman. Jeffrey katzenberg who are you know. Heavy hitters and there was a little bit of like you are being to embassies and therefore you shall fail. The company did fail and the idea that some creators will have a new life on another platform shows. That just don't even saw but people still worked on. And maybe you're really good. I think this this makes a lotta sense and good for roku to get exclusivity for at least a few years so does roku have to wait at all in order to start showing this content or can happen immediately. I don't know when the start date. Whenever the deal is you know goes into effect. Then they'll immediately be able to to show it so you know within a month or so it would be my guess anyway but no they. They don't have once. The deal is actually in effect. They don't have to wait. What's going on here. is that the baby. Production companies own the rights to their own stuff but they have a two year exclusive for each one of their shows with qube and those two year exclusives are now being transferred to roku so roka will be able to have the exclusive for the remainder of whatever. The period was with quick. That's why it's more a year. Exclusively goes away then they still have the right to show it until twenty twenty seven but the production companies that made it can now start shopping at around to other places as well so the production companies do hold the content and remember this is just the content. Qube is still in a over. Its turnstile technology which is holding it up from selling its technology and i would expect once it resolves that lawsuit should resolve it in a way that they still hold their technology. They'll sell that to so this isn't the last you're going to hear could be selling off a part of it. I would imagine. Gotcha yeah that whole. The whole technology part of qube was again was an ambitious thing that was released at a very inopportune time in twenty twenty when everyone was like. We're just sitting at home like we don't need this like mobile phone technology. It's like cool that you can shifted around but you can't even cast thing. I mean the company did fix that pretty soon after allow about she was just. I mean it's just did. The timing couldn't be worse but that technology when you think of it in a variety of other form factors such as monitors that swivel talked about some of those yesterday. I don't know that qube or tiktok or snapchat or all of the stuff where we're like. Oh yeah that's the. That's the portrait view. Rather than landscape view. That works for certain apps is is is all that this is four. I think there's more to it So we'll see what happens and there's patents and things that are always valuable because you can use those to extract some concessions and money and stuff. So yeah expect that all to come join the conversation in our discord which you can join by linking to a patriotic. Can't get in there and talk about your favourite qube shows with all the other discord folks. Just lincoln to your patriotic out at patriotair dot com slash. Dpd s all right shannon. How do you clone a security key. Well i i will say please do not stop using your security keys because of this story i will explain it. Researchers from ninja lab published a paper on thursday showing how you could clone a google tightened security gate this is a two factor authentication key which is very similar to a you. Be key that you have to plug in or tap in order to access an account after putting in your username or your password credentials. Were both so in order to pull off the clone. You would need physical access to the key for about ten hours. Sometimes a minimum of ten hours just kind of depends on how good you are at this. About twelve thousand dollars worth of equipment physical equipment and custom software and some advanced skills in electrical engineering and cryptography as well. So you have to remove the chip and then take measurements of it at a being registered on each account that you went to attack the measurements observe electro magnetic radiation as the chip generates digital signatures that let the attacker slowly deduced the private key so measurements take about six hours per account. That's not including taking apart. The original tighten security key putting it back together. Then you need to seal the chip back into its case. You also need the targets password in order for this to work. So the reason it works is because of vulnerability in the security hardware chip residing within the google titan key and that is called an eighty seven hundred x by this company called. Xp if it's exploited in attacker could grab the elliptic curve cryptographic private key for the account and the same chip is actually found in other two factor. Authentication physical tokens as well like There's a ubiquity that it's found in but chances of attack or very very minimal given the scope of the attack so if you do all of this without the target ever noticing then they would never duplicated key but again given the scope given how much it costs and everything behind the scenes probably when it happened to normal user. The point of these security keys being the best way to use For two factor. Is that you can't even get at your private key right you. Nobody has to be able to get in there like the chip. Just doesn't make it available so the fact that they were able to get in there and get it is huge. You know the fact that they were able to do this is significant. But i mean if you're not a target of an advanced persistent threat. You don't need to worry about this. No one's going to go to the trouble to do this. And even if you're a target. I would guess shannon that most of them probably would be able to notice if someone took their key for ten hours or more you. You likely likely would especially since a lot of people with hardware tokens like google titan will stick them on a on their keychain for example like with their house keys or whatever wherever they keep all those personal physical devices that they don't want lost or stolen they keep them all on engaging so if somebody was to take one of these out of your purse out of your gym locker wherever it might be and remove it for like ten hour street minimum. You would likely know that this would have happened. the neat thing about these chips inside of these. Google tightened security keys. And any other cryptographic hardware tokens like these is that. Even the manufacturer doesn't know the private key so the fact that they were able to find vulnerability on these specific chipsets is really interesting. And i think that's the important bit of that. Is is even though the google titan like the end all be all of really excellent. Two factor authentication. There's always. The potential that vulnerabilities can be found. So i'm happy that this research came out. It's so fascinating and it's so interesting in this means that an x. p. and other security chipset manufacturers that sell these teeny tiny chips to google or whoever the company might be They can build on this. They can research and figure out what the next version of their chipset needs to entail in order to not be vulnerable to this again in the future. Yeah i mean this is really a good security story right. We finally figured out because there's always a way right. We finally figured out the way you get the private key out of a security key and guess what it's really hard takes a long time and now that we know it we can make it even harder and hopefully you know push that barrier out even further and even if somebody did have time to do this and you didn't notice i was reading the paper because i'm a huge nerd and they go as far as using fuming fuming nitric acid in order to get like melt the epoxy off of the original google titan. How are you going to put that back together. In order for somebody to not notice like there's a lot of intricacies with this attack in order for it to actually be pulled off so chances are very very slim that somebody would be able to pull off so again as i said at the very beginning. Don't stop using your google tightened security key if you have one keep using it because chances are you would never be attacked with this. Just just know if you haven't seen it in ten hours look together strange. This is going to be in a movie though. I'm calling that shot right now. We're gonna we're gonna see this movie. Where like i hope so. Somebody goes into surgery and they take his key and they go out and do all this and they slip it back in because ten hours later. He wakes up from anesthesia on something like that. I just hope they talked to the researchers so they actually show it off right. Yeah Sony tv and audio announcements Starting with details for its own tv lineup. Sticking with lead ravi x four k and k. Tv's will support four k at one hundred twenty hertz variable refresh rate vr as well as a l l m low latency mode and e arc. These are all things that are important. If you've got a ps five now you've got sony. Tv they can go. That sony also has an improved a chip that is going to improve the picture and sound positioning. So it aligns with what you see on the screen. Sony's master series. Tv's will come with a sensor that adjusts white balanced immense. Your ambiente color temp. You don't have to do anything they'll just do it. Also an aluminum heat shield. That will make for brighter. All the sets will support. Hdmi two point one. Another big one for ps five dolby vision hdr angle tv. Sony also announced. It's three hundred sixty reality audio platform if you're not familiar with three hundred sixty degree audio places instruments and vocals in a virtual sound field around your head but using just the one speaker so you can do this in an amazon echo or google. Home sony will start streaming video with three sixty audio later this year. Starting with concert from zara larsson on january eleventh. And somebody's gonna make speakers that support this. It'll be may supported by other speakers as well. But sony is going to put out the are five thousand and three thousand They've got that dark cloth. Surface that all these speakers seem to have these days with either bronze or silver accents. Work with google and amazon assistance and can connect to select sony abroad via. Tv's as well as supporting wi fi bluetooth. Spotify connect in google cast. The speakers do automated calibration to the room. They're in donut. The press a button for that. Either and we'll simulate three hundred sixty degree audio for stereo tracks as well. The five thousand cost five hundred pounds or five hundred ninety nine euros no. Us price yet on the three thousand two hundred eighty pounds. Three hundred fifty nine euros. This seems this. Seems like it's shaping up to be one of the trends. Is this the sort of three hundred sixty degree audio while you're listening to your black bank and it's just one speaker or potentially a couple of speakers ativan. Maybe yeah yeah already supported. Yeah there's less of kind of like What do i have to do. Five point one surround or at least get a couple of speakers and make them a stereo pair type thing. I really haven't heard this in. I don't know. I used to hang out at magnolia at best. Buy all the time. And just like geek out on stuff like this. of course. this technology wasn't around at the time. But it's really come on. Let's turn on some stuff and see the speakers. Do it works well. Then that's awesome my first reaction because i got rid of my kind of pants speakers some years ago because friend of mine needed them more than i did and i didn't have room in my apartment but i miss that i'm also an a. A permanent now that's smaller and kind of has a lot of weird angles and i find audio bounces off walls in wiz. That wouldn't if it was more of a square box broom So i'm not sure that i'm the perfect target market for this. You're the you're the one puts this through its paces and sees if it really works. Yeah if i could actually work as advertised again with some funny angles in a big old frame. Then i'm i'm really into this and i've always been. I don't have a sony. Tv currently sorry zony. But i was abroad. Bravi a person for years. Nears i think what the new bravi line is coming out with. Looks really nice. And i mean not totally in the market for a new tv. But i like the fact that i might get a new sony again paired up with a sony speaker. You got three six. Yeah already got all this stuff. It's going to be a messed anyway. You slice it. But i like. I like this to be sixty reality audio platform. What would you have set up in your house. I was straight up going to mention sonos because if if it doesn't have the connectability to be able to work with all of my other platforms that currently have invested in. Then chances are i wouldn't buy it. So i do have sono says in my house and i do have some issues connecting those with other speakers in the household to like like my google hub for example so the fact that this works with google and amazon assistant the speaker specifically The audio speakers. I think that's pretty cool. I like that. They are bringing that in and i am interested because i do live in a household. That has very high ceilings. How this would work in that kind of environment. So yeah. I'm very interested in the audio aspect. Well you might also be interested in what colour has come out. Oh yes the folks who make things like toilets and and sinks and lots of appliances however. Been a real. Cas mainstay for the last few years for some cool innovations and this year is no different. Even though we're not in vegas koehler has a new smart bathtub called the stillness bath. That lets you use an app or use your voice using google or amazon's assistance to fill up the water or perhaps set the mood by changing the color of the lights around the tab or even add some fog. You know you wanna kind of pretend like you're in the then present routines also turn on features in a certain orders if you wanna get kind of creative. that's cool. Yeah the certain amount of limitations with the base model and the base model is not cheap so temperature and depth control models alone will cost around eight thousand six hundred ninety eight dollars. That's right it's almost nine thousand dollar bathtub. If you want the experience tower that lets you activate fog and aromatherapy. That will run you just over ten thousand dollars. Both models are available in july. There are real things and if you want the version with lights and floor grades for overflow fifteen thousand nine hundred ninety eight dollars available. This october signed me off. I won't be buying those. Nope not even a little bit but we could have taken a bath at s in the new in the pre show roger was like. Why would you want fog. It's like this. Why does anyone want to be on. Yeah racist luxury suites in hotels for sure as well as apple's houses sure yeah something well. Yeah it's it's that like hey look at what my bath can do people go. Wow very fancy and then you know ten years from now will be like remember when we thought it was fancied to talk to your bathtub so that it would start filling up without touching it but Yeah it's it's somewhat silly because of the price. But i'm not really much of a bath person but they do look very nice all right. Let's check out the mail bag but ads do it. Nick wrote in with a pronunciation. Ramps own neck. You are not alone he says. Ac's rog is an initial list. Because it's our og like fbi or cia. People say ron yet. They're lower end gaming brand tough not initially them. It's an acronym like scuba or produce you f but pronounced off. It's like ace's can't make up their name minds. Then there's strict which is our subbrand strikes as a word it's a completely nonsensical made up word. But it's a word and you pronounce it as such nick as honestly as somebody. That buys a lot of hardware. Because i've rarely had a bad experience with them over the past twenty years. I am baffled by some branding decisions. The one the bugs me. The most is the strict subbrand. Sometimes acis makes the tricks products. The high end product in the product stock yet other times. It's a mid range product. Would it be too much to ask for consistency and product. Branding twenty twenty one. Yes apparently apparently we feel your pain. Nick i love the dichter's just like i just need to vent you guys. Let me let me let me get this up. Just we appreciate that. Yeah i mean i. i'm with you nick. Everyday is a fresh new hell when it comes to reading out some model numbers but what is not is shouting out our patrons at our master and grandmaster levels. Today they include christmas merton james and digression daniels and of course landon peralta back and illustrating the show. What have you drawn for us today. Len well you know. I'm really excited. Say that we've have the first image of the ample car the car. Which i'm that's what i'm calling it. I'm sure they're gonna take my advice. Coming around twenty twenty seven ish or so maybe You know you may. If you're a fan of richard scary busy world a you may be very familiar with the look of of the apple. Ii car I think it'll be a big hit with with fans of people who have kids So check it out. this is called meet. I car And this is available right now. My patriot on which by the way has to new levels. If lets me be your Let me be your teacher. Your mentor with your artwork. I can give you some help that way. And patriots dot com forward slash. Len plus i also just launched a new product called flip face max which is over at lend store dot com. And i i want to show you what that looks like. I did something special. for For our friend shannon for snubs. This is a this is what the flipping flipped. Face masks. looks like This is It's a little bit higher Higher end than the normal flip sister used to But those are on the front page story on pro dot com. But this is for you shannon. If people wanna see that because most people are just listening to this what should they do. Go to well right now. It's going to be on twitter instagram later. But just go to lend dot com. You'll see all the ones i've done over the past couple of weeks and including including shannon's so it's really lovely. Let it's yeah. That's adorable shannon morris First show of twenty twenty one certainly not the last. I know you're a busy lady at. Where can people keep up with your work. Oh my gosh. I have been busy. Youtube dot com slash shannon morse. Just like name. I just did at tech predictions video and it was so cool. I got like eighteen up and coming tech youtubers to their twenty twenty one tech predictions for the year. And there's some names in there that you that you definitely know. Aunt pruitt Miriam take rene ritchie. So i had a whole bunch of people joining and kinda give me their thoughts and It was very very optimistic. And i was really happy to see that. So if you want to see that video and the rest of mine check out my youtube channel. Hey folks if you need. Just the headlines. It's okay to skip eighteen s. Know you get busy. Check out our related show daily tech headlines all the essential tech news in about five minutes daily tech headlines dot com. We're live on this show. Monday through friday at four thirty. Pm eastern twenty one. Thirty e. c. And you can find out more at daily tech news show dot com slash lives. We back monday with chris. Ashley have a gray weekend. All this show is part of the broadband network. Get more at frog pants. Dot com club who've enjoyed this broader.

Apple Hyundai Google Roku Mark Gurman Krebs Shannon Morris Sarah Lane Roger J Competition And Markets Author Hyundai Motor Samsung Shannon Sony Chris Krebs
Who's Adopting AI for Chat and Customer Support? - with Abinash Tripathy of Helpshift

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

07:13 min | 2 weeks ago

Who's Adopting AI for Chat and Customer Support? - with Abinash Tripathy of Helpshift

"So nash. I want to catch up with you here on the topic of who is adopting when it comes to artificial intelligence for chat. That's your world. It's wild you've been in there for what nine years now. Two thousand eleven or something like that. So you've seen a lot evolve you know when you think about who is really picking up on this who's starting to layer on top of their their serve chat conversations in a fruitful way. Who who do you see those early adopters or anything. They have in common with her industry size. Whatever a very good question. So i if you think about automation the effort in trying to get automation going in an enterprise. The biggest auto identity comes from people that are having high volumes of interactions. So you say when you find that as high volume deductions that are specific. Industries were customer service has very high volume of interactions and it's difficult visible in two ways. One is just they just have high volume second. Is the number of agency employees in contact center right. So if you think of industries that basically have the highest number of agence dealing with customer service. Those happen to be beat. Ac- industries anything that has to do with you know retail banking utilities telecom gaming which is where we got our start right because think about gaming for the second we gotta start in gaming because they are like any of the largest social media networks in the world they have hundreds of millions of people blaming online every month right so the monthly active users in gaming environment is massive. It's as biggest telecom and the volume is proportional to play the game. But i really think about the game. People wonder why gaming such big customer service. 'cause great games are just like casinos or retail outlets people play a game but to the game is a store and the store is usually selling stuff right that people buy an anytime people buy stuff that are all kinds of issues that can happen. The game itself may have issues. That are game blaze. She was that a fraud issues. This bullying issues all kinds of seeing the gaming world so we are starting gaming simply because gaming is a very digitally focused digital first world for them. The phone is a foreign concept. They don't want to have a phone based on people calling them on. The phones added costs so much money to serve a phone call so they want everything to be digital first until we dominate the gaming industry. Whether it is the largest games in the world that i can rattle off my mouth all of them of our help shifts right so that's where we got her start and now what we're seeing is. Lauded the bbc industries like to be dealt hospitality travel telecom deck banking at all. You know they have the dynamics but some of don those tend to be very traditional banking and banking does not have a digital first approach. Though i would argue both covid. Everybody's evaluating take time. What what their strategy is. Because you know if you noticed in observed when kobe what really happened. I wanted to lead this to you. Dan is that most of these. Contact centers. Operate with agents in manila manila down. And these workers that work in contact centers don't have internet cut home. Didn't even have computers. They had to come through physical facilities in manila Phone calls they couldn't even be online right so phone. Contact centers were shown hard immediately following all the lockdowns around the world. Right so my bank. For example chase dick would be when there was no way they could serve any of my phone calls right Goes if you had to do banking good luck that idea to wait for many days. Get through the phone contacts so everybody. Every large to a vertical is starting to think about how do better leverage digital and specifically in digital self service capabilities and so if you now that down subsurface capabilities broken up in gulick automation technology in lots or informational self service. So that's what i think. It's what we're doing is so interesting. Got it so just to touch on where you started. This kind of explanation was that you began in gaming because it's so digitally native and it's so averse to the phone right if you're a seventeen year old or a twenty seven year old in you're in the middle of a game. Yeah you're you're not gonna call a company you know that's something your mom would do. You're just going to chat or you're gonna put in an email ticket or whatever the case be so. That's a digitally native space. You mentioned retail. Do you see sort of basically for for retailers in terms of adopting a and chat from your perception looking out of the market whereas their trash and where whereas they're real buyers for this stuff is just a function of how big the retailer is or is it a function of both how big they are and their relative amount of revenue from e commerce. Because i would imagine that that would be indicative of their digital savvy on some level what are the factors that make a retailer more hot to trot more likely to actually be doing the kind of work that you guys do with other vendors or whatever i think do dynamics blame the bill segment. One is look at the gross margins of redel even e commerce businesses like amazon right. The gross margins are single digit vegetables single digit percent. Maybe even one percent right and with those kinds of gross margins yearly want the most effective customer service model right not that you want the cheapest most effective customer service model. And so it's it's there's a lotta margin pressure in the retail business. That's driving the shift digital but more importantly post covid. What has happened is if you look at the large format retailers like walmart for example for the first time what they've seen are completely changed sort of forced behavioral change in in the shopping process. Right so walmart now if you look at what's going on it's all like curbside delivery and cook's at pickup right so you can you can order ahead to a digital service like apple. A website like walmart dot com or target dot com and you can then scheduled to go pick up the products in the store during the walk into the store and walking the aisles. Thanks to the holiday shopping models changed. I would say that whole delivery. Big up curbside pickup. Even the food industry were observing this right. So all the restaurants like whether it's mcdonald's or at all like doubling down on the on the apps for ordering because it's all about pickup and got means you have to be able to order you don't want people calling the call center order. You would rather have a digital app where they can do that and so a lot of things can go wrong in that you know that whole process you order your orders delay and you need to talk to somebody deal time. messaging Becomes the perfect way to solve that and having people call a call center. Wait on the phone for twenty minutes back agent to those. The dynamics are mostly margin pressure and this changed sort of behavior of you know orbiting big our pickups or

Manila Manila Chase Dick Nash Gulick Automation Technology Kobe BBC Manila Walmart DAN Amazon Apple Mcdonald
How to pay for a big summer trip with new income?

Side Hustle School

05:03 min | 2 weeks ago

How to pay for a big summer trip with new income?

"Colors looking ahead to a bright covid free future. Aren't we all right. He is wondering about using money from a side hustle to pay for vacation. A big vacation as soon as travel is more accessible and welcome to school. My name is. Chris keller boasts so glad you're here it has certainly been a weird time for international travel in particular domestic travel to but especially international travel very confusing changing rules changing guidelines Changing cases in terms of the virus etc. You've got countries like new zealand and australia. That largely closed to outsiders like almost entirely closed. You have countries like turkey and mexico are pretty much welcoming. Anyone come one come all. We don't care there's been a model called travel bubbles. Which has well. Let's say bubbled up in a few different places like hong kong and singapore for example. They have this model where people from one place can travel to the other without quarantining as long as they follow certain protocols and such meanwhile got hawaii. Which can't decide what it wants and has made it very difficult for potential travellers by changing the rules every month and having different rules on different islands. Some people have even flown to hawaii having a negative test. Like they're supposed to have but then actually been turned around because they didn't the test or all kinds of crazy stuff like many other variations as well all over the world now looking forward. This variance is going to continue throughout much of two thousand twenty one but there will be a time when it gets easier and more open. Thanks to that a vaccine that you've heard about or those vaccines let's say so. What are the opportunities there. In terms of side-hustle ideas. That's what our caller is wondering about. So let's talk about it coming up in just thirty seconds after this quick message from our sponsor sell stuff online. You already know how busy twenty twenty wise. Everyone and their dog was shopping online. Maybe some cats to although they often forgot to check out well get ready for twenty twenty. One it's going to be even bigger. That's why online sellers need ship. Station are longtime sponsor partner and friend of many listeners. They upheld out. So many folks get twenty twenty one off to a great start by going to ship. Station dot com. Just use the code hustle to get a sixty day free trial. That is two months of no hassle stress. Free shipping ship station dot com. Click the microphone top and type in hustle ship station dot com offer code. Hustle ship happened. Take chris my name is nick and People i had to skip both my summer vacation and my winter getaway for twenty twenty. I mean as soon as we're able. I want to correct that. I'm planning a big summer trip for this year. And if all goes well i think it'll be the perfect time among other things There are lots of deals out there where you can prepay now and cancel later without losing your money. If it looks like the trip won't work I'm wondering might there be some way to cover the cost of the trip somehow by doing something along the way and i don't mean Like becoming travel influencer but more like Teaching english somewhere or or maybe starting a blog about travel postcode any thoughts. Thank you for the call. I know you're not alone in looking forward to a big summer trip or a big trip at some point at some point to somewhere so it sounds like a good plan here. I think the question is what is the connection between the project and the trip because you know in a lot of ways you could have any source of income that you save for the trip like whatever your side hustle is whether it it has some link to the trip or not but from the message. It sounds like nick looking for a specific connection next. He mentioned that he doesn't want to become a travel. Influencer is pretty good thinking but he likes the idea of teaching english or starting a blog Perhaps about travel recovery. Now these are interesting options and also quite different. Teaching english overseas can be meaningful experience. Actually did it for several months. Long ago in china thailand. But it's really more like a part time job. it's not like the kind of money making projects. We tend to feature on the program so if the other options we have so far starting a blog or other resources on post covid travel. Recovery is probably the most viable. And what would that look like. You know one thing i know. Is that postcode. We're going to have a tremendous travel renaissance. My good friend. Gary left calls at the golden age of travel returning. There's gonna be tons of deals going to be a lot of award availability for all those frequent flyer miles you have and just having used. It's going to be a great time at some point right so the question is what can you contribute. That space travel bloggers who've been around for a long time have a bit of an advantage. A head start. But i like the idea of focusing specifically on that post kobe world. I am perhaps preparing transition times. Where some parts of the world or more open and others. Because it's not going to be like flipping a switch where all of a sudden we're all vaccinated. It's gonna take a lotta time to roll this out so there will continue to be a lot of variance in policies and what's acceptable. What's okay what's safe. What's not set up. So there probably is something to be done there. And i really like eddie. Focusing specifically on post covid travel

Chris Keller Hawaii Hong Kong Turkey New Zealand Singapore Nick Mexico Australia Chris Thailand China Gary Eddie
How to pay for a big summer trip with new income?

Side Hustle School

05:03 min | 2 weeks ago

How to pay for a big summer trip with new income?

"Colors looking ahead to a bright covid free future. Aren't we all right. He is wondering about using money from a side hustle to pay for vacation. A big vacation as soon as travel is more accessible and welcome to school. My name is. Chris keller boasts so glad you're here it has certainly been a weird time for international travel in particular domestic travel to but especially international travel very confusing changing rules changing guidelines Changing cases in terms of the virus etc. You've got countries like new zealand and australia. That largely closed to outsiders like almost entirely closed. You have countries like turkey and mexico are pretty much welcoming. Anyone come one come all. We don't care there's been a model called travel bubbles. Which has well. Let's say bubbled up in a few different places like hong kong and singapore for example. They have this model where people from one place can travel to the other without quarantining as long as they follow certain protocols and such meanwhile got hawaii. Which can't decide what it wants and has made it very difficult for potential travellers by changing the rules every month and having different rules on different islands. Some people have even flown to hawaii having a negative test. Like they're supposed to have but then actually been turned around because they didn't the test or all kinds of crazy stuff like many other variations as well all over the world now looking forward. This variance is going to continue throughout much of two thousand twenty one but there will be a time when it gets easier and more open. Thanks to that a vaccine that you've heard about or those vaccines let's say so. What are the opportunities there. In terms of side-hustle ideas. That's what our caller is wondering about. So let's talk about it coming up in just thirty seconds after this quick message from our sponsor sell stuff online. You already know how busy twenty twenty wise. Everyone and their dog was shopping online. Maybe some cats to although they often forgot to check out well get ready for twenty twenty. One it's going to be even bigger. That's why online sellers need ship. Station are longtime sponsor partner and friend of many listeners. They upheld out. So many folks get twenty twenty one off to a great start by going to ship. Station dot com. Just use the code hustle to get a sixty day free trial. That is two months of no hassle stress. Free shipping ship station dot com. Click the microphone top and type in hustle ship station dot com offer code. Hustle ship happened. Take chris my name is nick and People i had to skip both my summer vacation and my winter getaway for twenty twenty. I mean as soon as we're able. I want to correct that. I'm planning a big summer trip for this year. And if all goes well i think it'll be the perfect time among other things There are lots of deals out there where you can prepay now and cancel later without losing your money. If it looks like the trip won't work I'm wondering might there be some way to cover the cost of the trip somehow by doing something along the way and i don't mean Like becoming travel influencer but more like Teaching english somewhere or or maybe starting a blog about travel postcode any thoughts. Thank you for the call. I know you're not alone in looking forward to a big summer trip or a big trip at some point at some point to somewhere so it sounds like a good plan here. I think the question is what is the connection between the project and the trip because you know in a lot of ways you could have any source of income that you save for the trip like whatever your side hustle is whether it it has some link to the trip or not but from the message. It sounds like nick looking for a specific connection next. He mentioned that he doesn't want to become a travel. Influencer is pretty good thinking but he likes the idea of teaching english or starting a blog Perhaps about travel recovery. Now these are interesting options and also quite different. Teaching english overseas can be meaningful experience. Actually did it for several months. Long ago in china thailand. But it's really more like a part time job. it's not like the kind of money making projects. We tend to feature on the program so if the other options we have so far starting a blog or other resources on post covid travel. Recovery is probably the most viable. And what would that look like. You know one thing i know. Is that postcode. We're going to have a tremendous travel renaissance. My good friend. Gary left calls at the golden age of travel returning. There's gonna be tons of deals going to be a lot of award availability for all those frequent flyer miles you have and just having used. It's going to be a great time at some point right so the question is what can you contribute. That space travel bloggers who've been around for a long time have a bit of an advantage. A head start. But i like the idea of focusing specifically on that post kobe world. I am perhaps preparing transition times. Where some parts of the world or more open and others. Because it's not going to be like flipping a switch where all of a sudden we're all vaccinated. It's gonna take a lotta time to roll this out so there will continue to be a lot of variance in policies and what's acceptable. What's okay what's safe. What's not set up. So there probably is something to be done there. And i really like eddie. Focusing specifically on post covid travel

Chris Keller Hawaii Hong Kong Turkey New Zealand Singapore Nick Mexico Australia Chris Thailand China Gary Eddie
How To Grow A Spider Plant From Cuttings

Your Gardening Questions

03:48 min | 2 weeks ago

How To Grow A Spider Plant From Cuttings

"My friend gave me a cutting from a spider plant. I put it in a vase with some water. But i'm not sure if there's a better way to get it started will probably not now if you're in the nursery business you'd you'd be doing a little differently but as far as home starts are concerned. that cutting and i hope they left just a little bit of the base of the stem on. I'm trying to remember right now whether it whether it sends out new tissue from that stem or actually to base the cluster. In any event. I think on her circumstances. That's the best thing to do now. The one thing that You had to be a little bit careful of. I like to put cuttings in in water such as that in an east window where they will get enough sun in the morning but the intensity of the sun is not so high because that plant right now probably has no way to actually pick up much water so you don't want to cook it so to speak in the hot west afternoon sun and and it's just a i find it where i don a comparison not not a studied when but at the same time i i have a little better luck starting plans to like that in east sunny situation morning only then just bright light the rest of the day because the plant has to continue to make food which requires some water in order to put out new shoots roots. That is well then then shoots so Yeah that's the only thing i can tell. Her is probably a east window is the best. Could you go ahead if you wanna to and start that in a like a medium will you could mark. But i've i've never done that. As a matter of fact if i had a greenhouse a bench had sand in it or a really good mixture of soil in san and so on And bottom heat from whatever source. I would say you might get faster Unit greenhouse by doing it that way but as far as homeless concerned i'm. I'm well relatively big on on the cuttings in a glass. Just don't let the water evaporate away from it because those little tiny new routes are. We'll be insulted heavily and gone. How do you know what it's time to move it back into a media cape that that's a darn good question mark and i would say Just to give a measurement to it anytime. The root is a half an inch or more in length and several of them hopefully I would say you can put it over into a soil medium. Now here's where it gets a little tricky. The root is growing differently in the water than it will in the soil medium. And i don't know how to explain that. I don't know enough about the physiology in the first place but i don't know how to explain other than to say. Put it over into a good potting soil not not regular garden soil. A good potting soil that will drain stay moist however And and then be cautious because routes aren't very deep in the pot. Don't let the top of the pot or the soil in the top of the pot. Dry out Because the plant has to kind of step back and and redo some cell changes in there so inch is a good length of route. I have ever on spider plant povo said and various other things that i play with I just stick them in a glass and one. The route serve really obvious from several strides away. That's when i move them. That just makes a lotta sense. Well in a way it does yes at and at the same time. It's hardly very scientific. No great rule of thumb. Hey i can see the roofs. That's right yes or non kurt non-dollar s sets right yeah.

East Sunny SAN
How To Build Your Best Skincare Routine with Celeb Facialist Rene Rouleau

Breaking Beauty Podcast

08:26 min | Last month

How To Build Your Best Skincare Routine with Celeb Facialist Rene Rouleau

"So what is the first stop to like assessing your own skin type. Like how do people figure that out at home. I think people often. It's just like your boss is like. I think people misdiagnosed that all the time and a lotta people misdiagnose skin type so help us. Yeah so i'm definitely the queen of skin types There definitely are some basics that people need to kind of look at so one is the concept of dry normal oily. So that's the first thing you need to look at and mainly you need to know that information because that will drive. What kind of moisturizer that you need to use light or how heavy it is so if you are somebody that gets shiny and your skin gets oily and greasy. That means that you already have oil in your skin so are gonna use somewhere water-based if you're somebody that's feeling really tight and gets flaky and doesn't look smooth to the touch. Chances are you're going to require more oil. And so you can look for more of a cream or even a skin oil or something like that. So i think understanding drone norman oily is important but i think also. It's one kind of side note of that. Is that a lot of people. They use a lot of strong active ingredients and so if they still get breakouts but they feel dry. The thing the understand with breakouts is that you have oil underneath there somewhere 'cause people who have truly dry skin bone-dry skin that don't have any oil at all. They're not going to break out. Because oil breeds bacteria bacterial to breakouts. So i'm always kind of educating people because people are like oh my gosh. I'm so dry yet. They have you know they still get a lot of acne so it could be because they're using things that are too strong so they're getting the sensation of being dry. But if there's breakouts there. I always tell them there's oil in there somewhere so we don't want to ask things that are too heavy so i think yeah so. I think the first thing is kind of just trying to assess. If you're dr norman oily and and again it's just more dryness is more if there's flaking and a constant kat constant tightness and absolutely no oil whatsoever a normal skin tiber combination could be somebody. That's a little tease zone. If your pores are larger in the area than they are on the other areas of the face. That usually is an indicator that you're a little more combination In that skin. Ken feel type. It's typically not going to be flaky. I mean obviously if you're using a prescription retinoid or something you know that would cause that but generally you can feel type but it's not flaky and then more oil is somebody that has enlarged pores all over the face and they're just shining in greasy like in a by one o'clock in the afternoon they can be blotting their skin with blotting papers and they see a lot of on there but again that you know. It's a lotion verses. A cream sensitive skin is one of those tricky subjects because the definition is different from anyone for from everyone when someone says yeah. My skin's really sensitive. The first thing i said is tell me what that means to you right so to one person. They'll say if i use something really harsher strong it. What you're a tape. My skin for which. I'm always like well. How about let's not use anything harsher strong okay But but then someone else will say if i use something too heavy will break me out. And then someone else will say everything. I wash with sting's my skin get read. I get rashes easily right. So there's and then some other people might even have other descriptions of them but those are the three that i hear the most so my definition of sensitive skin is more. They easily irritated the redness. The pinkies leave the Things staying easily as more of a moisture barrier issue. I don't really consider sensitive. Oh i can't use moisturizer that's too heavy because we'll break me out. Then you use them worst riser. That's stuck to you know will break you. There's an easy fix. Yeah yeah and but the problem with quote unquote sensitive skin care products out there. If it says for sensitive skin typically it means that they just took out the synthetic fragrance or the synthetic die but a lot of the sensitive skin care products. Don't necessarily actually try to calm the redness they'll take out the quote unquote irritants out of it. But if you have somebody that is you know. Easily irritated and read. The goal is to try to really like put the fire out com circulation sedate the skin and a lot of sense of skincare products. I don't feel like necessarily do that. Because the goals were trying to improve the skin barrier and make the skin less sensitive over time so just avoiding dyes and fragrances. That's just not gonna do that. Sure sting so dehydrate and dry. Those are two different things too right correct. And that's i mean that's a huge one. I have a great blog post about it. But that's probably you know the biggest the hardest thing for people to understand because people always say dry and And so i always say when someone says how. I'm really dry but then i see the breakouts. I'm like no can't be but all always say like. Does your skin ever get flaky. Because to me that's true the definition of dry and then absolutely you know producing no oil but the main difference is dry is lack of oil and dehydrate as lack water. So you can be oily in dehydrated. But you can't be dry. And so i think the i mean all skin types require water but not all skin types require oil right so so typically again if somebody has breakouts they still produce oil but they feel tight than that's dehydration versus somebody's you know bone-dry and they're you know forty five plus and they have tiny pores that's going to be more of a drier skin type so if you're trying to assess your own skin type do you even put dehydration into that category at all or thus just a condition you right. Yeah i mean the whole thing is any good skin care routine. Should always be hydrating your now if somebody comes to me you know if we have a customer client that has been using really harsh things and they kind of have destroyed their moisture barrier than we might need to load up on a few extra things just to repair their skin and get it. Back to healthy state the concept of the moisture barrier which. I'm sure you guys understand but let me explain it for your listeners. So your skin has this moisture barrier and think of it as like bricks on a house and when the barrier is damaged from harsh products. Genetics resistencia were. The skin is hot. And heat kind of naturally can deplete the moisture barrier or the moisture within the skin over full leading to many acids things like that so in these bricks like the mortar. In between the bricks starts to loosen you. Get these little invisible cracks in the skin when you get these invisible cracks in the skin moisture can escape easier and then irritance can get any easier so sometimes when people like are like yeah. Products are stinging my skin lately and normally that never happens. Well it's because when you have those cracks products especially water-based ones hit the nerve endings. Faster and you get a stinging sensation. So i have a great bog post about this as well. But it's all about kind of sealing up those invisible cracks so that wished your stays in and then irritants you know they're not irritating the skin as much and that's probably the biggest thing that i've probably seen in the past i'd say like four years or something is people's moisture barrier. You know were people who are. Oil are feeling dry. And it's because we have access to so many more active ingredients everybody's big into the liquid acid toning right now. They're using the. The acetone is twice a day. And you know then. They're using sonic cleansing. Brushes and there are you know which is is an expulsion in itself and then they're micronesian derm rolling at home poking holes in their faces. And so there's just a lot of people and we've kinda fallen into a culture of like if it doesn't burner staying it's not working and so people relate feeling something with doing something right and so and then you know you can buy all. These chemical peels on amazon. And so i just think that's like a big conversation that i'm having a lot with people as having people back off. A lot of thing is there in their effort to control their skin. And do more often die micromanaging. They're like that boss doing too much like if you actually back off. Yeah i'll be more productive

Dr Norman Acne KEN Amazon
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

02:44 min | Last month

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"That practices like yoga meditation and stuff they they have the power eight kind of i guess unite us all regardless of what culture country religion race were from It's fair to say that you know practices like yoga and meditation. These are like their religion agnostic. Race agnostic culture agnostic right. Allie focused on the person. And i think. Yeah i agree. That's a big reason. I am with your china's well so now at this point in time in two thousand red given your guess positioning in the industry you have a company that deals with the sorta stuff. You've been doing it recreationally for like fifteen years given all of that when you take a step back and kind of look at you know the yoga and wellness industry as a whole water like some of the things on the indicators that you know make you optimistic and maybe what are some of the i guess things that concern you. Go like okay. These are some things which like show me potential that this industry has the room grow and transcend these cultural unreligious boundaries. But what are there any things also conversely that gonna make you go like You know we should definitely change that about yoga. What would your take on that. He definitely i'm optimistic in the sense that even in the most commercialized form of at least you expose people to something that they didn't know andy. My spark and interest it can be shifting sided. They feel the yoga practice A when they're breathe being until forced might be like that little spark that allows somebody. Who's never heard of it or never done it before to wanting to find out more or continue growing with somebody else like I did my training. I was one of the two civilians. Everybody else was a veteran and never done yoga before but they were so to the point breaking the day wanted to find something and even without knowing how it was working but it was working so the ability to not just learn fools but will pay it forward and shared with other people who may need think that's incredible openness and like hope in that or even what i'm doing with law enforcement were doing with the fire department seeing the fire chief that actually and like you know the city county board like allocating money to introduce is practices to.

Allie china andy
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

04:32 min | Last month

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Think this is my experience. Some people perceive these practices as foreign not just from like a cultural standpoint. But like something that. I've never done before so we should be. We like to note. You got it right exactly my experience. Even the people that harvey most resistance with few exceptions once they try it in. They feel it in their body like. Oh what is this. And i want more. So it's it's a matter of lasting in in being exposed to that allows for this gap to be filled. So i think there's a little bit of hesitancy and then again like here in the west. It's a lot easier to physical class that medication class right. And so you only get a bit event and the population. I work with specifically they have a lot of injuries limitations and so forth so even going to they always tell me like these west. You go to a normal studio. They feel inadequate. There's this you know this illusion that only skinny girls in stretchy fans you know do yoga and so big burly man with injuries and so forth might feel a little shy and so forth. So there's all these obstacle that we impose on ourselves. And i also i think actually what you're saying yes. They're definitely a stigma about mental health. But i notice that Sometimes the people who don't the wooden goto a mental health practitioner would give it a shot to to crack his meditation or yoga class because it's a non clinical setting and so they don't feel judged road feel like the end of their some into like. I'm just doing this thing on a yoga mat. So you might be actually an easier way to start to understand that martin mind body connection in a way. That doesn't feel cleaning. call you you. You don't have a disease disorder ryan you just trying something with your guts. Really think there's a lot of married. I saw sorry no continue. Sorry but especially with fire department. I work with their behavioral health specialists as well and so while he deals with the clinical stuff. That behavioral counseling We are very much in alignment on how these things work together. And so we lead presentations together to you. Know we bring all the pieces and what he does. Wanna one with the personnel. I do going to the fire station in. We do it on the mat in you know in an entirely different way but it all comes together so i want to save for like any job practitioner. Or even like you'll go facilitator. I always say he say teachers feel just so hierarchical any shouldn't if you're interesting to work with these. That make the effort to connect with the psychologist if europe is the behavioral experts and find a way to integrate to really work together. I think i think that's so awesome. Said that had. And i. Honestly i'm still kind of coming to terms with because it really is insightful. I'm not just saying you know. About how yoga could actually be a more preferable alternative for people struggling with mental health compared to like seeing a therapist because like you said is on a clinical setting is on like oh you need to see a shrink that kind of vibe you know and yen i think i don't want obviously compare do but they're both very useful but yoga is awesome. You know dealing with stress management dealing with the mind body connection. Yes let's that's while is really cool way of putting it and like you said you know maybe people are inhibited. They don't like talking too much That could also be better right. Goes in yoga dockings minimal. It's a lot of Yeah just doing exactly that. That's that's a really really cool way of looking at it just so not something. I wanted to ask you general so you would agree..

harvey ryan martin europe
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

04:02 min | Last month

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Alcoholic created a horrible situation family situation for my mom and so forth. And i think a lot of italy also experienced that because were to right but back then. It wasn't such thing as a ptsd diagnosis mankin home more. If they were fine. Great if not be a dual things that affected you know the rest Of of the population the families they community and so forth and so on. I met my friend justin a former marine and he was talking about. He's not a see. Everything clicked to from a personal standpoint. Finally understood this is war. My grandfather had gone through and again that that embodied sense of like this is what i'm supposed to do to heal myself but also providing resources and tools for other than maybe going through the same experiences and that's why a lot of what i do deals with Bringing yoga to trauma survivors. Who may benefit from any specific end of or. That's how my purpose right lab so definitely a population that Tyrian first responders so definitely goes because of their job. They're exposed to very severe event that illicit our survival response in response to trauma remains stuck in the body in her mind through body sensations in australia and so forth cuddled through through more loops in the brain. The prevent has to coming back to place a balance and so definitely those relations I taught in jail for while dot yoga tooth male and female inmates and staff as well and so i didn't know their history. But definitely the Joe environment is traumatic for say the fact that you know he doesn't have taken away All of that in then everybody there especially the women had history of substance abuse in sexual trauma and so forth. There's know that population. And then i just recently started working but some You affected by complex trauma and then again everybody's response to traumatic event is different but the cady way the number system reacts there's a couple of strategy to cope with that and so i don't need to know even what's behind it know that certain tools working in a certain way and then it's up to the person to the side which tools were very very cool. Yeah i think honestly. You know being an entrepreneur. Were kind of like you said finding your dr murad which life purpose and you find found out that your life's involved serving the under served as you put it. I think you honestly can't ask for more right if you're happy with what you're doing you think And you happen to give back to society with it. I think that's just you know like you. Hit all three check boxes so very very cool And so. I just kinda wanna like switch registered since we spoke about our mind. We alluded to this a little earlier. you also yoga. Obviously specifically has very strong like indicate eastern routes right. I mean zoom zoom. These are all religions that obviously have global appeal and a global following but the origin stories kind of began in. Would you say that most global practitioners or even global students right of these practices. You think they're kind of aware of that thing that gets lost in translation. Like what's your assessment being in the industry on how that.

mankin trauma justin italy dr murad australia
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

02:15 min | Last month

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Connecting people networking. And sometimes you can be doing all the right things. And the market is not there or condemning happens fry Everything you're doing before needs to be flipped upside down. I definitely enjoy the freedom. The creative freedom the autonomy independence And there are some moments there. Yeah definitely scary. The absolutely and i'm glad you said that because that's very you know. Real assessment of what being an entrepreneur is like. I feel like a lot of people. Just think it's going to be like mark zuckerberg from the social network. You know like it's just one big leg race so the doll but like you said you need birdie strong game you know and like mental strength to do it sometimes the not so good things about it. So thank you for that. one thing. i wanted to it's interesting. You mentioned the word dharma so both for you know. I'm sure some of my indian listeners will know what it is but we have a global listenership. So how would you get my leg. It's auden english word. Obviously right so how would you based on your understanding experience. How would you like best. Translate the word karma to our non like audiences that may not be familiar with our listeners. May not be familiar with the concept. Sure and for me. It's my life purpose. What i'm here to do at my life purpose. It's something bigger than myself right. That's what it is like finally event everything came together. This is what i meant to do in. This is how you know just didn't happen. You know the light bulb off process support trying to understand hell. I can serve better and For me my life purpose is to serve population. There are making sacrifices for the rest of us in old so Just share a little bit history of generational trauma in my family that as affected population might. My grandfather was a soldier. Were to from detail army and his army. She is familiar. European or this world history but italy was allied with the germans back then he was sent to fight the russians on the russian front and he can back trump ties..

mark zuckerberg army italy
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

04:49 min | 6 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Off The coast of Nicaragua that was carried out by the United States in two, thousand, sixteen, the arbitration tribunal of the. Rule in favor of the Philippines in Philippines versus China, stating that China had no historical rights to any land or territory of the South China Sea, and for those you guys who don't know. China's been building a bunch of illegal islands in the South China, sea went accord and the arbitration tribunal ruled against China. Now in the case of the former, the first nick over the US US ambassador to the UN John Kirkpatrick said this of the International Court of Justice. He's that a semi legal semi judicial semi political body which nations sometimes accept and sometimes don't. This then went to the UN General. Assembly, where states had to vote on whether they believed the US should comply with the verdict or not, and all member states except Israel. The United States and Salvador voted against the US, but despite this the US chose not to pay any sort of finer reparations to Nicaragua, and they had no legal obligation to do so because as we've established at the very start of this case, the UN General Assembly resolutions are not binding. They are merely suggestions, so despite the fact that every country voted against America, except three America's still didn't have to pay any reparations to Nicaragua. Now in the latter case, which is Philippines versus China. In the latter case, which is Philippines versus China China also chose to reject the arbitrations ruling on the South China Sea, and since then they've only accelerated construction of islands in the region. And in both cases the US and China could get away with it because like we've said these are not binding resolutions or binding rulings, so he see yet another example of international law nod applying to the most powerful states in the world, the US and China, literally the two most powerful countries in the planet. So now my recommendation on how to solve this as follows and please note that I'm not claiming that this is how we can guarantee compliance to international law from countries like America and China. What I am seeing? Is that without the following steps taking place compliance from states like the US and China with international law would be impossible. So my recommendation is this that in addition to the structural reforms pertaining to the UN setup and the UN Charter, the funding structure needs to dramatically change as well former labor secretary of the US and current economics professor at the University of California at Berkeley. Dr Robert Reich, says this, but no matter what the organization is, follow the money to truly understand them, and this holds true for the UN and international legal system as well currently, the International Court of Justice. Is financed by the Secretary General's Trust Fund, which is taken directly out of UN funding, and we've spoken extensively about how the five donations wield a disproportionate amount of power over the UN's proceedings, so the five veto countries right literally account for forty five percent of Total U. N. funding, which means that a hundred ninety odd countries account for fifty five percent. Five countries account for forty five percent. I let you do the number crunching to figure out. How does the power dynamic? Now, further off these forty five percentage points, thirty eight percentage points are funded by the US and China alone so we see how they're able to evade international decisions that go against them. They control the money supply of these various solutions. So this is yet another example of how without this structural change, institutional funding international law will be used merely as a tool of. Excuse me. International, law will be used merely as a tool of America in China or countries like America. In China to preserve their own geopolitical interests, and all other financially influential countries that donate a lot of the US will follow suit. So how can we change this funding structure, Dr Mark, I look who was the two thousand and six deputy secretary, General of the United Nations under Kofi Annan, said that the united. Nations and all related international organizations today are league with a gross and ineffectual redundancy, which hinders swift decision making the United Nations databases estimate that they have an annual budget of twenty billion dollars including all relevant programs..

China China United States South China Sea United Nations South China Philippines Nicaragua UN General Assembly America International Court of Justice UN Charter John Kirkpatrick Dr Robert Reich Kofi Annan deputy secretary Israel nick secretary Salvador
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

08:07 min | 6 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Nine, hundred, sixty, two to put things in context, apartheid actually came to an end, only nine hundred and ninety four, which is more than thirty, which is more than three decades later. Sorry, that's thirty two. Two years later and keep in mind that the UN was formed in nineteen, forty five, which means they took seventeen years just to pass a resolution which condemned apartheid, the duke seventeen years to pass a resolution to say oh. Hey, you know what apartheid is bad. Now you know what you can make. The argument that this resolution made South Africa and International Pariah. The reality is led to no meaningful change. Doctor Alex Thompson who is a US foreign policy professor at Coventry University suggested that bilateral relations between the US and South Africa actually improved during the. Between Nine, hundred, sixty to one, thousand, nine, hundred, which is during the period, where apartheid was condemned by the UN, when they passed that resolution, seventeen sixty one, but part was still legal and South Africa. So just you guys know. Big companies like UBS Barclays, Exxon. Mobil British Petroleum Ibm Chrysler Ford General Motors, these American behemoth corporations all continued to operate in South Africa in between nine, hundred, sixty, two and nine, hundred, ninety four and. Archives further suggest that the South African Nationalist Party at the time. which was you know the party that promoted apartheid. anti-communist ideals which set the tone for agreed bilateral partnership between the US and South Africa because as we all know at the time America was battling communism. So this is evidence that regardless of these symbolic resolutions passed by the UN General Assembly states will continue acting in their own selfish interests as long as it's convenient for them to do so, and this is best evidenced by the US, and South Africa during apartheid now every wing of the United Nations, not just the General Assembly has purely this power to recommend and to suggest do its member states interestingly enough only one wing in the UN actually has binding `bout, which is the Security Council. But that doesn't mean that the Security Council is this highly effective organization either five countries in the security. Council have the ability to veto resolutions proposed in the Security Council meaning that potentially binding resolution would be deemed null and void up on video. So, why is this the case? Why do these countries? How do these countries have? The five veto powers I'll give you some context so the US. The UK China Russia and France are the five veto countries, and they were arguably the five most powerful nations of the dime of the second world. War, but that's not the only reason they have the powers. MR, Francis Wilcox. Who was the United States delegation adviser at the time, said that the big five as he calls it, you know these five countries with veto powers, the big five stated during negotiations, either there exists a United Nations charter where we have the powers or noise, you charter at all, so we see that even the very origin story of the veto powers in the UN is rooted in these powerful countries preserving their own self interest, not promoting. Promoting international peace and security, and you guys might ask. Does it play out this way in practice? You be the judge of that. The three most recent resolutions proposed by the UN Security Council have all been concerned with the following. This is directly sourced from the UN website so the first two resolutions as in the two most recent resolutions proposed by the UN, Security Council concern providing humanitarian access to eleven million Syrians displaced by the war in Syria. To resolutions were proposed on this and the second one is the third resolution the third most recent resolution deals with providing humanitarian assistance and interventions do how Venezuela where currently if you are unaware, people have no access to food, no access to water, no access to basic rations, and all three of these resolutions were proposing two thousand, nine hundred last year, and all three occasions both China as well as Russia vetoed these resolutions, so this is clear evidence that in this case in these cases rather China and Russia prioritized their own geopolitical self interest over humanitarian needs. Because let's be real right. Syria and Venezuela regardless of what your politics is, we can all agree. They've gone through hell right? People have their have no food, no water, so providing humanitarian assistance to. These countries which have gone through a nightmare you would think should not be. A contentious call, but the fact that China and Russia vetoed them shows that. Wow, you know like countries are always countries with veto. Powers are always going to abuse the veto powers do focus on their own geopolitical interests, because you know, they wouldn't benefit from humanitarian assistance, being provided to Syria Venezuela as opposed to promoting the peace and stability and promoting and certain dairy and help to these countries that greatly needed, so we see that veto powers are merely a tool used. Used to preserve strategic interests by powerful countries another fun fact in the last three decades, the United States and Russia bulled. Use their veto powers more than eighty times. That's insane. That's just an an insane statistic and in total Russia's used its veto power more than you know the US, UK France and China. It's used it one hundred fifteen times. If you're wondering which is again, just an absurd number of times, devito resolutions that more often than not try and help anyway. Countries like China and Russia are a great segue to what I believe is perhaps the single most needed structural reform in the UN. The UN official website talks about how democracy is a core value of the. And while the UN does not explicitly advocate for any one model of governance over another the do explicitly state that they believe that democracy and quote Liberal Democratic Values and quote are the best ways to promote international cooperation and security. Further the opening words of the UN Charter are. We the people so clearly. This shows its intent on being viewed as and functioning as a liberal democratic institution, and you know what let's be fair to it for the most part it does, try and operate that wick it grinds. Its member states both the right to vote as well as the right to descend which are key elements of the Democratic Model of governance, but despite all of this we see instances of the UN deviating from its promise of democracy and its origin story. Why is democratic? India the largest democracy in the world by the way which has more than fifteen percent of the global population, and over seventy million four individuals seventy million individuals below the poverty line. Which again fun fact India has more people below the poverty line than anything country on planet earth. So, why is this country not a member of the security? Council, do you not think a country that is saw? Densely populated a country that is democratic and abides by the liberal democratic values of the you add. Do you think they should be included in the Security Council of? Do you know? Show, the global inclusivity representation of an organization such as the Security Council. And we can get into. You know like what India could have done better to be a part of the security, council, but that's just a parallel of the big altogether..

UN Security Council UN Russia United States China South Africa Venezuela UN Charter India United Nations Syria General Assembly UK South African Nationalist Part Francis Wilcox Doctor Alex Thompson UBS Barclays Coventry University
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

06:34 min | 6 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Discourse isn't black or white. It's a whole lot agree. Hey, guys, thank you for tuning in I'm your host in each on Android? And this is the seventh episode of a whole lot. Agree where we're going to be discussing how we can better facilitate the process of promoting international fees as well as international security, because let's be real. God knows that the current system does not work for anybody so I want to start by providing you guys with a little bit of context. How did the international system as we currently know it? Come into existence. Let's rewind to September second nine, hundred, forty five. This was the day that the second world. War officially came to an end. Eighty million casualties, one point, three five trillion dollars and unimaginable amount of misery later, the world was in desperate need of an era of peace and stability. And Low and behold months later, the UN was established, which was intended to be a League of Nations two point Oh. Now as you guys know. The League of Nations was setup after the first World War to promote international peace as you also the fact that there was a second World War shows that this League of nations. Thing didn't work out quite as planned. Now, you guys might ask even post nine, hundred, forty five. There aren't too many incidents that this international system has successfully resolved. I'll tell you why a big reason for this is that the international institutions that are actually tasked with promoting these global changes are grossly ineffective so an international institution. Quick definition here is an institution where three or more countries work together to resolve issues that pertain to all member states of that institution, and if you're wondering, this is a paraphrase definition from the Global Energy Network Institute. Some prominent examples of international institutions are like the UN or the world. Health Organization so on and so forth, and I'm going to be using the term international institutions and international organizations interchangeably throughout this episode, so please don't get confused and I'm GonNa be largely focusing on the UN and the only reason for this is the UN is the largest oldest and most. Most prominent of the international organizations, so this is a quick breakfast that these comments that are making throughout the course of the episode, obliged to international organizations on the whole, and they're not exclusive to the UN. Even though the UN is going to be our subject to focus or our means subject to focus for this episode, so let's jump right into the. The data what do people think of the UN or what people think of international organizations? A Gallup poll found that as of two thousand eighteen, only thirty four percent of global respondents believed that international organizations do more good than harm that largely they are ineffective and bist trustful. Keep in mind this way down from the fifty five percent. WHO THOUGHT THEY DID? Did more good than harm. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, three, which was eight years after the UN was founded, so it's quite possible to conclude that whatever global progress has happened today in two thousand and twenty has happened despite the existence of these institutions, and not because of it. So why is this the case? Why are these institutions plagued with inefficacy? Let's explore three main segments on how we can potentially make the UN and other international organizations, more effective and useful to the global community. The first segment is structural reform of the institutions themselves. The second segment is having more binding power for U N. peacekeeping forces and the third final segment is making international law and the legal system more binding I'm going to go over each segment in detail starting with the first one structural reform of international organizations themselves before we talk about why the UN and other international organizations need structural reform. Let's go over how they came to be the existing structure of the UN and what its current problems are so following the second world. World War in October. Ninety forty five. The United Nations was setup now this was positive because it signaled the global intent for cooperation as opposed to competition and the geopolitical arena, but we all know that intend only goes a certain distance. If it's not followed through by action so now you must ask why the lack of action in the UN. I'll tell you why. There's a multitude of reasons for this so I'll try focusing on the important ones. The United Nations General. General Assembly as you guys know is the largest wing of the UN and this committee has delegates and representatives from all one hundred ninety three UN member states so wallets agreed forum, which allows for international dialogue and deliberation. There is a glaring structural weakness which prevents it from truly affecting any sort of change laws, and a lot of the critics of the UNC that the UN is a talk shop, not a do shop, and the reason for this is as follows the. The UN General. Assembly doesn't have the power to pass legislation that is binding or mandatory for its member states. What does this mean well? Because the first article of the UN Charter promises sovereignty and autonomy to every member state, the UN technically cannot interfere with domestic laws of UN member countries so ultimately every resolution that comes out of the General Assembly simply serves as mere recommendations or suggestions for these countries, not actual binding laws that these countries need to follow up on. And the best example for this is resolution seventeen sixty one. resolution, seventeen, sixty one was passed to condemn South African apartheid of those. You don't know apartheid. Segregation in South Africa, where the black population was discriminated against by the largely Caucasian South African government at the time now while apartheid was rightfully condemned around the world resolution, seventeen, sixty, one was passed in November..

United Nations UN Charter League of Nations General Assembly Global Energy Network Institut United Nations General South Africa Health Organization UNC
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

02:24 min | 8 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"A are always on and we have to find a new in different ways in which to achieve potential. And I and I guess. You know it's a bit of a cliche. We've always been known for its own frugal innovation. some of the people to guard, which is a big pejorative, but is at the end of the day. the ability A to. A find solutions. Back in from unlikely places What I really don't like, is picking up. Solutions that have been used in the West or another countries in applying them to India because first of all they don't fit roughly. And they don't get enough credit to audibility. Sunday or no sorry I was just I didn't mean to. I was just saying that the context in which we all prayed so different rights hard to just ninety applied. What may work in America? You ought to be in gone dex. But and yet so many people do that and that Greeley. A lot of people say look. This is the way in which it was so widely mentally less look. It's not a question reinventing the wheel. Essentially, you've got to find the. Courses and it's not like we can come up with solutions. Of That will help us achieve what we need to do. in fact if we can really say look, let's let's come up with a solution that that is suitable for it probably will be more efficient. And more effective given that it would have been designed for these conditions, no very very drew and with that We bring up. What's been just an amazing amazing amazing conversation Mr. Martha, thank you so much for your time and I hope you had as much fun being interviewed as I. Did Interviewing Yourself, and for all my listeners I would strongly Oh, to check out the xbox Nepal. Nepal Gass again. Link is going to be in the description below I'm also going to be watching link of Mr Martin's book as well as disputes pieces on you know data and privacy that he's written highly informative and I cannot stress enough. Just what a big value added it will be. Do add that your daily gone that list Samantha. Thank you again so much for joining us. Thank goodness. It's been a pleasure. Thank you so much..

Mr Martin Nepal Gass Greeley India audibility America Samantha Mr. Martha I.
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

07:17 min | 8 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Vehicles. It's just a Sony challenges with the bottle that unless you find the smocked economic model? Run a fleet of electric vehicles. You'RE NOT GONNA be able to have a EV's as the family motor shape transport, and really that is what I talk about some deal in that it. No absolutely unlikely said I. Don't want I. Don't want to do any spoilers from the episode and every listener who's listening to those right now to at checkout Mr Martin podcast right after this one last question from that episode as You talk about how the future of eady's is generally the trajectory. Right especially here in India. And you dr a bit of you. Being. Called battery swapping a good, you just spend like Denver fifteen seconds walking through. What exactly that is why it's beneficial. I think in order to essentially. Sort of your chain. reframe the way you think acres in your mind you've just got to. Separate the vehicle from the. All. Debate needs road ables. Now from the dawn of. The the the motor Gar. We have fitted electric. Fitted tanks into the car which we fill up with a petrol gasoline diesel. Fuel it is. And that all is done combustion engine, which moves the bow for one or the other with me run of federal. We go to the federal about we finished up again and then we keep moving. We built the electric bay. We essentially used the same mental model, which is that wave fitted batteries into the car, and then whenever we've added a battery will and Josh it. The other problem is I'm like a petrol, which you've been just a Filipina tank, and in five minutes or less. It takes even with the fastest fos judging solution at least in our discharge evacuated, and usually you're require. These five. Wait uh-huh to charge a battery. In given what they used to just accept. Of people so the battery swapping idea essentially means that you know when you have of our rather than Josh. Eventually a you'll essentially wouldn't be all batteries out, but a new mattress. This is something that stories. Or these gadgets if we Habra. you actually ever thought by that available. Because obviously it's it's. It's a much larger respect willing to a bedroom The gas station attendant just owns the backbone of your. And wishes of. Food Been Dan back in that. Replace, a, in dire banks are headed so correct, but the other example that I give to make this a little more valuable as before the in Donald question engine. We had all scattered. and when you want do. Drive a horse cottage across the country essentially what it would do is, you would have a venue stations where. You would have horses rested of fully fit waiting for you and you drive. Into that station swap audio host the Diet Horse. That has just written or the night. And swap that out of the new. Houses that are fish any ride. Those horses on so look. We've we've. We've had many mental models by which be designed. Remorse When we switched from the hostage to the The the best engine We essentially the horse into the gardens and fixed it there and we found a way to feed the GOP. If instead we. Just swapped it out. In the way that began with batteries it will be a completely different mental model, and that probably is the most useful mental models for this, so that is. The way I describe a battery swapping it's it feels unreal, because we're so used to thinking of Oslo particularly, but actually it's different from You know with with your watch. Your conscious is out of touch just. A more. Needed Muller. Control the or something like that exactly. I think the biggest was on the COOLEST WAY AS I. Just as general conversation with you is. How so much can be you know? At least dented do like started getting saw if we shift our leads obeyed if we just changed the way we abroad, a lot of these things I think that is of unity coup perspective to keep in mind so just one last question before we wrap this. What's amazing? Is Offer, both out Indian as well as non Indian listeners. Everyone I think is aware today in geopolitics that India is the sleeping bag on waiting to become that big stakeholder. Vicks and we are. We are getting in some sense. Would you think the three areas that we collectively as a country should be focusing on in order to unlock our true potential unlock are do future. Look I. Don't know if I make it to three, but let me tell you. What I think is really important, I think. You know what a huge untapped potential! In that Much off. The GDP of in too much of the GDP this on synthetic I up. and to find ways in which we can be used on. ways in which we can leverage. Able across the stack I think a lot of the platform technologies that we've been billions. Country other, which is the identity of black. You'll be able to the payment platform an all the the various platforms coming up. have tremendous ability to unlock the potential that is our. Hidden away outside of lead night so I think that sort of the the first key that I think. we're really focused on. I, as you can imagine, I have A. Huge. Dining allergy and so one of the things. that. I think we certainly should should trying to achieve. It's easiest at the done. A is to actually use data to leapfrog boss. Generations are so. We've done it in many occasions. In the past of most notably we leapfrogged landline telephone connections all the way to to pull violet. So you're China India short rest the word that. This is what it is like to be a first division of this huge automatic. On with..

India Josh Sony Mr Martin eady Denver Diet Horse GOP Donald Vicks Habra. Oslo Muller
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

01:37 min | 11 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"For our women listeners. Today I was just wondering if you could share any sort of insights as to what exactly where the hurdles that you had to overcome in order to get to where you are today at. How exactly did you overcome them? I'm sure it would provide immense value to not only our female listeners but also the rest of our audience as well. I wouldn't call them hurdles and I win. Call them specific female hurdles right my personal experience. I don't think I've I've I've had those. I think they're just you know growing hurdles and going for when you want and I often conferences on women in power and things like that then I always tell people look at you know what's holding you back in that's always most of the time anyways fear and you have to determine what is that fear what is based on and for Women One. Common factor is the lack of self confidence. That comes from the fact that when we grow up We're often told at the table. Were commended for B Wyatt. For not speaking out. You know you're such a good girl you need being ladylike and stuff right off the you know at the table. You're such a good girl. And went voice saying are functions and everything that's expected from them so they could leave the table the conspiracy taymor whenever it's Kinda like you know. It's okay guys like that and girls are like that and then we go to school and at the same thing and you tell girls. Oh you're such a good girl. You put up your hand when he wanted to speak employs just our on again. I'm trees ready in makes a difference between the boys and.

taymor Wyatt
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

03:21 min | 11 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"To twelve months now very very very careful so a former next question. I just wanted to read out this quote to you from Mr Ryan Johnson. Who is a senior manager of international public policy and access partnership which is a global attack in policy consultancy so he said that the first companies to be affected will be any outsourcing firms that deal with the European Union as well as the software firms that have personnel in both the European Union as well as in India so given that Europe is currently the second largest market for India nine hundred firms after North America? How exactly do you foresee this playing out for the Indian tech and it landscape? I think that's quite accurate. Gdp are I was I seeing you know as a European regulation and I think it took quite some time for the international community to really fully grasp the fact that it has really really far reaching extraterritorial reach and so It's been a slow process. But I think now it's really be no coming to the forefront end companies are starting to realize that aging if I'm collecting the data wherever I am in the world I'm going to have to comply with Garson definitely And IT companies are certainly going to be excuse me. I'm certainly going to be some of the companies that are going to be the most affected and there are ways that this can happen is If they have personnel in Europe or they have offices in Europe then they'd be subject to Vr by the fact that they have companies in Europe in all European companies have to be compliant with Genie. Vr. Wherever the processing occurs so if there's a company in company with a presence in Europe Wherever it's gross whether it's in Europe or in India the whole processing activity itself is subject to Gr. That doesn't mean that the whole Indian company is going to be subject to GDP are you pro. Cheer is processing activity so each processing as to comply with the GDP are the second thing. Is that what we've heard is a lot of you know companies and also in India saying well you know what we have no personnel in the EU we have no presence in the EU. So it doesn't affect us we don't have to become compliant and that's that's a misconception. That is correct if you're in India or somewhere else Outside of Europe anywhere processing. Eu Data. Chances are they're few exceptions. That could apply but chances are very likely. Then you will have to comply with the juilliard. If you're outside of Europe processing data you follow subject to the Genie. Biard any do not have any officer presence in e you then you have a next obligation. And that's two point an e representatives. So THAT'S A. That's a legal obligation. You can't say well I'm not sure and then evaluate whether we need it or not. It's not like a data protection officer ranked here to point data protection officer at GPO. But it's you know you you you have to examine your own situation and made me do remain. You don't have to point win whereas if you're an ninety companies fall outside of the union you fall within the scope of the.

Europe European Union India Mr Ryan Johnson officer senior manager North America Garson GPO
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

01:30 min | 11 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Acton right. It's longer just two BS of legislation right in your own words. You said it has a lot more teeth than the previous directive. Yeah exactly sir. And we're seeing that it's taking time for companies to to Kinda Gen- into the I would say the whole philosophy that has when GDP are came out a lot of companies or or complaining that it was such a heavy undertaking to be compliant and it was a lot you know still a lot of red tape and things like that making clients more complicated for companies and so. I think the whole point of GDP are came into effect was kind of lost in all the you know the e-mailings that we got from companies trying to to sell services for compliance. Because it was seen as something very cumbersome very expensive but now I think there's a shift in mentality that people are starting to see that that it's really beneficial benefit from a company point of US forces you to kind of an overview of all data that you have in use data and positive. Wayne data commercial mate that me. You didn't realize that you in the past right and so it's Kinda you know cleaning the house and then once you clean it up you realize. Oh Yeah Well Mississippi. Really Antonin we can. Do this can do that. And and seeing it more as an opportunity than an obstacle over that shift seeing Mass Dab. Six six.

Wayne data Acton Antonin US Mississippi
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

13:05 min | 1 year ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Two week journey from Plymouth to New York. Did you know that two of her initial crew members had to fly to in New York at the start since there wasn't any space left on the sailboat. And did you also know that. Two of her crew members had to fly to New York after regretted journey in order to sail it back from New York to Plymouth says Greta was sticking around in North America for an extended period of time after her speech. This is not awesome random conspiracy theory that I'm paddling by the way major European media outlets such as the times and the UK Andor Spiegel. Germany have confirmed this Julianne Jonge gear a member of the creative professional's networking group and senior journalist and editor based out of Michigan in the United States estimated that the the flights taken by those four people load generated more than two point one million grams of carbon dioxide. And what does this number look like. For perspective respective the US Environmental Protection Agency estimates that roughly two hundred thousand acres of forest would be required to offset that level of of carbon emission so this is emblematic of what is generally wrong with a lot of efforts in the climate activism space today the lack of a practical solution to cut down on carbon footprint in scalable and cost efficient manner. And don't just take my word for it. The University of California Climate Solutions Russians group. Infers that unless future climate proposals actively account for cost efficiency and its practicality within a strong regulatory regulatory framework those climate proposals would ultimately be rendered to list Greta Bloomberg has been immortalized as the face of the climate movement movement. But has she actually been the most devoted climate activist in terms of commitment to preserving the environment. Well when we look at add global outreach regarding the fight against climate change and in terms of sheer time spent preserving the environment it is super hard to discount at the impact of Solomona that Mika from Tim coup which is a rural district in southern India. Her story is simply mind boggling. She's lived for more than a century still alive today. By the way at a hundred seven years old She grew up impoverished in rural southern India and is a recipient of the pod mastery and has an international NGO called thin macos resources for environmental education which functions bulletin Los Angeles as as well as in Oakland in California when we look at all of this alone. It's already far more than what Greta has brought to the table. In the fight against climate change inch and like Mrs Dominica there are numerous other individuals around the world who were making efforts to preserve their local environments. But yet they're we're not receiving the same spotlight despite having done a ton to preserve the environment and who hail from far more vulnerable parts of the globe then Sweden. There's probably another Solomona that in your backyard. Who you've never even heard of so far grotto's most prominent prominent geopolitical action is filing an official complaint against five countries France Germany Turkey Brazil and Argentina China for their failure to prevent environmental degradation in their respective jurisdictions? Now all this sounds well and good but the complaint seems to have have no tangible and goal in sight apart from ensuring that the five countries will do their adequate share to cut down on carbon emissions. I mean we've all heard that before right. It's not like we've never heard politicians or heads of state make empty promises. So here is the thing. There's no penalize regionalization. There is no sanction that can be meted out by the international legal system. Should these countries failed to comply with grads demands. There is no oh real incentive to cut down on carbon emissions insofar as it promotes economic growth in a cost efficient manner. which is the reality for for a lot of these countries today in conclusion? Here's what we can surmise about. Greta and her activism her activism has done an amazing job job of garnering much-needed media attention on a highly pressing issue. And it's also brought about increased awareness. Add vigor in the fight to preserve move our environment however this awareness vigor and activism needs to translate into tangible policy reform in order for her her to be heralded as the champion climate activists of our time. So let's take a look at three reasons why her activism needs to go a long long way way. That is if she's serious about making any sort of meaningful change the first so we know that she's filed a lawsuit against five nations agents. Brazil Argentina France Germany and Turkey. But you know who the five biggest polluters per capita in the world today are it's the US Saudi Arabia Canada South Korea and Australia. None of whom she's included in this lawsuit even if we take her at her best case scenario. Which is the symbolic lawsuit? We spoke to you about earlier. GIULIANA versus the US will in all probability ability get reversed by the Supreme Court as Stated by Columbia University's Center for climate change which we sided and spoke to you about earlier in this episode and the top five countries generate more than sixty five metric tons of carbon per capita per annum to put the things in perspective again. What does this number look like as for the US Environmental Protection Agency? This level of carbon emissions is enough to power more than thirty million smartphones so unless her activism magically finds a way to incentivize these five nations nations from cutting down on emissions. It is super unlikely that she's going to have any global impact in the fight against climate. Change the second reason Greta Foon Berg hails from Sweden. which is a highly industrialized? Society would less than ten million people bull to put things in perspective. That number is smaller than the population of most metropolitan cities in countries like India. Brazil will China or the US aid. Rio De Janeiro New Delhi Shanghai. These are all cities that have more people than all of Sweden. So the reality reality is this a lot of the majorly populated countries right now need to emit some form of carbon in order to get to the same levels of industrialization socialization that the Nordic countries like Sweden or Norway or Finland. Enjoy today. Tom Audela. Who is a journalist as a part of the Associated Press Presses East Africa Bureau reports that ninety percent of the waste in nations that are classified as low income is either burned or or dumped owing to a lack of proper waste management infrastructure the National Center for Atmospheric Research in the US states? That burning waste is a major reason for the worsening of Air Quality Day state that almost thirty percent of global emissions that cause air pollution. Come from waste-burning. I think now a lot of these. Low income countries don't have the mechanisms to recycle or process the waste that they generate. Why is all of this relevant for starters? How do you expect those countries to transition to renewable sources of energy like wind or solar hydro and cut down on their carbon footprint rent when they're burning plastic and burning rubber just to dispose of them? I for one can't help. But think that Grenada's preaching to the rest of us to assembly stop burning even though there's no real alternative proposed comes from a highly privileged point of view. Sweden had time to industrialize. Sweden had time to develop so they can afford to divorce themselves from the realities that low income countries go through to dispose of their waste. Ace signed APPS energy and environmental consulting firm based in Boston says that solar panels are luxury for the citizenry of the US. So then how do you expect. Countries like Ghana Baucus Tan or Liberia. To make this transition if people in America think this transition is expensive if the citizens of the low income developing world were all on twitter the might have even asked Greta how dare you in response to her wistfulness to have everyone transition to renewable resources. This reality is a sobering reminder that Greta Thune Berg while her intentions and activism maybe well well-meaning hails from a socioeconomic upbringing that cannot comprehend many of the realities that serves obstacles to solving climate change the third and final final reason carbon emissions are going to continue to get polluted insofar as both economic growth as well as cost. Efficiency are on the table. So that being said Said Gratis. Best Bet is best echoed by on Mahindra. Who is the chairman of the Mahindra Group in India? which is one of India's largest companies is an is an MNT worth roughly thirty billion dollars? Here is her to find a way for sustainability to promote economic growth. But not wild. That's a great solution. To harsh reality is right now. It would cost countries and immense amount of time and money to make that transition and the Institute for Energy Research estimates that it would cost four point five trillion dollars and at least the next three decades for low and medium income countries to successfully make that transition again for perspective four point five trillion dollars is roughly a quarter of united skates GDP. So where will these poor countries get the cash from. It's only once. Sustainability brings the same promise of economic growth and and cost efficiency as fossil fuels do D- Global Fraternity can work on collaborative solutions to more efficiently invest there are Indian tax tax credits. Unsustainable practices that are not only environmentally friendly but also economically viable. And until. And unless that happens. It's I'm just going to be deemed as privileged discourse where those individuals who hail from small and industrialized economies are chastising the rest of the world to do not develop and to not burn fossil fuels without providing any alternative as to how we can use ECO friendly renewable sources of energy to our advantage while remaining cost efficient in conclusion. I've got a couple of things to save as a sixteen year old Greta. Thune Berg is certainly commendable. Most sixteen year olds me included. Were probably just playing xbox all day at her age without a care in the world and she certainly has gotten a lot of people involved loved the discussion. And you could even argue that. This is only the beginning of her journey but the hard truth is this. She has been the recipient of an insane amount of media coverage and has been deemed as our savior right now to combat the climate crisis. What about the other unsung heroes in your backyard? Around the world in low and medium income countries that we've been ignoring we've shown you in this episode itself that there are other activists both for the environment as well as for for children's rights who have done more than Greta has but have not received any of the attention. I cannot help but wonder that given Greta does lack of understanding thing about the context that racial minorities and other impoverished communities live through around the world have we chosen the right person as a symbol for the movement that is supposed to be dealing with the greatest threat that our generation is.

Greta Greta Thune Berg Sweden United States India US Environmental Protection Ag Brazil New York University of California Clima Greta Bloomberg Germany France Turkey Plymouth
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

14:57 min | 1 year ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Cultural economic political. Maybe a dash of social issues these are discussions discussions. That we've been having since time immemorial but it's easy to view these issues is buying it. It's easy to view them as either black or white. When in fact there era a whole lot agree on the issue of solving the global climate crisis? Is Greta Thune Berg the real deal or is she merely media media hype. Thank you for tuning in. I'm going to try and answer that for you on this episode of a whole lot of gray with a neon Rome Scientists.

Greta Thune Berg Rome
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Then the bourgeoisie owned the land and the proletariate served as Labour working on this land but the global global economy as we know it today is far more capital intensive and has many more nuanced levels of delegation and hierarchy thanks to processes such as globalization Zeeshan and the rapid technological advancements. That have happened. In the past. Few decades there is no bourgeoisie class or proletariat class that you can use to separate people anymore. There are far more layers in this economy of which the Communist ideology or Marxism simply cannot fathom so. None of those concepts would even be relevant today but magically even if somehow they were applicable they would not be successful talking pure economics the World Bank or do thousand eighteen reward talks about our free trade which is free from the licenses and many deregulations that AH communist regime would require has led to a direct increase in economic growth among low income countries. And take the two most powerful countries today in the world in two thousand twenty the United States and China which have a combined. GDP of more than thirty thirty trillion US dollars which is more than a third of global GDP. The United States the American dream Silicon Valley Hollywood and their countless other examples Gargantuan economic success stems result of freedom from these communist policies. Not Their adoption of it but this example maybe even more telling Chana which according to the world population review we read out is one of the five communist countries in the world today but remember what we said at the start. It is an exception exception to the communist way of life in one aspect and that's in terms of economics and likely established at the start of the episode. Communism is both an economic as well as a political political system and China made the economic exception to its otherwise communist way of life in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight and guess what it is disc -ception and China's adoption of free market economic policies via processes like foreign investment and free trade that accelerated China's meteoric rise to the top talk of economic food chain. And don't take my word for it. Harvard Business Review States that since nineteen seventy eight up until two thousand eighteen. China's economy has has grown more than fifty times with more than six hundred million people escaping poverty and as per the population review again to reiterate. There are five communist dates in the the world today. Vietnam Laos North Korea China and Cuba and all five of them are politically communist. While China is economically capitalist but keep in mind China's still politically communist which means China's still terrible politically freedom house has consistently criticized the Chinese government for their repression of human rights. It's worth sites such as Google and facebook are completely banned in China. While Uber Muslim minorities are being sent to concentration camps as we speak and the other four countries trees Laos Vietnam. North Korea and Cuba are all equally bad politically freedom. How states that? These nations are experiencing an almost unprecedented level all of Internet censorship and a crackdown on civil liberties and keep in mind that they don't even have the economic benefits that China does because unlike China they're still economically communist. The Telegraph states. That seventy one percent of North Korea's population is undernourished owing to North Korea's economic situation and Gaza Cuba which is an organization in that assist Cubans emigrating to Texas stated that immigration from Cuba to the United States continued through the twenty first century given Cuba's economy being in dire straits straights and showing very little side of improvement so in conclusion communism is greatly economically ineffective in addition to being politically devastating. There is noughties single example in two thousand nineteen of a country that is wholly communists. Keep in mind both politically as well as economically that successful and either a guard and the only only reason the China's successful economically is because they are no longer economically communist had China not economically liberalized in nineteen seventy eight. Who knows they may have been in the same boat as North Korea or Cuba even in terms.

China North Korea United States Cuba World Bank Harvard Business Review Laos Vietnam Chana Texas Google Gaza Chinese government facebook
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

15:18 min | 1 year ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Cultural economic political. Maybe a dash of social issues these are discussions Russians. That we've been having since time immemorial but it's easy to view these issues is buying it. It's easy to view them as either black or white. When in fact there the whole lot agree on this episode of a whole lot of grey? We are going to be talking about the very real world. Dangers singers that come with endorsing an ideology like communism and just how devastating the ideology has been throughout human history and to arrive at this conclusion Asia. We're going to be talking about do the first. The sheer lack of awareness that exists about communism and a second why democratic countries should should work towards marginalizing communist ideologies from the mainstream..

Asia
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

14:16 min | 1 year ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Cultural Economic Political. Maybe a dash of social issues these are discussions discussions. That we've been having since time immemorial but it's easy to view. These issues is binary. It's easy to view them as either black or white. What in fact there Sarah a whole lot of grey hi and welcome to the second episode smashing the Indian Patriarchy start with sex at? I would like to state that. The following topic is obviously an extremely sensitive one owing to the fact that it covers themes such as x rated content and sexual violence additionally I would urge all my listeners to listen to the piece in its entirety before drawing any conclusions. Because I've tried to address this very pressing issue in a brand of manner I would like to start off by bringing your attention to a report released released in June. Two Thousand Eight hundred the Reuters Foundation deemed India Indus report to be the most dangerous country in the world for women and for those of you you wondering they use four criteria to arrive at his judgment the first access to healthcare for women to second access to economic resources for women the third sexual abuse and harassment and the fourth human trafficking. Now if you go online and look at organizations such as Human Rights Watch or amnesty amnesty and other local as well as international media outlets. I'm sure that you will find tons of different sources that either agree with or contradict the conclusion off the Reuters report and be that as it may whether or not India's de most dangerous country in the world for women. The Saudi reality is this that certain parts of our our country are extremely dangerous for women and we have to be doing better to guarantee the safety and security of nearly five hundred million people in our country. We'll be looking at three key areas where we can at least begin to invest our time energy and resources towards solving. What is a highly pressing problem? The I allowing free access to sex education and explicit content the second dispelling the cultural myth and discussing all of households and finally ensuring that feminist movements are not restricted exclusively to privilege urban circles. So the first point allowing free access to sex education and explicit content the Indian government mandated that sex education be incorporated into all school syllabi throughout the country in two thousand five and they call the scheme the adolescence education education program and seriously props for passing the scheme as that is the first step however while this is certainly a promising first step simply having laws laws that mandate sex. Ed should not be perceived as the end goal in and of itself in fact laws on the books are useless. If they're not properly enforced to yield tangible manageable outcomes and sadly this is the reality on the ground in India especially in this regard Unisex published a two thousand thirteen report on the state of sex and reproductive-health in India which highlighted one of the major issues as the massive gap that currently exists between the policy legislation and policy implementation. Now it is important to note that this particular problem off there. Being a gap between policy legislation and implementation is not exclusively Sibley restricted to rural India. It is a problem that pervades urban upper middle class areas as well the proper enforcement of programs such as the adolescence education program program and conversations surrounding themes such as sexual intimacy and adolescents are simply not happening even top schools in urbanized cities. Take my own personal experience. I for one was privileged enough to do my schooling from a well reputed K twelve school in Bangor Banglore which for our non India. Listeners is my hometown and a city in southern India now my school was continually praised both locally as well as nationally for for having things like a strong academic standing and an affluent alumni network and yet during my entire time. They're not even once where we talked about sex education seriously. Don't get me wrong. We had adolescence. Education program is class but to put things in perspective during and one of our adolescence. Education program sessions in either the ninth or tenth grade wants to topic of menstruation. Came up all the guys in our entire batch watch were told to exit the seminar. Now as for me this. How can you claim that you're preparing future? Generations especially future men for healthy intimate and on sexual experiences when you're censoring information about periods and menstruation from all the guys in that class and keep in mind to reiterate this was the reality eighty in a private well reputed school in one of the most urbanized and developed cities and our country again for reference for our non-indian listeners. Government sources versus estimate Bangalore to be the third of the fourth richest city in India. So given this reality what do you think the state of adolescence education in rural India is going to beep veep now if you wish to dismiss my example purely because it's anecdotal. I urge you to consider the five findings of this 2015 in fifteen report published by the Indian Journal of Psychiatry as well as the UNICEF report of two thousand and thirteen which we mentioned earlier on in this episode so the first finding six percent of adolescent women and two percent of adolescent man note abysmally low numbers actually felt comfortable talking to their parents about menstruation. The second finding finding India has the largest number of adolescence in the world estimated to be roughly two hundred fifty million and yet only twenty percent of them have heard the terms. STD's STD's and seventy percent of them believe that men should take the final decision regarding sexual and reproductive health. The third almost seventy five percent of married read couples in rural India. Felt that they do not get adequate information about sex or marriage in their adolescent age before finding one in every three women report board experiencing both domestic abuse and domestic violence and the fifth and final. Finding it goes back to the point. I raised earlier about there being a massive gap off between policy legislation and policy implementation. So although the Indian government has these various initiatives although they have programs such as the adolescence education program a very small percentage of youth actually partake in these programs in fact the national average of youth participation in programs such as as rh which stands for the adolescent sexual and reproductive. Health strategy is a low. The national average of participation is eight percent which states like Bihar going as low as one percent and again the most important takeaway is this it is one thing to pass legislation. Mandating these programs grams exist but it is a totally different ballgame to actively spread awareness about these programs in schools and in public life and to train providers at add these clinics not to be flippant not to be insensitive to guarantee confidentiality and privacy among youth participants. These are the things that will increase youth participation so activism in this space and India needs to recognize one thing it isn't about passing stricter laws the laws already exist. It's about stricter implementation. Haitian and this problem is not restricted exclusively to schools unfortunately it spills over to all facets of our daily life as well now with the age of the Internet and smartphones smartphones. The world's database and a whole host of content is at our fingertips we have access to a whole area of content ranging from innocent too explicit explicit. Simply a few google searches away bearing this in mind. Some of you may be familiar with the Indian government. Banning Porn sites lead October two thousand eighteen for context. This born band was based on a two thousand fifteen directive from the ultra conned High Court that porn promotes sexual assault. Now newsflash the born ban obviously did not prevent people from consuming pornographic content in India topped and VPN which is a London based as VPN analytics platform reported four hundred and five percent increase in VPN downloads in India in the past twelve months loan since the porn bat. Now many of you may be thinking that you know what this could be a coincidence. There are a lot of reasons that the surgeon VPN downloads may have happened. It could have been a certain sports channel or certain Netflix show. That was not being broadcast in India. But Trust me. This was no coincidence. And it was causally linked to the porn ban a similar web and Israeli web analytics firm found out across more than twelve hundred porn sites. The monthly average of visits to these sites from Indian consumers consumers was two point three billion between January and October two thousand eighteen note right before the band takes place now this number rises to an average of two point eight billion which is roughly an increase of five hundred million in the months of November two thousand eight hundred to January two thousand nineteen again note note. These are the first three months after the porn band. And we've witnessed an increase of roughly five hundred million visits on porn sites born hub. which for those of you? You were going to pretend that you've never heard of that. Before is the world's largest platform four x rated content and found that sixty million visits to their site. We're from India alone in the month of November and December. Two thousand eight hundred. which again is the first two months immediately after the porn band takes place four knob estimates that this was pretty much at all time high for visits from India for the calendar year? Two thousand eight hundred further google trends. which is Google's official tool to analyze analyze data patterns at Google searches found that searches like porn? VPN and porn proxy sites went up by seven to ten times in the months following following the porn. Back so what are the implications of this porn bat. Or what are the implications. been thus far. Well firstly. It's not even having its intended effect of reducing the number of people consuming pornographic content the data I provided to you from similar web topped. VPN and Google Trans all demonstrate this fact secondly with no other alternative to consume such content users in India are opting to visit illegal platforms streaming sites which naught only don't provide the same protections as legal sites which will talk about in a second but actually profit off of disgusting and a heinous content in two thousand sixteen multiple media outlets ranging from Aljazeera to the Times of India reported that there was a demand in stores in rural or Turkish which is India's here's most popular state for rape videos that sold for less than three dollars and the shopkeepers of some of these stores said that these videos were often taken by the perpetrators to blackmail rape victims from filing complaints to the police. And we're done uploaded to these illegal porn sites ones. That did not have a strict. I guide lines as porn hub or any of the other platforms that were banned by the Indian government the recognition that sexual release and sexual desire are fundamental. Human needs is the first step to having the right outlook on sex education and starting the right conversation surrounding sex. The author British example shows us that people do not have an outlet to express these needs they will sadly resort to these horrifically disgusting measures and this sentiment was actually echoed by Mr Cory Vice. Who is the vice president off porn? He cautioned that India's ban of pornographic content would result in Indian streaming illegal platforms arms to consume the sad x rated content now again. Why is all of this dangerous? Well currently regulated platforms that host pornographic content such as porn hub uber. You porn are bound by strict guidelines for instance content that shows heinous acts such as torture or rape and not content. That shows abort acts like sexual intercourse with a minor to name a few are allowed on these legally regulated porn sites and again the example shows us that corey vices concerns of there being a black market for illegal pornographic content are far from unfounded. Did and this black market for pornographic content in tandem with our complete apathetic attitude to words. Sex and toward sex education is adding fuel fuel to the awfully depressing fire that we find ourselves in today. John Milton and John Stuart Mill who were both legendary philosophers from the seventeenth. Mhm Century founded a concept called the marketplace of ideas. The logic is this that all ideas should be allowed to operate in a free free market environment where everybody's exposed to all sorts of ideas without fear of censorship and where the best ideas outweigh the others on the face of their marriage. The moment that you censor or ban something that is fundamental to human curiosity you will create a black market for it. We even saw it with alcohol. Aw during the prohibition era in the US where speakeasy were created. Now I know speakeasy tend to be associated with these sort of hipster venues today in two thousand thousand nineteen but interestingly enough these were illicit establishments that served alcohol which came into prominence as a direct result of alcohol being banned and during the Prohibition Era American media giants a Andy Networks which is the broadcasting wing of the Walt Disney Company estimates. That there were more than and five hundred thousand speakeasy on the east coast of the US alone. History Dot com also owned by a and tells us how Al Capone the gangsters dominated take Chicago in the one thousand..

India Indian government Google India Indus Reuters Foundation Sarah Reuters rape Indian Journal of Psychiatry US Bangalore Al Capone Netflix harassment High Court UNICEF Bangor Banglore