35 Burst results for "Lotta"

Roku and Peacock made nice. Will HBO Max and Fire TV follow suit?

The 3:59

04:40 min | 20 hrs ago

Roku and Peacock made nice. Will HBO Max and Fire TV follow suit?

"So going into last week, what was the status quo of the standoff between Hbo Max Peacock on the Streamer side and then Roku and fire TV on the devices I'd. So it was a rollback to May, which was when if you're Max launched was surprise honestly all of us that HP the Roku Fire TV, we're not going to have the HBO AD and. That's still the case today You know it's been said launch. Max's not been on either of those two devices against super popular like you said, Roku TV, they're really the least expensive streamers out there and you could you know so many people have them on TV's on on the street devices themselves. So and then peacock which debuted nationwide in July also didn't have HBO Max and didn't have. Sorry. Didn't have a Roku or fire TV. So again both those major services both you know had a lot of hype leading up to them in both kind of like. You know they're not on these super popular devices. So last Friday that changed and Roku peacocks deal. So finally, Roku owners can watch peacock just like everybody else right. So what are the I'm sure that you it's been similar for you like me I've even people that work at c net with us have message to me occasionally and been like w why can't I watch the streaming service? On my Roku or on fire, you have you been getting a lot of reader reaction to the fact that. We had readers were really like I think a lot of years that are in the know are Kinda like at this point like they're they're they're they. They know that it's an issue in the they do complain about especially when they hear about new stuff on on either service potentially but we had a discussion internally about the editor's choice award, which is something that we give to products. We really like currently our editor's choice product is a roku streaming stare. and. We're like is worth polling this this this award, you know give them a little bit of time still especially going into the fall season, but you know it's a big issue offer us evaluating these products so yet again it was it was a surprise. People are still kind of mystify that these massive services from the media companies they can't agree to deal to just get the basic APP on their devices. So also, can you talk a little bit about? What are people missing out on Hbo Max Peacock in addition to being new services especially with Max been a little confusing for people to understand any way. It doesn't help if you can't watch these services on like the most popular things that people watch the but give people sense. You know what are they missing out on if they are Roku or fire TV users, what are they missing by not having a up until last week not having access to both HBO Maxine PGA While I. Think Big Picture. You're missing more on peacock the Max at least in the beginning because. If. You're a Roku or a fire TV user. You can get the regular HBO APP still. So you can watch you know all the shows that are on HBO succession, which just one. In the EMMYS did really well, all those hbo things there on both Max and regular HBO. The things that you're missing on MACs are primarily friends which obviously is is the big marquee feature there and those Hbo, Max. Originals. So that's on there. If you're if you're Roku or five TV subscriber, you can't watch those my kids really like the elmo show on for example. Like he gets up at elmo goes and does a late night show. It's called the not. So late show with ELMO and You know we watch that on our apple TV you know the one time we don't use Roku our house right off because you can't you can't watch it on the Roku. With peacock I think their catalog is a is a little bit less compelling overall You know it's a less expensive service. It's free. But. Again, you're missing a lot of their back catalogue ABC has or NBC. Sorry NBC shows. law and order Svu as well as a parks and recreation thirty rock big names like that. You can stream on peacock and you can't get those on other services however for example, those are both of those comedies thirty rock in. Parts of the wreck are on Hulu. Hulu Subscriber, obviously, you got Hulu APP on your fire TV or Roku. So you're not missing quite as much I think if you're a again a Roku Amazon Rtd user with peacock. So you know it's it's it's it's very complicated, and then these services have different tiers right so at the end of the day, it's it's hard to Parse it all and you can get a Lotta these shows on different services. If you look around

Max Peacock HBO MAX Roku Roku Amazon Rtd Hulu Editor HP NBC Maxine Pga Apple SVU ABC
Why are humpback whales getting stuck in rivers?

The Naked Scientists

03:50 min | 1 d ago

Why are humpback whales getting stuck in rivers?

"Say the least as it's the first known instance of this happening. The first little these animals up to as much as twenty kilometers up a river up in the northern territory and USTRALIA dissipated pitchy here we're talking murky muddy waters and so when I first saw the picture of Humpback Whale, which is an oceanic spacey's in this murky water, it was something that was a phenomenal thing thought sydney-based marine scientist Vanessa at PIRATA. Now, two of the whales is thought have since swam back out to sea but at least one remains in the river and the worries if stranded in the shallow water, is it going to be able to get out? So the main reason that the probably in there is well, I should point out this has never happened before, but maybe one of the animals took. A wrong turn and ended up in this area thumbed back wiles generally in the Kimberley region, which is northwest of Australia H. and every year to breed and have their babies, and now say time to be hitting Beck South dant Antarctica where they're going to spend the summer fading. Let's hope that this one reminding while has the opportunity to do just that being a. Tidal River is rather different to being in the sea. So how might the whale be doing? Do you sound to to listen and to vocalise to talk about now this whale because in on Acre located may be reliant on visual cues. So simply having a little look around or trying to say where there's a space to soon that's that site side there's a whole. Number of things that would probably be going through this wiles mind and without ends Promo fighting it'll putting a human spin on it on show that this animal might be doing circles or at least on. Friday. There'll be a tame going up just to have another look at it just to say what it's doing and to see if it's made any progression in its movements. strumming is a real risk and up in the Northern Hemisphere Southampton University's Clive. Truman, told me why this is dangerous for a whale watch would want to be supporting with the weight of the organs and the way to the animal. So when it strands that can compress the lungs and undamaged into Logan's same time if a while is stuck and tide is coming in and out almost paradox. Can Drown because it can lift itself off of the the bite can then water can get into the blowhole and drown. So what tools to scientists have available to encourage twelve plus meet away? Oh, to do anything, there's a couple of examples that I could run through one being creating a physical barrier with farts. So the animal was simply move away with type in some cases that hasn't worked in the past where the animal is simply gone onto bites you could use acoustics such as banging on physically banging on vessels, which is really nice for a while some have suggested using kilowatt playback sounds, which is the Predator of the humpback whales but again, a Lotta, these are potentially guttering juice stress our. Expert, team will have to y out what options are potentially going to be put on the table to see if it's worth inducing these kinds of reactions to then have a favorable result, which would be the animal turning directions and heading out to say as the name of the river suggests the whale isn't the only thing in east alligator river. Clive again. It folktales of fantastic animals extremely intimidating, but probably not a risk to sixteen major adult humpback whale unless again the whale is stranded, and if the world is stranded and stuck than, you could imagine the talk dolls could pies an additional risk.

East Alligator River Tidal River Beck South Dant Antarctica Truman Vanessa Scientist Hemisphere Southampton Univers Clive Kimberley Australia Logan
Ellen DeGeneres Addresses "Toxic" Allegations

Daily Pop

02:59 min | 1 d ago

Ellen DeGeneres Addresses "Toxic" Allegations

"Ellen show returns to day and she is not holding back she is facing all the drama and ugly accusations listen to this. As, you may have heard this summer there were allegations of a toxic work environment at our show. And then there was an investigation I learned that things happened here that never should have happened I take that very seriously and I want to say I am so sorry to the people who were affected. We have made the necessary changes and today we are starting a new chapter. The truth is I. Am that person that you see on TV I am also a lot of other things I sometimes I. Get sad get mad I get anxious I get frustrated I get impatient and I. am working on all of that I am boss of two hundred and seventy people two hundred and seventy people who helped make this show what it is two hundred, seventy people. Still Bracing for. All I want is for every single one of them to be happy and to be proud to work here. I, Still WanNa be the one hour a day the people can go to escape and laugh. Okay. So that's her monologue for the show airing today she kind of touched on everything. So how do you feel about Ellen after watching that I? Mean I watched the whole thing from start to finish and the entire time my recurring thought was just like. Damn killing this right now like she is just such a true professional. This is where she shines right and you know I think she is what she said seventeen seventeen years I believe I don't know how many seasons that is but for her to be on our air for that long to be as highly popular as she has been I'm sure that things were behind the scenes I'm sure there's a Lotta people that no longer work there that are probably like, okay this sounds like a lot of bs but. Like it was set up in a way that Ellen trust fortunately for her was not in a position to take the fall and I really do feel like the way she addressed everything i. smiled halfway through I realized she is just so damn good at this and look I really liked the way she sort of broke it down into categories where she's like I said kind of the I said be kind to one another because of this reason, she reminded everybody the reason for that which I didn't even remember. And I think she was really smart is that she went into all of the different categories of like we're all really complex human beings. Sometimes, I'm happy sometimes I'm mad sometimes I'm sad sometimes a good mood sometimes I'm pissed at the end of the day I'm a woman in this business for twenty plus years I am the boss of to hundred and seventy people. I'm not gonNA perfect interaction with every single person and I hate to pull this car because I like to think that I'm pretty even on this. Front, but if this was a man I, don't think we'd be challenging her as much as we have been and I'm not saying that things were not done an era of not saying that she has been perfect and it clearly shows that she needed to take accountability for a lot of stuff that went down when I think she did a good job for that and I think this is going to go under to go under the bridge and we're going to keep watching Allen and not think twice about it.

Ellen Allen
No Weapon Formed Against You Shall Prosper

Joyce Meyer Radio Podcast

05:13 min | 2 d ago

No Weapon Formed Against You Shall Prosper

"Isaiah chapter fifty, four verse seventeen. Actually. One morning when I was doing my walking God kept putting this on my heart. You wouldn't think get a whole four part series out of one scripture but praise God we did. No weapon but no weapon that is formed against you shall prosper. And every tongue. Horizon Gainst you in judgment. You shall show to be in the wrong this piece righteousness security and triumph over opposition is the heritage of the servants of the Lord, those and whom the ideal servant of the Lord. Is reproduced now we're gonNA take this scripture apart this weekend and We're going to do four different teachings from Liz. Each one will be different. A separate message in its own. But I want to start by just say a few things about this scripture. No weapon that's formed against you shall prosper every tongue that rises up against you in judgment which none of us enjoy that dewey nobody likes being judged or criticized. Is showed to be in the wrong but on the practical side for Christians Life, how do we show those who judge and criticize us that they're wrong? Do we ourselves. Do we. Get Mad at them and say equally bad things about them. Now none of that works does it You know the Bible says that when Jesus was insulted, he didn't offer insult and return. When he was abused he didn't abuse in return, but he trusted himself and everything to him who judges fairly. So the bottom line is the way that we show those who judge and criticize us that they're wrong about us. is to behave in a godly way. Instead of letting the devil did through them caused us to act like him. I must say that again. What we're so tempted to do is We're not gonNA talk to me like that. If you think you're going, do that then I'm going to do this to you I'm GonNa. Cut you out of my life. I'm going to tell everybody what you did to me. Well, we're doing when we do that is. First of all, we don't war with human beings. The Bible tells us that that our war is not with flesh and blood, but with principalities and powers of wickedness in high places. Now, that doesn't relieve people any of us of our responsibility to not let the enemy work through us, but the bottom line is, is all evil everywhere in the world all bad things that happen. The source of those is. An entity that the Bible calls the Devil Satan, the evil one, the deceiver, the wicked one on and on and on. We don't like to talk about the devil who likes to talk about the devil but the sad thing is in some churches because talking about the devils a little unpleasant, they talk about the devil and I was in a charge for a Lotta years and went on a regular basis and I never even realized that the devil was real. I thought he was some kind of Halloween character put on. Red Suit carried a pitchfork and had a long tail and that was the devil I mean, I, knew that there was a devil but I didn't know that he could be our was a real problem in my life and so the first thing you WanNa do when somebody judges and criticises you is pray for them. Because they need an understanding a revelation of how dangerous it is to judge and criticize other people, which is a very dangerous thing to do I know none of you do it. So I don't need stop and have a sermon about that right here. But I'm just throwing it out there. It's a very dangerous thing to do because the Bible says that the way you judge others you'll be judged in the same white, the white you criticize others you'll be criticized in the same way. So always remember that if you want. The, benefits of this scripture to work for you see a lot of times we read a scripture and we wanna take the benefits. But we don't want to do the part. That we need to do to have those benefits. You know we have. We have a bad habit of just picking parts out of. Well, no weapon formed against me shall prosper the Bible says that. The devils under my feet. He's defeated no weapon formed get. You shall prosper every tongue that rises against you judgment. You shall show it to be in the wrong but the way you do it is by behaving in a godly way. So they can't find fault with you. Rather than leading what the enemies doing through them cause you to turn around and act just like the enemy to

Bible Devils Isaiah Jesus LIZ Dewey US. Red Suit
Lego Fans Tricked By Counterfeit Kits

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:24 min | 5 d ago

Lego Fans Tricked By Counterfeit Kits

"Lagos, are more than a toy, their investment, the company that makes those little plastic building blocks pulled in more than five point five billion dollars in sales. Last year, they often sell legos in special kits, sometimes depicting famous movie scenes and they retire those kids after a while making them collector's items for fans and upping their value. But where there's money to be made, there are also scams. Let's go into the world of counterfeit. Lego sets with Stacey Vanek Smith and Sally herships from the PODCAST, the indicator planet money. Tom glasco lives in Dayton. Ohio is three kids and they all love Lego, which is how he got into trouble. He'd been looking for a LEGO ray resistance fighter for his son and so perusing facebook one day I saw an ad for it for what seemed to be a low. But maybe not too low of a price. The exiting was half price just thirty bucks. The pieces weren't the same quality and they didn't go together quite as nicely as regular legos Tom had bought what turned out to be a knockoff. Lego set a counterfeit on their own legos are just these little plastic bricks. You can see why it would be tempting to make. Counterfeits chronic air pot or an apple watch or something the biggest and most notorious. These counterfeiters is a Chinese brand called Leppin. It operates completely openly I mean you can visit the company's website Leppin, world dot com and you will see that its logo and Legos logo are almost identical. But if you end up buying a knockoff, you don't just risk getting a flimsier product you could also ended up costing yourself money down the line if you're planning to resell your legos later on to understand how the LEGO scams work I turned to a superfan Steve Elliot he is thirty eight and lives in Albany Wisconsin if someone posts like a big seven, hundred dollar. People will zoom in and look to see if they can see the legos stamp on the top of a brick, which is called a stud. They don't see it. They'll accuse them of it being a knock off products. The lego community is enormous. There are whole websites like brick picker, dot, com brick link, and facebook groups like star. Wars Lego collectors USA, and if you buy fakes even accidentally and try to resell them, you could get yourself banned in two thousand seventeen something unprecedented happened in the Lego aftermarket, the secondary market, the prices of big sets, those giant boxes with thousands of. Lego pieces they started dropping, and this is according to brick picker. One of those Lego pricing and investment guides unprecedented here here's a clip from the brick picker youtube channel. Now, elephants in the room of course, is the Millennium Falcon and take a look at legal Millennium Falcon Graph when the Lego Millennium Falcon was first released over a decade ago. It was the most expensive legos ever four, hundred, ninety, nine dollars, ninety, nine cents, and then the price shot up to almost five thousand dollars but a couple of years ago it dropped by more than thirty percent in less than a year. By this set was one of the worst decisions that I made in my entire collection brick picker said. In Alkan started cropping up all over the Internet from places like let's knock off Millennium Falcon sets, which, of course, sell for much less a Lotta the Lego fans I talked to you were pretty upset about this. So be careful out there the next time you are shopping make sure you are getting the real thing

Lego Tom Glasco Facebook Lagos Stacey Vanek Smith Leppin Apple Dayton Ohio Sally Herships Steve Elliot Albany Wisconsin
How the Gates Foundations values shape the world

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:41 min | 6 d ago

How the Gates Foundations values shape the world

"This week we've been talking with Bill Gates copy of the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and is trying to eradicate polio and malaria globally gates created a billion dollar climate investment fund. He has funded multiple factories to find a vaccine for Covid nineteen and the foundation is matchmaking companies around the world to get that vaccine distributed. Gate. Doesn't the position to do all of this because he's one of the world's richest people because he co-founded Microsoft and to be honest that's a little weird. So in part three here I asked Bill Gates how his philanthropy ends up doing. So much of the work of government he said some of it is mission creep take malaria. When we started out, we mostly thought that we would just increase the arm de because. You know for malaria, the people who die which at that time was over a million children a year they don't have enough money to have a voice in the marketplace. So there was no. Science, or willingness to fund on their behalf in a capitalistic system. And there was a little bit of foreign aid but much. So we came in, is the the biggest player in Malaria Ding. At first, I thought our role would just be to create the drugs and the nats. And that we weren't mean to fund the actual delivery side. Because once we have the tools. The uptake would be there in fact, it turned out that. It was much harder to. Have things delivered than we expected. So we were CO founder the Global Fund. Goes after three diseases HIV to Berkeley similar, and we were a founder of this Kavi organization that buys vaccines for the poor countries at the very lowest prices, and so those two institutions which we did in our first two years of existence to learn about delivery so far actually they've probably been the most impactful thing we've done. The R. D. promises to give us some amazing things including the tools that will help ascent malaria and. Make incredible progress on issues but the delivery side I underestimated how hard it was and how we would have to partner up to figure out what kind of axiom would be acceptable. What kind of medical intervention you know even how do you tell people that they really need to sleep under that bed net and that feeds back to the design of the product? Because you're a partner in the delivering, you see what's not working and we thought we could get women to take a daily pill. For, HIV prevention. And the uptake on that very very low, and so now we're working on something that you'd only have to take either a shot or a pill every ninety days because it looks like that would get uptake, but you're driven by the limitations of of uptake, and so that's why we've got to be deeply involved not just in rnd, but also the delivery side at what point do your priorities, the priorities of the foundation end up becoming the priorities for the world, and you've described a sort of a series of unintended consequences that pull you in deeper and deeper to. Ultimately, the work of governments in no case should countries depend on our philanthropy or any other philanthropy to solve a basic need? We can accelerate the RND and so yes, by spending money on malaria supposed to. Some. Fancy. Vacation or something. Yes. The world's resources are going more into malaria now than they did before and those million deaths are now down four, hundred thousand and so yes our values to change what gets funded in this economy and malaria just. was in my view grossly underfunded. You said it was either like it could be either malaria or a luxury. Good. But there's like a lot in between there and do you ever think maybe I. Should Turn My Lens on disinformation or wealth inequality or racism in the United States. Well we spend. We have two big things. We do one of inequity in the US, which is lot about education, and then there's global health I do believe you really have to focus and become expert. We're basically saving a life for less than a thousand dollars per life saved. These miraculous interventions in other fields. People have brackets interventions through the giving pledge. Make sure lots of plant perceived these high impact things some problems. Government's spending way more than plant. Can haven't been able to solve. So mostly flat becomes up with pilots pilots. Of a mentoring program pilots of. How schools could organize a bit differently. So we do a Lotta that but once we've committed to Milorad occasion we're not going to abandon that. Sadly, there's very few fields where you can save millions of lives for small sums of money. Bill Gates is Co Chair of the Gates Foundation.

Malaria Bill Gates Co Founder Melinda Gates Foundation Malaria Ding Gates Foundation Microsoft Global Fund Polio United States Partner Nats Milorad HIV Berkeley Co Chair
Should You Offer Chat Support in Your Business?

The $100 MBA Show

06:05 min | 6 d ago

Should You Offer Chat Support in Your Business?

"Like I mentioned that the top of the episode chat support is a great solution. We've been doing chat support under Ninja for over four years. Now we offer twenty, four, seven life support, and it's one of the hallmarks of our company. It's one of the big reasons why our customers stay customers and the reason people choose us over our competitors but there was a lot of work that needed to be done before we were ready to offer chat support. There's some foundational work you need to do and things you need to consider before you make that switch. It's also important to understand that once you offer chat support. It's one of those things that you want to offer it. It's really hard for you not to offer it again. So once people get used to a certain level of support, you might start with email. Then you'll at chat support if things are not going right or you didn't set yourself up properly and then you remove chat support this disgruntled some customers and really can affect their experience and mega make him feel really took something away from them that they're used to maybe enjoyed. So there are a few things I want to highlight that will help you get prepared to launch chance support in your business the right way. First of all, why would you want to offer chat support in the first place? Why don't you just stick to email more and more every single day every single month every single year chat support is becoming the new phone support. Prefer to chat. Now, text than to get on a phone call it's often faster to solve a problem get questions answered through chat suppor- think about it most people don't make phone calls or take phone calls or get phone calls that often but they sent a lot of text messages and facebook messages and what's happened all that stuff. It's a way for you to go back and forth with your customer live and get them a win in that moment in the moment, they reach you the moment they visit your website allows them to make a decision quickly rather than the hit your website, and then they're like, oh, I, have a couple questions. Let me see if they have. An e mail or contact form and most people don't even go that far they're just leave the website and check out a competitor. But if you have chat support allows them to say hey, I got a quick question. Let me just ask right now there's somebody right there and that question could be very simple. It can be somebody overlooked it could be something that's on your website or on your your sales pages, and the answer that question could make them feel confident enough to make a purchase right then and there it's also a huge benefit a huge benefit for your customers that already paying you. They feel like you always have their back and you're just one message away. And flat out chat support is just fun. You can send him Ho- Jeez and Jeff's funny images, and you can really express your brand and your style through Chad. The email really doesn't do as well. A lot of our branding is done through chance support a lot of our customers become customers because we're like everything like your style on chat your team really made me feel comfortable and welcomed in a professional yet casual way. So what are some of the things that you need to consider before you say Yep, let me go ahead and go chat support. The first thing I want to say to you is a Lotta people think okay. What software do I need to chat with? You know there's a lot of chat software out there whether it's intercom. Or. Fresh desk or Zen desk or help scout there's so many out there. Right and all the offers are pretty much assume depends on your needs not gonNa really get into that right now that's the easy part. But what are the things you need to consider is your customer base where is your customer base? Do you serve only a national market the covers maybe A. Few time zones or your customers international around the world. If that's the case you need to make sure you're able to offer your chat support twenty, four seven throughout the day. So you can cover the entire globe that means having at least three people on chat or on your customer support team. Each of them have an eight hour shift. Now, some people they start with five. It is week of chat versus seven days a week, and that's a good way to get into the game. But if your customers are global, you need to consider the fact that you can't just offer chat certain hours of the day. Those hours could just be in the middle of the night for somebody else and it's just really not a benefit at all you also. Have to take a look at if you have the manpower, the staff to be able to handle the amount of chats are getting. Now if you're on email support right now, this is not a good measure. Why? Because email support takes a little bit effort for the customer to actually send an email they'll probably go through a few other hoops or maybe how the tutorials or Do, a little bit of Reading for trying to figure it out themselves before they email, and this is while I will start with mail because it lowers the number of support requests but also drastically lowers the number of presell emails or chats or you'll messages. So as soon as you offer chat on your website, it's Gong to invite more conversation. That's a good thing because you're. Getting in touch with their customers and you're making connections, but it's also something you need to consider because if you were getting, let's say a hundred emails a day in email support. That's no indication of how many messages are going to get in chat because that's really going to open up the floodgates because now it's easily accessible. People can easily chat with you and send a message. It's not always easy to predict, but the traffic to your website is really a good indicator forgetting getting over one hundred thousand visitors to your website. You're going to have a good amount of those people chatting with you asking questions out say ten percent is a good measure at least ten percent people are going to reach out and ask questions especially, if you prompt them to ask questions, which is really cool. You noon chant. Throwing the pricing you can ask, Hey, you got any questions about pricing or choosing the right plan for yourself chataway with us. If you think about that, if you have if you have one hundred, thousand visitors every month that means ten thousand people chat with you every month now you might think that's a law is a lot and it's better free to over estimate and be ready for the traffic.

Facebook Ho- Jeez Chad Jeff
Is God the same in the Old and New Testaments?

The Bible Project

06:26 min | Last week

Is God the same in the Old and New Testaments?

"The first question is from Nancy. In? Michigan? Hi I'm Nancy from Grand Rapids Michigan. Thank you for this excellent series. Here's my question. My son grew up in the church but has been questioning his faith at times. He Sees God is being contradictory in appears to be emotionally abusive at times. In one of your podcast, you mentioned that Jesus is the full orb portrait of God. If people don't see this, they are either misunderstanding God or Jesus or both. What exactly would you say people are misunderstanding about the God of the Old Testament and? The New Testament. Thanks great question. Yeah. I felt like this is a question that a Lotta people have a lot of people resonate wish up here. I have found. We all have talked about this all three of us at some point that it's actually. A more regular experience that I found in pastoral ministry when are coming to own their faith or they're just exploring it to try and take it more seriously, and they just read the actual Bible as opposed to rely on the versions of the stories that they were given through teaching or something. There's a whole phase usually of the Bible creating all these problems for people actually John you lived there for quite some time. So this is a very common issue. The portrait of God is complex. Yeah. and difficult to process, and I just thought you doing a character of God series and I think Nancy in her son is experienced probably represent where a lot of us have been or are in this moment it's especially hard when you are reading say the psalms and you just want some real feel good like. worshipful contemplative things and dishonest psalmist are talking about a really retaliatory or oh, sure. Angry God. That does at times strike you as is this abusive is gone too far and when you can pull those out and you're confronted with those. That's a total. Yeah. I've experienced that same feeling. Yep. Yeah. Yeah. She is as though word or her son I guess emotionally abusive at times. It seems like that topic of the violence of God or violent depictions of God. In the Old Testament, especially is really hard to deal with and I guess for me when I think about questions like this for myself or for other people, it seems really important to acknowledge that their space to ask those questions in their space within even the Christian tradition to not know the answers to those things like to just recognize that a Lotta people think differently about these issues like some people read the Old Testament and think this is. An ancient document that you knows written by by ancient authors who were accommodating or God was accommodating their culture and their style of communication or God was actually accommodating and how he acted within history or they're just a lot of different ways that we can. We can read and interpret scripture and I. Guess. It's just helpful for me to recognize the that they're space within the Christian tradition to ask these kind of questions and think about how we interpret. But will said on both those points. So however, you know there are there are ways to get an angle to make some forward. Movement Yep isn't our understanding This is kind of surprising perspective that I find keeps helping me process this and it has to do with the composite mosaic character of the Bible. So you know these texts emerge from if you if you take the Hebrew Bible but then add the new. Testament on, we're talking about over a millennium long process of the collection and shaping of these texts and sewed the Biblical text, incorporate stories poems and laws and. All kinds of stuff from all these periods of Israelite history and experience but they have been brought Organiz together with patterns in a message and so on. So that's what our whole how to read the Bible series about but it does create a challenge because when I encounter like you John. Charissa. And we worked together and we see each other on a regular basis and pretty much. You know your behavior is consistent from day to day and you start to build up a portrait over time of like Oh. Here's how Chris is. This is her character that I infer from your behavior. And then let's say you get to know somebody long enough and they'll be. Something extreme that happens and then they'll be some new aspect of their character and like Whoa ow that's I didn't see that and so there is something kind of analogous like that to the Bible but it's actually more complex because it wasn't all written at one go. And so the way God behaves in one story and the way got as than another store. He'll. He'll like judge a whole city and destroy it but then he'll forgive a murderer like cain and you're like what? What's the deal and so we have to do with and what Christians have struggled to do is in adopting the Hebrew scriptures. Putting them alongside the stories of Jesus the writings of the apostles we have this huge project of synthesis that lay before us of how to create. A Mosaic Portrait of God's character out of all of these pieces from different times and places, and I think that's essentially the challenge is. Is Finding the the continuity and so what we're emphasizing the series is that the your way of the Hebrew Bible is actually a lot more generous, gracious and compassionate than most people tend to think what we are not focusing on but which is true is that Jesus is actually a lot more aggressive and intense and judgmental. Then people often make him out to be He certainly didn't get crucified for telling people to love your neighbor. You Got, crucified for critiquing publicly the religious and political authorities of his day, and he was very intense with them. And said, they were going to be destroyed. So I think part of it is we also need to learn how to augment this Old Testament is angry god New Testament is the loving Jesus caricatures don't do justice to either. So the two factors that have been helpful for me as I go into think about individual texts

Grand Rapids Michigan Michigan Bible Nancy John Organiz Cain Chris
How to Make Your Website Accessible to All

The $100 MBA Show

06:18 min | Last week

How to Make Your Website Accessible to All

"Hello My name is Jeff White. And I'm the CO founder of Kula Partners, a marketing and web design, and Development Agency based in Halifax Nova Scotia Canada. We work primarily with BT manufacturers located throughout North America and I'm also the CO host of a podcast called the Kula ring where we interview those manufacturing marketers and learn about their successes and failures and the things that they're most interested are excited about. But today, I'm here to talk to you about how to make your website accessible to all. It's a really important topic and not one that a Lotta people understand or even know. The importance of. But the fact of the matter is. Over thirteen percent of adult Americans have some form of disability with vision and hearing loss being the most prevalent and in this day and age there are actually lawsuits being levied against organizations that do not have. Websites in fact, the same laws that apply to accessible places such as having wheelchair ramps or accessible washrooms the ADA. With disabilities, act applies to the web. So what are we going to talk to you today about how you can structure your site in a way? So that is going to be available and accessible to everyone and I'm GonNa show you exactly what you can do in order to make your site available to all. With thirteen percent of Americans having disability, and the fact that in many beat be sales relationships having eight ten to fourteen. Members of buying committee. There's a very real chance that some of the people that you're trying to sell to actually do have a disability and as such ensuring that your site is available to those people is not only the right thing to do but it also may impact your ability to sell to the companies that you want to sell to. So, let's talk about that. From a foundational perspective. One of the very first things that you need to consider when you're building an accessible website is that your navigation is clear and concise and that it makes sense and adds value to the content on the site. Many. People when they're putting together their information architecture, there's main sitemap navigation? Used general categories such as products services about us, things like that. But those don't really begin to describe what kinds of content you're going to find underneath of them. and. I often urge our clients and others that we work with to use more descriptive language that talks about the actual categories of products at the top level of their site. This ensures that upon first glance or I read through of those navigation categories that someone can actually get more information about what it is that your company does or cells. So I would encourage you to put those key categories into the navigation to ensure that it actually makes additional sense to someone who's breeding it or viewing it for the first time. While it's very important for your navigation to be well-structured and for the link names to be relevant and descriptive of the content that people are going to find behind them. Structuring the page hierarchy of the site is of equal importance. And not only does this help to organize the content within the site, but it also helps to ensure that visitors to the site are able to find where they are in the overall site structure. You need to add signposts, breadcrumbs, and other elements help people exactly what page people are on within the site and what category of content they're looking at it in. This will help them ensure that they know where they are spatially within the site. One of the great things about using semantic. For your navigation is that not only are you going to make it easier to understand in use for all of your site visitors, but it's going to have a positive impact on your on page search as well. So as you're creating this navigation, the second thing that you need to consider is that people with certain disabilities are going to have a hard time navigating the site with traditional tools like track pads and mice, and touch. They're going to be using screen readers and other assistive tools. And they need to be able to move through the site in a way that isn't necessarily the same as what a sighted person would be able to do. So, we like to employ something called keyboard navigation that allows a user to quickly skip past all of the chrome or navigational elements that they can get right to the meat of the site this happened by hitting the tab key and allowing somebody to actually skip directly to the content within the site, and if they choose not to do that, it will actually read to them what the different navigational elements are. So implementing keyboard navigation is one of the quickest things that you can do to actually make your site accessible. If you're looking for a guide to all of the requirements for website accessibility you need look no further than the website content accessibility guidelines or why Cag-. This is a list of all of the available accessibility features and things that need to be built into your site to meet or exceed the accessibility standards. There are currently two core levels that we are concerned about, and that's Aa and. AAA. AAA guidelines actually add additional scope for higher level contrast, as well as devices and considerations for those with cognitive disabilities, not just hearing or sight. And there are two different levels of this. The AA guidelines have less stringent contrast requirements. In. Small text. It's four and a half to one in the triple A. Guidelines looking at a difference of seven to one. So this insures that text that is smaller than eighteen point in Roman or fourteen point in bold has sufficient contrast between the foreground, the background. So as to be legible to those who may not have the ability to see it as clearly as those with regular normal site.

Jeff White North America Kula Partners Halifax Nova Scotia Canada Co Founder Development Agency
Dr. Yusef Salaam And Ibi Zoboi On Punching the Air

Good Life Project

05:14 min | 2 weeks ago

Dr. Yusef Salaam And Ibi Zoboi On Punching the Air

"So you both met originally, it was ninety nine. There is a class at Hunter College were you were both attending and I wanna talk about that moment and what what came out of it because I know there was a conversation that began that took you on a walk from sixty eighth straight up to Harlem which for those who are not familiar with New York City is not a walk that's often done. And then it kind of vanished into the background for a number of years before it led to this recent collaboration let's let's sort of put a hold on that for the moment because I'm also curious. So the the decade or so leading up to that meeting and ninety nine was profoundly different experiences of life for each of you. and. I want to talk about that a little bit and then what kind of work away back to that meeting and then fell from there. Why don't we actually start with? Agree with you. I know originally born in Haiti raised in Bushwick in Brooklyn, at a time where for those who know Bushwick these days a lot of times people associated with gentrification a Lotta hipsters amazing street art, and are quote RT's no food eighties and nineties very different place right i. Immigrated to the United States from Haiti in Nineteen eighty-one I was four years old and the neighborhood that my mother could afford and was just me and my mother was Bushwick So bushwick at the time was very broken and dilapidated, very much like the Bronx and Harlem. So these neighborhood attack rundown buildings burnt out buildings because of the economic strife. That was in new. York City in the Seventies. So she rented a top floor apartment in a Brownstone by a friend a friend of a friend another Haitian immigrant who had his own business in the basement floor and he was a tailor and Bush get the time was affordable for a lot of immigrants because it was sort of no man's land. And for a long time. It was just me and her I left Bushwick in nineteen, eighty seven and a we moved to East, New, York Brooklyn, another broken and dilapidated neighborhood. That's another place that she could afford. So as an immigrant, I was aware of New York culture but was not part of it. I. Was a child, of course. So as a single mother. She was very overprotective and I watched New York City through the top floor window of a building or a brownstone apartment, and when I was allowed to play with the neighborhood kids outside I got made fun of in teased. But one important aspect about my growing up in New York City is a level of fear that my mother had. around the neighborhood kids. So I, now I know that kids just being kids they are a product of their environment but as immigrant as a single mother, my mother was a single mother as only her only daughter for a time. Neighborhood Kids were sort of a threat she was mugged in Bushwick Park and she was mugged a few times in fact, and that sort of fear she instilled in me for a very long time up until high school. When I started, you know having boyfriends she still remembered the neighborhood kids being sort of a threat and I was actually in sixth grade in east. New. York. Brooklyn when the Central Park five case had happened but before that I remember on gets in the subway vigilante trial I remember all those other racial violence incidents in New York City I watched it in a news I was a latchkey kid. And this all filtered into just my whole view and perspective of New York City as a child as an immigrant child and as a girl quite frankly. So I mean there there's a sense of danger that that is built into I and I mean if my understanding is also I mean. Part of I know your mom sounded incredibly protective I'm curious also whether that was entirely response just what she was experiencing in and around New York in the eighties where there's some of that also was drawn from the circumstances that led her and you to originally leave Haiti in the first place where she was essentially fleeing a relationship for safety purposes for both of you. A exactly, my mother was broadcast journalist in Haiti and my father was the owner of the radio station and he was thirty years older than her. So. What she was fleeing a sense with another form of Patriarchy that looks somewhat different than it does here in his country in that women go into relationships for financial support in a in a different way or fear there is no choice as I tell young people when I talk about my immigrant story is that there is no sexual harassment in a third world or developing country there is sexual harassment, but there's no calling out. metoo movements look very different in the developing world.

New York City Bushwick Haiti Brooklyn Bushwick Park Harlem Bush York Hunter College Harassment Central Park United States Bronx
Why Gianna Nino-Tapias Embodies Labor Rights

Latina to Latina

04:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Why Gianna Nino-Tapias Embodies Labor Rights

"Yana. Nino thought BS planned to spend the summer before her first year at Stanford Medical School doing contact tracing working retail. But when her job search a dead end, she went back to seasonal fruit picking work. She's been doing since she was fourteen. At the end of one long day she tweeted about farm workers like her being paid seven dollars for two gallons of blueberries. She then asked how much do you pay for your blue various? I had talked to her I did and learn so much about her path to medicine as a first gen college student indigenous rights farm worker's Rights on. We'll consumers need to know about the people who make their food possible. Jeddah. Where are you right now? I'm Linden from California Palo Alto our new you're back at school ivax going out here. I always remember those summers during college going home in it's. It's so strange because you have all this independence when you're at school and then you come home and your parents. Treat, you like you're still in high school, right? Right and every time I go home. It's just there's just a large expectation fairly for my mom is my own expectation that I should be like helping my mom in linked doing some chores and like lightening her load guy at school it's like you're right like complete freedom I do whatever I want whenever I want. Do you perceive your mom to have a heavy load Yeah absolutely. I think she's our only period and. I think that you know we go to work and she has to come home and make them some meals for everyone. There's five of us and she kind of like cleaned for Yooglie of she loves house being cleaned. So I help out with all those things whenever I can. To Lot Yeah You're born you're born in Eastern, Oregon, you grew up in eastern Washington state. Told me about where you grew up. So Eastern. Washington is very different from Seattle. I think that's why. Like columnists conception that I. Get is that the thing it's just like satellite super rainy it's actually not. So eastern Washington Eastern Oregon both desert in the rain shadow of. E mountain range. So we get like very little rain, it's very conservative. There's very little diversity out there I think the main communities of color that live out there my farmer communities in the needle in communities I think it was a great place ago by the you grow up because it is so rural. There's so much nature around there so much like the outdoor activities to do Saigo peron alarm really enjoyed around a lot of fields. So my working in the field I love Eastern Oregon eastern Washington I would love to go back someday is that the plan to go back? Yeah. Absolutely. How old were you when you started working in the fields? I was fourteen years old. What was your first day of work like? I. Think I was super excited for my first year. We're ten years ago. And they all super excited because I would get to contribute. Tie Household I, think the causes for me was like, okay I can use this money to go to my mom to make your life easier and then she would let me keep some of it so that I could spend it on what I wanted to nature's like take my siblings than I on a shopping spree for for school. So he went to buy school supplies in. We were very excited like Bonnie backpacks unlike brand name markers and stuff like that. I have three younger siblings. So they were all little and they were excited because we had never done that like I think I'll. Getting. The bare minimum that we need for school and now it's finally like being I was able to get them whatever they wanted. Is there a story from childhood that captures who you were as a kid. I think one story though remembering like me, my mom and my sister was. Going to do this activity called Battle of the books where there's a selection link. Eight books that read it's handling a quiz bowl style where you just like recall parts of the book and I've always loved reading and so we were remembering that I read all the books like my sister was on my team even though she was two years younger than me in the elementary school and she was like, yeah, you just carry the team and you like because remembered everything and I think that that was super emblematic of just who I was of like my love for reading my. Or. Competitive data. Just like a real enjoyment for school and like why The promise of my mom always wanted to go to school didn't get the chance to and so. She was always telling me and my siblings like, Oh, you go to school a you do all in school. It's GonNa take you to a Lotta places in. So I guess those just carry me through life

Stanford Medical School Washington Oregon Yana. Nino Yooglie Eastern Jeddah Saigo Peron California Palo Alto Seattle Bonnie
What John Thompson Meant To DC

The Lead

08:48 min | 2 weeks ago

What John Thompson Meant To DC

"What was it like for you to cover John Thompson and the Hoyas as a young reporter? What were your interactions with him like? It was. You know it was an education was twenty, three, twenty, four years old and that was my first beat but John was a handful. As you can imagine, and he controlled everything we control the player access you controlled access to himself and draw the program, and so John was someone that you You had to kind of meet on his terms. Can you describe he was six foot ten? He was just this literally and figuratively massive figure. Can you describe what it? was like to be in his presence well, I mean look any six, ten, three, hundred, pound guy is going to have a certain amount of power to him. You know he wasn't nimble I won't say he was Nimble but he certainly had the meeting of former athlete and you know he had a big loud booming voice nothing had happened by accident I had no intentions of being a basketball court. I. Wanted To be a teacher basically social worker kind of person freelance. Knew. How to use his size and his voice to great effect and I, was not the recipient of John's paint peeling yelling as as the players often were but they will tell you that there was just there was just nothing like it when he really was angry and was coming after you about a mistake, you made a decision you made. He certainly tilted the room when he came in when their buzzer went off and they said it's over. We didn't stay up and down the hallway and talk with people kissing is just so we can get a good article written about us he coach during the glory days of the Big East what do you remember most about his team's and just the style and the way that they played? Well, the frenetic full court pressure was their thing. To set up an impressed. Retract. Very physical teams anybody that came into the pink dot hit, and that's just the way that they had always played. Here. And that leads to a lot of confrontations. A couple of pretty bad fights. But a lot of grabbing and holding things like that. And that's just the way that they had always played in obviously worked for them. David you're born and raised DC. Can you talk about what John? Thomson and the Georgetown Program? Men's to people in DC and in particular to black basketball fans in the city DC was like a lot of cities in the eighties dealing with a lot of different stuff that was that was very difficult. The year is only sixty days old during that time. There have now been ninety-two homicides here in the District of Columbia last year sixty to eighty percent of the murders in the nation's capital, we're listed as drug related. You had the explosion of crack cocaine in DC in in the mid eighties just devastated whole swath of the community and you had Marion Berry who was this incredibly polarizing figure, and this is before his drug problems came to bear. He was polarizing well before then because he insisted that these rich white guys that tended to run the city hire black people all the people who only know Marion Barry through the nasty headlines in the videotape of crack cocaine. Don't know extraordinary work. He did in this in Washington to open up the doors of government to the black people of Washington you're shutout for years decades, and then you have this presidential era of Reagan, where there was a lot of hostility towards cities, there was a lot of cutting a city services. There was a lot of emnity towards people that were on welfare and they've perception that raking perpetuated was that all these people are welfare cheats and they're not in their bums and you're not working for a living perhaps the most insidious effect of welfare is it's usurpation of the role of provider. Public assistance for a single mother can amount to much more than the usual income of a minimum wage job. In other words, it can pay for her to quit work. These competing forces, all kind of colliding with one another in the city in the early eighties in the mid eighties and into that Maelstrom, you have this basketball team. That is good enough to win a national championship in one, thousand, nine, hundred, four. Jobs. The I ask championship. And then notice that the team is mostly black eleven of the twelve guys or thirteen or fourteen guys that get your attention in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, three, or eighty four you know rap videos late eighties is a Lotta Georgetown starter jackets in those videos. was torn concept had long hair and short baby came in national programs to the point where a lot of black people thought. Georgetown was an HP. Come to the. Question to see hundred. So there was this kind of interesting blend. Wall Street types and judges, and fortune five hundred CEO's with the people that cleaned the offices and drove the buses rooting for the same team and it was gonNA. Kinda, cold because it kind of it helped bring the city together in ways that really only the football team had done previously and it brought a lot of pride to the city as as a six. They were proving that black kids from inner city high schools could go to Georgetown and do work. They could do the work and that was a source of immense pride to people in DC Thomson was, of course, the first black basketball coach to win a national championship. But David you've written about how Thompson would bristle when asked about that accomplishment. Why did he? Take exception to that question will John would always say is that the question implied that he was the first black coach who who had the qualifications to win a national championship I'm not interested in being the first and only black do anything because it implies that in Nineteen eighty-four, a black man finally became intelligent enough to win NCAA, title and that's very misleading. And that was John's way of saying you know you need to understand the history of coaching. There was a lot more deferential treatment provided to white coaches for for decades and coaches like Adolph rupp that didn't recruit black players. was hostile toward black players. So that was John's way of saying you know do your homework. In nineteen, eighty nine. He famously walked off the court before a game to protest an NCWA rules that he felt disproportionately affected black students. undercurrent NCWA rules students can qualify for athletic scholarships by scoring seven hundred out of a possible sixteen hundred on the College Board Sat test fifteen out of thirty six on the act or with a two point average and certain. Subjects proposition forty two would require athletes to have both. What did he? What did he say about that? John's position was that both the sat scores and your grade point average could be impacted adversely due to the educational disparities present throughout public schools at the time black has weren't being taught the things that were on the sat. He made his point that you know these tests should not be the end all and be all in terms of determining whether or not a kid was smart enough to go into college. Moment existence and I. started into school that I would not been dotted with an opportunity to get a college education myself. He was recruiting kids that play but also kids that can do the work. So it was not as much an issue for him in terms of recruiting it was more the bigger picture of. Are we going to allow these tests to determine whether black kids can get into colleges and then they finally wound up modifying prop forty two as a result of it.

John Thompson Basketball DC Crack Cocaine Georgetown David Hoyas Dc Thomson Marion Barry Washington Reporter Adolph Rupp District Of Columbia Georgetown Program Thomson College Board HP Marion Berry Ncaa
Brooklyn Nets Hire Steve Nash As Head Coach

The NBA Show

00:51 sec | 2 weeks ago

Brooklyn Nets Hire Steve Nash As Head Coach

"We are here. On the heels of a big announcement. Yeah. Steve Nash Future Hall of Famer. Future Hall. Of famer is the coach new coach of the Brooklyn Nets. What's going on listen I? Think it's it's it's a good. It's a good pairing with him and Katie. You know as well as anybody that there was a pre existing relationship Steve was a player development consultant for Golden State. He spent a Lotta time with Kevin Durant is I would talk to him over the years about his experiences. In golden state like not just learning from Steve Kerr and those guys who specifically he was working within. Golden State and it always Katie was always you know like one of the names that he said a lot what I thought he'd be working with the guard so that relationship and then you sean marks played with him in Phoenix. So there's a real. There's a real respect there as well. So I think it made a lot of sense.

Steve Kerr Golden State Future Hall Katie Kevin Durant Brooklyn Nets Sean Marks Development Consultant Phoenix
Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

The Vergecast

31:46 min | 3 weeks ago

Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

"Hey everybody seemingly from the verge cast really special interview episode this week yesterday the verge published feature package where calling capturing the police which was a months-long effort for almost everybody at the site to really interrogate the role of technology in the movement against police violence. The heart of the package is a feature where we talk to. People who had filmed the somewhat viral videos of police violence asking him why they did it. What happened next how they felt in the moment whether they would do it again, really contextualising these that we've seen over and over and over again we estimate videos. One is about a specific incidents with a specific set of men in Baytown Texas who filmed police violence and what happened next another one from the science team is about body cameras and police body cameras, and how they affect your perception. What's going on in some academic research that's come out about that. So I asked verge reporter, Steven and verge video producer, my calf, the two leaders of the site wide project To come on, say talk to me about the project what they learned in. Really I, keep thinking about this, the role that our phones are playing in changing our relationship to the and the government. I don't think any product manager or designer at a smartphone company ever thought that their products will be used in this way or create this moment. This is the direct intersection of technology and culture, which is something the virtuous. Investigate. So this is a really great conversation with John and Maria and a really big project. We're very proud of it that'd be read. Watch it here are John and Maria. Maria Abdul. John Steven Welcome to the virtuous easy doing well I. I'm doing great another beautiful day in. Quarantine Mario. How are you? I'm good. I'm very relieved that this really big thing that we have produced is out there. So now I get to. Take back and reflect de. So Youtube or the editorial leaders have big projects that four I would say two months we just called the police project I. Hope Everybody can see it on site. We're very proud of it in scope it looks at how people have been using technology to record the police record police behavior protests use technology and the tools to organizers protests to organize. The movement around police brutality, and then a lot of how those cameras in particular affect our relationship with the police. So it was a huge project and it looks like one big feature, a bunch of. Additional reports around that feature in two videos that my help produce. Let's start with where it came from. How did this project begin in? How did it take the shape that it ended up being on the site? That is very, very good question because. It was sort of such a big undertaking. We it started in a very different direction than it ended as I think a lot of large projects generally tend to. So it started with an idea, a sort of idea in the staff, one of our executive editor was like we should do something to capture the moment then it sort of fell on me to shape that idea. Which is, which is interesting sort of problem because I was very interested in. Working with the initial iteration of the of the project, but getting a chance to shape it meant that I had to think critically about sort of what what would fit the moment and what would capture the moment. Well, I would say so that's how we came came up with the idea of focusing on the people filming videos of police brutality because it felt like there was a section missing to the narrative that was Benjamin. Circulating around social media, which is to say, we don't really hear from those people like we hear a lot from from victims we hear from police officers, but we don't really hear from people who like the everyday people who are sort of in the line of fire and decide to make the very brave decision to pick up their phones and record and sh like shine light like shed light. On on this type of violence that really sort of goes undocumented because one of the things we police finances, it never really shows up police reports. Yeah. One thing that caught me is I say this a lot but this is a new way of using phones that fundamentally what's happening with with all of these if you look at our feature, we started at very intentionally with Rodney King. George holiday that the person who shot the Rodney King beating in the nineties using gigantic Sony eight millimeter cassette handicap which basically no one had those like some families WanNa had those. But the the that camera was present at that moment in time at one am on that corner to witness that thing was astoundingly improbable and as we've come to now, the presence of cameras is actually more likely than not in just the way people live their lives and so the decision to record seems at once. Easy simple. Everyone has a camera. It seems likely that everything will be recorded, but it also turns out to have dramatic consequences. Yeah. Yeah. I think one of the main threads which will I'm sure get into later is a lot of these people felt afraid of retaliation from the police because they posted on social media they sort of were indentifying themselves as targets, Samara and you pretty. Videos here how how did you pick the two together the verge video team did want in the verge science team did one how do we land in those two? So. At the first video and Ben Evita's. I initially saw the video on this very large like database of other videos, police brutality that had been collected, and that was being shared on twitter that we were using that we were looking through for this project, and when I first saw the video I serve noted it as something worthy. But because it had, it didn't happen at a protest. It wasn't the the video that I thought I was going to focus on but after just Justin Callum did the interview with Isaiah for the peace reporters feature in. Told me after he published the video, there had been an increased police surveillance in his life and that he was feeling a lot of anxiety and a Lotta paranoia since he published video. It just really struck me that he still even with all of the sphere and all this anxiety and what was happening he still wanted to talk to us because he had told Justin that he was interested in being part of the video project and so as soon as she told me that I spoke to him and as we sort of spoke, it was just. So clear that he understood the magnitude of recording and he understood the consequences that comes with it and yet still wanted to bring awareness to not only this moment but also what happens when you record the police? So that's how we landed on that video. So our second video on the role of body cams and capturing police brutality fell imperative that we would cover. It in that way given that it's not only bystander footage that is coming out of these recent protests. It's also a lot of body CAM footage in. So we thought it was important and imperative, and that verge science team thought it was imperative to also cover the role of camps and capturing police brutality, but also how they might actually influence how we perceive police. Violence. So it just added a different layer and a different impact to this larger piece. One thing that caught me about that and Addie has report that just is really stuck with me as we went through the project about how all these videos of protests and police violence are becoming a genre film, and as I read that and I watched the body cam video. It just occurred to me that we actually have to use of the formal language of film to describe what's happening here that the body cam is telling the story because it's one kind of camera it shows you one kind of it has a gaze and all these other cameras have another kind of perspective in it. I. Don't think we ever think about that as these videos is having maybe like that formal connection between what the cameras are doing and what you is the viewer perceived and that to me has been a very powerful through line of this whole project. Actually cameras are active participants in these stories and they shape the narrative. The same way that we we know this in every other situation where there's cameras camera shape the narrative, and they leave things out in a enhance other things and that to me I think there's going to be a big long cultural reckoning over the role of cameras in these moments because we don't really understand how that affects our blazing to the culture to the police to the state, and it's changing because the. Cameras Right now I mean it is ironic a little bit that this genre films started in Los Angeles. Well, that's the most cameras right and it's I mean like you know if you think about it that way it's like it makes sense that like Rodney, King beating was filmed by a person in Los Angeles and maybe not elsewhere but also I, think I think it's interesting that you bring up peace because i. I do think filmmakers understand this. And it is also I mean to to get not conspiratorial but to go a little bit off the rails which I still think it's in line but. The US government spends a not insignificant amount of money advising film makers were making films about the police and the military, and they do get some of these editorial. Editorial. Control some of the stuff. and. I think that perspective does shape the way that we see some of these institutions. Which is why I think it's very powerful that. People on the ground filming and they're making their own narratives about these institutions in real time. So let's start there. That's the that's the big feature. That's the piece reporters. It's eleven interviews with people who film police violence. I want to just immediately atop credit or creative director William troll and the engineer from the box media team Adler who built this thing it is beautiful is quite an experience to go through it. But the stories are actually of course, the most powerful thing. John, tell me about one thing you said to me at the very beginning of this project was this is the same story over and over again? Yes. And there's something about the volume of it that I think really brings it home feature came together and tell me hey, came to that realization and tell us what that story actually is. Yeah. So we interviewed a lot of people that was that was the hard part. One of the hardest parts of the projects was finding people who actually wanted to talk to us but I think we were using Greg sets list on twitter to find some of these people Shasta Greg I did actually interview him for. The you know that's a separate thing but yeah, I think I mean I. Think it's very it's interesting right because through these videos like they all have the same, the same beginning middle and end and. It's once you've see enough of them. It's very it's becomes predictable where the rising action in the falling action isn't purely film criticism terms I. Think the reason that we decided to go this route was because it adds context experience police violence like it's one of the things that like it really gives depth to what's going on and it's stuff that you don't normally see and the idea was to bring that sort of reality. Home to people reading, which is why the reason it's the same story every time and the reason that it's sort of like it was distracting actually at the beginning because I was like, okay, this is a different place. This is a different time. These are different people, but like chronicling the experience effective people in the same way, and that's why it was the same story every time because it's not every day that you see. Somebody who is like an officer? Who's who has sworn an oath to protect the public, just beating the shit out of. A peaceful protester and I think it's one of those things it sort of jars you out of complacency and I think for a lot of the people that we spoke to the interviews it seemed like these people were very sort of Shell. Shocked. They sort of knew the extent of the problem but a lot of them were just normal people who happen to be a protest and happened to be filming when stuff went down and so it was very strange reading these these. Reports from the ground like these eleven fourteen over and over again because. One of the reasons I think that it's important that we have the dateline like when it happened where it happened and like you know how many shares or whatever it, the the videos got was because it, it gave back some necessary context because again, if you're if you're reading this stuff in a vacuum if you're just reading reports. From. People who filmed the stuff it really does get eerily similar in for whatever it's worth videos are almost all at night. If they're usually chaotic and they all feel like are happening same place. Yeah. It's really strange and maybe they are I mean at least psychically speaking right like it's it is the same sort of mental place I think yeah and that was one of the notes as we were putting the thing together that we got from our editors was this we have to return some sense of place to it. So we we added that back in as you were kind of editing each of these individual vignettes. was there a theme that that really came out from each of the people? Was it? What what strikes me as as I watch all these videos there's just everyone has a phone out. Right like all the time it just seems like this instinct to have your phone out that to me is new. That's yeah. That's not how people thought ten years ago or twenty years ago I really do think that's in large part because of the power of social media because again, like the thing about social media, people dismiss it out of hand as like a bad and toxic place which a lot of the time it is like don't get me wrong. However, it is one of the only avenues for social change for people who are marginalized like it's a place where you can go to be heard. By by the institutions who would normally just have the power to ignore you and I think like police violence is one of those things where it is like it is sort of an abuse of power, right? It's one of these. It's like something that it won't show up on an incident report somebody like a cop like using their baton on a protester but if somebody films that and films like the circumstances where it where it happened how it happened like you you you you get a sense of whether or not this was justified and I think. A lot of the Times it's not and a lot of the Times that goes on reported and I think. People have seen that you can actually like get some measure of justice from these otherwise unaccountable institutions by sharing the stuff on social media because public pressure is still a thing and it's interesting that to go back to Isaiah Ben Evita's. He has video that officer fired like his him posting the video actually made a change at the very local level. In his town and I think I think that's a really important thing and I, that's that's sort of what's driving this stuff because again, institutions like the police were previously entirely unaccountable to the public. Mario I mean you, you are yourself filmmaker you talked to Isaiah how do you? How do you take that? That everyone is just instinctively pulling out their phone because they think it will lead to some some change down the road. I think what's interesting about Isiah specifically is that this video doesn't take place at a protest it. He was filming outside of a convenience store they were coming from a barbecue. They hadn't gone to protests recently, they were the at that moment they weren't planning necessarily planning on going to protest later that week however. In as the video begins, you hear him say I've got to get out and record this. You also hear his friends in the car say we've got a record this and yet when we interviewed them, it was the first time any of them had ever recorded police had ever been with other people who recording the police and I think that is largely part to seeing these videos. On twitter and on facebook of police violence being captured by by citizens being captured by civilians, and so they wanted to hold this police officer accountable and they also started recording him preemptively. They didn't start recording him the moment he started you know approaching them they started recording the minute they were pulling over in. So I think that really signifies to us at least to me that. Even. If you've never participated in a protest or never participated in filming the police, you now know that's an option for you. That's an option for you and that's an option for your community. It is I do think the third part that is going on said here. Is that like it is a protective thing too. You have evidence that maybe you weren't doing anything wrong even like, okay like you get pulled over by the cops and they sight probable cause like you're sitting there peacefully. You get to tell your story, view the camera to I think. These videos, I. Am sure are showing up in courts of law across the country. One thing that's really interesting about this. Again, I come back to that the piece from addy come back to the the body cam video from the science team. I was filming someone else he was at a remove right? It was his friend who is in in the encounter at the police. Most of the powerful videos we see the lead to change our are removed. They're not from the participants. How do you? How do you think that plays out in this larger? There's a lot of change in this country. Now, there's a lot of conflict actually WANNA talk we we published the piece yesterday there's been some criticism I wanNA talk about that. But right now we're we're seeing one sort of very clear perspective from a remove. How do you think that's that's playing I. think a big part of when you hear Isaiah speak about filming he talks about the fact that he constantly to remind himself to take a step back because he knew the moment that he engaged directly with these officer, the officer could come out for could come for him. You know he had he very much understood the power dynamics at play. Even, as him as the filmer, so he kept as the officer kept getting closer he kept moving back and he would ask you can hear in the learned the full twelve minute video this incident you continuously hear him ask the other officer in the video hayes it. Okay. If I'm standing here, is it okay if I'm standing here, he's very conscientious of his body and his proximity to the violence to the violence has been that's being enacted against his friends and when we interviewed him the reason that he did take a step back was because he knew that if they took him if he got arrested along with his friends that that video. Might, not like not not got published right? Like he might not get his phone back. These things might happen and he knew the power of that video and the power of what he was holding his hands and he wanted to share it with the world so that meant taking a step back so he do that and it doesn't mean that it didn't traumatize him every time he sees the video he gets. Traumatized by seeing his friends violated in this way however, he understood that the consequences would not have been possible. Had he not taken a step back and capture according? I also think. Just. Generally speaking like we tend to trust videos that come from outside sources or people who are around but not exactly involved. It adds another like an extra veneer of credibility. I think which is. Another reason that like some of the biggest videos that we see are not like it's not the body cam it's not the person on the ground being choked to death. At, somebody else. Who has has has had the same realization as as but. I think you know just subjectively with trust trust those perspectives more because they feel more objective. CVT camera just happened to capture the incident on on film. I would say with this specific incident like the group that was arrested. In Zambia. The was interested but his friends, Skyler Gilmore Phillips were they were all taking part in questioning this officer across the parking lot. So I don't think they were necessarily objective I. Don't I. Don't think they were I think they saw there being pulled over, they recognize the police officer there friend had just been with them at this barbecue and I think the fact that he was able to get the video out there in the fact that you can see the whole incident play out right? Like in our video we don't show the whole twelve minute video, but it's like five minutes. Of Not, much going on until the officer sort of approaches them. So I think the added quote unquote like credibility is that you see the beginning middle and end of that incident Isaiah did not stop recording until the police left Isaiah began filming before the police had even had even gotten out of their cars. So I think with this specific video, it's less about the eject objectively and more about the fact that he was able to capture all. How do you think that ties into one thing that we write about a lot surveillance where all being surveilled all the time you mentioned TV cameras. A on a different day in a different moment. The way our talks about like extremely prevalent C. T. V. Cameras is crap ring put a camera everywhere. Now we're being surveilled in the cops have access to this footage, right? At the same time what we've been talking about a lot is the presence of this camera at a remove actually serves a purpose is Asia. Taking that video from that remove sort of purpose. How should we think about this balance because I I personally right? Like you catch me in a different minute. I'm over here. I'm over there. Actually surveillance is good. No, I think the difference is it really depends on like the the institution that has the footage and what they want to do it. Right like the cops when they get ring footage and what I mean like it's not it's like the cops are using footage to incriminate and I think generally this is very generally speaking in very, very general terms like it's evidence, right? And you know when it's coming from people on the ground protests were filming. It's documentation it's like the same footage, but it can be used in very different ways depending on who's doing the asking. For, the footage like and where it's going I think I think that context is actually super important right? Because like in England, for example, there are cameras everywhere. There's just like municipal cameras run by the fucking. Like in London, for example, there's there's cameras run by the Metropolitan Police Department, and that's just that's just a fact of life. And I think it's interesting because like they I think they have like controls on how you can use that stuff whereas with ring networks here it's like sort of ad hoc private companies turning it over to the police whenever they feel like it. I don't know I guess I'm going on a little tangent here. I really do think that like it depends on who's asking for the footage and what they intend to do with it. I think you know people taking footage is as it's intended to sort of exonerate his friends and that they weren't doing anything wrong and this sort of an unjustified thing. And I think the intent really matters. So I think that it's not just about the presence of cameras and footage, but it's also about who has those cameras and this of act of pulling out your phone to question authority to question police officers is actually referred to as surveillance by scholars. It is the opposite of surveillance. Right surveillance is often reserved for those in power. It doesn't necessarily mean it's always the state surveilled someone but the moment that you begin to surveilled them, you were taking a bit away a bit of their agency away from them. You're taking a bit of their privacy away from them but soon, valence is this idea of challenging. Authority by trying to sort of disrupt this power dynamic by filming your oppressor by filming specifically in marginalized communities, the police, and so with surveillance, it is the idea of this is what we're talking about right like it's not mentioned one time in the videos nor is it mentioned in any of these pieces but all of this is what scholars refer to sue balance, which was coined by Steve Man, and it's all about looking from below. So you're not looking from below you're not the person who is above and the position of power. You are the person who's often surveilled right like with Isaiah and friends like they were they knew this officer they. They had never recorded this officer, but they not only knew of him. They had previously had seen incidences of him, and so I think by pulling out their phone, what they're doing is trying to challenge this authority figure to them that had represented sort of. Head oppressed in had sort of harassed or had allegedly harassed and targeted African Americans in their community. So they see this officer, they see their black friend being pulled over they understand this officer had allegedly been targeting and harassing African Americans they pull out their phone to begin to try to create a counter narrative, and before any of these things I think Bijon spoke about this earlier like when you start recording early on, you can sort of see the maybe there wasn't any probable cause and what you hear them saying the first few minutes of the video is, what's the probable cause? What's probable cause like why did you over in the officer officers aren't engaging right? and. So I think the role of that video in that moment is about who has it right? Like you can hear them. Surveillance video from above that's muted that can be distorted. It's about the person who got out of the car who started filming. Once they start one saw him started getting attacked the person who filmed at the very beginning and surveillance often doesn't involve you filming. Once you see the police officers sort of attacking someone but you film when you see a police officer because you want to challenge there are over you. Yeah. The when I say we're GONNA face a long period of cultural reckoning over this I don't think that we the surveillance scholarship is that it's very early stages right and it's not builds out. It's not complete. We're learning how it works and that to me is one of. You know when when the smartphone cameras invented I don't think people thought the people who invented the ship in the back of every smartphone thought we're going to have to have a conversation about surveillance when this is all said and done and that to me is. Right and that I think about that, all of the time like there are engineers and product managers and designers who make these products. and. Sometimes they have a guest of how they'll be used but this to me is one of the most surprising revolutionary uses of the technology right just fundamentally and I think this conversation about what does it mean for everyone to record the state? What does it mean for the state? Maybe record your back with a body camera or something else it's going to change the nature of our relationship with the people in power. It is interesting like one of the things that fascinates me about taking video protest specifically is like I think, a lot of police officers on the ground seat is violence when somebody holds a camera to them because it like it does challenger Authority, but it also like like it is a a thing creating a record in real time that they cannot control in a situation and I think it's just very strange because. Yeah I mean, the perspective really matters who's who's taking the video really really really matters. Let's talk about that for a minute in this conversation. In the feature, we have very intentionally chosen to highlight one perspective people filming the videos. We have almost no perspective from the police in return know perspective from the state in return as we are making this project I, you know the editor in chief ultimately I'm for everything I knew we were making that decision I felt comfortable with it. We do hear a lot from the police, but that notion that the camera is impeding the the police officers job that the police are themselves scared of violence they need to be protected that there are people with guns in the street Often fear for their lives how do you think that I mean the piece is almost yesterday right for many people liked it. Some people were critical of it. We appreciate the criticism and makes us better. But how do you how were you prepared for that criticism that there was no perspective from the police as after pieces published how did he react and where are you at now? That's a really I mean that's a really really good question I haven't seen much of that criticism. Charts to my filters I. Guess My. But it's I mean I think the larger question of like what police think is really interesting to me new I. Don't know if you know there's been a few years ago. I actually spent a year in Ohio reporting a story on cops there and like. Like this, this very, it was Liverpool East Liverpool Ohio, which is a very small town between it's like West Virginia Pennsylvania and Ohio. It's right on the border of those places and it was the site at one point of the like it had the worst heroin. Like heroin outbreak people were dying of overdoses every single day like the average was like one a day and the police department was like it largely fell on them to take care of the people and it was really interesting because I what I did was like I just spent like my time going on right alongside like. Suit up get my notebook get in the car and we drive around like I would smoke black and milds with this cop, and we would like He. He would pick people up and so I went to the county jail and like I saw the mechanisms of the state like from the passenger seat, which was very interesting because like the more time you spend with police officers, the more you understand that like. Seeing people seeing people's worst every day does something very bad to your brain. It puts you on extremely high alert. And it makes ordinary situation seem incredibly terrifying and I think. One of the things that goes unexplored is the trauma police officers sort of feel, and they just don't talk about it like all of these. There were seven people department all of them were very, very, very clearly traumatized. In a way that was not obvious to them, but very obvious to me is like an outside observer. And it was interesting because like the other thing that they did most of the time, it was just like social work they were just they knew all the people that were talking to they were involved in the community. Everybody knew them like I remember. The COP I was with like picked up this woman because she like had drugs on her. And he was like, why? Why? Like what happened like we talked about this I let you go last time because like you said, you were working on your raptor what happened to that and it was like one of these things where I was like Oh this guy actually really doesn't understand like where these people are coming from we ended up having to take her to the county. Jail because she didn't have money for bail is like one hundred bucks and he was like on the on the hour long ride back. He was fuming that she would have to spend this long in jail just because she didn't have hundred dollars and so it's one of these things I think like you know there are good cops. The police is fundamentally like disordered. I will say it's like. And I think both of those things are in conversation with each other because like again, there are days that are incredibly bad like this cop was telling me like the worst day of his life I ask offhandedly by the way never ask cop with the worst day of their life is. He Was Not prepared for the answer which was like he was like Oh. Yes. So I had to respond to a call this. This guy had kids who you know his his kids were friends with he locked them in the House and burn the house down because his wife was cheating on him and so this cop had to respond to the call and then go tell kids afterward what happened and it was I was just like that is just like outside. So outside of the scope of a normal person's life. That it's like did it requires examination right and I think that's the kind of trauma that these people are like seeing like one of those one of those events can scarred for life I don't necessarily think being police officer is as dangerous to save a firefighter like statistically speaking. But again, like these horrific incidents of violence really do change your perspective and I think a lot of this kind of trauma is invisible and goes unexamined and it's difficult because a protests which is a very ordinary event. There is A. There is some potential for stuff to go wrong and I think if you're on the lookout for that, like it makes it skews your perspective and you can't see what is happening objectively, which is I think why it's very important that people also film the police at these events because there is another record that is being created in real time.

Officer Isaiah Ben Evita Twitter John Steven Rodney King Texas Metropolitan Police Department Youtube Product Manager Maria Abdul Reporter United States Los Angeles Engineer Heroin Isiah Justin Callum Producer
The Latest Projects with Adam Justice

Home: On

05:57 min | 3 weeks ago

The Latest Projects with Adam Justice

"Welcome to episode one, hundred, Thirty, eight of home on a show about the I y home control and automation brought to you by the digital. Media Zone. Richard Guenther and I am so happy to be joined again by Adam justice my friend, the CEO of connects sense Adam. How are you? Good it's been a minute since I've been on your show. Yeah it has. been a while and it's really funny because as I was thinking about that as a window last time we've talked together on home on. Of course, we co host the smart home show together. So we get a chance to talk all the time. It just hasn't been necessarily with this audience, but I'm glad you could join me. We're just going to run through the. Normal News stuff you know we've been doing a bunch of topics, special episodes and I haven't been getting episodes out as quickly. So I just wanted to do some news focused discussion and maybe maybe a little bit of an update from the last time you and I spoke on our other show about the projects that we've been up to. Okay sounds great. We're going. To start with the long awaited news from smart things, we finally have a sunset date for the classic APP. So if you're still using smart things classic, it is going away on October fourteenth and by going away I mean it will no longer work period. If on the fourteenth you go into the classic APP, you'll be prompted to create your Samsung account you haven't. Done that and download and switch over to the standard smart things up. It seems silly to call that the new APP since it's been out for about two and a half years now but not everybody has switched over to it yet. Now, this is not the only thing changing. In fact, if you're still using the classic APP Today You may have noticed that your event history is no longer showing up there. It's over in the new APP. So that's an incentive to maybe switch a little bit early if you haven't already and similarly if you have Samsung products, their status is. No longer showing up in the classic APP, that is also only happening in the new smart things up. So they're really serious about this. They've given us lots of time plenty of notice that this was coming I'm just curious. Are those diehards going to end up sticking with it now or are they going to end up jumping and try and something else? Yeah. I mean these things always happen and it sounds like they've given everybody plenty of notice to make a move but there's always somebody that's not going to be happy and I think the real hardship is going to be for. Those heavy duty hobbyists who might have some smart apps still in use in the classic APP that as of yet haven't been rewritten for the new platform or just aren't going to be one example is and I'm really not quite sure why they called this out specifically. But Samsung smart things announced when they announced this sunset date that the echoes speaks smart APP, which is a third party. SMART APP by an independent developer is no longer going to be supported on the new platform. The crazy thing is that according to Jimmy Hawkins are smart things guy developer didn't even know that until. The announcement came out. Whoops whoops is right. This is a shame because this is a cool up but of course, this is doing stuff that you're not really supposed to do. This is sending audio statements to echo devices to say directly, and that's not really something that even Amazon wants developers doing right now my guess is it probably got called out because it has a huge install base and they new people were GONNA be upset about it, and so you know and I'm sure Amazon called him out at one point and they're like, okay well, it'll die when the old APD is. That is probably the most likely scenario right I could see that happening indeed the next piece of news here was that Google has made a huge investment in Adt. It was about four hundred, fifty, million dollars for a six point, six percent stake in the company which you noted as a seven billion dollar valuation. That is the thing that's astounding to me that at is considered a seven billion dollar business. Yeah I. had no idea they were that large company but good for them. With this investment, Google's going to integrate its nest smart home devices in with eighty t and their devices. Yeah and it seems like they're just trying to at least get the devices on the docket right now. But it's very likely that these frankly dated and less well-known devices like sensors and cameras, and so forth at Adt has been using some of them. I think are even white labeled and used with ADT branding they're going to go away. You're basically going to be buying nest systems through at to the extent that at customers are going. To get access to nest aware, which is nest subscription service. So sounds to me like eighty s pretty much handing over the reins to Google year. Yeah I think this marriage makes a Lotta sense. Obviously, nest wants to get more into security and you can either fight Adt in the battle against ring or you can join them and you know put your powers together. So I think ADT's branding is a lot stronger insecurity and obviously ness branding is a lot stronger and smart home so that it feels like a win win for both companies.

ADT Samsung Google Richard Guenther Adam Amazon Developer CEO Jimmy Hawkins
Episode 6: Tama Pili  Why I can practice homosexuality and still worship god

Think On Your Faith

08:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Episode 6: Tama Pili Why I can practice homosexuality and still worship god

"The fearless Thomas who's not afraid of WHO is. When I see prepared a Gopher Church on Sundays, I always think to myself. Does. He not know what the Scriptures say. Does he not know? or or so I guess I, want to ask you. You Are you aware? Are you aware of what the penalty he is out of that if you don't depend on mean in other words if you continue to live your lifestyle, not according to but according to the doctrine are Mormon doctrine and Christian doctrine. If you continue to live the lifestyle that you live and you don't apologize for it and you don't make you know you don't make the efforts to repent of it. Your resting. Place. Is the according to the Old Testament the vengeance of eternal fire. Yeah. I am well aware of that as sitting out so I know the consequences. And the senior is and the reason why I do what I do, and I did the way I live is as I That's in the future and I am not going to. Don't know what the future out I don't know. Maybe maybe one of these days I'll have a cheese of art. As. Is there part of you that hopes and believes at some point in the future? Maybe a future rebel revelation will change this in the church and that you'll be exonerated you'll be vindicated. To me, that's. An issue. To me if it happens, it happens. That's great if it doesn't, it doesn't. I like to focus on today an. and. And try to do things to make me happy. Do you go your testimony on? No? No the only thing I do is I be. The only thing you do is what? May tithing. Partake of the sacrament. No I. Don't I. I. I know what I can and can't do and I only do I know I I can do is it safe for me to assume that? What keeps you going on Sundays. Is the social aspect of religion. All Hell No. It's not I do not socialize with anybody church except for like if I see my family I, just go for a Sacramento and I I do not for us I just. My Tidy Heidi. There and then I. I I come home and So you don't attend any classes you don't take. Any callings in Youtube in the church. No I told him I. Yeah. I 'cause I know I can't and I'm not going to. Not going to go to the process of repentance because every smell feeling of remorse as ours making me feel bad. I WanNa, go through the motions just look. Good added just look like I'm worthy serve because that's not me I wanna live my true self. And you wanted to and part of that is the election church and do what I can do and I don't participate in things that I know I shouldn't be artistic eating to me. have. You ever considered the alternative that you can actually live exactly the life that you want right now outside of Church has ever entered. Go to church though still go to church every Sunday. Yeah I think there's a problem in going to church I. Think part of it is also because that's just the How was raised in mashes And I I still. I. I still believe in God and. I still like I said, I go back to my testimony and when I received my own personal witness. And I can't deny it. And so that's the narrative way however like religion. There's a Lotta. There's some issues that I. have about religion but I just talked ducks like, okay. I just don't understand the every now and I'm not GonNa try to get ashes spread like for instance. Like, okay. We're taught that God is unchanging and cannot look at in the least agree. Oh, that's right. Like if you go in the scriptures. Okay seems like he is changing because sometimes. Things are acceptable. Started Times into non-acceptable at a nurse I'm like for else correct. Like. For instance, if you if you prescribed to those rem creation and how how we came about. We started with two people here on earth. So obviously, it says blood was the. down. Bucky your mother or your. How about? Not only happen once. In. Of Atom and then it was it was it was legit or happy with no. Light. So. So And then. I said, okay, insisted okay and then all of us in the nursing living me. Obviously. It's like it was okay then and now it's Ok okay. So right there is that. Okay. So we're taught that God is changing and put on policy for me I'm not. opne down because then I go back to the basis the what I do. Try to understand, I will not fully comprehend. Is, principle that will never fully comprehend. Learn learn it earned are. Just go back to the simple things and I back my own personal witness. And And I I lean on that and that's not going and it's like he's Doing what I do and it sounds like it's almost like a comfort blanket to it's just something that you're used to. It was something that's causing. And in fact, I actually end the way I'm doing not right now 'cause Mike by by name film Records Church when I came to my molly. Sorry, you said Your name is what? My Name's Star on Breakfast with the church but wh- debut if you're still going to church. Well because of my lifestyle because what I have, you have you been excommunicated. No I had A. WHO's who? Were then there's no reason you name would be removed from the church. Wall because. With my lifestyle I mean, obviously they would I on the ground. So excommunication. But anyways but I wanted to when I came out when I first came out of the house. My Mom me while the second time a team. I told her. I can't do this anymore I'm going to do this. I told her know because I. I respect sacredness of the covenants I mean you know as a member of the church and I told her I said I. Take these. and. So I want to take my name off the record church and then my mom only please whatever you do not take your name. So I might okay. So out her wishes, I didn't take my name. So then I change. Of course I stop wearing. Of course couldn't go to the temple and and that's how I. In that, that's how I've been living for all these years and so I'm comfortable with. Numbers. How does your word members in your bishop? Feel about that. Well. Let me see I. Don't to call me tell me that they're going to hold court and stuff like that. But. There's some people in the word that they follow me on facebook at

Gopher Church Sacramento Thomas Youtube Facebook Heidi WH Bucky Mike
How To Tell Your Employees The Truth

Jocko Podcast

05:19 min | 3 weeks ago

How To Tell Your Employees The Truth

"So Dave here we are I want to talk a little bit about how we got here in why we decided to do this. What we do. Sean Front. Is Work with companies we talked to them about leadership we try and pass on the lessons that we learn about leadership. We try and help them along the pathway and help the organization align all of their leadership. We do the same thing with e Af online, which is our all my platform. And we spend. Basically, all day every day talking about leadership with. All these different individuals and all these different scenarios and we. When these things happen, you know there's issues that get resolved. There's issues that get. The don't get resolved and take another move in another step, and we spend a Lotta time debriefing these things and I. I was thinking and we were thinking that it would be. I've got done. One of these things and I said Nice if we had recorded that debrief and let everybody know that. There's solution to that particular problem. A lot of good topics, lot of universal lessons and we thought it might be cool to put together a podcast about that. So here we go. We try and keep it a little bit shorter than the normal Jaakko podcast not talk for hours. So we people can digest them get the lessons in move on try and keep up maybe like a half an hour something like that. Cover a couple of topics. So with that. Dave let's debrief we got. The cool part about talking about leadership. All Day, every day. I can't think of anything else. I'd rather be doing. And the conversations were having are these real time problems at these companies are struggling with and when we come up with a solution and makes a huge impact and I think the connection I was making when we're talking to it is how useful back can you don't have to be at this company for the lesson and the takeaway to be useful for you? So. This is pretty universal. The first company. This first conversation we're having it came up recently and the thing is crazy about it I probably had four different companies that I've been working with just in the last couple of weeks all dealing with the exact same thing. Gobert hits. Early March. The whole thing everything kinda shuts down. And, one of the first things we were talking about you talked about this on one of our very first eve online sessions you gotTa. Tell your people the truth. and. This is an emotional time you gotta say detached from the emotion, but you have to tell people the truth. And one of the things I think a few. People did was in their. Fifth Concerned about making their people worried. They said, hey, there's nothing to worry about. Everything's going to be fine. We're not letting anybody off we're not gonNA, make any big movements and so in the interest of keeping people come, they said something that in in in the short term actually kept them pretty calm. Hey. Yeah. Nothing to worry about. Let me ask you this. What was what they were saying the truth. So No. It wasn't the you say. That you can. You can pre identify the issue that you're going to have when the out of the gate, what you're saying is not the truth. Yeah, and here's what you gotTA. Watch out for his. I think. that you understand you might think you understand and you kind of bolster your opinion because you know it's the easy way. It's the easy way to roll. So I look and go hey, what this viruses hitting it's going to last a month. You know what we can we got enough funds will be fine. We're not laying anyone off. That's the truth as you see. The part that you're missing is you don't know. That's the part that you're missing, and if you remember early on when we were talking you national on front I said. Hey, this is a virus. It's going to run its course it just like when you get sick as a human being with virus look when you get a bacterial infection guess what you go and you take antibiotics clean you up that's just what you do. With a virus there's no, there's no antibiotics. It runs its course, and then it's you spend three days in bed. And then when it's over, it's over you lose. Five, eight pounds of whatever. Because you can't eat or you're sick or you're throwing up and then you get down is over and then you go back to normal life and I just thought to myself. Okay. This is a virus is going to run its course. In you just extrapolate that out to the nation and you say, okay, well, the virus that's what I did. Okay. The virus going to run its. And actually when you look. When you look at the world. Many places. That's exactly what it looks like. There's a massive spike, the virus runs its course, and then it's kind of gone. The. If you look at easily right now massive spike people dying it's awful and then it's over, it's run its course. So that was that was my opinion of what was gonNA happen but if you remember. When we talked about what we were going to do it s front. I said we could breath hold through this thing meaning, Hey, we could just be like, okay. Batten down the hatches. Let this thing get go through and we'll be back on the road. Two months and we'll be back to normal business.

TA Dave Sean Front Batten
Minnesota's boreal forest is a climate change hot spot

Climate Cast

03:49 min | 3 weeks ago

Minnesota's boreal forest is a climate change hot spot

"As climate change unfolds we're learning that warming is uneven temperature records show distinct climate change hotspots, and northern Minnesota's among the fastest warming areas on the planet. Minnesota's iron range and Canadian border counties have worn more than two degrees, Celsius or three point six degrees Fahrenheit since eighteen ninety-five. That's twice as fast as the twin cities and the global average of about one degree Celsius. How is that changing Minnesota's Flores Lee? Froehlich directs the University of Minnesota Center for forced ecology. Highly Hi, fall good to be with you. How quickly do force react to that kind of temperature change there already reacting the seedlings of Red Maple and Northern Red Oak. And a few other species of trees are already spreading in places like the boundary waters that is enough of a temperature rise that those species which are from southern Minnesota in central Minnesota are moving into what we call the boreal zone, which is the very northern part of Minnesota. Where normally it would be so cold that you wouldn't have anything other than Birch and Aspen and conifers like spruce, and for let's say I'm traveling up in northern. MINNESOTA. What should people look for to see the forest changing? Well if you drive the highway. From Virginia to Ili. Say in mid September. You will see a lot more red there because red maple has expanded quite dramatically there does that mean it's a less favourable environment for the coniferous trees also, we don't think so not yet. That hasn't gotten warm enough to start reducing the growth or to kill the conifers but we do know that if it does warm up another degree Celsius, we might start seeing mortality and reduced growth those coniferous trees when I travel up north I the a lot of these dead birch stands across northern Minnesota. Is there a climate connection there? Yes. There is a climate connection. Now Paper Birch is very sensitive in this case to warming soil temperatures in summer. So just the fact that springs are a little earlier and falls are a little later means that the soil has more time to warm up during the summer and you combine that even with mild to moderate droughts like we had several of between two thousand and two, thousand and ten, and you get a Lotta root damage do these changing forests affect our lakes in Minnesota yes. with fewer conifers and more deciduous trees. The chemistry of the water that percolates through the soil and end of the lake will be different because. The full edge when it falls off, the trees is less acidic for things like Maple and oak that would be for spruce and for so the chemistry of the water will be different. Probably that will lead to more nutrients in the lake and US in a small enhancement of the amount of algae and so on that what grow in the lake in your work as you look ahead, what forest trends will you be watching for the next five to ten years and beyond? Well, we'll be watching the sea of. The maples and oaks continue into invade. The boreal forest will also be looking for wildlife species like deer and Bobcat, will they continue to move in and replace Moose and links? There are also somewhat climate dependent So a lot of interesting things to watch for

Minnesota University Of Minnesota Center United States Birch Paper Birch Flores Lee Forest Trends Froehlich Virginia ILI
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

04:49 min | 2 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Off The coast of Nicaragua that was carried out by the United States in two, thousand, sixteen, the arbitration tribunal of the. Rule in favor of the Philippines in Philippines versus China, stating that China had no historical rights to any land or territory of the South China Sea, and for those you guys who don't know. China's been building a bunch of illegal islands in the South China, sea went accord and the arbitration tribunal ruled against China. Now in the case of the former, the first nick over the US US ambassador to the UN John Kirkpatrick said this of the International Court of Justice. He's that a semi legal semi judicial semi political body which nations sometimes accept and sometimes don't. This then went to the UN General. Assembly, where states had to vote on whether they believed the US should comply with the verdict or not, and all member states except Israel. The United States and Salvador voted against the US, but despite this the US chose not to pay any sort of finer reparations to Nicaragua, and they had no legal obligation to do so because as we've established at the very start of this case, the UN General Assembly resolutions are not binding. They are merely suggestions, so despite the fact that every country voted against America, except three America's still didn't have to pay any reparations to Nicaragua. Now in the latter case, which is Philippines versus China. In the latter case, which is Philippines versus China China also chose to reject the arbitrations ruling on the South China Sea, and since then they've only accelerated construction of islands in the region. And in both cases the US and China could get away with it because like we've said these are not binding resolutions or binding rulings, so he see yet another example of international law nod applying to the most powerful states in the world, the US and China, literally the two most powerful countries in the planet. So now my recommendation on how to solve this as follows and please note that I'm not claiming that this is how we can guarantee compliance to international law from countries like America and China. What I am seeing? Is that without the following steps taking place compliance from states like the US and China with international law would be impossible. So my recommendation is this that in addition to the structural reforms pertaining to the UN setup and the UN Charter, the funding structure needs to dramatically change as well former labor secretary of the US and current economics professor at the University of California at Berkeley. Dr Robert Reich, says this, but no matter what the organization is, follow the money to truly understand them, and this holds true for the UN and international legal system as well currently, the International Court of Justice. Is financed by the Secretary General's Trust Fund, which is taken directly out of UN funding, and we've spoken extensively about how the five donations wield a disproportionate amount of power over the UN's proceedings, so the five veto countries right literally account for forty five percent of Total U. N. funding, which means that a hundred ninety odd countries account for fifty five percent. Five countries account for forty five percent. I let you do the number crunching to figure out. How does the power dynamic? Now, further off these forty five percentage points, thirty eight percentage points are funded by the US and China alone so we see how they're able to evade international decisions that go against them. They control the money supply of these various solutions. So this is yet another example of how without this structural change, institutional funding international law will be used merely as a tool of. Excuse me. International, law will be used merely as a tool of America in China or countries like America. In China to preserve their own geopolitical interests, and all other financially influential countries that donate a lot of the US will follow suit. So how can we change this funding structure, Dr Mark, I look who was the two thousand and six deputy secretary, General of the United Nations under Kofi Annan, said that the united. Nations and all related international organizations today are league with a gross and ineffectual redundancy, which hinders swift decision making the United Nations databases estimate that they have an annual budget of twenty billion dollars including all relevant programs..

China China United States South China Sea United Nations South China Philippines Nicaragua UN General Assembly America International Court of Justice UN Charter John Kirkpatrick Dr Robert Reich Kofi Annan deputy secretary Israel nick secretary Salvador
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

06:34 min | 2 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Discourse isn't black or white. It's a whole lot agree. Hey, guys, thank you for tuning in I'm your host in each on Android? And this is the seventh episode of a whole lot. Agree where we're going to be discussing how we can better facilitate the process of promoting international fees as well as international security, because let's be real. God knows that the current system does not work for anybody so I want to start by providing you guys with a little bit of context. How did the international system as we currently know it? Come into existence. Let's rewind to September second nine, hundred, forty five. This was the day that the second world. War officially came to an end. Eighty million casualties, one point, three five trillion dollars and unimaginable amount of misery later, the world was in desperate need of an era of peace and stability. And Low and behold months later, the UN was established, which was intended to be a League of Nations two point Oh. Now as you guys know. The League of Nations was setup after the first World War to promote international peace as you also the fact that there was a second World War shows that this League of nations. Thing didn't work out quite as planned. Now, you guys might ask even post nine, hundred, forty five. There aren't too many incidents that this international system has successfully resolved. I'll tell you why a big reason for this is that the international institutions that are actually tasked with promoting these global changes are grossly ineffective so an international institution. Quick definition here is an institution where three or more countries work together to resolve issues that pertain to all member states of that institution, and if you're wondering, this is a paraphrase definition from the Global Energy Network Institute. Some prominent examples of international institutions are like the UN or the world. Health Organization so on and so forth, and I'm going to be using the term international institutions and international organizations interchangeably throughout this episode, so please don't get confused and I'm GonNa be largely focusing on the UN and the only reason for this is the UN is the largest oldest and most. Most prominent of the international organizations, so this is a quick breakfast that these comments that are making throughout the course of the episode, obliged to international organizations on the whole, and they're not exclusive to the UN. Even though the UN is going to be our subject to focus or our means subject to focus for this episode, so let's jump right into the. The data what do people think of the UN or what people think of international organizations? A Gallup poll found that as of two thousand eighteen, only thirty four percent of global respondents believed that international organizations do more good than harm that largely they are ineffective and bist trustful. Keep in mind this way down from the fifty five percent. WHO THOUGHT THEY DID? Did more good than harm. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, three, which was eight years after the UN was founded, so it's quite possible to conclude that whatever global progress has happened today in two thousand and twenty has happened despite the existence of these institutions, and not because of it. So why is this the case? Why are these institutions plagued with inefficacy? Let's explore three main segments on how we can potentially make the UN and other international organizations, more effective and useful to the global community. The first segment is structural reform of the institutions themselves. The second segment is having more binding power for U N. peacekeeping forces and the third final segment is making international law and the legal system more binding I'm going to go over each segment in detail starting with the first one structural reform of international organizations themselves before we talk about why the UN and other international organizations need structural reform. Let's go over how they came to be the existing structure of the UN and what its current problems are so following the second world. World War in October. Ninety forty five. The United Nations was setup now this was positive because it signaled the global intent for cooperation as opposed to competition and the geopolitical arena, but we all know that intend only goes a certain distance. If it's not followed through by action so now you must ask why the lack of action in the UN. I'll tell you why. There's a multitude of reasons for this so I'll try focusing on the important ones. The United Nations General. General Assembly as you guys know is the largest wing of the UN and this committee has delegates and representatives from all one hundred ninety three UN member states so wallets agreed forum, which allows for international dialogue and deliberation. There is a glaring structural weakness which prevents it from truly affecting any sort of change laws, and a lot of the critics of the UNC that the UN is a talk shop, not a do shop, and the reason for this is as follows the. The UN General. Assembly doesn't have the power to pass legislation that is binding or mandatory for its member states. What does this mean well? Because the first article of the UN Charter promises sovereignty and autonomy to every member state, the UN technically cannot interfere with domestic laws of UN member countries so ultimately every resolution that comes out of the General Assembly simply serves as mere recommendations or suggestions for these countries, not actual binding laws that these countries need to follow up on. And the best example for this is resolution seventeen sixty one. resolution, seventeen, sixty one was passed to condemn South African apartheid of those. You don't know apartheid. Segregation in South Africa, where the black population was discriminated against by the largely Caucasian South African government at the time now while apartheid was rightfully condemned around the world resolution, seventeen, sixty, one was passed in November..

United Nations UN Charter League of Nations General Assembly Global Energy Network Institut United Nations General South Africa Health Organization UNC
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

07:17 min | 3 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Vehicles. It's just a Sony challenges with the bottle that unless you find the smocked economic model? Run a fleet of electric vehicles. You'RE NOT GONNA be able to have a EV's as the family motor shape transport, and really that is what I talk about some deal in that it. No absolutely unlikely said I. Don't want I. Don't want to do any spoilers from the episode and every listener who's listening to those right now to at checkout Mr Martin podcast right after this one last question from that episode as You talk about how the future of eady's is generally the trajectory. Right especially here in India. And you dr a bit of you. Being. Called battery swapping a good, you just spend like Denver fifteen seconds walking through. What exactly that is why it's beneficial. I think in order to essentially. Sort of your chain. reframe the way you think acres in your mind you've just got to. Separate the vehicle from the. All. Debate needs road ables. Now from the dawn of. The the the motor Gar. We have fitted electric. Fitted tanks into the car which we fill up with a petrol gasoline diesel. Fuel it is. And that all is done combustion engine, which moves the bow for one or the other with me run of federal. We go to the federal about we finished up again and then we keep moving. We built the electric bay. We essentially used the same mental model, which is that wave fitted batteries into the car, and then whenever we've added a battery will and Josh it. The other problem is I'm like a petrol, which you've been just a Filipina tank, and in five minutes or less. It takes even with the fastest fos judging solution at least in our discharge evacuated, and usually you're require. These five. Wait uh-huh to charge a battery. In given what they used to just accept. Of people so the battery swapping idea essentially means that you know when you have of our rather than Josh. Eventually a you'll essentially wouldn't be all batteries out, but a new mattress. This is something that stories. Or these gadgets if we Habra. you actually ever thought by that available. Because obviously it's it's. It's a much larger respect willing to a bedroom The gas station attendant just owns the backbone of your. And wishes of. Food Been Dan back in that. Replace, a, in dire banks are headed so correct, but the other example that I give to make this a little more valuable as before the in Donald question engine. We had all scattered. and when you want do. Drive a horse cottage across the country essentially what it would do is, you would have a venue stations where. You would have horses rested of fully fit waiting for you and you drive. Into that station swap audio host the Diet Horse. That has just written or the night. And swap that out of the new. Houses that are fish any ride. Those horses on so look. We've we've. We've had many mental models by which be designed. Remorse When we switched from the hostage to the The the best engine We essentially the horse into the gardens and fixed it there and we found a way to feed the GOP. If instead we. Just swapped it out. In the way that began with batteries it will be a completely different mental model, and that probably is the most useful mental models for this, so that is. The way I describe a battery swapping it's it feels unreal, because we're so used to thinking of Oslo particularly, but actually it's different from You know with with your watch. Your conscious is out of touch just. A more. Needed Muller. Control the or something like that exactly. I think the biggest was on the COOLEST WAY AS I. Just as general conversation with you is. How so much can be you know? At least dented do like started getting saw if we shift our leads obeyed if we just changed the way we abroad, a lot of these things I think that is of unity coup perspective to keep in mind so just one last question before we wrap this. What's amazing? Is Offer, both out Indian as well as non Indian listeners. Everyone I think is aware today in geopolitics that India is the sleeping bag on waiting to become that big stakeholder. Vicks and we are. We are getting in some sense. Would you think the three areas that we collectively as a country should be focusing on in order to unlock our true potential unlock are do future. Look I. Don't know if I make it to three, but let me tell you. What I think is really important, I think. You know what a huge untapped potential! In that Much off. The GDP of in too much of the GDP this on synthetic I up. and to find ways in which we can be used on. ways in which we can leverage. Able across the stack I think a lot of the platform technologies that we've been billions. Country other, which is the identity of black. You'll be able to the payment platform an all the the various platforms coming up. have tremendous ability to unlock the potential that is our. Hidden away outside of lead night so I think that sort of the the first key that I think. we're really focused on. I, as you can imagine, I have A. Huge. Dining allergy and so one of the things. that. I think we certainly should should trying to achieve. It's easiest at the done. A is to actually use data to leapfrog boss. Generations are so. We've done it in many occasions. In the past of most notably we leapfrogged landline telephone connections all the way to to pull violet. So you're China India short rest the word that. This is what it is like to be a first division of this huge automatic. On with..

India Josh Sony Mr Martin eady Denver Diet Horse GOP Donald Vicks Habra. Oslo Muller
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

02:33 min | 6 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"So just <Speech_Male> one last question <Speech_Male> before we wrap up. What <Speech_Male> has been an amazing interview <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> our world <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is ever globalizing <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and you talk <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> about. How cross <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> border data flows are <Speech_Male> also an inevitable <Speech_Male> process? <Speech_Male> So how <Speech_Male> important is <Speech_Music_Male> cross border trade <Speech_Male> in this dynamic <Speech_Male> you talk about? <Speech_Male> How big of an advocate <Speech_Male> of International Trade? <Speech_Male> You are specifically <Speech_Male> as <Speech_Male> the final thoughts <Speech_Male> for this episode. <Speech_Male> Could you tell <Speech_Male> our listeners? A <Speech_Male> what positive <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> value do you think <Speech_Male> that? International <Speech_Male> Trade Creates <Speech_Music_Male> for the global <Speech_Music_Male> fraternity at large <Speech_Music_Male> especially <Speech_Male> in an age of globalization <Speech_Male> when our <Speech_Male> cultures are <Speech_Male> interacting with one another <Speech_Male> cross worth <Speech_Male> of data <Speech_Male> of ideas <Speech_Male> and in <Speech_Male> a way. Thanks to globalization. <Speech_Male> We are <Speech_Male> more interconnected <Speech_Male> than ever before <Speech_Male> as human <Speech_Male> civilization <Speech_Male> so given this <Speech_Male> reality if you could <Speech_Male> share some final thoughts <Speech_Music_Male> to our listeners. <Speech_Music_Male> About what <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> exactly's deposit <Speech_Music_Male> value of <Speech_Music_Male> international trade <Speech_Music_Male> in this Globalizing <SpeakerChange> Sphere? <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> He said you know. This is <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> such a <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> globalized <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Era <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Right now and so <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> everybody just stays <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in their own little <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> backyard. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> It <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> doesn't <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> doesn't foster <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> growth and <Speech_Music_Female> so <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> when ideas are <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> shared where <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> brainstorming <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> studies. Show <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that it's always better <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to be <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> many to think about <Speech_Music_Male> something to come up with <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> better solutions <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to sit in your <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> own room <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and and and think <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> about things all by ourselves <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> so <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> national trained to use the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> same thing in <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> sharing of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> goods and services <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and knowledge <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> throughout <Speech_Music_Male> the whole <Speech_Music_Female> international community. <Speech_Music_Female> And <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that's how <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> everything improves. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Because <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> what's best in India <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> six boarded <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> here <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and then we'll integrate <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> it into our culture <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> grow and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> be better for it <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and you know <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the same goes <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Throughout <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the world <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is everybody's <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> sharing what they <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> have and hopefully <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> keeping <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the negative out <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and and <SpeakerChange> concentrating <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on the stuff <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> with that we come to <Speech_Male> the end of what has <Speech_Male> been a very <Speech_Male> fascinating conversation <Speech_Male> on very <Speech_Music_Male> very very <Speech_Music_Male> pertinent topics. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you <Speech_Male> so much Miss Murphy <Speech_Music_Male> for your time. I'm <Speech_Music_Male> sure our listeners <Speech_Music_Male> and viewers really really <Speech_Music_Male> appreciate your <Speech_Music_Male> insights that you put <Speech_Music_Male> forward and <Speech_Music_Male> for all our listeners <Speech_Music_Male> and viewers who wished <Speech_Male> to understand more <Speech_Male> of what the GPO <Speech_Male> is an does <Speech_Male> exactly. <Speech_Male> I've linked their website <Speech_Male> in my description <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> below on Youtube. <Speech_Male> Spotify apple <Speech_Male> whatever podcast. <Speech_Music_Male> You're <SpeakerChange> listening to this <Speech_Music_Female> odd. <Speech_Music_Female> Thank you so <Speech_Female> much any. I <Speech_Music_Female> thoroughly enjoyed <Speech_Music_Female> this interview <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> thanks again. <Music>

Miss Murphy Youtube. India
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

01:39 min | 6 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Don't buy into the conditioning that women have to be lady like in Dos. I'll and all of a sudden raid. I I'm not even joking Murphy. I got goosebumps. And you said my motto is never seen fear. That sounds like something out of a Batman movie. It's very cool. I like listening to the hell but syllable of back to the just another couple of questions I wanted to ask you. So the or the European data protection office is pretty much your brainchild something. You founded and from my understanding a big reason why you founded. This was so bad. Non European Union companies shouldn't view the GDP as an obstacle to international trade grab. That's absolutely it any you know. I'm big defender of international trained and I think it's very beneficial for everybody right and you come up with you. Know a regulation. That's there to protect the individuals and the privacy rights and their you know any at all of their personal data. I think that's fantastic. But it shouldn't be an obstacle to train. So I you know from the very get l was thinking. How do I play a role in this to help? Companies to continue to be able to have access to the EU market into the EU customers and and vice versa. Rain and reconciling these two different types of principals protection of the EU individuals in the privacy rights and international trade and cleaned this. This was yeah my way of having. I hope a little impact very very solid.

European Union Murphy
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

01:37 min | 6 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"For our women listeners. Today I was just wondering if you could share any sort of insights as to what exactly where the hurdles that you had to overcome in order to get to where you are today at. How exactly did you overcome them? I'm sure it would provide immense value to not only our female listeners but also the rest of our audience as well. I wouldn't call them hurdles and I win. Call them specific female hurdles right my personal experience. I don't think I've I've I've had those. I think they're just you know growing hurdles and going for when you want and I often conferences on women in power and things like that then I always tell people look at you know what's holding you back in that's always most of the time anyways fear and you have to determine what is that fear what is based on and for Women One. Common factor is the lack of self confidence. That comes from the fact that when we grow up We're often told at the table. Were commended for B Wyatt. For not speaking out. You know you're such a good girl you need being ladylike and stuff right off the you know at the table. You're such a good girl. And went voice saying are functions and everything that's expected from them so they could leave the table the conspiracy taymor whenever it's Kinda like you know. It's okay guys like that and girls are like that and then we go to school and at the same thing and you tell girls. Oh you're such a good girl. You put up your hand when he wanted to speak employs just our on again. I'm trees ready in makes a difference between the boys and.

taymor Wyatt
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

01:51 min | 6 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Risk Assessment. Very very solid and anyway. Thank you so much for the insights regarding your bread and butter and GPS and data privacy and all those themes. Tonight's wants to switch the conversation to more personal element and I noticed Prior to this interview on your Social Media Your Lincoln You've said that you've always wanted to be a lawyer. And specifically an international lawyer. So could you walk us through that part of your journey? How did you know you always wanted to be a lawyer? And why international lawyer? Why did that fascinate you? An interesting question always wanting to be a lawyer died. Love solving problems in helping people so from very young age. I started looking into how that would be possible and I love the intellectual challenges of legal discussions negotiations and things like that and Y for national. I Dunno since I was very young. I've always been curious about different cultures and love meeting people from other places in my thing. You know it helps people making minimum basically sounds corny. That's Dodo League's going feel is going around and I think sharing values and experiences and backgrounds and different countries. Well it just helps everybody. A little bit helps me tremendously and I hope I can help other people too when I travel and it's just knowledge sharing values sharing absolutely absolutely. I think like you said a big advantage is I mean there's so many things that separate us on grounds of culture and race and religion and these other things I think it's very very impressive? Bad you've decided to use. Our international global diversity is a strength and trying to find.

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

01:30 min | 6 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Acton right. It's longer just two BS of legislation right in your own words. You said it has a lot more teeth than the previous directive. Yeah exactly sir. And we're seeing that it's taking time for companies to to Kinda Gen- into the I would say the whole philosophy that has when GDP are came out a lot of companies or or complaining that it was such a heavy undertaking to be compliant and it was a lot you know still a lot of red tape and things like that making clients more complicated for companies and so. I think the whole point of GDP are came into effect was kind of lost in all the you know the e-mailings that we got from companies trying to to sell services for compliance. Because it was seen as something very cumbersome very expensive but now I think there's a shift in mentality that people are starting to see that that it's really beneficial benefit from a company point of US forces you to kind of an overview of all data that you have in use data and positive. Wayne data commercial mate that me. You didn't realize that you in the past right and so it's Kinda you know cleaning the house and then once you clean it up you realize. Oh Yeah Well Mississippi. Really Antonin we can. Do this can do that. And and seeing it more as an opportunity than an obstacle over that shift seeing Mass Dab. Six six.

Wayne data Acton Antonin US Mississippi
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

01:52 min | 6 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Means for the subjects to be able to verify their data and to rectify when they wanted me. Then you have storage the medications so you can't store data for an unlimited period of time unless that's part of the the the legal requirement for that type of data which is very seldom so you have to for every type. Data explain and detail in your register processing deputies. How long are you going to store the data and it has to be for? Irritib- time is proportional to the purpose that you're the legal basis for which you're processing the data so if you have you know if you're you're you're receiving CD's for jobs you can't keep the database for the next five years because that would not be you know of course to the reason why electing the genus though for every type of processing you're going to have to explain how long day no and then you have integrity and confidentiality. That goes without saying that. The data the incorrect has to be. You know not just accurate but it has to be non A. Tom Brady threw lying and has been confidential Soviet again. We're back to mass access to the data to make sure that you keep it at all times confidential and the last one which is all income missing a faulty other principals is the accountability principle and that is really the whole underlying theme. I would say of the GDP are it's making companies accountable for what they're doing personal data so that just means putting everything in place to show that you have done what it takes to secure the data to protect it so to to be able to demonstrate compliance. So that's That's a real easy than and the general loss of the genie are.

Tom Brady
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

13:05 min | 8 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Two week journey from Plymouth to New York. Did you know that two of her initial crew members had to fly to in New York at the start since there wasn't any space left on the sailboat. And did you also know that. Two of her crew members had to fly to New York after regretted journey in order to sail it back from New York to Plymouth says Greta was sticking around in North America for an extended period of time after her speech. This is not awesome random conspiracy theory that I'm paddling by the way major European media outlets such as the times and the UK Andor Spiegel. Germany have confirmed this Julianne Jonge gear a member of the creative professional's networking group and senior journalist and editor based out of Michigan in the United States estimated that the the flights taken by those four people load generated more than two point one million grams of carbon dioxide. And what does this number look like. For perspective respective the US Environmental Protection Agency estimates that roughly two hundred thousand acres of forest would be required to offset that level of of carbon emission so this is emblematic of what is generally wrong with a lot of efforts in the climate activism space today the lack of a practical solution to cut down on carbon footprint in scalable and cost efficient manner. And don't just take my word for it. The University of California Climate Solutions Russians group. Infers that unless future climate proposals actively account for cost efficiency and its practicality within a strong regulatory regulatory framework those climate proposals would ultimately be rendered to list Greta Bloomberg has been immortalized as the face of the climate movement movement. But has she actually been the most devoted climate activist in terms of commitment to preserving the environment. Well when we look at add global outreach regarding the fight against climate change and in terms of sheer time spent preserving the environment it is super hard to discount at the impact of Solomona that Mika from Tim coup which is a rural district in southern India. Her story is simply mind boggling. She's lived for more than a century still alive today. By the way at a hundred seven years old She grew up impoverished in rural southern India and is a recipient of the pod mastery and has an international NGO called thin macos resources for environmental education which functions bulletin Los Angeles as as well as in Oakland in California when we look at all of this alone. It's already far more than what Greta has brought to the table. In the fight against climate change inch and like Mrs Dominica there are numerous other individuals around the world who were making efforts to preserve their local environments. But yet they're we're not receiving the same spotlight despite having done a ton to preserve the environment and who hail from far more vulnerable parts of the globe then Sweden. There's probably another Solomona that in your backyard. Who you've never even heard of so far grotto's most prominent prominent geopolitical action is filing an official complaint against five countries France Germany Turkey Brazil and Argentina China for their failure to prevent environmental degradation in their respective jurisdictions? Now all this sounds well and good but the complaint seems to have have no tangible and goal in sight apart from ensuring that the five countries will do their adequate share to cut down on carbon emissions. I mean we've all heard that before right. It's not like we've never heard politicians or heads of state make empty promises. So here is the thing. There's no penalize regionalization. There is no sanction that can be meted out by the international legal system. Should these countries failed to comply with grads demands. There is no oh real incentive to cut down on carbon emissions insofar as it promotes economic growth in a cost efficient manner. which is the reality for for a lot of these countries today in conclusion? Here's what we can surmise about. Greta and her activism her activism has done an amazing job job of garnering much-needed media attention on a highly pressing issue. And it's also brought about increased awareness. Add vigor in the fight to preserve move our environment however this awareness vigor and activism needs to translate into tangible policy reform in order for her her to be heralded as the champion climate activists of our time. So let's take a look at three reasons why her activism needs to go a long long way way. That is if she's serious about making any sort of meaningful change the first so we know that she's filed a lawsuit against five nations agents. Brazil Argentina France Germany and Turkey. But you know who the five biggest polluters per capita in the world today are it's the US Saudi Arabia Canada South Korea and Australia. None of whom she's included in this lawsuit even if we take her at her best case scenario. Which is the symbolic lawsuit? We spoke to you about earlier. GIULIANA versus the US will in all probability ability get reversed by the Supreme Court as Stated by Columbia University's Center for climate change which we sided and spoke to you about earlier in this episode and the top five countries generate more than sixty five metric tons of carbon per capita per annum to put the things in perspective again. What does this number look like as for the US Environmental Protection Agency? This level of carbon emissions is enough to power more than thirty million smartphones so unless her activism magically finds a way to incentivize these five nations nations from cutting down on emissions. It is super unlikely that she's going to have any global impact in the fight against climate. Change the second reason Greta Foon Berg hails from Sweden. which is a highly industrialized? Society would less than ten million people bull to put things in perspective. That number is smaller than the population of most metropolitan cities in countries like India. Brazil will China or the US aid. Rio De Janeiro New Delhi Shanghai. These are all cities that have more people than all of Sweden. So the reality reality is this a lot of the majorly populated countries right now need to emit some form of carbon in order to get to the same levels of industrialization socialization that the Nordic countries like Sweden or Norway or Finland. Enjoy today. Tom Audela. Who is a journalist as a part of the Associated Press Presses East Africa Bureau reports that ninety percent of the waste in nations that are classified as low income is either burned or or dumped owing to a lack of proper waste management infrastructure the National Center for Atmospheric Research in the US states? That burning waste is a major reason for the worsening of Air Quality Day state that almost thirty percent of global emissions that cause air pollution. Come from waste-burning. I think now a lot of these. Low income countries don't have the mechanisms to recycle or process the waste that they generate. Why is all of this relevant for starters? How do you expect those countries to transition to renewable sources of energy like wind or solar hydro and cut down on their carbon footprint rent when they're burning plastic and burning rubber just to dispose of them? I for one can't help. But think that Grenada's preaching to the rest of us to assembly stop burning even though there's no real alternative proposed comes from a highly privileged point of view. Sweden had time to industrialize. Sweden had time to develop so they can afford to divorce themselves from the realities that low income countries go through to dispose of their waste. Ace signed APPS energy and environmental consulting firm based in Boston says that solar panels are luxury for the citizenry of the US. So then how do you expect. Countries like Ghana Baucus Tan or Liberia. To make this transition if people in America think this transition is expensive if the citizens of the low income developing world were all on twitter the might have even asked Greta how dare you in response to her wistfulness to have everyone transition to renewable resources. This reality is a sobering reminder that Greta Thune Berg while her intentions and activism maybe well well-meaning hails from a socioeconomic upbringing that cannot comprehend many of the realities that serves obstacles to solving climate change the third and final final reason carbon emissions are going to continue to get polluted insofar as both economic growth as well as cost. Efficiency are on the table. So that being said Said Gratis. Best Bet is best echoed by on Mahindra. Who is the chairman of the Mahindra Group in India? which is one of India's largest companies is an is an MNT worth roughly thirty billion dollars? Here is her to find a way for sustainability to promote economic growth. But not wild. That's a great solution. To harsh reality is right now. It would cost countries and immense amount of time and money to make that transition and the Institute for Energy Research estimates that it would cost four point five trillion dollars and at least the next three decades for low and medium income countries to successfully make that transition again for perspective four point five trillion dollars is roughly a quarter of united skates GDP. So where will these poor countries get the cash from. It's only once. Sustainability brings the same promise of economic growth and and cost efficiency as fossil fuels do D- Global Fraternity can work on collaborative solutions to more efficiently invest there are Indian tax tax credits. Unsustainable practices that are not only environmentally friendly but also economically viable. And until. And unless that happens. It's I'm just going to be deemed as privileged discourse where those individuals who hail from small and industrialized economies are chastising the rest of the world to do not develop and to not burn fossil fuels without providing any alternative as to how we can use ECO friendly renewable sources of energy to our advantage while remaining cost efficient in conclusion. I've got a couple of things to save as a sixteen year old Greta. Thune Berg is certainly commendable. Most sixteen year olds me included. Were probably just playing xbox all day at her age without a care in the world and she certainly has gotten a lot of people involved loved the discussion. And you could even argue that. This is only the beginning of her journey but the hard truth is this. She has been the recipient of an insane amount of media coverage and has been deemed as our savior right now to combat the climate crisis. What about the other unsung heroes in your backyard? Around the world in low and medium income countries that we've been ignoring we've shown you in this episode itself that there are other activists both for the environment as well as for for children's rights who have done more than Greta has but have not received any of the attention. I cannot help but wonder that given Greta does lack of understanding thing about the context that racial minorities and other impoverished communities live through around the world have we chosen the right person as a symbol for the movement that is supposed to be dealing with the greatest threat that our generation is.

Greta Greta Thune Berg Sweden United States India US Environmental Protection Ag Brazil New York University of California Clima Greta Bloomberg Germany France Turkey Plymouth
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

14:57 min | 8 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Cultural economic political. Maybe a dash of social issues these are discussions discussions. That we've been having since time immemorial but it's easy to view these issues is buying it. It's easy to view them as either black or white. When in fact there era a whole lot agree on the issue of solving the global climate crisis? Is Greta Thune Berg the real deal or is she merely media media hype. Thank you for tuning in. I'm going to try and answer that for you on this episode of a whole lot of gray with a neon Rome Scientists.

Greta Thune Berg Rome
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

13:48 min | 8 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Nine hundred also rose to prominence and actually became a multimillionaire through racketeering and bootlegging the alcohol black market during the broom Bishen era era and now we're seeing similar effects for block. Markets for porn in India and black markets by their very nature are extremely dangerous because of how unregulated the art so the solution is not to ban porn or not to talk about sex. In fact. It's quite the opposite. It is to recognize the reality that these are fundamental needs that govern our society and to properly instructed educate both the adolescent as well as general populace on how to interact with these needs in a civilized and healthy fashion and a big component of being able to have these interactions is recognizing that women like sex too and sadly there shamed for or it in many parts of India the Indian Journalists Psychiatry states that roughly fifty five percent of Indian women across both rural as well as urban areas have been slut shamed aimed for expressing their enjoyment of sexual intercourse now obviously women enduring slut shaming is a global social problem that needs to to be addressed worldwide men collectively around the world need to do better and need to be a better educated but that said there are still places where women are not ought shamed as much for enjoying sex. The World Economic Forum found that Iceland for instance is the best country in the world for women as well as gender parody. The is Lyndyk sexology association. States that Icelandic women are known for their positive attitudes toward casual sex now. This has a pretty interesting origin. Urgent Story in the one thousand nine hundred seventies Scandinavia. There was a smallpox outbreak where the king of Denmark who ruled Iceland at the time declared it lawful for Icelandic women regardless of their marital status to have up to six children in an effort to repopulate the country. So historically sex was never associated with shame shame for women but rather with pride and patriotism and this today has led to the culture of Icelandic women and men having candid conversations about of female pleasure in sexual intercourse and Dave dismissed archaic ideas of slut shaming and having these candid conversations about such topics and recognizing that women enjoy sex taxes. Well does positively improve the situation of women safety and don't just take my word for it. New World Health which is an organization that analyzes both global global health as well as migration trends found in a two thousand seventeen report that Iceland along with New Zealand and Canada where the three safest countries in the world for women and the National Center for Biotech Information in the US founded these three countries also prioritized what they called comprehensive sexual education. Where where the todd? Both young men and women on how to approach members of the opposite sex the nature of female orgasm and other topics that are simply not talked about in India. Reversing the porn band making sad more comprehensive and having these candid conversations. These are the first steps in guaranteeing a more safe environment for women in India as we said at the start of this section allow access to sexually explicit content have the candid conversations about sex about how it's perfectly normal human human need and that women enjoy it as well pretending that this is not the case only creates a black market for sexual content. It makes women feel more unsafe. It increases the amount that slushing and a does absolutely nothing to address the issue of safety or healthy sexual relationships which brings me to my second point dispelling the Cultural Myth and discussing discussing the role of households in this equation. So many of you might be asking in India. Why is there such a taboo against sexual education and sexually explicit content content? What would the porn bannon everything? Many activists and many journalists alike have been content with saying that Indian culture is to blame. But let's take a step back and look at a couple of facts and see if Indian culture is to blame the first fact Hinduism which is India's oldest religion and some sources say that it's the world's oldest religion as well in the only major religion in the world which has goddesses as major deities and festivals dedicated to these goddesses and the nudity of both men and women in Hindu art is a commonplace phenomenon. The caves economic in western India and the nationally renowned cudgeon temple in central India are both testament to this the second fact so the exact timeframe is disputed ass sometime between the first and sixth century BC but that was around when ancient Indian philosophers wrote the Karma Sutra. And again for those of you who are going to pretend that you don't know what that is. It's an ancient Indian text taxed Sanskrit which explicitly talks about themes like Saks eroticism and their role and satisfaction fulfillment of human desires. So based on these facts. Loan it is shocking. That India is such a sexually repressed society today which experiences such great crime against women. Where did we go wrong? Well L. A. Large part of our sexually repressed present can be attributed to Victorian era history under British colonial rule and under their definitions of what constituted modesty a host of Archaic Laws Governing Social Intercourse in India where past for instance section three hundred. Seventy seven off the Indian penal little code which criminalised homosexual intercourse was actually struck down only recently by the Indians agreement. Court fun fact. It was passed at eight hundred sixty one by the British empire. The same can be said for section four hundred ninety seven of the Union penal code which criminalized adultery on the grounds of and I quote maintaining inning. The dignity of women again. This was a law that was struck down by the Indian Supreme Court in two thousand eighteen and this law also has its origin story dating back to eighteen in sixty again passed by the British Empire but despite all of this despite all this Victorian Era British legislation the messaging that surrounds Both religious and cultural influences in this fear is flawed. Rural India. For instance is where a lot of the crime and discrimination against women and Poor Sexual Education tends to happen. We've backed US up with UNICEF two thousand thirteen report. We talked about at the top of this episode now. In addition to that report a the center of the study of developing societies report in two thousand and thirty found that fifty two percent of people in rural India identified themselves as strictly Lee religious. Ms Doran Jacobson with the University of Chicago Press published a report in the early one thousand nine hundred eighty s where in large parts of rural India Associated Traditional Snow Practices of women's modesty with Indian culture and like I stated earlier. It is very hard to argue that something is intrinsic Indian culture. Given even that India host the only major religion in the world where women have been elevated to the status of goddess and we gave the world the Kama Sutra so given all of this and the fact that India's only been independent since nineteen forty seven. There is no denying that Victorian laws passed by the British Empire and dating back to the mid eighteen hundreds have surely had some residual social effects in terms of how Indian society views bode sacks and sexual intercourse again. It is important to no. I'm not blaming the British for our predicament. Today I've already said that. The free access to explicit content and better sex ED in schools is the need of the hour but the narrative that ideas governing a woman's modesty and the negative outcomes associated with sexual crime and the treatment of women D- Narrative that at these things are intrinsic Indian. Culture is what has to change and this starts by spreading greater awareness of the fact that Victorian era legislation during the British Raj is actually how a lot of these archaic laws came about in the first place and this messaging ought to be spread far and wide across the country country in schools in urban areas rural areas and villages honestly everywhere. Because the thing is this if one truly is a devout Hindu and and looks at Hinduism's artistic works and Literature Tax as past precedent. It is very hard to believe that the negative treatment of women in India Today it is rooted in Hinduism and Hindu culture. Sadly most people in India or religious or otherwise in urban or rural areas are simply not aww aware of any of these facts we need to take control of the story and that starts with dispelling the myth that Indian culture mandates a pathetic attitudes toward sex Ore Indian culture is the reason for our sexual repression in the twenty first century. Now in addition to dispelling these mitts. We have already spoken about how adolescence education programs in schools need to be more comprehensive and how governments can enforce already existing legislation far more strictly but again apart from all of this. What role can households play in this equation and the most damning indictment of how devoid of these conversations households holds it? India are comes from a Washington Post piece in two thousand and seventy which tracks miss mother. Mita Bondi who was a part of the criminology department at Anglia Ruskin University in the United Kingdom Miss Mother Mita Bondi interviewed. One hundred convicted rapists in India's capital city of New Delhi to understand what could prompt these people to commit such heinous crimes against humanity. She talks about how these interviews showed her demand stigmatization an of sexual conversations in Indian households both rural and urban alike. She learned how words such as sex or penis or vagina are intentionally smelly omitted and interactions regarding how to properly go about sexual intercourse simply are not hat. Concepts like consent toward women are unheard of and false notions of masculinity and femininity are paddled instead. So the idea that a woman's virginity somehow correlates to her purity dirty and that a man's inability to lose his virginity makes many less masculine are bold misconceptions. That need to be done away with immediately and households can start right and disregard. We've already shown you. Data which shows how a comprehensive sex education in schools leads to better outcomes both for men and for women limit so having similar education conversations at home with family members can only have positive outcomes as well Canada which keep in mind the new you world health report that we spoke about earlier found Canada as a top three country for women's safety so Canada has a Sexuality Education Resource Resource Center and they corroborated this by saying that the earlier household. Start having these conversations about sexual intimacy with their children. The more likely likely that these children will grow up without stigmatizing or attaching any sort of taboo to these topics and the reality is they will invariably deal with these topics once. They're older older. The Sexuality Education Resource Center of Canada also found that starting these conversations in the right manner will lead to a higher likelihood of children understanding how to navigate around having healthy sexual relationships households starting these conversations among their families brings me to my third and final Section which is ensuring that feminist movements are not restricted to privileged or urban circles. Now a big segue in ensuring that the above discussions are not restricted exclusively to urban and socio economically privileged areas is bringing individuals from rural backgrounds on board and. Don't worry I get. How audit is coming from me? Given that a lot of our listeners probably hail from urban upper middle class areas themselves me included. I'm only hoping thing that me doing. This episode is at the very least a very small step in the right direction but back to the point a big overlap that does see rural Labour interact act with urban households is the industry of domestic workers. And for those of you who are unaware especially our non Indian audience. Owing to India's cheap cost of labor a lot of households in urban India can employ domestic help such as cooks or maids or drivers at relatively nominal rates in two two thousand eighteen business standard report D estimated that there were at least fifty million domestic workers in India for perspective. That would be the if sixty percent of the United States was working as domestic help in urban Indian households given this insanely high number domestic workers who hail from rural areas and work in urban households are the perfect starting point for urban households to start these conversations. What is more telling? Is that more than thirty. Thirty five million of these workers are women so having these conversations really could go a long way. Ms Durga Tenaga who is an officer in. India's administrative administrative services wrote an Economic Times piece in two thousand sixteen about how a majority of women in rural India simply aren't aware of their rights to begin with starting these conversations with your domestic help and urban areas is a great start to bridging this rural urban divide. It is worth taking the onus as urban households in terms of starting these conversations especially since the economic resources of these domestic workers are extremely limited monthly income for domestic workers.

India US Iceland Indian Journalists Psychiatry Indian Supreme Court British Empire sexual crime Lyndyk sexology association racketeering Canada Denmark UNICEF Scandinavia Dave todd Sexuality Education Resource C Saks New Delhi Ms Durga Tenaga
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

04:42 min | 8 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Then the bourgeoisie owned the land and the proletariate served as Labour working on this land but the global global economy as we know it today is far more capital intensive and has many more nuanced levels of delegation and hierarchy thanks to processes such as globalization Zeeshan and the rapid technological advancements. That have happened. In the past. Few decades there is no bourgeoisie class or proletariat class that you can use to separate people anymore. There are far more layers in this economy of which the Communist ideology or Marxism simply cannot fathom so. None of those concepts would even be relevant today but magically even if somehow they were applicable they would not be successful talking pure economics the World Bank or do thousand eighteen reward talks about our free trade which is free from the licenses and many deregulations that AH communist regime would require has led to a direct increase in economic growth among low income countries. And take the two most powerful countries today in the world in two thousand twenty the United States and China which have a combined. GDP of more than thirty thirty trillion US dollars which is more than a third of global GDP. The United States the American dream Silicon Valley Hollywood and their countless other examples Gargantuan economic success stems result of freedom from these communist policies. Not Their adoption of it but this example maybe even more telling Chana which according to the world population review we read out is one of the five communist countries in the world today but remember what we said at the start. It is an exception exception to the communist way of life in one aspect and that's in terms of economics and likely established at the start of the episode. Communism is both an economic as well as a political political system and China made the economic exception to its otherwise communist way of life in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight and guess what it is disc -ception and China's adoption of free market economic policies via processes like foreign investment and free trade that accelerated China's meteoric rise to the top talk of economic food chain. And don't take my word for it. Harvard Business Review States that since nineteen seventy eight up until two thousand eighteen. China's economy has has grown more than fifty times with more than six hundred million people escaping poverty and as per the population review again to reiterate. There are five communist dates in the the world today. Vietnam Laos North Korea China and Cuba and all five of them are politically communist. While China is economically capitalist but keep in mind China's still politically communist which means China's still terrible politically freedom house has consistently criticized the Chinese government for their repression of human rights. It's worth sites such as Google and facebook are completely banned in China. While Uber Muslim minorities are being sent to concentration camps as we speak and the other four countries trees Laos Vietnam. North Korea and Cuba are all equally bad politically freedom. How states that? These nations are experiencing an almost unprecedented level all of Internet censorship and a crackdown on civil liberties and keep in mind that they don't even have the economic benefits that China does because unlike China they're still economically communist. The Telegraph states. That seventy one percent of North Korea's population is undernourished owing to North Korea's economic situation and Gaza Cuba which is an organization in that assist Cubans emigrating to Texas stated that immigration from Cuba to the United States continued through the twenty first century given Cuba's economy being in dire straits straights and showing very little side of improvement so in conclusion communism is greatly economically ineffective in addition to being politically devastating. There is noughties single example in two thousand nineteen of a country that is wholly communists. Keep in mind both politically as well as economically that successful and either a guard and the only only reason the China's successful economically is because they are no longer economically communist had China not economically liberalized in nineteen seventy eight. Who knows they may have been in the same boat as North Korea or Cuba even in terms.

China North Korea United States Cuba World Bank Harvard Business Review Laos Vietnam Chana Texas Google Gaza Chinese government facebook
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

15:18 min | 8 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Cultural economic political. Maybe a dash of social issues these are discussions Russians. That we've been having since time immemorial but it's easy to view these issues is buying it. It's easy to view them as either black or white. When in fact there the whole lot agree on this episode of a whole lot of grey? We are going to be talking about the very real world. Dangers singers that come with endorsing an ideology like communism and just how devastating the ideology has been throughout human history and to arrive at this conclusion Asia. We're going to be talking about do the first. The sheer lack of awareness that exists about communism and a second why democratic countries should should work towards marginalizing communist ideologies from the mainstream..

Asia
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

14:16 min | 8 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Cultural Economic Political. Maybe a dash of social issues these are discussions discussions. That we've been having since time immemorial but it's easy to view. These issues is binary. It's easy to view them as either black or white. What in fact there Sarah a whole lot of grey hi and welcome to the second episode smashing the Indian Patriarchy start with sex at? I would like to state that. The following topic is obviously an extremely sensitive one owing to the fact that it covers themes such as x rated content and sexual violence additionally I would urge all my listeners to listen to the piece in its entirety before drawing any conclusions. Because I've tried to address this very pressing issue in a brand of manner I would like to start off by bringing your attention to a report released released in June. Two Thousand Eight hundred the Reuters Foundation deemed India Indus report to be the most dangerous country in the world for women and for those of you you wondering they use four criteria to arrive at his judgment the first access to healthcare for women to second access to economic resources for women the third sexual abuse and harassment and the fourth human trafficking. Now if you go online and look at organizations such as Human Rights Watch or amnesty amnesty and other local as well as international media outlets. I'm sure that you will find tons of different sources that either agree with or contradict the conclusion off the Reuters report and be that as it may whether or not India's de most dangerous country in the world for women. The Saudi reality is this that certain parts of our our country are extremely dangerous for women and we have to be doing better to guarantee the safety and security of nearly five hundred million people in our country. We'll be looking at three key areas where we can at least begin to invest our time energy and resources towards solving. What is a highly pressing problem? The I allowing free access to sex education and explicit content the second dispelling the cultural myth and discussing all of households and finally ensuring that feminist movements are not restricted exclusively to privilege urban circles. So the first point allowing free access to sex education and explicit content the Indian government mandated that sex education be incorporated into all school syllabi throughout the country in two thousand five and they call the scheme the adolescence education education program and seriously props for passing the scheme as that is the first step however while this is certainly a promising first step simply having laws laws that mandate sex. Ed should not be perceived as the end goal in and of itself in fact laws on the books are useless. If they're not properly enforced to yield tangible manageable outcomes and sadly this is the reality on the ground in India especially in this regard Unisex published a two thousand thirteen report on the state of sex and reproductive-health in India which highlighted one of the major issues as the massive gap that currently exists between the policy legislation and policy implementation. Now it is important to note that this particular problem off there. Being a gap between policy legislation and implementation is not exclusively Sibley restricted to rural India. It is a problem that pervades urban upper middle class areas as well the proper enforcement of programs such as the adolescence education program program and conversations surrounding themes such as sexual intimacy and adolescents are simply not happening even top schools in urbanized cities. Take my own personal experience. I for one was privileged enough to do my schooling from a well reputed K twelve school in Bangor Banglore which for our non India. Listeners is my hometown and a city in southern India now my school was continually praised both locally as well as nationally for for having things like a strong academic standing and an affluent alumni network and yet during my entire time. They're not even once where we talked about sex education seriously. Don't get me wrong. We had adolescence. Education program is class but to put things in perspective during and one of our adolescence. Education program sessions in either the ninth or tenth grade wants to topic of menstruation. Came up all the guys in our entire batch watch were told to exit the seminar. Now as for me this. How can you claim that you're preparing future? Generations especially future men for healthy intimate and on sexual experiences when you're censoring information about periods and menstruation from all the guys in that class and keep in mind to reiterate this was the reality eighty in a private well reputed school in one of the most urbanized and developed cities and our country again for reference for our non-indian listeners. Government sources versus estimate Bangalore to be the third of the fourth richest city in India. So given this reality what do you think the state of adolescence education in rural India is going to beep veep now if you wish to dismiss my example purely because it's anecdotal. I urge you to consider the five findings of this 2015 in fifteen report published by the Indian Journal of Psychiatry as well as the UNICEF report of two thousand and thirteen which we mentioned earlier on in this episode so the first finding six percent of adolescent women and two percent of adolescent man note abysmally low numbers actually felt comfortable talking to their parents about menstruation. The second finding finding India has the largest number of adolescence in the world estimated to be roughly two hundred fifty million and yet only twenty percent of them have heard the terms. STD's STD's and seventy percent of them believe that men should take the final decision regarding sexual and reproductive health. The third almost seventy five percent of married read couples in rural India. Felt that they do not get adequate information about sex or marriage in their adolescent age before finding one in every three women report board experiencing both domestic abuse and domestic violence and the fifth and final. Finding it goes back to the point. I raised earlier about there being a massive gap off between policy legislation and policy implementation. So although the Indian government has these various initiatives although they have programs such as the adolescence education program a very small percentage of youth actually partake in these programs in fact the national average of youth participation in programs such as as rh which stands for the adolescent sexual and reproductive. Health strategy is a low. The national average of participation is eight percent which states like Bihar going as low as one percent and again the most important takeaway is this it is one thing to pass legislation. Mandating these programs grams exist but it is a totally different ballgame to actively spread awareness about these programs in schools and in public life and to train providers at add these clinics not to be flippant not to be insensitive to guarantee confidentiality and privacy among youth participants. These are the things that will increase youth participation so activism in this space and India needs to recognize one thing it isn't about passing stricter laws the laws already exist. It's about stricter implementation. Haitian and this problem is not restricted exclusively to schools unfortunately it spills over to all facets of our daily life as well now with the age of the Internet and smartphones smartphones. The world's database and a whole host of content is at our fingertips we have access to a whole area of content ranging from innocent too explicit explicit. Simply a few google searches away bearing this in mind. Some of you may be familiar with the Indian government. Banning Porn sites lead October two thousand eighteen for context. This born band was based on a two thousand fifteen directive from the ultra conned High Court that porn promotes sexual assault. Now newsflash the born ban obviously did not prevent people from consuming pornographic content in India topped and VPN which is a London based as VPN analytics platform reported four hundred and five percent increase in VPN downloads in India in the past twelve months loan since the porn bat. Now many of you may be thinking that you know what this could be a coincidence. There are a lot of reasons that the surgeon VPN downloads may have happened. It could have been a certain sports channel or certain Netflix show. That was not being broadcast in India. But Trust me. This was no coincidence. And it was causally linked to the porn ban a similar web and Israeli web analytics firm found out across more than twelve hundred porn sites. The monthly average of visits to these sites from Indian consumers consumers was two point three billion between January and October two thousand eighteen note right before the band takes place now this number rises to an average of two point eight billion which is roughly an increase of five hundred million in the months of November two thousand eight hundred to January two thousand nineteen again note note. These are the first three months after the porn band. And we've witnessed an increase of roughly five hundred million visits on porn sites born hub. which for those of you? You were going to pretend that you've never heard of that. Before is the world's largest platform four x rated content and found that sixty million visits to their site. We're from India alone in the month of November and December. Two thousand eight hundred. which again is the first two months immediately after the porn band takes place four knob estimates that this was pretty much at all time high for visits from India for the calendar year? Two thousand eight hundred further google trends. which is Google's official tool to analyze analyze data patterns at Google searches found that searches like porn? VPN and porn proxy sites went up by seven to ten times in the months following following the porn. Back so what are the implications of this porn bat. Or what are the implications. been thus far. Well firstly. It's not even having its intended effect of reducing the number of people consuming pornographic content the data I provided to you from similar web topped. VPN and Google Trans all demonstrate this fact secondly with no other alternative to consume such content users in India are opting to visit illegal platforms streaming sites which naught only don't provide the same protections as legal sites which will talk about in a second but actually profit off of disgusting and a heinous content in two thousand sixteen multiple media outlets ranging from Aljazeera to the Times of India reported that there was a demand in stores in rural or Turkish which is India's here's most popular state for rape videos that sold for less than three dollars and the shopkeepers of some of these stores said that these videos were often taken by the perpetrators to blackmail rape victims from filing complaints to the police. And we're done uploaded to these illegal porn sites ones. That did not have a strict. I guide lines as porn hub or any of the other platforms that were banned by the Indian government the recognition that sexual release and sexual desire are fundamental. Human needs is the first step to having the right outlook on sex education and starting the right conversation surrounding sex. The author British example shows us that people do not have an outlet to express these needs they will sadly resort to these horrifically disgusting measures and this sentiment was actually echoed by Mr Cory Vice. Who is the vice president off porn? He cautioned that India's ban of pornographic content would result in Indian streaming illegal platforms arms to consume the sad x rated content now again. Why is all of this dangerous? Well currently regulated platforms that host pornographic content such as porn hub uber. You porn are bound by strict guidelines for instance content that shows heinous acts such as torture or rape and not content. That shows abort acts like sexual intercourse with a minor to name a few are allowed on these legally regulated porn sites and again the example shows us that corey vices concerns of there being a black market for illegal pornographic content are far from unfounded. Did and this black market for pornographic content in tandem with our complete apathetic attitude to words. Sex and toward sex education is adding fuel fuel to the awfully depressing fire that we find ourselves in today. John Milton and John Stuart Mill who were both legendary philosophers from the seventeenth. Mhm Century founded a concept called the marketplace of ideas. The logic is this that all ideas should be allowed to operate in a free free market environment where everybody's exposed to all sorts of ideas without fear of censorship and where the best ideas outweigh the others on the face of their marriage. The moment that you censor or ban something that is fundamental to human curiosity you will create a black market for it. We even saw it with alcohol. Aw during the prohibition era in the US where speakeasy were created. Now I know speakeasy tend to be associated with these sort of hipster venues today in two thousand thousand nineteen but interestingly enough these were illicit establishments that served alcohol which came into prominence as a direct result of alcohol being banned and during the Prohibition Era American media giants a Andy Networks which is the broadcasting wing of the Walt Disney Company estimates. That there were more than and five hundred thousand speakeasy on the east coast of the US alone. History Dot com also owned by a and tells us how Al Capone the gangsters dominated take Chicago in the one thousand..

India Indian government Google India Indus Reuters Foundation Sarah Reuters rape Indian Journal of Psychiatry US Bangalore Al Capone Netflix harassment High Court UNICEF Bangor Banglore
"lotta" Discussed on How Neal Feel

How Neal Feel

14:43 min | 11 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on How Neal Feel

"Like six granny's it makes. It's the dumbest like can't believe what is going on. There's an doc doc net flicks right now. It's about Gene editing and it's like a million dollars to get certain gene therapies commandment. Just Chinaman I mean yeah. Because you'll just get the recipe right. Knock on your door. You make this so that was fucking pretty wild wild Chinese but the but the shows were really fun and I I think there were some feelers in Shanghai can't remember and and yet but the but just just thinking about the life I don't I like I don't do well. I don't know the rules like I get a little like even like no I'm doing this fucking can Ozlem Aleichem joke. Even if not like I was like I can't I'm a fucking. I can't not do the thing I don't think I I would protests in Hong Kong but I'll say anything that's almost like I'll say fuck it anything but the in terms will the Hong protesters are kind of fucked up. Because they're not they don't have. I talked to a few people that are doing it. That the drug kid was going the Hong Kong and He was saying like there's no organization. Yeah they have no. They've no hierarchy. They have no demands left after. It's all very specific like no we want this by this date and it's like well you know we could just fuck in rap Yup right right but they're so. I don't know what's going to happen. Yeah every time. I've gone to Thailand China Iran. You you start realizing how amazing freedom of speeches. Yeah it's almost like aging pat say so so by the way they had to before they could get apartment for me to do the show. They had to go through a transcript. Free Mike's to see what sort of assume that I would do three mice again. That's like the assumption because they don't understand comedy right so you have to throw your our out the Carlin. They don't understand that the rules but but yet you can't make fun of the government on television looking anywhere but even these types of governments there so everything is so controlled. I think my cousin wanted to perform a a song in Iran at on campus. And anytime you want to do anything for arts music movies anything if to send a transcript of the script song lyrics everything and most of them. Don't a lot of them don't get it Muslim get denied because they're usually if they're not against the government there I don't want to will. Yeah eight people. Yeah it's just an odd but the but the upside is this reliability. I mean the upside. Is You sort of know what to no one's GONNA be homeless. Do you know what I mean like. No one's GONNA be. There's it's all the social safety net like no one's going to go bankrupt because the medicine no one's GonNa. It's that stuff that there is. The train was ninety cents the subway to the airport. Yeah Ninety cents so again. It's like pick for. which ones do you want There's a big part right. I mean that's thinks America would be better off with with not with a social safety net like that but yeah for sure. Sure don't film everybody and let us say we want like Y'all want I want some of and then people get loyal to the way things have been. It's it's not better just because will we never had met. It's the American way that's ran. What does that mean it? It doesn't mean anything means freedom now it doesn't it means you can say whatever you want and the government can't have you arrested which tower for it's not. That's no small thing. No it's it's weird. Though when I was in China I realized if you're a government and you WANNA control one point five one point six billion people they have. It's really impressive. How uniform their culture is good for China? What's the funny thing is like lot of dude standing around in a uniform? Innovate uniform. Where like what what he did like? This is a green one. This is standing kind of looking around and I don't think they have any. They don't keep like you'll never know how they come to these decisions. No they just released some documents cables. Yeah and that's about the warriors and and And and it's like they don't know it's like cables in that one too. Yeah there's running cables today. Somebody gives so so. Yeah it's that's a weird thing did not be You don't have to adhere to what the people want an all but now and then here you go stupid so so you know. They got tricked into voting for a fucking moron and they're tricked into like believing that's a fake. You left on a good week. Such a week acted acted. Yeah but that's also why I don't understand when people go to North Korea because there are There are It goes to North Korea. There's vacation packages of that from America where you can go to North Korea. And I'm like why. Are you going to North Korea. I I mean who that Ottawa doctor. The WHO did all the tim must've went and he said it was fucking crazy like they had to turn the generator on to pretend that the restaurant was open. But like it's just like it's fake. It's like no one and then someone else just sat like just fake weird feeators of and you don't ever want someone with you all the time. I have a few times I think the Newark Symphony or some orchestra went and they wouldn't let them out twice if you had to. Can we get our people back. I mean it's I don't understand the point as we think Americans have it so good that they it's entertaining to go. Oh into poverty places porn. Yeah it's it's anti human rights point where you're like. Oh wait I am. Am I gonNA get in trouble. ooh Oh I better not say what I'm about to say. Yeah but I didn't I didn't I'm not in any hurry. Go back interesting. I also don't like going places where you have to get visas. Well all night yet. One ten-year visas gray would Vietnam. It's I went to Vietnam two years ago and the visa weight. And you gotta pay and it just feels it feels more. I get. Why Vietnamese aren't die and for Americans? Comeback Com guys lit loosen up the visa. You're really holding a grudge on this yet. But I don't I don't think I'm GonNa go back anytime okay. Inches it was just. This is not my speed. I really love China but especially talking to all my friends who visited China. I think it's because my brother was there and we did all all these really cool shit because he'd been living there for five years so he did all this really interesting stuff. I don't think I would have seen if I was just on my own for me. I loved it and he had tons of friends. Whatever so I guess it was just like laid up in a hospital? Not late wasn't laid up. I would just like read. And then they go okay. I had the forty five minute break in between each session and then I would just go back and maybe O of four the hospital with me in it. And it's all this Chinese El Show de it's fucking hilarious like pictures of me and they WANNA show now. Did you learn any Chinese Shosha. That's thank you she. She did total. Shame that's what I was told and I think Boulez no bull. Yeah we of course I liked that one and that was all I that I learned. Pay happy to have you so. Yeah but really it was very interesting. It was fucking very interesting and it makes. It's the point of travel which is like okay. There's some more context there's like okay. There's there's an absence of the values I'm used to or customs. I shouldn't even say values. It's like that's okay. There was also going to the airport airport. It was nice like other tours like we have to transfer here and I was like what now it's here. Everyone's helping you like. That's nice. I like Shit like I bet. Yeah like that next fucking theme. Well Shit yeah good `whoosh mm-hmm so let's go. Let's talk about this clown Prince Andrew. Rowe quick he's a black son. Does it right yeah. There is like the scandal when I lived in Europe. And it's just funny. I love those guys. Those big panico Prince of Monica now different Guy Prince Philip Prince Andrew Rooms. That's Prince Philip. Prince Andrew was epsteins front and he didn't interview and in any shot the best not good. He couldn't figure out how to say I'm not a pedophile and I shouldn't have been friend of the pedophile it. It was as bad as our Kelly. Gale gale gale. Might as well as your you're killing me for my life over yes so so What happened yeah so I was just thinking if if if you're pedophile and I'm staying at Your House you gotTa tell me you gotTa tell me maybe I'll spoiler alert? Maybe I'll put it together. But maybe you also tell me I feel like it's it's the sex offender lists like if I go to your house. You gotTa tell me like. Hey although he went to his house for four days to break out with them. It's fucking look crazy interview. He's like I didn't want to break up with him over the phone and so I went to New York to do it over four days. Who who let sorry man? I'm going to take four days. What he did was it seemed like he was like week anymore but before I do where was that little girl the real little girl where she no no no no the other one dark skinned one? Nobody nobody wants so whatever nothin- in nothing up top nothing below Yet so that's what I think happened there and don't be a pedophile Gal. And but also the fact that they are holding Prince Andrew as if these people are special in any way is so crazy. Yeah you definitely crazy. It's like the granddaughters of the revolution. Here like those like weird. It's like an East East Coast. But it would be like honoring the progeny of Abraham Lincoln. Still but worse. 'cause I think older than that like George Washington's great great great great great granddaughter. I love we. Don't give a shit like really. Where do you work so that so he go and give me another spin cavern? I told you this guy. Hi As to what. He's the roommate. Hong Kong burning that you don't that is it's not worth it. There's no woken up. There's no woke woke enough for cabinet guns girl there just isn't they you. He will feel like a the sell out what he was wearing. A KUNTI cantate shirt before that he took up. It's like I do. Yeah everything can be analogous to slavery everything in the world. Every job can be like this is like slavery right They wanted to the the sticking point was they wanted them to sign a contract contract saying I mean again. My reading contract was if I get injured during this tryout you guys are not liable it said It basically said he can't sue them for future collusion in the future for collusion and colluding against him. It had like that clause which his his lawyers were like. No we're not signing this and I guess it was different than something we'd sign in the past so he just made his own. which that I'm fine with I'm not banking the? NFL is giving him a real. Just a simple contract for protecting themselves against Colin Kaepernick. I believe it's not like that. Big of a stretch at being like..

China North Korea Hong Kong Prince Andrew America Ozlem Aleichem Gale gale gale Shanghai Colin Kaepernick Guy Prince Philip Prince Andre Prince Philip Iran Newark Symphony Thailand Mike Vietnam NFL Europe
"lotta" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"lotta" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Lotta felt like a healthcare when he's tweeting a guy from la has i l things like that so he knows some once more about the tax code health care for everybody is complicate the tax code is as well but we know our area we know use we know what affects our family or business or on we really know it well in so from that standpoint his his he's been extremely valuable gonna go to a question from one of our colleagues column wilhelm who i think is in the audience on no i don't seem at the moment but now in the basque youths have seen him in the hallway but billion timezone figure one on it late at night after yep yeah yeah so we've stain great question so how do you reconcile house and senate again what's been incredibly helpful is that have that framework we agreed to i think the senate will take some different uh pass the hit that target of the framework which i think is healthy the the goal is to reconcile this at the am in their challenge of course has to move that through the senate since so i actually believe having slightly different or may be substantially different designs to hit that target that's that's all part of the process i also am hopeful as we market up in committee neck this week as we see whether aries we can approve we throwing a lot of new stuff on the international saive on the small business pass through side on introspective now we're we're going a significantly different concepts here we expect to be incorporating those improvements some fine tuning in we're helped they'll be part of the process so there there's been some was one of the things we've heard from the we've all heard from the outside groups is that there is a back door bat a border adjustment bility tax that's going to happen consumers across the country in this bill but why are they saying that my back is still sore from the discussion over border adjust nothing coming in any direction there so i think i think that's a silly notion but what are they tell us with what is in the bill so when we move because we after when we.

Lotta la wilhelm senate