35 Burst results for "Lotta"

Los Angeles Lakers, Anthony Davis Agree To Five-Year $190 Million Contract

Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

01:03 min | 1 d ago

Los Angeles Lakers, Anthony Davis Agree To Five-Year $190 Million Contract

"Anthony davis got a lotta time. He could build a whole olympic sized jacuzzi now with his hundred and nine hundred million dollar contract. Five years l. c. Four years stared teed without an opt-out it's all guaranteed but i'm saying four years concurrent better said and then a option for the fifth year player option. It's look it has been a great week. If you're the los angeles lakers. Obviously it's a great week of your anthony davis and the davis family lebron james and the james family and it's been a great week for jeanie buss who you mentioned but i'm gonna add one more person. It has been a great actually. Great couple of weeks for rob pelinka and a guy that you and i and a lot of us have all a couple years ago now. We're critical of because there was some stuff and moves that were questionable but none since the last two off seasons and he has not only nailed it. But i think he had the best off season of anyone in the sport so he needs deserves all the kudos in the world.

Anthony Davis Jeanie Buss Rob Pelinka Lakers Lebron James Los Angeles Davis James
Interview With Shawn Van Dyke

Essential Craftsman Podcast

07:57 min | 2 d ago

Interview With Shawn Van Dyke

"John thanks for taking the time to come and chat with us today. How's it. How's it going on doing great man. Thanks for having me. will you give us. I read your bio on your website. But will you give me in the audience of big picture of your background and kind of have to where you are now in. kind of. Give us the backstory. Yeah sir so by education and training or by just sending a lot of tuition money to the university of tennessee. I eventually ended up with a couple of engineering degrees. So i started my career in construction even though that might offend some people when this always used to be an engineer i make fun of engineers used to be one but i got a degree in civil engineering and then a master's in structural engineering and then went out and did the engineering thing for several years and then realized i don't really know how to build anything and i wanted to get out on the job site so transition from i'd say transition from engineering into construction. I really got laid off from the engineering firm. Heart was working for In went and joined project management team for large commercial contractor that. Put me out on large commercial sites Building all sorts of seven are really really like that Did that for a few years than my way. Up working for some architects and then for real estate developer Doing construction management so. I ended up traveling around the country building commercial real estate projects. You know big stores in the out lot developing out lots and all of that kind of stuff in that for several years. And by this time i was married had five kids now so the second kid was on the way my wife was like. I'm glad you're enjoying your job but You gotta stick around mean. I was on the road three or four days a week wherever the projects were so. That was my first business. Started back in. Two thousand five was a construction management and real estate development company. I'm here in knoxville tennessee. So as doing that work here locally then two thousand eight hit and banks were not lending money to real estate developers anymore So i transitioned from there and started a remodeling in general contracting business People these days called a pivot. I didn't realize pivoting at the time. I just time. I had four kids. Three four came back them So put the tool belt on and started a small construction company. Built it up from there and then one of my subcontractors might trim and melwork subcontractor young guy. We went to church together. His business was blowing up because he got into the high end. Trim and melwork work Market here in our area and typical difficult construction business owner great craftsmen horrible business person and he approached me one day and said man. Your i like the way that you run your construction business and everything's always organized I wanna talk to you about how to run a better business. So we met up for lunch and was talking to him about that and giving them some tips and tricks. And and i didn't know he was interviewing me at the time he said. Okay well i think. I need to hire somebody to run my construction business. Much mill work company and He's an acid yeah. I think you should do that. Because you're a horrible business person but you're an awesome. You're awesome craftsmen in great with the guys out in the field and the work was just unbelievable and he just said okay. I want you to do it. And so i thought i was like i got my own thing going on. I'm okay and he's a great salesman and he's like listen. You have a small construction company is gonna take you twenty years to get where you want to be. I'm already in those projects as a subcontractor we've landed some really high end stuff but this business that we just acquired meaning that the projects coming up he said it's gonna put me out of business doing these projects because i don't know what i'm doing and He he so he said I want you to come and run the business. And i thought i bluff bluffing okay. The only way. I'm going to run your business that you let me run the business. You run the field our on the business. But i'm i'm in charge of the business side of it. And he said no problem and he literally pulled out of manila folder with the entire business and it just random paper. Here's the business slid across the table and said you run it and went home talked to my wife and said this is a crazy idea. This is really stupid but my friends gonna suffer and he was right. It was an opportunity to get on some really into high level projects high end projects that i'd already always been wanting to do in such kind of step back and said all right. Maybe we should do this and So bit the bullet went on went. Joined that team as a as the chief operating officer and at the time we had six guys out in the field in within eighteen months we were at twenty two guys in. He was in debt and not making any money. And we kinda turn that around and and that wasn't all me. We had great team a great owner. That had a really good vision and i was just the execute and putting systems in place. Oh did that for about four years and then got another crazy idea saying. Hey what i've done with my businesses and now with this treadmill work business. I think i see the problem here. Within an industry. I can help a lot more business. Owners with systems. All i know construction. It's all i've ever done so after about four years of being the executive there. I left that that job and started writing books and and speaking at industry events and now it's four years later and i've been doing coaching and consulting work strictly for construction business owners since those back in twenty sixteen. So yeah right up for years. We've been doing this Before we move on but are you recommending to your kids. They go to college. You spend a lotta time in college. You said a master's in engineering of some type so talk about that for a second. Are you gonna man. You're gonna make mom hears this. He's gonna get offended. And it. Every time i say but m. i. encouraging my kids to go to college no not specifically i'm encouraging my kids to develop skills in areas that interest them and figuring out how they can make money at it now. Some of those things that some of my kids are interested in now will require them to go to college. But especially as we're seeing in twenty twenty man colleges change. They're still the same tuition rate but they're not allowing you to go on campus and all of the other things that higher said that here's where value is. Now they're saying nope can't come to campus. We're going to do all virtually. So i think the whole world has changed so but to answer your question. No i don't encourage my kids to go to 'cause. I don't discourage them from going to college. The i feel like it's my job as a parent when you're out on your own which i got four boys in a baby girl. I say baby girl. she's five. She's always going to be my baby girl. The boys they're on their own at eighteen. You better figure out how you're gonna make money at eighteen and if that means you're going to college then you know what i took me. I was on the five year plan to get my undergraduate now. Four year plan right but i worked the entire time and paid for most of my most of my college through work. They can do the same thing so And it looked statistically it takes most people at least six years to get an undergraduate degree and only forty percent of incoming freshman even graduate with a degree at all. So yeah do. I encourage them to go that path. Only if it interests them. Only only if that's that's where their future light. Hey you know. One of my kids wants to be a doctor yet. You probably better go to college. I have several of them that are interested in computer stuff in graphic design and other things and got my fourteen year old son this year to start working for a contractor and over the summer and he came home with more money and more cash in his pocket. And said yeah. That's what happens when you go work. And that's what happened with skill so

Melwork University Of Tennessee Knoxville Tennessee John Manila
Houston City Council approves additional round of COVID-19 relief funds for residents during pandemic

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:46 sec | 2 d ago

Houston City Council approves additional round of COVID-19 relief funds for residents during pandemic

"The city of houston is expanding. Its latest round of emergency relief funding to help more people in need city council just approved thirty million dollars in direct assistance that can be spent on any expenses like childcare transportation and utilities not just rent houston mayor sylvester turner would allow people to use it based on their needs. So we're not putting a lotta strings on it saying the people you know your situation better than we do. until now. most of the city's relief. Money was only available to renters whose landlords chose to participate but with this direct assistance. Houstonians will be able to get help without their landlords residents could be eligible for to twelve hundred dollars. The money comes from the city's allocation of federal cares act funding which must be spent by the end of the

Sylvester Turner Houston City Council
Writing and Marketing Books During the Pandemic With Michelle Jackson and Gertrud Nonterah

The Thought Card

05:59 min | 2 d ago

Writing and Marketing Books During the Pandemic With Michelle Jackson and Gertrud Nonterah

"Welcome everyone spending another episode of the thought card podcast. Today we have two very very special guests. They're both my internet buddies. I've actually met michelle in real life as well and hope to g soon but we have a lot in common we are all podcasters. We are all also authors and we're all have a liking in an interest in the personal finance space as well. So i really wanted to bring us all together to talk primarily about what it's like writing right now during the pandemic because it does its little challenging like there's good things there's bad things there's good days and bad days but has honest conversation. I think will be helpful for those who are thinking about writing books or those who are writing books right now. So why don't we go around the room and introduced ourselves and what types of books you right. so let's start with g. a. l. Yell so thank you so much for having me on your podcast. I really appreciate you. I am many things and wear many hats. But i can help you Launch reminds writing. Business where you get paid anywhere between one hundred and five hundred dollars to write articles and you can do multiple times over and over and actually make that a living And i also coach women on how to take a book idea from blank page to complete book as well as with a marketing clan. And i absolutely have a passion for these things. I have a passion for writing. I run Several projects Like you all. I wear several different hats for the purpose of this conversation. I run a personal finance website and podcast called. Michelle is money. agreed. Where michael is really help. People have empathetic conversations about money but also to monetize what you already know monetize and sell what you already know and leverage the internet to do that and e-books in particular In britain content similar to g does is where. I'm focused i started my interest with. E-books was a kind of fostered. Because i hate it low paying freelance work. And because i was able to leverage the book sales to a certain amount whereas getting really nice income coming in i stopped freelancing and then was able to go back in an almost eight months later in only pig great clients because i had money the end from these different revenue streams so I love leveraging writing as a skill in. I think it's gonna be a lot of fun to talk about all these. yes well. I am super excited. Gee i think we're gonna get started with you. What inspired you to write a book during the pandemic this is a book had been monster to write for a really long time rights and i think that office in the office. I coach most of the time when they come to me. It's not because they don't have the ability to write a book. It's not they don't have ideas. But because maybe they're in their own heads about it right or They've been using everything else is on excuse as to why they won't write the book and so when the pandemic hits and we could go nowhere literally go nowhere. I was like life. First of all life is really short and then on top of that like all your excuses to do stuff right now just went out the window. So why don't you just sit down and write so i had. I had this that. I was already writing so this is a good time to finish it. I gave myself a month to finish the book completely. And then another month to edit and then And get the book covering all that together within two months my book you know i was able to launch the book so i had been wasting it for a while but i think one of the pandemic happened a little my excuses who out the window and also i think that it made a lot of us have rethought. A lot of things in this pandemic happened right i. There's not a single person on the planet right now that That have not that. Hasn't rethought everything so my book Is win felines writing. It's on amazon right now. And you know. I i talk about writing. I get questions while what's felines writing. How can i get started. And so i put all that into volumes so that people could go purchase that on amazon. That's why i finished writing the book. I had the book idea. I never really to finish. And the pandemic really got a lotta thinking right. So i'm one of those things was get your book out girl. So so that was. That was why i would in the middle of a pandemic very very inspiring now michelle. I know that your story is a little bit different because you had quite a few books already the queue that you were going to release and the pandemic hit so what do you think is has been the hardest part of writing all these books that you're ready had planned during this time. Well it's interesting. Because i actually was working very specific strategy. I had already released a few books in january february. And i'm going to tell you the names of those just to give you context about how things went really left so for my romance fiction. I decided to write a series of books that take place at the vets. That event was the olympics. The olympics the the first year says first time since world war two that the freaking olympics are canceled. I have these books that i was working specific strategy with and i was like i want to say a bad word but i'm not going to okay however for my not fiction books. I had two other ones that i wrote and out again this january february and the second the first one in his share of i actually had recorded additional interviews to be embedded into that book is supplement the book

Michelle Britain Michael Amazon Olympics
Writing and Marketing Books During the Pandemic With Michelle Jackson and Gertrud Nonterah

The Thought Card

05:59 min | 2 d ago

Writing and Marketing Books During the Pandemic With Michelle Jackson and Gertrud Nonterah

"Welcome everyone spending another episode of the thought card podcast. Today we have two very very special guests. They're both my internet buddies. I've actually met michelle in real life as well and hope to g soon but we have a lot in common we are all podcasters. We are all also authors and we're all have a liking in an interest in the personal finance space as well. So i really wanted to bring us all together to talk primarily about what it's like writing right now during the pandemic because it does its little challenging like there's good things there's bad things there's good days and bad days but has honest conversation. I think will be helpful for those who are thinking about writing books or those who are writing books right now. So why don't we go around the room and introduced ourselves and what types of books you right. so let's start with g. a. l. Yell so thank you so much for having me on your podcast. I really appreciate you. I am many things and wear many hats. But i can help you Launch reminds writing. Business where you get paid anywhere between one hundred and five hundred dollars to write articles and you can do multiple times over and over and actually make that a living And i also coach women on how to take a book idea from blank page to complete book as well as with a marketing clan. And i absolutely have a passion for these things. I have a passion for writing. I run Several projects Like you all. I wear several different hats for the purpose of this conversation. I run a personal finance website and podcast called. Michelle is money. agreed. Where michael is really help. People have empathetic conversations about money but also to monetize what you already know monetize and sell what you already know and leverage the internet to do that and e-books in particular In britain content similar to g does is where. I'm focused i started my interest with. E-books was a kind of fostered. Because i hate it low paying freelance work. And because i was able to leverage the book sales to a certain amount whereas getting really nice income coming in i stopped freelancing and then was able to go back in an almost eight months later in only pig great clients because i had money the end from these different revenue streams so I love leveraging writing as a skill in. I think it's gonna be a lot of fun to talk about all these. yes well. I am super excited. Gee i think we're gonna get started with you. What inspired you to write a book during the pandemic this is a book had been monster to write for a really long time rights and i think that office in the office. I coach most of the time when they come to me. It's not because they don't have the ability to write a book. It's not they don't have ideas. But because maybe they're in their own heads about it right or They've been using everything else is on excuse as to why they won't write the book and so when the pandemic hits and we could go nowhere literally go nowhere. I was like life. First of all life is really short and then on top of that like all your excuses to do stuff right now just went out the window. So why don't you just sit down and write so i had. I had this that. I was already writing so this is a good time to finish it. I gave myself a month to finish the book completely. And then another month to edit and then And get the book covering all that together within two months my book you know i was able to launch the book so i had been wasting it for a while but i think one of the pandemic happened a little my excuses who out the window and also i think that it made a lot of us have rethought. A lot of things in this pandemic happened right i. There's not a single person on the planet right now that That have not that. Hasn't rethought everything so my book Is win felines writing. It's on amazon right now. And you know. I i talk about writing. I get questions while what's felines writing. How can i get started. And so i put all that into volumes so that people could go purchase that on amazon. That's why i finished writing the book. I had the book idea. I never really to finish. And the pandemic really got a lotta thinking right. So i'm one of those things was get your book out girl. So so that was. That was why i would in the middle of a pandemic very very inspiring now michelle. I know that your story is a little bit different because you had quite a few books already the queue that you were going to release and the pandemic hit so what do you think is has been the hardest part of writing all these books that you're ready had planned during this time. Well it's interesting. Because i actually was working very specific strategy. I had already released a few books in january february. And i'm going to tell you the names of those just to give you context about how things went really left so for my romance fiction. I decided to write a series of books that take place at the vets. That event was the olympics. The olympics the the first year says first time since world war two that the freaking olympics are canceled. I have these books that i was working specific strategy with and i was like i want to say a bad word but i'm not going to okay however for my not fiction books. I had two other ones that i wrote and out again this january february and the second the first one in his share of i actually had recorded additional interviews to be embedded into that book is supplement the book

Michelle Britain Michael Amazon Olympics
Interview With Michael Spedden of "Fowl Players Radio"

Too Many Podcasts!

06:49 min | 3 d ago

Interview With Michael Spedden of "Fowl Players Radio"

"Welcome to many podcasts. The podcast about podcasts. Now podcasting from the sherpa chalet on matt podcast era. He's your host jim. The podcast shah rebels in too. Many podcasts the podcast about podcasts. And so much more. You know who you're listening to right. Seen five me. Jim the podcast sherpa bringing you another wonderful interview. And i think you're really gonna like my guest today. Who's out guest today. show pa. He was a lot of fun to talk to. His name is michael sped. And many times that i get his name wrong in the interview. He told me what the name is that he uses for his podcast. And that is the name. Obviously us and i misheard him and hello sherpa. These name was right on the little zoom screen. I could've just read it right there but we were just talking and having so fun. I wasn't paying attention to the name on the little corner. Zoom screen play. It happens but michael is such a great guy. We're actually close in age. And he said it was fun talking to someone who was close in age because he was making references that i understood and to return the favor i actually appeared on his podcast called foul players radio. And you got to check that out. That's a lotta fun on that. Show mike a great guy had a super time on his show. And i think he had some fun over here to didn't even have to make him pay to come on it or anything like that. He did it absolutely free. Free didn't charge them a dime. If you want to listen to michael's free interview on this show how to listen. Hello rebels i send something foul. No it's mike stagnant from foul players. Radio is my guest. He's a musician. A podcast an actor and we're gonna be talking about his career so we can get to know him so you guys might want to check out his podcast you mike. Welcome to the sheriff. La it's great to be here with you tonight. greeting from maryland. All the way up to long island great to talk income. I appreciate you having me having pleasure to have you here sir. I always like to start off by asking. I guess to tell a little bit about themselves. So if you can k- Right now i'm the host of foul players radio. That's f o w l like the bird It's named after my murder. Mystery company called the foul players of perryville. Perryville is where. I live in maryland. Were about fifty miles northeast of baltimore. The reason why we make that ton or whatever you would say it would be for. Foul is because The town i live in is right on the susquehanna river which is known for its multiple species of waterfowl people. They have actual waterfowl museums ear to talk about that stuff so we figured it'd be a nice play on words for foul play my head. The murder mystery company for a couple of years. Now we perform on boats and on trains office parties and vineyards and whoever have us. I also am a musician. I right now have an acoustic duo. That i've had for about fifteen years and we're kind of comedy act sort of similar to the smothers brothers. It's two of us. We play acoustic guitars and the humor isn't as much when with the banter between us as it is with the humor's actually in songs so that's called. The uncle moldy show. And we perform a in the maryland area a wide knob sometimes in pennsylvania to most recently. You may know me as the viking. And the jim what worth commercials while riding around on the bus. I was the big viking. That came out of the back You've also seen me this year on kimmy versus the reverend if you haven't seen that movie it's based on the unbreakable kimmy schmidt and it's there's a scene where kimmy and tight us. The two main characters are way out in the country and they come into a bar. There's a leonard skinner ban. they're playing. And i'm the bartender in there. I won't give away the movie. But it's an interactive movie but no matter what choices you make in the movie. You always get to see me. So that's the good part about it. You know it's it's not like that movie revolved around me or anything like that We have been nominated nominated for a couple of emmys I believe it was for best special perhaps and then Titus burgess has been nominated for an emmy for male performance. I believe as well. I'm excited about that. I'm also appeared on gotham. I wish unseasoned. Five episode eight played one of the penguins henchman named dale. I was shot to death in the third scene. I was in. And i've also done a number of discovery. Id shows and some mom commercials down here in maryland. When i was starting out and everything. I'm also years ago. I was in the hair bands of the eighties. I had a big hairband back. In those days. I had a band that was kind of more like the call to little bit. After that when the hairband started going out we were called orange seed parade we played. Cbgb's in new york a number of times. And you know open for a couple of national acts over the years. So yes so. That's me in a nutshell so we can get a little more specific if you like Depending well you know the first thing that you said that caught my ear was the susquehanna river and i was thinking of that old. Avidan castillo routine about the susquehanna company. All right right squad at company there may have been years ago but the majority of there's only a couple of miles of the susquehanna bets in maryland and it actually goes all the way up to near upstate new york so there could be something on the way you know that river goes through lancaster and harrisburg and it goes quite a ways up. I believe almost up to upstate. New york if it doesn't start up there somewhere along the line. I'm sure there was and with your murder mystery troop you. You're an actor in the troupe. Right yes i am. Yeah okay so basically your book like for parties and stuff like that and there's someone who's been killed in they have to figure out if it's you or one of your co stars did it. Yeah yeah exactly. Exactly exac- i'm normally the detective and the host i'm normally the host and the narrator at the beginning and i have a row i have roster i would save about fifteen or twenty really good actors from this area here and we we kind of rotate. We were on trains. One of our biggest clients is the western maryland. Scenic railroad all. the way out and cumberland. That's all the way out. The panhandle of maryland out west year west virginia. But we also do the pride of or not the pride of the susquehanna we do. The black eyed susan riverboat. We do Slate form brewery. We do some microbreweries. Mount felix winery a lot of the tasting rooms where they have events and trains and boats and office parties corporate events. Whoever will have us

Maryland Michael Mike Kimmy Susquehanna River Kimmy Schmidt Leonard Skinner Perryville Titus Burgess PA JIM Baltimore Avidan Castillo LA The Susquehanna Company Emmys Pennsylvania Emmy
Rachel Nichols On NBAs Return To Action Outside The Bubble

ESPN Daily

03:36 min | 4 d ago

Rachel Nichols On NBAs Return To Action Outside The Bubble

"We've been getting clarity about what this season is actually going to look like so it scheduled to start december. Twenty second and the finals are expected to end sometime in july. But i wanna talk to you about everything may or may not happen. I guess between those two dates because this is not going to be a bubble situation. Now what are the broad strokes of what the league is planning for this season. I think one of the most interesting things that's going to happen to the nba. Is that the situation in the country. Should hopefully all fingers crossed significantly change. Through the course of the season rachel nichols is the host of espn's nba show the jump. She's been reporting on the nba for nearly two decades. It could be. Maybe i'm being optimistic that there's enough people in this country vaccinated that the numbers of of infection or lower in deaths are low and that we have a full city to city. Travel fans in the stands. Nba finals when right now a majority i think of nba teams or at least a big chunk of them can't even have a single fan in the building. And i think that the nba is smart and taking sort of month by month approach. They're not even planning to release the full season schedule at the beginning of the season. Has it ever happened before. I don't think so in any sport like it's it's it's all a little bit up as they go along because that would imply that they didn't know what they were doing. And i think the nba has shown they really do know what they're doing as much as anyone can right now but we don't know so much about what's going to happen in this country that i they can look at the first chunk and just say okay. Here's what we're gonna do at the beginning and we'll see after that give you the basics. Though in terms of how many games we're playing year where they're going to happen. What are the fundamentals of what the first half of this. Season's gonna look like right. Well they're trying for seventy two games in quote home markets in home arenas. They've talked about trying to do the puzzle pieces of the schedule in a way. Where teams if they're you know a lotta times. Nba teams love to tell you how bad the league offices screw them on their travels. Because you know if you're portland and all of a sudden you're going to miami and then you're going to utah and then you're going to new york and then you're going to denver and then you're going back to brooklyn you're like i was just in new york. They're going to try to not have that happen. The thing that they have on their side this time is that there's really not concerts at arenas to schedule around the ideas that if you travel to a certain region of the country baseball style you can maybe play all the teams all of which is great and they've told teams when you do travel. Obviously they take their own plane they will get to a hotel but a hotel with other people in it so they've given them rules and there is this you know. Nearly one hundred fifty page rulebook. They dumped on the teams and thanksgiving weekend and one of them was. Hey when you're at the t. motel. Your guys can't use the gym and the only way they can use the gym if the hotel agrees to clear every other hotel guests out of the gym keep it closed for the entire duration of the stay. Have it cleaned between each player when they use the hotel gym. I mean there's just that's the level of Of sort of detail. They've gone into which is great but the bottom line is you're playing a sport on like football. Unlike baseball that has played indoors. Where the guys are breathing and sweating wreck on each other with no helmets or equipment in between so the league. That didn't have any player. Positive cova tests through this whole last. Six months of on-court play is going to have them this season pretty much guaranteed. So you're in the bubble.

NBA Rachel Nichols Espn New York Portland Utah Miami Denver Baseball Football Cova
Rita Ora sorry for birthday party that broke lockdown rules

Who? Weekly

07:15 min | 4 d ago

Rita Ora sorry for birthday party that broke lockdown rules

"Now for some breaking news. Was she wary. Where was she seen she posted. Why on instagram. Who clean gone too long pause. What's rita ora up to. Who is this woman. We've never done this before we've never opened with what's read or up switching the order of the show were doing top down instead of bottom up. No we're doing bottom up top down bottom up and as we've said a few times in the past month or so rita's back to normal. You know the world isn't back to normal but reed is back to normal. Were sitting about it and yet now i'm like regret now like we jumped the thrill she was getting. We were thrilled. That she was getting The same number of headlines that she used to get however we didn't want her to get these types of headlines. Oh no this is very bad. So celebrated bad parts. Don't throw your own bad party. It's funny because when. When i saw that she was turning thirty i felt a little pang of leg odds tube-like turning thirty like this time like that's that's more rain could feel bad. Yeah for somebody who loves to party. She loves to party but she something happened here. And she's now in a lotta deep water. She's on the cover of the sun so when she turned thirty. This is what we thought on. Saturday night was at saturday night. That her she posted at thirtieth birthday video that her team made her. Were all these important people in her. Life mcwhirter happy birthday. Big jazz. host of it was just so many people i mean. It's dozens of pete. That's what we thought we were going to be talking about today. That's exactly what o our michael caine star studded video incredible. Here's who's in it. We identified a lot of these people even though it was very difficult and then and then this happened sunday night. We'll saturday night. saturday night. Rada had a birthday party that was like a fake up or they. So i think that a lot of people are doing this and this is not just celebrities. This is normal people. They're showing the world one thing on instagram than they're doing something entirely different offense to graham serena showed me beth so rita showed a thirtieth birthday party that was very small and cute in her apartment in her flat. There were balloons on the ceiling. She watched the video. You could tell there. Were a couple other voices in there. She showed this big spread of desserts and it was like look at this cake. I'm gonna eat it all by myself. Ha ha ha. So it's very like this is how i'm celebrating in these times. But she also had a thirtieth birthday party at a fancy restaurant in notting hill. Yeah and it looks like she just hossack rented the space definitely because there were people bringing in liquor and ice and so it looks like she just rented the space and had over thirty people. And it's apparently against the law to even have like more than one person outside of your household and there are more. Their lockdown laws are more We have some to here. But there's more and they're more will get you your name. They're more like actually taking this seriously but also like they should take rita ora doing this more seriously than anyone because again. She's a public figure. And this shit's going to get photographed. What i'm confused about. And i wonder what you think is like. Did somebody call the paparazzi. Like who how. What's the deal with that like. There were lots of photos or photos of the cops getting there and being like What's going on in here. You know like literally. They had photos of the whole shebang. People going in people going out. Rita going in rena going out and i just wonder like for rita we've already said like. Oh you know. She calls the paparazzi. But like you wouldn't call the paparazzi on your own like a legal birthday when you're doing something like flagrantly illegal but this dead. Maybe not someone whether it was someone at the restaurant a neighbor because it doesn't look like these people they're like they're actually sneaking and they're going back doors like it doesn't look like they wanted anywhere right there and also looks it also looks late as hell like it doesn't look. It doesn't look just like nighttime. It looks like it's late really fucking stupid like i. Not that. I want people to like you know flout these rules or whatever but it just looks. They did it. The stupidest way that i could imagine doing this type of kind of activity Are photos all over the son of like police officer showing up in peering into windows. They're blurry paparazzi time photos of her sister and that guy vast morgan showing up with arm. Loads of prospero tequila articulate brand. Poppy delevingne kara levin. A lot of people. I can't recognize among the thirty so if we have photos of those we have photos of the people people knew you know but there are twenty eight other people who weren't photograph because i guess they weren't important enough to be photographed. Her hat to have photographs. Patty love to identify those people. So according to the loss this is what it says in the guardian england's national lockdown which ends on tuesday which is like ria you could of waited it's against the law to meet more than person you do not live with acceptance specific circumstances. Police have the power to break up gatherings issue fines of up to ten thousand pounds for breaches of regulations so she just voluntarily pay according to the sun this morning. She just voluntarily paid ten thousand pounds. She was like you know what. Here's the money police. Stay away from me. I'm so sorry alone. She's on the cover of the sun with a mask on in a big firm furnish coat that says read a party. Cheater was a really good. That was a really good line in the sun that said bang out of ora. Rita ora slammed she flouts lockdown laws. With thirty thousand. I was like bang out of something. Must be a british slang and it is. It's bang out of order which means someone is like acting a mess acting fool. You're being unreasonable. Your bang out of order posted a apology already on instagram winch. Is you know she said hello. I attended a small gathering with you through the gathering rita. You through the party. It was it was a spur of the moment decision. No it wasn't. It was a party that you through a birthday party made with the misguided view that we were coming out of lockdown. This would be okay. You were but few days later. Sorry i've commentary for all this. I'm deeply sorry raking the rules and intern understand that. This put people at risk. This was a serious inexcusable. Error of judgement given the restrictions. I realize how responsibilities actions and i take full responsibility. I feel particularly embarrassed knowing firsthand. How hard people have worked to combat this terrible illness and being fully aware of the sacrifices that people and businesses have made to help. Keep us all safe. Even though. this won't make it right. I want to sincerely apologize.

Rita Ora Rita Life Mcwhirter Graham Serena Hossack Instagram Michael Caine Rada Reed Notting Hill Kara Levin Beth Morgan Patty Guardian England
Godly Stress Management

Joyce Meyer Radio Podcast

02:47 min | 5 d ago

Godly Stress Management

"Think surely we all understand that. It's not god's will for us to live under pressure and stress all the time. How many understand that that is. Not god's will okay and so it is a disease of our culture but just because we live in a culture that doesn't mean that we have to adopt that culture. Now listen to what i'm sayin otherwise. Just end up making excuses for everything it's like. Well that's just the way the world is today but does not have to be the way your world is and then i'm gonna say that again you know just because that's the way the world is today doesn't mean that has to be the way your world is our the way my world is and i can tell you if anything's going to change in your life or my life then we're going to have to take responsibility to change it now. I don't mean that we change anything. Without god the first thing we always do in every situation as go to god but i think we get mixed up between what god will do and what he will enable us to. Do you see we are participators with got. We're partners with god. And i really think that a lotta times. People think that prayer is just kidding. God to fix all this while i just don't do anything are even just keep doing the same silly things i'm already doing. But now i'm expecting god to somehow get rid of the harvest that i'm sewing in my own life making sense and so when you pray you have to have your ears open to see what god will say to you about what the root cause of your problem might be now. Sometimes there's not anything we can do. And if that's the case then god comes in and does it all but a lotta times. Root of our problem is to the honest. just living with a lack of knowledge. We're living in what the bible calls ignorance. We're not walking in wisdom. We're we're doing things. Maybe because that's just the culture we live in and that's what everybody does and so we do that. But we have to go back to the word of god all the time back to the word of god and boys proverbs full of wisdom back to the word of god and make a commitment that we're not gonna live according to what's going on around us but we're gonna make decisions based on the leadership of the holy spirit. How many of you believe with me that if we will all be led by the spirit we're gonna have pretty peaceful lives

Bible
How Plants Fight Disease

In Defense of Plants Podcast

05:51 min | 6 d ago

How Plants Fight Disease

"The microbial world and to my listeners. Probably the most. Famous interactions are the mike arousal associations or maybe some of the bacteria that form in the knowledgeable lls and help fix nitrogen but there is a wide spectrum. Oftentimes pathogenic interactions between plants and microbes. So what made you go sort of the pathogenic or at least like disease route with them. Tie back to where. I kind of realized that when they get sick they actually died and when they died. Then there's less moves go around the world that means prices will go up and that means people that are less fortunate probably not gonna be able to bottles plants or bottles products eventually and it just kind of tie back to where i wanted to katina help others. So it's still tana original passionate helping others. i'm just doing it at a bigger in a much broader implant. That's really cool. Yeah and thinking about sort of all of the threats we face with climate change and just habitat loss. And you know everything. We're going through society right now. Understanding how plants are going to either survive. Stressed out or die has huge impacts across the board whether you're an ecologist worried about conservation or the idea of like food security and just getting people with their right to have access to good food. All of this can tie back to plants on some level and really that stressor. It's not like they're all just gonna fry because it's too hot out a lotta times. They're getting stressed and dealing with a lot of other stuff. Which is where your research. A lot of your research comes in so you mentioned They have similar ways of fighting disease but not exactly because their plants. They're not animals and so let's think about how plants interact with microbes. Do plants have and immune system on a broad spectrum. Is it anything akin to like what we have so. Am i get some backlash for this. But i go hanley. Okay always been. That's always been this debate whether plants have immune system and i some people like to use it I don't like it at all. Okay just put a bad. That they don't have white blood cells. They don't have antibodies. They don't have this like adaptive immunity like we do. I don't really consider that as amused. Glance what. I like to call that. Halfway is planning needs. So they have immunity something. They have components that they made themselves the fan against grows okay but they don't really have that adaptive like components that you will call an immune system so i think If we want to go down with differences so plants and humans One thing they do have in common is they both. Have these receptor like proteins or something that helps them to chat micros. Okay so the way. That dataset microsoft similar invoke lanson mammals. The difference with the malians is Wadis components that water similar allow these receptors are intracellular and Mammals while plans are intracellular. So they stay outside of plant sale and they perceive those microbial related is cool now thinking about all of the different sorts of microbes that can cause an issue for a plan. I mean there's bacteria viruses fungi. I mean does the response. Sort of differ depending on. What's coming in or is it. Just kind of all lumped in and sort of the mechanisms of detection might have some variants. Or where does it begin depending on. What kind of micro talking about here. And i think that's what kind of Fascinate me about this. Feel is like Depending on what the pathogen is or what motive of affection is doing like you get a totally different defense mechanism front of land. So let's say bacteria for example That's half jello. So that receptor. Or the estrogen receptor of plants dakin that said a certain points of jello or from some better and when they detect that part of on they send like a sidney lynne halfway or finland was biased. Light through the plant sales down the activate a defense response or to defend ourselves against the pathogens. So that's like the plant site first response to it But bacteria what they have evolved to do as they had these small proteins or relatively small proteins call factors and these factors what they can do. They can kind of turn off that plants. Though plans they try and go for gel on. They'll try to turn the pathway on and a bacterial cells secrete of that. There's an plant sale and l. Shut off that halfway. Jeez yeah no and that allows the bacteria to continue to invade the vet the planned sale with some cases plant sales. They of all some of these Resistant genes components which are located intra zillur so when arafat their turns off there signaling pathways. You have somebody's resistant. Genes that can detect those offenders and entered on this really robust defense response to kind of just get rid of packaging and so it's just this back and forth on race between planning micros is kinda fascinated with and i'm so glad you said the arms race analogy because that's all i was thinking of is like it's like tit for tat. Every new thing that one develops the other one kind of has two counter end to think that you know obviously there are different players nowadays but this is something that's probably been going on. Ever since plants evolved are crawled onto the land with their roots. And to think of all of the ways. This has been going on through time. It's just this constant change evolutionary pressure to just constantly be going back and forth with these potential pathogens and the ways you can fight them. That is so cool. Yeah i mean it's still kinda going still going on to this day like they're still evolving is still trump

Katina Tana Hanley Sidney Lynne Dakin Microsoft Finland
PS5 owners complain of ‘frustrating’ bugs that stop games downloading and block 4K resolution

Giant Beastcast

01:18 min | Last week

PS5 owners complain of ‘frustrating’ bugs that stop games downloading and block 4K resolution

"We're going on with the hate hard drives four k hdr now. I've been reading about really. What is it on the d f on on digital foundry. People are taught some. Tv's are not playing nicely with the displaying. Four k hdr and four k. I have not had that expe- i either Just like a lotta strange little combinations of settings that that are are playing playing hell with how that thing you know works. I don't i you know. I think it's I think this is a bit of a betas situation. We're in it's a soft launch. We'll call it. I don't know but You know look. I will say this from from the perspective of someone who was playing with both of these things as they were leading up to launch. If i were to have bet on november november i which console would have come out of the gate stumbling Just in terms of like you i. Is this going to work. I would have bet on xbox doing it and man. I'm glad there's no bookies taken action on this. Because i lost that bet Ps five is much bogere in my experience then xbox at this moment in time

Bogere
Economics of Flight Training: Taking The Written Test First?

Behind the Prop

05:17 min | Last week

Economics of Flight Training: Taking The Written Test First?

"So the big question. The one that kind of started all this this. This particular episode for us was while i get asked all the time or i see people all the time. Walking the only go. You know what i'm gonna. I'm gonna start flight training but i'm a couple months away i'm gonna take my ridden first and then i'm gonna come back and see you ever heard anybody with that guidance. I have and i've had a lot of people Suggest that to say go ahead and get the written out of the way or As as the faa calls it the knowledge test So we're gonna use those terms interchangeably the written or the knowledge tests. We're all talking about the same thing. And and ironically when we say the written there's really nothing written about it. It's all online That's that's a little bit old school but The faa has done has gone to great lengths to Make the written or the knowledge test more relevant in the the the scheme of flight training in and they're making strides. I don't think there where they wanna be with it As far as it it making a whole lot of sense. I know when back in the day. When i was learning to fly and taking these these knowledge tests For my first several ratings seventies. On all mine written tests and then i i learned how to pass the tests and then i started making nineties If i go back and i look at my experience. I don't think i ever made an eighty something on a written test anywhere higher low. Yeah yeah i was barely passing it. And then all of a sudden i figure out the tricks to pass the test and then i was making ninety five's and as an examiner I i've never really taken paid attention to The data but i think that's pretty. I think if i were to actually track the written test scores i think the majority that i would see are in the seventies or in the nineties You know you'd think Just statistically that about a third of your tests scores will be in the eighties. But i really don't think that's the way it it turns out so I think the the the idea of getting the written out of the way before you even start training is. It's a nice idea in that. Okay that's just something you don't have to worry about but the fact is that You just don't Me you you just memorize answers. Yeah and and You know there's a lot of the things on the knowledge test that make are gonna make a whole lot more sense if you've actually done it in the airplane princeton. If you're gonna let let's let's just use this example. Let's say you you've got a friend who has come from a foreign country and they have never will us golf. We'll use the sport of golf since you're an avid golfer. They have never played golf. And you want to teach them how to play golf. Well you're probably not gonna give him a book and say read this book and then in three weeks will go out and we'll we'll get a golf club and hit some balls probably pretty fast pre- pretty upfront in the process. You're going to go outside at least out in the backyard and show okay. This is a golf club. This is the way you hold it. This is the way you swing it. You're gonna let them get some hands on stuff so You know use that with the airplane. You want some hands on knowledge before you start attacking the the knowledge test. at least. that's my opinion. yeah. I'm a big believer in that. As well and i don't know under which context you this question. Obviously i get it when people are coming in here looking for a flight school there asking these questions. Normally they're saying. I was told that it'll save me a lotta money. If i do this. It'll save me a lot of money. That just doesn't make sense to me at all. I think you know i. I like the idea of saying. I could get that done but it really is memorization and there are no. There are no time requirements for the knowledge exam. I just have to take it before. I'm endorsed to take my practical exam. Which would be the check ride and mine. My normal advice to young people and adults and parents would bring their. There's sip in i say. Look when would you take a test that you're gonna be graded on and then have to speak to orally about your results. Would you take it before you ever did any flying or would you wait and do it like five to ten days before you had to take that practical exam if there really is no timeline on it. Why would i ever take it before. I finished all this training. You know right. I do my cross country planning probably a month into my flight training but i'm going to go take a written exam how to do cross country flight planning before i ever do any cross country flight planning right. It really is either memorization at that point. Or you're missing the opportunity to truly understand the material like

FAA Golf Princeton
Building Products with Keith Pitt of Buildkite

Developer Tea

06:14 min | Last week

Building Products with Keith Pitt of Buildkite

"If you were to evaluate the landscape and let's say you. Let's say bill didn't exist today and you were to look at the available tooling out there and maybe find that there are some other self hosted kinds of things and would that have deterred you you know. Just kind of trying to rewind back if you had found something kind of filled that that need for you would you have gone and built something yourself or was that really the the critical kind of crux of the matter. That didn't exist yet and you wanted to. I think if i'd found what i was looking for the time i probably built it I just felt compelled for this thing to exist because my problem. The problem wasn't solved. If someone had sold to. Or any for me. I would have been great. I would have been very very happy and over the moon 'cause i'm way more about the problem being solved in solving the problem myself And so yeah. I think that if if the tool head existent of her would have used it already. But it didn't so i just felt like the need to build it so that's the story it it it was this. This need that you had and you were able to recognize that you're able to see clearly can of what you wanted to do. You saw the other competing or not even competing but can of the pieces of the puzzle. The different pieces of the puzzle One did one thing you liked another did another thing you liked but they didn't you know none of them did everything that you needed them to do. It wasn't necessarily. I'm going to put words in your mouth wasn't necessarily because it was a novel idea was because it was a mix of multiple ideas that had already been executed on just not together. Would that would that. Is that true. Yes that's right. I wasn't i took the best of both worlds sir Felicitous that may not know much about cic d- There are two different sort of flavors of cic d. The flesh flava is the self hosted option. And that's you run the tests yourself on sevens that you control and then you run the plane yourself as well And that's going to be done in in if you have a distributed team where the needs to access the tool from harm A lot of these tools aren't really that great of being run on open internet so a lot of sort of kept within. Vpn's or hidden inside offices that's the self hosted option. The other option is the hoisted cic de tolls Your circles you travis's and and those tools you handle that. Will you occurred to them and they manage the orchestration plane and the running tests yourself. The problem with that is twofold but the host options are two major problems. The first problem is you have to you. Have to handle a all of your employees if you want to do continuous deployment which i'm a big fan of Yet the beautifully keys to potty which for some organizations is inaugur the second problem is those tools ernie go so fast if you go to their pricing page. We'll see the slider that earning goes so far out of the rut and you can integrate lost without there. Being a big sign that says contact us to go foster And i didn't want any of those. I didn't accept the cons of the hosted option. It didn't accept the cons of the self hosted option. And so i was thinking to myself. Surely there is some middle ground And so i sort of set out to kind of cherry. Pick the best of both worlds sort of crepe credit mashup of what i thought would be the perfect tool and that's kind of how do was born and i wanted. I wanted to zero in on this idea. Because i think it's important to recognize especially for engineers who are kind of thinking. Oh i have this idea. And it doesn't exist but people can do it themselves if they go and you know mix x and y these two existing things out there A lot of these ideas that tend to be A kind of remixes of multiple other ideas together or you know taking one thing. The best of both worlds like you said. The new product is multiplicative in value. rather than additive. Right in other words somebody could probably go and run. You know two different things to get this same values but when you put them together. It changes the landscape. It's not the same thing is just running those two things back to back. It's changing Kind of the fundamental shape of that product in so it's important to recognize that because critic most critically i think a lot of people who are thinking about starting a business or they're you know they're they're thinking. Hey you know. I'm i'm might do the side thing. I might build a product on the side. I think a lot of them are thinking. Oh i have to come up with a truly new completely novel idea. or outs. Nobody's going to want it right. There can't be at shadow of this idea on the market. Otherwise you know it's it's already saturated every ideas already taken. And i have to come up with something totally new for to be successful and it couldn't be further from the truth. Yeah that's exactly right. There's no such really. there's no such thing as a new idea I think south park said it really. Well they have this episode of the simpsons already did it and there's a recurring joke where they have these themes or plots within the episode. But simpson's already done that particular plot. It's the same product as well. If you look at the big ones rubio burs taxis But they sort of took it and did a mash up and made it better airbnb. Her tells But they've taken it mashed up and made something new. See i city. I didn't invent the i. C d i didn't invent it at all. I just took the best of a bunch of really good ideas and put them together to create something new a new product. And i think that's kind of what a lotta the tools these days. I just improvements of existing ideas.

Travis Foster South Park Simpson Rubio
This is Apples secret weapon to make you care about AR

The 3:59

10:40 min | 2 weeks ago

This is Apples secret weapon to make you care about AR

"With need. Scott stein are guru on virtual and automated reality reality reality to welcome scott a thank you so i'm gonna reality or a are has been something that tech companies trying to make a thing for years and the best example that we still point to which is several years old now is pokemon go which really drew people into this world at least for this kind of gimmicky game. Where are we couple years since then. I know there's some folks are so played a very many as as during the peak was the state of aol. Right now transitional. You know. I feel like what we're looking at We you know we had these the magic leap in all lens that we're talking about how that's all going to be coming soon. And it's not and those expensive multi thousand dollar headsets ended up being slotted into business use. And you never see them in the real world the things you see our vr things. Even those are pretty rare and are kind of like a special treat that people get themselves so the air on phones has just been continuing to evolve and apple has been doing this all along. Google has a our tools That are baked in. And i think what we're seeing now with with a are is a move to more practical things in the in the past. A i got to talk to to apple mike. Rockwall alexandra mcginnis and they're saying that the first goal was just get you to get it to exist in the world in two thousand seventeen so that was your whole like pokemon dinosaurs things that you know. Oh this magically appears it's cool by their latest focused similar. Google is to do something productive and whether that's helpful information or creative stuff. It's like two different pads on the lighter side. Apples made a big deal of lighter sensors on the iphone twelve pro on the ipad pro. Those are opening up into basically creative. Augmented reality yeah. Let's let's slow down for a second there. Let's talk about light art because light are really is the eastern referred to as one of the secret weapons. That apple has a to make a are thing but just for listeners. Who don't know what lighter is. Could you sort break it down for us. Yeah absolutely. I mean stuff like this has been around for a bunch of years of being following tack Google tango. If you're if you're a technical you follow this stuff Years ago had same idea where you would scan the world. It's shooting out. Little infrared dot dot array like like like the face. I d camera or the microsoft connect with that technology way. Back on the connect was shrunken down in one of the makers that was incorporated babble was a bob apple So what it's doing sending out this like these little things. Is there a light pink measuring the space and you get like a dot matrix. A measurement of the space really fast and that meshes meshes is the term for creates a a basic map that space and instead of just saying oh. I recognize a floor. It's like throwing a blanket on the world where it's like. Oh i see where the chair comes up. I see where the walls are. I see where everything you know. And then that combines with things like computer vision which is like recognizing stuff like people you know where the camera like. Google does a stewart's like that's a person that's dog that's so it's a combination of those two things. That's what light are is. Helping do is mapping about five meters away from you see. I've seen this impractical cases where the aca Use your phone to scan living room in the flyer. Central recognizes though. This is a couch. This is the floor is your tv and it'll not consistently put your whatever i hear. You can't pronounce names anyways. The whatever the cabinets and intellectually know that the cabinet will will slot in there in between your tv. Your couch how he said lighters been around for a while. It's just coming into these phones or death on twelve lineup. now we've had a offer while. I'm just curious. How like what does light are do. Now that like these phones couldn't do before. Yes so that's where like when i was mentioning the super weapon in the story. It's kind of double. It's double edged. Meeting one is that it's lighter. But i think apple's real secret weapon is scale so when i talked to developers it's like you go. Oh there's already bad here what's the deal. Well it's kinda like when you see a technology and you go will. It didn't feel like a got there until it got there. Like i feel like what apple is doing is the same idea but refined and pushed into a lot more devices so the iphone twelve pro and the ipad pro but much bigger footprint than google tango was on just two very fringy phones and but but what google in the other thing that track. Here you're right like what really does for a are is. It makes things speedier and better like it gets a ping on stuff faster but it's simultaneously happening with computer vision getting better at doing the same thing without that so google has been doing this with just cameras. Were vr headsets. Do this with four cameras and like they can approximate a lot of that really fast. So it's a dance between that and the more advanced sensors. That's get under the hood. But like i think just means it's faster and better recognizing the world but the second part that i think is interesting is this whole like three d. scanning movement that has been around for a while but is about creating three d objects that you can then share with other people that's getting more of a groundswell in is becoming less fringy and nerdy with every passing year. Interestingly enough to the we're talking about this on phones there's constant rumors. That apple is going to release a headset. At some point of. Do you think the future of a our lies it glasses or in our phones. I think it'll be both. And i think what what you know. Talking with adobe briefly about like their head of a are about what they're doing air creative tools a very interesting observation. He made where they haven't thinking for a while is that it's very hard to enter the ar vr space Until it works with the stuff you already got all your apps like an oculus. Quest is a game console. it doesn't interact with like your phone apps. And so you wanna open like zumra wanted open document. It's a pain. You have to huggins so google apple. Google did this with daydream. Kind of but google and apple needs to approach having work with the phones and qualcomm is already laid this groundwork out. The qualcomm makes the chips in like all the air vera had set right now apple could be the other big competitor in that space. But what they've been talking about is plugging phones in headsets with usb c or wirelessly there already a few emerging anything that's wet provides the power but also like you say the app compatibility so i guess like we the reason i say yes and is like so your app on your phone could do a lot of it and then you plug in your headset like headphones for your eyes. And you're doing the rest of it. I think that extends it and then you think about apple that makes a lot of sense because like the apple watch it becomes another peripheral that makes sense in the sense. Like you're relying iphone is really the brains of the muscle powering experiences but ultimately you view it on your headset or your watch or whatever that doesn't require heavy lifting isn't required you don't necessarily wanna processor heating up right by your exactly and that gets you to things like five g because like talking to developers about five john headsets. It's very slow. Get for that exact reason like qualcomm has has the roadmap for five g. Headsets but it adds a lot of battery drain. You got to build more of a thing on your head No one's really done it yet. But like you're five g phone powers that gets to all the five g. Ar in the cloud stuff. That like microsoft. Google apple. like everyone's going for that. So i think it makes a lotta sense that that would be the path and then like apples processors. Like we're seeing the mac book and the am one like they just keep getting more crazy powerful and you kind of say four. What but like a are is a very intense said a processes and so. That's the stuff that those those processors could drive a lot of that. And then you again. You're not sticking it on your head. Otherwise i don't know will make something. That's like sleek on your face. It'd be hard if you had to put all the stuff in there you talk about a are as a creative tool elaborate on this idea of what. What exactly can visiting with a are so like when i downloaded the first set of like light are unable apps. It really surprised me going back to the ipad pro in the spring. Like the first bunch of a our apps again. We're like pokemon go dinosaur you know dinosaur play game. A lot of these are three d scanners and they are. They're pretty alienating at first. 'cause you're like you bring it up and suddenly you wave it around and you're creating this measure of your room and then you get this like crazy kind of dollhouse three d. model. And if you've never done it before you might wonder where to start how you create this. Some of them look kind of broken. In an interesting way spoke to like one of the bigger repositories of three d objects stock like it. Sketch fab saying it takes them finessing to get there so like these things and that's the stuff that's happening now with lighter. It's not there are some like. Oh the games run better. You can have like a remote control car now your table and like the table blocks it right and it can like hit a wall or like a it could hit like a box like recognizes all the things in your world which is like air. Headsets are going to start doing. But i think it's the creative part. That's interesting whether it's like really scanning in creating tools. And then both adobe and apple have a our creative toolkits with reality composer ero where. They're trying to get people to do this too. So that's what i mean by that. But it's so interesting to me when i look at the iphone. How little of that is at the forefront of what you see on a daily basis like you would never be aware of it and that's the hard part to get on board like apples. Camera doesn't have three d. Scanning it just but it uses light are for focus like in the background so apple definitely hasn't like made it a main part of ios yet but it's in the background

Apple Google Scott Stein Rockwall Alexandra Mcginnis Qualcomm AOL Zumra Scott Microsoft John Headsets Stewart Cabinet Huggins Adobe ERO
America’s Zombie Companies Have Racked Up $1.4 Trillion of Debt

CNBC's Fast Money

07:41 min | 2 weeks ago

America’s Zombie Companies Have Racked Up $1.4 Trillion of Debt

"Zombie apocalypse on wall street. Hundreds of big name companies wants american icons are now among the walking dead names like boeing carnival delta exxon macy's. They aren't making enough money to pay the interest. On the mountains of debt they feasted on during the pandemic. Nearly two hundred companies have joined the zombie ranked since march and their numbers are growing total debt obligations now nearly one point four trillion dollars. So is there any hope for the walking dead here guy. I mean what's interesting. Is that a lot of these names. They are names that we talk about trading on this show. So how should we start thinking about this before we get in the walking dead. I just want to point out. That's a great job by our crack. staff leading. With of course the cranberries zombie which is a bit of an obvious choice in the great delors. Oh reared who lost too soon. She was obviously the founder of the band wonderful vocalist. I might have gone a different direction. And maybe we could've played something like this for example. Melissa leo the crack staff is listening into the show. Why the zombies. No it's important to point out the folks at home. It's more important than actually trading our first topic in what is known as the block of the. It's not it's not more important. And i and we'll talk about the black and we'll talk about zombie companies because i think it's important and last night we mentioned macy's and you talked about one hundred dollars table. Then tim said might be the thousand dollar table. And i think collectively. We thought there was a real good chance that with test that nine fifty five level which was the june high and i think it got up to nine twenty five today on two or three times normal volume. Now's the time to be taking profits. A lotta shorts have been squeezed other companies that you mentioned delta for example. I think that's a completely different ballgame. But what i will say. This counterintuitive is. This may seem if the economy starts to get better. You would think this is good for these companies but that means interest rates economic higher. And that's going to cripple some of these companies. We talked about it last night. And i'm sure one of our guests coming out. We'll talk about that again. Tim how do you start thinking about macy's and that debt that they apparently can't service. I mean when i think about dombi i think about that thriller video and i know guys got that red leather jacket with all the zippers on it. So just just to be clear. I think when i think about those companies you just mentioned they're all they're all different in terms of their Potential to be proper zombies a great band by the way. But i think you know boeing not assam company You know it's not Boeing is a company that has the ability to raise debt. But more importantly yes. Boeing's business has been totally disrupted boeing. His burned through so much cast in the last year. And it will burn through some castro most of twenty-one but it will be free cash flow positive by twenty two in probably be neutral by the fourth quarter so calling them assam company. I think is absurd. Calling macy's zombie company is something that's at least a fair analysis although again macy's showed that free cash flow with something that they expect they're going to have in twenty twenty one two and a company that raised a lot of money To to at least be able to fight another day including having a three billion dollar asset back facility is something you don't do cartwheels over macy's position right now but the recovery there and i'm long so i've made this clear. I actually think there's more of a recovery story even though i don't think macy's gets better overnight. Delta relative to other airlines is not even close to his ambi- story dealt is actually going to start to make money towards the fourth quarter of next year and we're not talking about a normalized business. We're talking about a business where odyssey international comes under a lot of pressure. So i also just think that the fed and the role that the fed is playing here and the role that the fed will play just through talking About the bazooka in their pocket means a lot of these debt markets. Don't have a whole lot of an impact in the next six months To what people think they're gonna do. I really don't expect it so it doesn't matter that these companies zombie companies it doesn't matter that delta added twenty four billion dollars in debt since the pandemic started by baldwin. At what point do we start getting worried about that. Debt load and these companies guy made the point that if the economy gets better you would think that that'd be better for these companies that can make more money they can etc said sell more whatever they make but then interest rates go higher. So how do you weigh that. Yeah those are all interesting. Factors that keep into To keep in the front of your mind. And tim did a good job of laying out the differences of these companies. But speaking to your question right the commonality of all these of these companies that they have as you have looted to have added significant portions of the balance sheet this year and they're burning through cash at a rate and their revenues are down at rates that we just haven't seen we're talking about you know seven and a half billion dollars of cash burn and eighteen billion dollars of casper burn boeing's example seven and a half carnivals example. So you have this push pushing pull situation. What i will say is that you've seen across the board. All these companies put one thing. I right and that is runway. And so they've taken on this debts that they have enough cash to get them to their next stop in order for them to continue to be able to operate what we've seen is them trying to achieve operating leverage by reducing staff count. And that is what. I think the topic that we're kind of trying to speak to. Here's when you start slashing human capital when you stop investing in capital expenditures when you stop innovating that is what leads you to being somewhat of a dead zombie company even after you've getting on the other side of this debt service coverage ratio also something to keep in mind. You can't meet your interest. Can't meet your debt service coverage ratio. You got serious problems dan. Yeah i think bond would makes a great point there and just look at our auto industry over the last ten years and obviously gm came out of bankruptcy ten years and wiped out a lot of that debt but they had a huge government interests that was really carried along and probably hurt them a lot of different ways as far as innovation and the way the bhawan just described it. It's clearly hurt for a lot of ways and look at the auto companies are doing really well right now so i think that's a great point. The other point on this make about this is that this is the world that we live in. It's the world that a lot of parts of our planet have been looking at japan over the last thirty years or whatever and then we are going to be saddled with debt whether it's consumers whether it's sovereign balance-sheets whatever the heck it is corporates. That's just the way it is. And that's why interest rates are really never gonna meaningfully. Go up again. Because we can't service all the debt and just make one other point if you think about twenty twenty and what's happened here. Obviously the fed has done their job. They hit this crisis early to make sure that we did not have large-scale bankruptcies right of some major corporations which would really snowball the unemployment situation here but let me just tell you this here. We are now four months out from expanded unemployment benefits. Were heading into the holiday season. We're in a very rocky transition and a lame duck. Congress and there is no more fiscal stimulus for small businesses and consumers. That need it really bad. So the fact that we have a trillion dollars for a bunch of companies that were buying eighty five percent using their free cash flow to eighty five percent of their free cash flow to buy back their stock over the last five years. The airlines and we can't bail out restaurants so we can't bail out consumers that is really troubling to me. Yeah we're really tough spot right now in terms of that bridge to the other side waiting for that other side for the vaccines actually be distributed and as well as injected into the arms of americans

Macy Boeing Carnival Delta Exxon FED Melissa Leo Odyssey International TIM Castro Delta Baldwin
Pandemic & Enlightenment

Soul Crafting Inner Circle

04:37 min | 2 weeks ago

Pandemic & Enlightenment

"Everyone today from my home office. I hope that you guys have a wonderful week. I wanna talk to you today about something that keeps showing up. So what happened with the pandemic was when the when they d Blaze and at all these things where you can social distancing In all of those that eventually people will start questioning theirselves into sanity. okay. I think that the The sanity is is common to ablaze. Were what i was saying in the early stages of days is is is. This circumstances was happening. Right now will bring to lie if he was really the problem or shes a lack of discipline. Because with barbie glows people able to go. How what end the happen was that now. Use sorta has to phase yourself and what has been consistent in the last couple of weeks me talking to different clients and talking to people is the feel like the all messed up. Everything that every the are walking apologies. Well i don't think they should realize that. But as i think and the other hand is like when you have the pandemic showing up in the in you only amazon people. They can be alone and their own outfits by themselves. Is you start facing things. The four day today leaving we usually high and some people have alcohol. Draw zoll Movies going out being social but not working on themselves. So i think now we are in the edge were we have seen lately. A lot of people comedian That are the didn't Dark places because they either the spend a lotta time with themselves or the realize that. It was not a matter of time to do what they need to do for themselves. It was sort of the lack of discipline or the lack of law for themselves. I can tell you that we are as long as if you walk in water Semiotics for the comments below. And i will i do training with you but if you don't we are all working in processes we all doing. All of this is to love ourselves best possible way so an a and they me insane many times and this process is people in front of you will you will ask for help. And his people behind you. They will help. So if you are feeling right now Day you are all over the blaze and the feeling that they can mess. I'm just using words that people have been describing to me and the last couple of weeks and they're being saying that they're reporting their faces together just to make it bourboule for the people around them.

Amazon
The fight over gig worker status is going national

The 3:59

10:03 min | 2 weeks ago

The fight over gig worker status is going national

"Buber lift scored a big victory in california with proposition. Twenty two which shared that its drivers will remain classified as independent contractors taking the national. But is that a good thing. Roger chang and this is your daily charge as derek carr. Who covers the gig. Economy copies for cnn has been all over the story for the last year welcomed their hi. How's it going good. Well thanks for joining us so to properly set the scene for a listeners. Because everyone is date on california politics. Give us a quick refresher of what Twenty two is and what is going to do. Now that it's become law in california right so prop twenty. Two is a ballot measure that was authored and sponsored by five gig. Economy companies uber left. Door dash instacart postmates and it was a response to a law that california passed a year ago that would essentially make gig workers employees and so rather than comply with that law. The companies put forward the notion basically sidesteps that law would do uber lift and these other gay copies say is their argument for why they should be exempt from that earlier. California law. yeah. There's a bunch of reasons that they give One of them is that they can apply to them that their technology companies the on. They're not massive employers. A another one is they say their drivers in the gig. Workers don't wanna be employees so they're advocating on behalf of those people Another reason is that this making their drivers. Employees could really adversely affect the company's financial prospects. Which currently aren't good. Doordash uber lift aren't profitable and instacart has shown some profitability. But it's it's minimal you. What are the drivers. Say about this. You know it's all over the map and it's actually. It's pretty hard to get a clear answer. There hasn't been any Widespread unbiased polling of drivers so most of the surveys polls that we get had been funded by the companies and those that are independent. Don't tend to be scientifically based like they don't have the the methodology that you need a scientific poll. So you know. The driver's that wanted to be employees are very vocal. They're the ones who helped get the california law passed. They hold protests they have all sorts of networks on social media and a a strong presence on twitter and they really the driving force behind the the california law but uber left. Were very savvy in their messaging during the campaign put out all sorts of paid for studies and advertising by divers saying that they really don't wanna be pleased so as a common person. It's really hard to get a gauge. On what the answer is to that question. Yeah i've got a lot of friends and family who who live in california from there to talk to them about it just to get the pulse and most of them ended up voting for up to a lot of it was because they thought that was the that was the decision to make when you want to support drivers so the messaging alice clear. The these companies spent a fortune on the messaging for this effective because folk clearly thought they were helping drivers out when they were voting for To let's talk about your story. And the fact that even before the elections last november months before these companies were gearing up for a campaign to basically take this national. What what did you find right so this this kind of flew under the radar for quite a while because so much. Attention has been focused on california and california's kind of been seen as the template are like bellwether. What will happen nationwide. It's the fifth biggest economy in the world. You know what happens here can lay the groundwork for what happens the rest of the us but the companies were already thinking ahead Whether they win in california are not and had started to lay groundwork in other states. They are speaking with lawmakers and governors in various states. The companies won't Specify which states are working with but there's indications that they may be in talks with new york and maybe an illinois so it's Done a bunch of work along that front They've been emailing drivers in various states asking them to support their campaign. They have written white papers. They've done national polls to see what people think about keeping divers classified as independent contractors and then they kind of came public with this in march when the uber ceo wrote a letter to president. Donald trump laying out This plan for what she calls the third way it yet chuckled about the third way. Whigs xactly is this. Yes so the third way the way the companies say spin. It is that you know. Our labor laws are over one hundred years old. And there's it's time for an upgrade and this it's a classification of worker that is neither independent contractor nor employees so it's kind of a mix of the two It's those workers that just wanna work. Maybe one or two hours a week and not have to speak to a boss. But they shouldn't they won't get the same types of benefits. Employees have like healthcare sick leave. -cation time minimum wage guarantees all of that so essentially what was on twitter. The right yeah route. Twenty two is is one hundred percent this third way and what prop twenty two offers is it offers a an earnings guarantee that the company say is twenty one dollars per hour but a lot of economists thank after expenses are taken out and if the the amount of time drivers are working is really crunched that they're not going to be making minimum wage. So there's still a lot of discourse around us whether it's going to be good for drivers going national. It's obviously a much bigger deal than just doing this. Focusing on one. St in california they spent Ross or two hundred million dollars on five hundred five million dollars on pro-trade to go national. It's a much bigger deal. Tuggle that about the incoming president elect joe biden and vice president-elect come harris what their positions were appropriate to in just how much Sep of this take will be with incoming white house administration herber and left. The trump white house was very favorable to their position. The department of labor seemed to be heading in the way of saying gig. Workers should be cost-wise independent contractors and the biden win really throws that in a tailspin both biden and harris came out against prop twenty two. They said it on twitter. They urged voters to vote. No on prop twenty two saying decimated workers rights and they have released their plan for workers on their website called empower workers that has a whole section around gig workers and saying that they're being mis classified as independent contractors. So you know depending on how things go. The federal government could place a damper on uber lifts. Plance it's interesting. That harris take that steph. When she's from the valley she's i know she's you wrote about how comfortable she's got in terms of the relationships with silicon valley companies is that is that a surprise that just because democrat. That's democrats role with these In this position you know. I can't i can't speak for her. But this definitely workers rights has been a f- campaign point that bernie sanders and elizabeth. Warren have ran on ams. I think progressives were really hoping harris would and biden take that same torch and they definitely have and it is with harris particularly interesting because her brother in law who worked under the obama administration the head lawyer for uber and has been the kind of voice piece for keeping gig workers classified as independent contractors. And there's there's more That he will be getting a position in the biden harris white house. So you know things things could really be up in the air It's it's going to be really interesting to see how things play out over. The next few months desperately in federal route doesn't go their way. You've already started that. They're talking about other states. Do you think that the go state by state or is that zone strategy that spread themselves too thin. Yeah the experts. I spoke to kind of All over the map on that they the state by state. Now there's fifty states that's a lotta work. They had two hundred million into the california campaign. I mean theoretically not every state is gonna be as difficult as california highly progressive state. That's like berry union strong but other people say you know the state by state way is the only way they're really going to be able to get a handle on this

California Roger Chang Derek Carr Doordash Instacart Buber Twitter Harris CNN Biden Tuggle Herber Donald Trump White House
A look at what’s next for the Knicks after the 2020 NBA Draft

Real_Sports: A Snapchat Sports Pod

01:37 min | 2 weeks ago

A look at what’s next for the Knicks after the 2020 NBA Draft

"Former head of basketball or whatever at ca His son sam represents ob top. And at ca leon is out here money laundering and the new york it is. It is in broad daylight in front of us and nobody's saying anything. It's right in front of your face you don't to be you don't have to work in finance or not. Even money. Laundering is to know that. Ca eric paschal and karl anthony towns in that. Listen i just keep an eye. You need to see a names. I know you know the names. There's there's some guys out there jalen brunson there. There's jim well. That's a lien. Rose family connection. So he's coming soon. I bet But just something's fishy in in the makah congrats on. Ob congrats on quickly. The shooter from kentucky our kentucky scraps but I've got my eye on the garden. All right let's round out the lottery. Deady shutout israel cheer locker room. Podcast chat cheers to that. He goes nine sticks. He's a male and guide. Jalen smith goes tens of sons devin vessel great. So i don't know a lotta guys. I'll be straight on like this the draft where. I didn't know a lot of people but who did the sun stick stick's jalen smith. He's great great goggles. Gray goggles yeah. That's what i got. And then it's the first

Eric Paschal Karl Anthony Towns Jalen Brunson Jim Well Leon Basketball SAM Deady Kentucky New York Jalen Smith CA Rose Devin Israel
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

04:49 min | 4 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Off The coast of Nicaragua that was carried out by the United States in two, thousand, sixteen, the arbitration tribunal of the. Rule in favor of the Philippines in Philippines versus China, stating that China had no historical rights to any land or territory of the South China Sea, and for those you guys who don't know. China's been building a bunch of illegal islands in the South China, sea went accord and the arbitration tribunal ruled against China. Now in the case of the former, the first nick over the US US ambassador to the UN John Kirkpatrick said this of the International Court of Justice. He's that a semi legal semi judicial semi political body which nations sometimes accept and sometimes don't. This then went to the UN General. Assembly, where states had to vote on whether they believed the US should comply with the verdict or not, and all member states except Israel. The United States and Salvador voted against the US, but despite this the US chose not to pay any sort of finer reparations to Nicaragua, and they had no legal obligation to do so because as we've established at the very start of this case, the UN General Assembly resolutions are not binding. They are merely suggestions, so despite the fact that every country voted against America, except three America's still didn't have to pay any reparations to Nicaragua. Now in the latter case, which is Philippines versus China. In the latter case, which is Philippines versus China China also chose to reject the arbitrations ruling on the South China Sea, and since then they've only accelerated construction of islands in the region. And in both cases the US and China could get away with it because like we've said these are not binding resolutions or binding rulings, so he see yet another example of international law nod applying to the most powerful states in the world, the US and China, literally the two most powerful countries in the planet. So now my recommendation on how to solve this as follows and please note that I'm not claiming that this is how we can guarantee compliance to international law from countries like America and China. What I am seeing? Is that without the following steps taking place compliance from states like the US and China with international law would be impossible. So my recommendation is this that in addition to the structural reforms pertaining to the UN setup and the UN Charter, the funding structure needs to dramatically change as well former labor secretary of the US and current economics professor at the University of California at Berkeley. Dr Robert Reich, says this, but no matter what the organization is, follow the money to truly understand them, and this holds true for the UN and international legal system as well currently, the International Court of Justice. Is financed by the Secretary General's Trust Fund, which is taken directly out of UN funding, and we've spoken extensively about how the five donations wield a disproportionate amount of power over the UN's proceedings, so the five veto countries right literally account for forty five percent of Total U. N. funding, which means that a hundred ninety odd countries account for fifty five percent. Five countries account for forty five percent. I let you do the number crunching to figure out. How does the power dynamic? Now, further off these forty five percentage points, thirty eight percentage points are funded by the US and China alone so we see how they're able to evade international decisions that go against them. They control the money supply of these various solutions. So this is yet another example of how without this structural change, institutional funding international law will be used merely as a tool of. Excuse me. International, law will be used merely as a tool of America in China or countries like America. In China to preserve their own geopolitical interests, and all other financially influential countries that donate a lot of the US will follow suit. So how can we change this funding structure, Dr Mark, I look who was the two thousand and six deputy secretary, General of the United Nations under Kofi Annan, said that the united. Nations and all related international organizations today are league with a gross and ineffectual redundancy, which hinders swift decision making the United Nations databases estimate that they have an annual budget of twenty billion dollars including all relevant programs..

China China United States South China Sea United Nations South China Philippines Nicaragua UN General Assembly America International Court of Justice UN Charter John Kirkpatrick Dr Robert Reich Kofi Annan deputy secretary Israel nick secretary Salvador
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

06:34 min | 4 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Discourse isn't black or white. It's a whole lot agree. Hey, guys, thank you for tuning in I'm your host in each on Android? And this is the seventh episode of a whole lot. Agree where we're going to be discussing how we can better facilitate the process of promoting international fees as well as international security, because let's be real. God knows that the current system does not work for anybody so I want to start by providing you guys with a little bit of context. How did the international system as we currently know it? Come into existence. Let's rewind to September second nine, hundred, forty five. This was the day that the second world. War officially came to an end. Eighty million casualties, one point, three five trillion dollars and unimaginable amount of misery later, the world was in desperate need of an era of peace and stability. And Low and behold months later, the UN was established, which was intended to be a League of Nations two point Oh. Now as you guys know. The League of Nations was setup after the first World War to promote international peace as you also the fact that there was a second World War shows that this League of nations. Thing didn't work out quite as planned. Now, you guys might ask even post nine, hundred, forty five. There aren't too many incidents that this international system has successfully resolved. I'll tell you why a big reason for this is that the international institutions that are actually tasked with promoting these global changes are grossly ineffective so an international institution. Quick definition here is an institution where three or more countries work together to resolve issues that pertain to all member states of that institution, and if you're wondering, this is a paraphrase definition from the Global Energy Network Institute. Some prominent examples of international institutions are like the UN or the world. Health Organization so on and so forth, and I'm going to be using the term international institutions and international organizations interchangeably throughout this episode, so please don't get confused and I'm GonNa be largely focusing on the UN and the only reason for this is the UN is the largest oldest and most. Most prominent of the international organizations, so this is a quick breakfast that these comments that are making throughout the course of the episode, obliged to international organizations on the whole, and they're not exclusive to the UN. Even though the UN is going to be our subject to focus or our means subject to focus for this episode, so let's jump right into the. The data what do people think of the UN or what people think of international organizations? A Gallup poll found that as of two thousand eighteen, only thirty four percent of global respondents believed that international organizations do more good than harm that largely they are ineffective and bist trustful. Keep in mind this way down from the fifty five percent. WHO THOUGHT THEY DID? Did more good than harm. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, three, which was eight years after the UN was founded, so it's quite possible to conclude that whatever global progress has happened today in two thousand and twenty has happened despite the existence of these institutions, and not because of it. So why is this the case? Why are these institutions plagued with inefficacy? Let's explore three main segments on how we can potentially make the UN and other international organizations, more effective and useful to the global community. The first segment is structural reform of the institutions themselves. The second segment is having more binding power for U N. peacekeeping forces and the third final segment is making international law and the legal system more binding I'm going to go over each segment in detail starting with the first one structural reform of international organizations themselves before we talk about why the UN and other international organizations need structural reform. Let's go over how they came to be the existing structure of the UN and what its current problems are so following the second world. World War in October. Ninety forty five. The United Nations was setup now this was positive because it signaled the global intent for cooperation as opposed to competition and the geopolitical arena, but we all know that intend only goes a certain distance. If it's not followed through by action so now you must ask why the lack of action in the UN. I'll tell you why. There's a multitude of reasons for this so I'll try focusing on the important ones. The United Nations General. General Assembly as you guys know is the largest wing of the UN and this committee has delegates and representatives from all one hundred ninety three UN member states so wallets agreed forum, which allows for international dialogue and deliberation. There is a glaring structural weakness which prevents it from truly affecting any sort of change laws, and a lot of the critics of the UNC that the UN is a talk shop, not a do shop, and the reason for this is as follows the. The UN General. Assembly doesn't have the power to pass legislation that is binding or mandatory for its member states. What does this mean well? Because the first article of the UN Charter promises sovereignty and autonomy to every member state, the UN technically cannot interfere with domestic laws of UN member countries so ultimately every resolution that comes out of the General Assembly simply serves as mere recommendations or suggestions for these countries, not actual binding laws that these countries need to follow up on. And the best example for this is resolution seventeen sixty one. resolution, seventeen, sixty one was passed to condemn South African apartheid of those. You don't know apartheid. Segregation in South Africa, where the black population was discriminated against by the largely Caucasian South African government at the time now while apartheid was rightfully condemned around the world resolution, seventeen, sixty, one was passed in November..

United Nations UN Charter League of Nations General Assembly Global Energy Network Institut United Nations General South Africa Health Organization UNC
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

07:17 min | 6 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Vehicles. It's just a Sony challenges with the bottle that unless you find the smocked economic model? Run a fleet of electric vehicles. You'RE NOT GONNA be able to have a EV's as the family motor shape transport, and really that is what I talk about some deal in that it. No absolutely unlikely said I. Don't want I. Don't want to do any spoilers from the episode and every listener who's listening to those right now to at checkout Mr Martin podcast right after this one last question from that episode as You talk about how the future of eady's is generally the trajectory. Right especially here in India. And you dr a bit of you. Being. Called battery swapping a good, you just spend like Denver fifteen seconds walking through. What exactly that is why it's beneficial. I think in order to essentially. Sort of your chain. reframe the way you think acres in your mind you've just got to. Separate the vehicle from the. All. Debate needs road ables. Now from the dawn of. The the the motor Gar. We have fitted electric. Fitted tanks into the car which we fill up with a petrol gasoline diesel. Fuel it is. And that all is done combustion engine, which moves the bow for one or the other with me run of federal. We go to the federal about we finished up again and then we keep moving. We built the electric bay. We essentially used the same mental model, which is that wave fitted batteries into the car, and then whenever we've added a battery will and Josh it. The other problem is I'm like a petrol, which you've been just a Filipina tank, and in five minutes or less. It takes even with the fastest fos judging solution at least in our discharge evacuated, and usually you're require. These five. Wait uh-huh to charge a battery. In given what they used to just accept. Of people so the battery swapping idea essentially means that you know when you have of our rather than Josh. Eventually a you'll essentially wouldn't be all batteries out, but a new mattress. This is something that stories. Or these gadgets if we Habra. you actually ever thought by that available. Because obviously it's it's. It's a much larger respect willing to a bedroom The gas station attendant just owns the backbone of your. And wishes of. Food Been Dan back in that. Replace, a, in dire banks are headed so correct, but the other example that I give to make this a little more valuable as before the in Donald question engine. We had all scattered. and when you want do. Drive a horse cottage across the country essentially what it would do is, you would have a venue stations where. You would have horses rested of fully fit waiting for you and you drive. Into that station swap audio host the Diet Horse. That has just written or the night. And swap that out of the new. Houses that are fish any ride. Those horses on so look. We've we've. We've had many mental models by which be designed. Remorse When we switched from the hostage to the The the best engine We essentially the horse into the gardens and fixed it there and we found a way to feed the GOP. If instead we. Just swapped it out. In the way that began with batteries it will be a completely different mental model, and that probably is the most useful mental models for this, so that is. The way I describe a battery swapping it's it feels unreal, because we're so used to thinking of Oslo particularly, but actually it's different from You know with with your watch. Your conscious is out of touch just. A more. Needed Muller. Control the or something like that exactly. I think the biggest was on the COOLEST WAY AS I. Just as general conversation with you is. How so much can be you know? At least dented do like started getting saw if we shift our leads obeyed if we just changed the way we abroad, a lot of these things I think that is of unity coup perspective to keep in mind so just one last question before we wrap this. What's amazing? Is Offer, both out Indian as well as non Indian listeners. Everyone I think is aware today in geopolitics that India is the sleeping bag on waiting to become that big stakeholder. Vicks and we are. We are getting in some sense. Would you think the three areas that we collectively as a country should be focusing on in order to unlock our true potential unlock are do future. Look I. Don't know if I make it to three, but let me tell you. What I think is really important, I think. You know what a huge untapped potential! In that Much off. The GDP of in too much of the GDP this on synthetic I up. and to find ways in which we can be used on. ways in which we can leverage. Able across the stack I think a lot of the platform technologies that we've been billions. Country other, which is the identity of black. You'll be able to the payment platform an all the the various platforms coming up. have tremendous ability to unlock the potential that is our. Hidden away outside of lead night so I think that sort of the the first key that I think. we're really focused on. I, as you can imagine, I have A. Huge. Dining allergy and so one of the things. that. I think we certainly should should trying to achieve. It's easiest at the done. A is to actually use data to leapfrog boss. Generations are so. We've done it in many occasions. In the past of most notably we leapfrogged landline telephone connections all the way to to pull violet. So you're China India short rest the word that. This is what it is like to be a first division of this huge automatic. On with..

India Josh Sony Mr Martin eady Denver Diet Horse GOP Donald Vicks Habra. Oslo Muller
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

02:33 min | 9 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"So just <Speech_Male> one last question <Speech_Male> before we wrap up. What <Speech_Male> has been an amazing interview <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> our world <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is ever globalizing <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and you talk <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> about. How cross <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> border data flows are <Speech_Male> also an inevitable <Speech_Male> process? <Speech_Male> So how <Speech_Male> important is <Speech_Music_Male> cross border trade <Speech_Male> in this dynamic <Speech_Male> you talk about? <Speech_Male> How big of an advocate <Speech_Male> of International Trade? <Speech_Male> You are specifically <Speech_Male> as <Speech_Male> the final thoughts <Speech_Male> for this episode. <Speech_Male> Could you tell <Speech_Male> our listeners? A <Speech_Male> what positive <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> value do you think <Speech_Male> that? International <Speech_Male> Trade Creates <Speech_Music_Male> for the global <Speech_Music_Male> fraternity at large <Speech_Music_Male> especially <Speech_Male> in an age of globalization <Speech_Male> when our <Speech_Male> cultures are <Speech_Male> interacting with one another <Speech_Male> cross worth <Speech_Male> of data <Speech_Male> of ideas <Speech_Male> and in <Speech_Male> a way. Thanks to globalization. <Speech_Male> We are <Speech_Male> more interconnected <Speech_Male> than ever before <Speech_Male> as human <Speech_Male> civilization <Speech_Male> so given this <Speech_Male> reality if you could <Speech_Male> share some final thoughts <Speech_Music_Male> to our listeners. <Speech_Music_Male> About what <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> exactly's deposit <Speech_Music_Male> value of <Speech_Music_Male> international trade <Speech_Music_Male> in this Globalizing <SpeakerChange> Sphere? <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> He said you know. This is <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> such a <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> globalized <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Era <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Right now and so <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> everybody just stays <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in their own little <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> backyard. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> It <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> doesn't <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> doesn't foster <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> growth and <Speech_Music_Female> so <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> when ideas are <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> shared where <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> brainstorming <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> studies. Show <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that it's always better <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to be <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> many to think about <Speech_Music_Male> something to come up with <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> better solutions <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to sit in your <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> own room <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and and and think <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> about things all by ourselves <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> so <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> national trained to use the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> same thing in <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> sharing of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> goods and services <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and knowledge <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> throughout <Speech_Music_Male> the whole <Speech_Music_Female> international community. <Speech_Music_Female> And <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that's how <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> everything improves. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Because <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> what's best in India <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> six boarded <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> here <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and then we'll integrate <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> it into our culture <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> grow and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> be better for it <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and you know <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the same goes <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Throughout <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the world <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is everybody's <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> sharing what they <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> have and hopefully <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> keeping <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the negative out <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and and <SpeakerChange> concentrating <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on the stuff <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> with that we come to <Speech_Male> the end of what has <Speech_Male> been a very <Speech_Male> fascinating conversation <Speech_Male> on very <Speech_Music_Male> very very <Speech_Music_Male> pertinent topics. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you <Speech_Male> so much Miss Murphy <Speech_Music_Male> for your time. I'm <Speech_Music_Male> sure our listeners <Speech_Music_Male> and viewers really really <Speech_Music_Male> appreciate your <Speech_Music_Male> insights that you put <Speech_Music_Male> forward and <Speech_Music_Male> for all our listeners <Speech_Music_Male> and viewers who wished <Speech_Male> to understand more <Speech_Male> of what the GPO <Speech_Male> is an does <Speech_Male> exactly. <Speech_Male> I've linked their website <Speech_Male> in my description <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> below on Youtube. <Speech_Male> Spotify apple <Speech_Male> whatever podcast. <Speech_Music_Male> You're <SpeakerChange> listening to this <Speech_Music_Female> odd. <Speech_Music_Female> Thank you so <Speech_Female> much any. I <Speech_Music_Female> thoroughly enjoyed <Speech_Music_Female> this interview <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> thanks again. <Music>

Miss Murphy Youtube. India
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

01:39 min | 9 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Don't buy into the conditioning that women have to be lady like in Dos. I'll and all of a sudden raid. I I'm not even joking Murphy. I got goosebumps. And you said my motto is never seen fear. That sounds like something out of a Batman movie. It's very cool. I like listening to the hell but syllable of back to the just another couple of questions I wanted to ask you. So the or the European data protection office is pretty much your brainchild something. You founded and from my understanding a big reason why you founded. This was so bad. Non European Union companies shouldn't view the GDP as an obstacle to international trade grab. That's absolutely it any you know. I'm big defender of international trained and I think it's very beneficial for everybody right and you come up with you. Know a regulation. That's there to protect the individuals and the privacy rights and their you know any at all of their personal data. I think that's fantastic. But it shouldn't be an obstacle to train. So I you know from the very get l was thinking. How do I play a role in this to help? Companies to continue to be able to have access to the EU market into the EU customers and and vice versa. Rain and reconciling these two different types of principals protection of the EU individuals in the privacy rights and international trade and cleaned this. This was yeah my way of having. I hope a little impact very very solid.

European Union Murphy
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

01:37 min | 9 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"For our women listeners. Today I was just wondering if you could share any sort of insights as to what exactly where the hurdles that you had to overcome in order to get to where you are today at. How exactly did you overcome them? I'm sure it would provide immense value to not only our female listeners but also the rest of our audience as well. I wouldn't call them hurdles and I win. Call them specific female hurdles right my personal experience. I don't think I've I've I've had those. I think they're just you know growing hurdles and going for when you want and I often conferences on women in power and things like that then I always tell people look at you know what's holding you back in that's always most of the time anyways fear and you have to determine what is that fear what is based on and for Women One. Common factor is the lack of self confidence. That comes from the fact that when we grow up We're often told at the table. Were commended for B Wyatt. For not speaking out. You know you're such a good girl you need being ladylike and stuff right off the you know at the table. You're such a good girl. And went voice saying are functions and everything that's expected from them so they could leave the table the conspiracy taymor whenever it's Kinda like you know. It's okay guys like that and girls are like that and then we go to school and at the same thing and you tell girls. Oh you're such a good girl. You put up your hand when he wanted to speak employs just our on again. I'm trees ready in makes a difference between the boys and.

taymor Wyatt
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

01:51 min | 9 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Risk Assessment. Very very solid and anyway. Thank you so much for the insights regarding your bread and butter and GPS and data privacy and all those themes. Tonight's wants to switch the conversation to more personal element and I noticed Prior to this interview on your Social Media Your Lincoln You've said that you've always wanted to be a lawyer. And specifically an international lawyer. So could you walk us through that part of your journey? How did you know you always wanted to be a lawyer? And why international lawyer? Why did that fascinate you? An interesting question always wanting to be a lawyer died. Love solving problems in helping people so from very young age. I started looking into how that would be possible and I love the intellectual challenges of legal discussions negotiations and things like that and Y for national. I Dunno since I was very young. I've always been curious about different cultures and love meeting people from other places in my thing. You know it helps people making minimum basically sounds corny. That's Dodo League's going feel is going around and I think sharing values and experiences and backgrounds and different countries. Well it just helps everybody. A little bit helps me tremendously and I hope I can help other people too when I travel and it's just knowledge sharing values sharing absolutely absolutely. I think like you said a big advantage is I mean there's so many things that separate us on grounds of culture and race and religion and these other things I think it's very very impressive? Bad you've decided to use. Our international global diversity is a strength and trying to find.

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

01:30 min | 9 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Acton right. It's longer just two BS of legislation right in your own words. You said it has a lot more teeth than the previous directive. Yeah exactly sir. And we're seeing that it's taking time for companies to to Kinda Gen- into the I would say the whole philosophy that has when GDP are came out a lot of companies or or complaining that it was such a heavy undertaking to be compliant and it was a lot you know still a lot of red tape and things like that making clients more complicated for companies and so. I think the whole point of GDP are came into effect was kind of lost in all the you know the e-mailings that we got from companies trying to to sell services for compliance. Because it was seen as something very cumbersome very expensive but now I think there's a shift in mentality that people are starting to see that that it's really beneficial benefit from a company point of US forces you to kind of an overview of all data that you have in use data and positive. Wayne data commercial mate that me. You didn't realize that you in the past right and so it's Kinda you know cleaning the house and then once you clean it up you realize. Oh Yeah Well Mississippi. Really Antonin we can. Do this can do that. And and seeing it more as an opportunity than an obstacle over that shift seeing Mass Dab. Six six.

Wayne data Acton Antonin US Mississippi
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

01:52 min | 9 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Means for the subjects to be able to verify their data and to rectify when they wanted me. Then you have storage the medications so you can't store data for an unlimited period of time unless that's part of the the the legal requirement for that type of data which is very seldom so you have to for every type. Data explain and detail in your register processing deputies. How long are you going to store the data and it has to be for? Irritib- time is proportional to the purpose that you're the legal basis for which you're processing the data so if you have you know if you're you're you're receiving CD's for jobs you can't keep the database for the next five years because that would not be you know of course to the reason why electing the genus though for every type of processing you're going to have to explain how long day no and then you have integrity and confidentiality. That goes without saying that. The data the incorrect has to be. You know not just accurate but it has to be non A. Tom Brady threw lying and has been confidential Soviet again. We're back to mass access to the data to make sure that you keep it at all times confidential and the last one which is all income missing a faulty other principals is the accountability principle and that is really the whole underlying theme. I would say of the GDP are it's making companies accountable for what they're doing personal data so that just means putting everything in place to show that you have done what it takes to secure the data to protect it so to to be able to demonstrate compliance. So that's That's a real easy than and the general loss of the genie are.

Tom Brady
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

13:05 min | 11 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Two week journey from Plymouth to New York. Did you know that two of her initial crew members had to fly to in New York at the start since there wasn't any space left on the sailboat. And did you also know that. Two of her crew members had to fly to New York after regretted journey in order to sail it back from New York to Plymouth says Greta was sticking around in North America for an extended period of time after her speech. This is not awesome random conspiracy theory that I'm paddling by the way major European media outlets such as the times and the UK Andor Spiegel. Germany have confirmed this Julianne Jonge gear a member of the creative professional's networking group and senior journalist and editor based out of Michigan in the United States estimated that the the flights taken by those four people load generated more than two point one million grams of carbon dioxide. And what does this number look like. For perspective respective the US Environmental Protection Agency estimates that roughly two hundred thousand acres of forest would be required to offset that level of of carbon emission so this is emblematic of what is generally wrong with a lot of efforts in the climate activism space today the lack of a practical solution to cut down on carbon footprint in scalable and cost efficient manner. And don't just take my word for it. The University of California Climate Solutions Russians group. Infers that unless future climate proposals actively account for cost efficiency and its practicality within a strong regulatory regulatory framework those climate proposals would ultimately be rendered to list Greta Bloomberg has been immortalized as the face of the climate movement movement. But has she actually been the most devoted climate activist in terms of commitment to preserving the environment. Well when we look at add global outreach regarding the fight against climate change and in terms of sheer time spent preserving the environment it is super hard to discount at the impact of Solomona that Mika from Tim coup which is a rural district in southern India. Her story is simply mind boggling. She's lived for more than a century still alive today. By the way at a hundred seven years old She grew up impoverished in rural southern India and is a recipient of the pod mastery and has an international NGO called thin macos resources for environmental education which functions bulletin Los Angeles as as well as in Oakland in California when we look at all of this alone. It's already far more than what Greta has brought to the table. In the fight against climate change inch and like Mrs Dominica there are numerous other individuals around the world who were making efforts to preserve their local environments. But yet they're we're not receiving the same spotlight despite having done a ton to preserve the environment and who hail from far more vulnerable parts of the globe then Sweden. There's probably another Solomona that in your backyard. Who you've never even heard of so far grotto's most prominent prominent geopolitical action is filing an official complaint against five countries France Germany Turkey Brazil and Argentina China for their failure to prevent environmental degradation in their respective jurisdictions? Now all this sounds well and good but the complaint seems to have have no tangible and goal in sight apart from ensuring that the five countries will do their adequate share to cut down on carbon emissions. I mean we've all heard that before right. It's not like we've never heard politicians or heads of state make empty promises. So here is the thing. There's no penalize regionalization. There is no sanction that can be meted out by the international legal system. Should these countries failed to comply with grads demands. There is no oh real incentive to cut down on carbon emissions insofar as it promotes economic growth in a cost efficient manner. which is the reality for for a lot of these countries today in conclusion? Here's what we can surmise about. Greta and her activism her activism has done an amazing job job of garnering much-needed media attention on a highly pressing issue. And it's also brought about increased awareness. Add vigor in the fight to preserve move our environment however this awareness vigor and activism needs to translate into tangible policy reform in order for her her to be heralded as the champion climate activists of our time. So let's take a look at three reasons why her activism needs to go a long long way way. That is if she's serious about making any sort of meaningful change the first so we know that she's filed a lawsuit against five nations agents. Brazil Argentina France Germany and Turkey. But you know who the five biggest polluters per capita in the world today are it's the US Saudi Arabia Canada South Korea and Australia. None of whom she's included in this lawsuit even if we take her at her best case scenario. Which is the symbolic lawsuit? We spoke to you about earlier. GIULIANA versus the US will in all probability ability get reversed by the Supreme Court as Stated by Columbia University's Center for climate change which we sided and spoke to you about earlier in this episode and the top five countries generate more than sixty five metric tons of carbon per capita per annum to put the things in perspective again. What does this number look like as for the US Environmental Protection Agency? This level of carbon emissions is enough to power more than thirty million smartphones so unless her activism magically finds a way to incentivize these five nations nations from cutting down on emissions. It is super unlikely that she's going to have any global impact in the fight against climate. Change the second reason Greta Foon Berg hails from Sweden. which is a highly industrialized? Society would less than ten million people bull to put things in perspective. That number is smaller than the population of most metropolitan cities in countries like India. Brazil will China or the US aid. Rio De Janeiro New Delhi Shanghai. These are all cities that have more people than all of Sweden. So the reality reality is this a lot of the majorly populated countries right now need to emit some form of carbon in order to get to the same levels of industrialization socialization that the Nordic countries like Sweden or Norway or Finland. Enjoy today. Tom Audela. Who is a journalist as a part of the Associated Press Presses East Africa Bureau reports that ninety percent of the waste in nations that are classified as low income is either burned or or dumped owing to a lack of proper waste management infrastructure the National Center for Atmospheric Research in the US states? That burning waste is a major reason for the worsening of Air Quality Day state that almost thirty percent of global emissions that cause air pollution. Come from waste-burning. I think now a lot of these. Low income countries don't have the mechanisms to recycle or process the waste that they generate. Why is all of this relevant for starters? How do you expect those countries to transition to renewable sources of energy like wind or solar hydro and cut down on their carbon footprint rent when they're burning plastic and burning rubber just to dispose of them? I for one can't help. But think that Grenada's preaching to the rest of us to assembly stop burning even though there's no real alternative proposed comes from a highly privileged point of view. Sweden had time to industrialize. Sweden had time to develop so they can afford to divorce themselves from the realities that low income countries go through to dispose of their waste. Ace signed APPS energy and environmental consulting firm based in Boston says that solar panels are luxury for the citizenry of the US. So then how do you expect. Countries like Ghana Baucus Tan or Liberia. To make this transition if people in America think this transition is expensive if the citizens of the low income developing world were all on twitter the might have even asked Greta how dare you in response to her wistfulness to have everyone transition to renewable resources. This reality is a sobering reminder that Greta Thune Berg while her intentions and activism maybe well well-meaning hails from a socioeconomic upbringing that cannot comprehend many of the realities that serves obstacles to solving climate change the third and final final reason carbon emissions are going to continue to get polluted insofar as both economic growth as well as cost. Efficiency are on the table. So that being said Said Gratis. Best Bet is best echoed by on Mahindra. Who is the chairman of the Mahindra Group in India? which is one of India's largest companies is an is an MNT worth roughly thirty billion dollars? Here is her to find a way for sustainability to promote economic growth. But not wild. That's a great solution. To harsh reality is right now. It would cost countries and immense amount of time and money to make that transition and the Institute for Energy Research estimates that it would cost four point five trillion dollars and at least the next three decades for low and medium income countries to successfully make that transition again for perspective four point five trillion dollars is roughly a quarter of united skates GDP. So where will these poor countries get the cash from. It's only once. Sustainability brings the same promise of economic growth and and cost efficiency as fossil fuels do D- Global Fraternity can work on collaborative solutions to more efficiently invest there are Indian tax tax credits. Unsustainable practices that are not only environmentally friendly but also economically viable. And until. And unless that happens. It's I'm just going to be deemed as privileged discourse where those individuals who hail from small and industrialized economies are chastising the rest of the world to do not develop and to not burn fossil fuels without providing any alternative as to how we can use ECO friendly renewable sources of energy to our advantage while remaining cost efficient in conclusion. I've got a couple of things to save as a sixteen year old Greta. Thune Berg is certainly commendable. Most sixteen year olds me included. Were probably just playing xbox all day at her age without a care in the world and she certainly has gotten a lot of people involved loved the discussion. And you could even argue that. This is only the beginning of her journey but the hard truth is this. She has been the recipient of an insane amount of media coverage and has been deemed as our savior right now to combat the climate crisis. What about the other unsung heroes in your backyard? Around the world in low and medium income countries that we've been ignoring we've shown you in this episode itself that there are other activists both for the environment as well as for for children's rights who have done more than Greta has but have not received any of the attention. I cannot help but wonder that given Greta does lack of understanding thing about the context that racial minorities and other impoverished communities live through around the world have we chosen the right person as a symbol for the movement that is supposed to be dealing with the greatest threat that our generation is.

Greta Greta Thune Berg Sweden United States India US Environmental Protection Ag Brazil New York University of California Clima Greta Bloomberg Germany France Turkey Plymouth
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

14:57 min | 11 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Cultural economic political. Maybe a dash of social issues these are discussions discussions. That we've been having since time immemorial but it's easy to view these issues is buying it. It's easy to view them as either black or white. When in fact there era a whole lot agree on the issue of solving the global climate crisis? Is Greta Thune Berg the real deal or is she merely media media hype. Thank you for tuning in. I'm going to try and answer that for you on this episode of a whole lot of gray with a neon Rome Scientists.

Greta Thune Berg Rome
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

13:48 min | 11 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Nine hundred also rose to prominence and actually became a multimillionaire through racketeering and bootlegging the alcohol black market during the broom Bishen era era and now we're seeing similar effects for block. Markets for porn in India and black markets by their very nature are extremely dangerous because of how unregulated the art so the solution is not to ban porn or not to talk about sex. In fact. It's quite the opposite. It is to recognize the reality that these are fundamental needs that govern our society and to properly instructed educate both the adolescent as well as general populace on how to interact with these needs in a civilized and healthy fashion and a big component of being able to have these interactions is recognizing that women like sex too and sadly there shamed for or it in many parts of India the Indian Journalists Psychiatry states that roughly fifty five percent of Indian women across both rural as well as urban areas have been slut shamed aimed for expressing their enjoyment of sexual intercourse now obviously women enduring slut shaming is a global social problem that needs to to be addressed worldwide men collectively around the world need to do better and need to be a better educated but that said there are still places where women are not ought shamed as much for enjoying sex. The World Economic Forum found that Iceland for instance is the best country in the world for women as well as gender parody. The is Lyndyk sexology association. States that Icelandic women are known for their positive attitudes toward casual sex now. This has a pretty interesting origin. Urgent Story in the one thousand nine hundred seventies Scandinavia. There was a smallpox outbreak where the king of Denmark who ruled Iceland at the time declared it lawful for Icelandic women regardless of their marital status to have up to six children in an effort to repopulate the country. So historically sex was never associated with shame shame for women but rather with pride and patriotism and this today has led to the culture of Icelandic women and men having candid conversations about of female pleasure in sexual intercourse and Dave dismissed archaic ideas of slut shaming and having these candid conversations about such topics and recognizing that women enjoy sex taxes. Well does positively improve the situation of women safety and don't just take my word for it. New World Health which is an organization that analyzes both global global health as well as migration trends found in a two thousand seventeen report that Iceland along with New Zealand and Canada where the three safest countries in the world for women and the National Center for Biotech Information in the US founded these three countries also prioritized what they called comprehensive sexual education. Where where the todd? Both young men and women on how to approach members of the opposite sex the nature of female orgasm and other topics that are simply not talked about in India. Reversing the porn band making sad more comprehensive and having these candid conversations. These are the first steps in guaranteeing a more safe environment for women in India as we said at the start of this section allow access to sexually explicit content have the candid conversations about sex about how it's perfectly normal human human need and that women enjoy it as well pretending that this is not the case only creates a black market for sexual content. It makes women feel more unsafe. It increases the amount that slushing and a does absolutely nothing to address the issue of safety or healthy sexual relationships which brings me to my second point dispelling the Cultural Myth and discussing discussing the role of households in this equation. So many of you might be asking in India. Why is there such a taboo against sexual education and sexually explicit content content? What would the porn bannon everything? Many activists and many journalists alike have been content with saying that Indian culture is to blame. But let's take a step back and look at a couple of facts and see if Indian culture is to blame the first fact Hinduism which is India's oldest religion and some sources say that it's the world's oldest religion as well in the only major religion in the world which has goddesses as major deities and festivals dedicated to these goddesses and the nudity of both men and women in Hindu art is a commonplace phenomenon. The caves economic in western India and the nationally renowned cudgeon temple in central India are both testament to this the second fact so the exact timeframe is disputed ass sometime between the first and sixth century BC but that was around when ancient Indian philosophers wrote the Karma Sutra. And again for those of you who are going to pretend that you don't know what that is. It's an ancient Indian text taxed Sanskrit which explicitly talks about themes like Saks eroticism and their role and satisfaction fulfillment of human desires. So based on these facts. Loan it is shocking. That India is such a sexually repressed society today which experiences such great crime against women. Where did we go wrong? Well L. A. Large part of our sexually repressed present can be attributed to Victorian era history under British colonial rule and under their definitions of what constituted modesty a host of Archaic Laws Governing Social Intercourse in India where past for instance section three hundred. Seventy seven off the Indian penal little code which criminalised homosexual intercourse was actually struck down only recently by the Indians agreement. Court fun fact. It was passed at eight hundred sixty one by the British empire. The same can be said for section four hundred ninety seven of the Union penal code which criminalized adultery on the grounds of and I quote maintaining inning. The dignity of women again. This was a law that was struck down by the Indian Supreme Court in two thousand eighteen and this law also has its origin story dating back to eighteen in sixty again passed by the British Empire but despite all of this despite all this Victorian Era British legislation the messaging that surrounds Both religious and cultural influences in this fear is flawed. Rural India. For instance is where a lot of the crime and discrimination against women and Poor Sexual Education tends to happen. We've backed US up with UNICEF two thousand thirteen report. We talked about at the top of this episode now. In addition to that report a the center of the study of developing societies report in two thousand and thirty found that fifty two percent of people in rural India identified themselves as strictly Lee religious. Ms Doran Jacobson with the University of Chicago Press published a report in the early one thousand nine hundred eighty s where in large parts of rural India Associated Traditional Snow Practices of women's modesty with Indian culture and like I stated earlier. It is very hard to argue that something is intrinsic Indian culture. Given even that India host the only major religion in the world where women have been elevated to the status of goddess and we gave the world the Kama Sutra so given all of this and the fact that India's only been independent since nineteen forty seven. There is no denying that Victorian laws passed by the British Empire and dating back to the mid eighteen hundreds have surely had some residual social effects in terms of how Indian society views bode sacks and sexual intercourse again. It is important to no. I'm not blaming the British for our predicament. Today I've already said that. The free access to explicit content and better sex ED in schools is the need of the hour but the narrative that ideas governing a woman's modesty and the negative outcomes associated with sexual crime and the treatment of women D- Narrative that at these things are intrinsic Indian. Culture is what has to change and this starts by spreading greater awareness of the fact that Victorian era legislation during the British Raj is actually how a lot of these archaic laws came about in the first place and this messaging ought to be spread far and wide across the country country in schools in urban areas rural areas and villages honestly everywhere. Because the thing is this if one truly is a devout Hindu and and looks at Hinduism's artistic works and Literature Tax as past precedent. It is very hard to believe that the negative treatment of women in India Today it is rooted in Hinduism and Hindu culture. Sadly most people in India or religious or otherwise in urban or rural areas are simply not aww aware of any of these facts we need to take control of the story and that starts with dispelling the myth that Indian culture mandates a pathetic attitudes toward sex Ore Indian culture is the reason for our sexual repression in the twenty first century. Now in addition to dispelling these mitts. We have already spoken about how adolescence education programs in schools need to be more comprehensive and how governments can enforce already existing legislation far more strictly but again apart from all of this. What role can households play in this equation and the most damning indictment of how devoid of these conversations households holds it? India are comes from a Washington Post piece in two thousand and seventy which tracks miss mother. Mita Bondi who was a part of the criminology department at Anglia Ruskin University in the United Kingdom Miss Mother Mita Bondi interviewed. One hundred convicted rapists in India's capital city of New Delhi to understand what could prompt these people to commit such heinous crimes against humanity. She talks about how these interviews showed her demand stigmatization an of sexual conversations in Indian households both rural and urban alike. She learned how words such as sex or penis or vagina are intentionally smelly omitted and interactions regarding how to properly go about sexual intercourse simply are not hat. Concepts like consent toward women are unheard of and false notions of masculinity and femininity are paddled instead. So the idea that a woman's virginity somehow correlates to her purity dirty and that a man's inability to lose his virginity makes many less masculine are bold misconceptions. That need to be done away with immediately and households can start right and disregard. We've already shown you. Data which shows how a comprehensive sex education in schools leads to better outcomes both for men and for women limit so having similar education conversations at home with family members can only have positive outcomes as well Canada which keep in mind the new you world health report that we spoke about earlier found Canada as a top three country for women's safety so Canada has a Sexuality Education Resource Resource Center and they corroborated this by saying that the earlier household. Start having these conversations about sexual intimacy with their children. The more likely likely that these children will grow up without stigmatizing or attaching any sort of taboo to these topics and the reality is they will invariably deal with these topics once. They're older older. The Sexuality Education Resource Center of Canada also found that starting these conversations in the right manner will lead to a higher likelihood of children understanding how to navigate around having healthy sexual relationships households starting these conversations among their families brings me to my third and final Section which is ensuring that feminist movements are not restricted to privileged or urban circles. Now a big segue in ensuring that the above discussions are not restricted exclusively to urban and socio economically privileged areas is bringing individuals from rural backgrounds on board and. Don't worry I get. How audit is coming from me? Given that a lot of our listeners probably hail from urban upper middle class areas themselves me included. I'm only hoping thing that me doing. This episode is at the very least a very small step in the right direction but back to the point a big overlap that does see rural Labour interact act with urban households is the industry of domestic workers. And for those of you who are unaware especially our non Indian audience. Owing to India's cheap cost of labor a lot of households in urban India can employ domestic help such as cooks or maids or drivers at relatively nominal rates in two two thousand eighteen business standard report D estimated that there were at least fifty million domestic workers in India for perspective. That would be the if sixty percent of the United States was working as domestic help in urban Indian households given this insanely high number domestic workers who hail from rural areas and work in urban households are the perfect starting point for urban households to start these conversations. What is more telling? Is that more than thirty. Thirty five million of these workers are women so having these conversations really could go a long way. Ms Durga Tenaga who is an officer in. India's administrative administrative services wrote an Economic Times piece in two thousand sixteen about how a majority of women in rural India simply aren't aware of their rights to begin with starting these conversations with your domestic help and urban areas is a great start to bridging this rural urban divide. It is worth taking the onus as urban households in terms of starting these conversations especially since the economic resources of these domestic workers are extremely limited monthly income for domestic workers.

India US Iceland Indian Journalists Psychiatry Indian Supreme Court British Empire sexual crime Lyndyk sexology association racketeering Canada Denmark UNICEF Scandinavia Dave todd Sexuality Education Resource C Saks New Delhi Ms Durga Tenaga
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

04:42 min | 11 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Then the bourgeoisie owned the land and the proletariate served as Labour working on this land but the global global economy as we know it today is far more capital intensive and has many more nuanced levels of delegation and hierarchy thanks to processes such as globalization Zeeshan and the rapid technological advancements. That have happened. In the past. Few decades there is no bourgeoisie class or proletariat class that you can use to separate people anymore. There are far more layers in this economy of which the Communist ideology or Marxism simply cannot fathom so. None of those concepts would even be relevant today but magically even if somehow they were applicable they would not be successful talking pure economics the World Bank or do thousand eighteen reward talks about our free trade which is free from the licenses and many deregulations that AH communist regime would require has led to a direct increase in economic growth among low income countries. And take the two most powerful countries today in the world in two thousand twenty the United States and China which have a combined. GDP of more than thirty thirty trillion US dollars which is more than a third of global GDP. The United States the American dream Silicon Valley Hollywood and their countless other examples Gargantuan economic success stems result of freedom from these communist policies. Not Their adoption of it but this example maybe even more telling Chana which according to the world population review we read out is one of the five communist countries in the world today but remember what we said at the start. It is an exception exception to the communist way of life in one aspect and that's in terms of economics and likely established at the start of the episode. Communism is both an economic as well as a political political system and China made the economic exception to its otherwise communist way of life in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight and guess what it is disc -ception and China's adoption of free market economic policies via processes like foreign investment and free trade that accelerated China's meteoric rise to the top talk of economic food chain. And don't take my word for it. Harvard Business Review States that since nineteen seventy eight up until two thousand eighteen. China's economy has has grown more than fifty times with more than six hundred million people escaping poverty and as per the population review again to reiterate. There are five communist dates in the the world today. Vietnam Laos North Korea China and Cuba and all five of them are politically communist. While China is economically capitalist but keep in mind China's still politically communist which means China's still terrible politically freedom house has consistently criticized the Chinese government for their repression of human rights. It's worth sites such as Google and facebook are completely banned in China. While Uber Muslim minorities are being sent to concentration camps as we speak and the other four countries trees Laos Vietnam. North Korea and Cuba are all equally bad politically freedom. How states that? These nations are experiencing an almost unprecedented level all of Internet censorship and a crackdown on civil liberties and keep in mind that they don't even have the economic benefits that China does because unlike China they're still economically communist. The Telegraph states. That seventy one percent of North Korea's population is undernourished owing to North Korea's economic situation and Gaza Cuba which is an organization in that assist Cubans emigrating to Texas stated that immigration from Cuba to the United States continued through the twenty first century given Cuba's economy being in dire straits straights and showing very little side of improvement so in conclusion communism is greatly economically ineffective in addition to being politically devastating. There is noughties single example in two thousand nineteen of a country that is wholly communists. Keep in mind both politically as well as economically that successful and either a guard and the only only reason the China's successful economically is because they are no longer economically communist had China not economically liberalized in nineteen seventy eight. Who knows they may have been in the same boat as North Korea or Cuba even in terms.

China North Korea United States Cuba World Bank Harvard Business Review Laos Vietnam Chana Texas Google Gaza Chinese government facebook
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

15:18 min | 11 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Cultural economic political. Maybe a dash of social issues these are discussions Russians. That we've been having since time immemorial but it's easy to view these issues is buying it. It's easy to view them as either black or white. When in fact there the whole lot agree on this episode of a whole lot of grey? We are going to be talking about the very real world. Dangers singers that come with endorsing an ideology like communism and just how devastating the ideology has been throughout human history and to arrive at this conclusion Asia. We're going to be talking about do the first. The sheer lack of awareness that exists about communism and a second why democratic countries should should work towards marginalizing communist ideologies from the mainstream..

Asia
"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

A Whole Lotta Gray

14:16 min | 11 months ago

"lotta" Discussed on A Whole Lotta Gray

"Cultural Economic Political. Maybe a dash of social issues these are discussions discussions. That we've been having since time immemorial but it's easy to view. These issues is binary. It's easy to view them as either black or white. What in fact there Sarah a whole lot of grey hi and welcome to the second episode smashing the Indian Patriarchy start with sex at? I would like to state that. The following topic is obviously an extremely sensitive one owing to the fact that it covers themes such as x rated content and sexual violence additionally I would urge all my listeners to listen to the piece in its entirety before drawing any conclusions. Because I've tried to address this very pressing issue in a brand of manner I would like to start off by bringing your attention to a report released released in June. Two Thousand Eight hundred the Reuters Foundation deemed India Indus report to be the most dangerous country in the world for women and for those of you you wondering they use four criteria to arrive at his judgment the first access to healthcare for women to second access to economic resources for women the third sexual abuse and harassment and the fourth human trafficking. Now if you go online and look at organizations such as Human Rights Watch or amnesty amnesty and other local as well as international media outlets. I'm sure that you will find tons of different sources that either agree with or contradict the conclusion off the Reuters report and be that as it may whether or not India's de most dangerous country in the world for women. The Saudi reality is this that certain parts of our our country are extremely dangerous for women and we have to be doing better to guarantee the safety and security of nearly five hundred million people in our country. We'll be looking at three key areas where we can at least begin to invest our time energy and resources towards solving. What is a highly pressing problem? The I allowing free access to sex education and explicit content the second dispelling the cultural myth and discussing all of households and finally ensuring that feminist movements are not restricted exclusively to privilege urban circles. So the first point allowing free access to sex education and explicit content the Indian government mandated that sex education be incorporated into all school syllabi throughout the country in two thousand five and they call the scheme the adolescence education education program and seriously props for passing the scheme as that is the first step however while this is certainly a promising first step simply having laws laws that mandate sex. Ed should not be perceived as the end goal in and of itself in fact laws on the books are useless. If they're not properly enforced to yield tangible manageable outcomes and sadly this is the reality on the ground in India especially in this regard Unisex published a two thousand thirteen report on the state of sex and reproductive-health in India which highlighted one of the major issues as the massive gap that currently exists between the policy legislation and policy implementation. Now it is important to note that this particular problem off there. Being a gap between policy legislation and implementation is not exclusively Sibley restricted to rural India. It is a problem that pervades urban upper middle class areas as well the proper enforcement of programs such as the adolescence education program program and conversations surrounding themes such as sexual intimacy and adolescents are simply not happening even top schools in urbanized cities. Take my own personal experience. I for one was privileged enough to do my schooling from a well reputed K twelve school in Bangor Banglore which for our non India. Listeners is my hometown and a city in southern India now my school was continually praised both locally as well as nationally for for having things like a strong academic standing and an affluent alumni network and yet during my entire time. They're not even once where we talked about sex education seriously. Don't get me wrong. We had adolescence. Education program is class but to put things in perspective during and one of our adolescence. Education program sessions in either the ninth or tenth grade wants to topic of menstruation. Came up all the guys in our entire batch watch were told to exit the seminar. Now as for me this. How can you claim that you're preparing future? Generations especially future men for healthy intimate and on sexual experiences when you're censoring information about periods and menstruation from all the guys in that class and keep in mind to reiterate this was the reality eighty in a private well reputed school in one of the most urbanized and developed cities and our country again for reference for our non-indian listeners. Government sources versus estimate Bangalore to be the third of the fourth richest city in India. So given this reality what do you think the state of adolescence education in rural India is going to beep veep now if you wish to dismiss my example purely because it's anecdotal. I urge you to consider the five findings of this 2015 in fifteen report published by the Indian Journal of Psychiatry as well as the UNICEF report of two thousand and thirteen which we mentioned earlier on in this episode so the first finding six percent of adolescent women and two percent of adolescent man note abysmally low numbers actually felt comfortable talking to their parents about menstruation. The second finding finding India has the largest number of adolescence in the world estimated to be roughly two hundred fifty million and yet only twenty percent of them have heard the terms. STD's STD's and seventy percent of them believe that men should take the final decision regarding sexual and reproductive health. The third almost seventy five percent of married read couples in rural India. Felt that they do not get adequate information about sex or marriage in their adolescent age before finding one in every three women report board experiencing both domestic abuse and domestic violence and the fifth and final. Finding it goes back to the point. I raised earlier about there being a massive gap off between policy legislation and policy implementation. So although the Indian government has these various initiatives although they have programs such as the adolescence education program a very small percentage of youth actually partake in these programs in fact the national average of youth participation in programs such as as rh which stands for the adolescent sexual and reproductive. Health strategy is a low. The national average of participation is eight percent which states like Bihar going as low as one percent and again the most important takeaway is this it is one thing to pass legislation. Mandating these programs grams exist but it is a totally different ballgame to actively spread awareness about these programs in schools and in public life and to train providers at add these clinics not to be flippant not to be insensitive to guarantee confidentiality and privacy among youth participants. These are the things that will increase youth participation so activism in this space and India needs to recognize one thing it isn't about passing stricter laws the laws already exist. It's about stricter implementation. Haitian and this problem is not restricted exclusively to schools unfortunately it spills over to all facets of our daily life as well now with the age of the Internet and smartphones smartphones. The world's database and a whole host of content is at our fingertips we have access to a whole area of content ranging from innocent too explicit explicit. Simply a few google searches away bearing this in mind. Some of you may be familiar with the Indian government. Banning Porn sites lead October two thousand eighteen for context. This born band was based on a two thousand fifteen directive from the ultra conned High Court that porn promotes sexual assault. Now newsflash the born ban obviously did not prevent people from consuming pornographic content in India topped and VPN which is a London based as VPN analytics platform reported four hundred and five percent increase in VPN downloads in India in the past twelve months loan since the porn bat. Now many of you may be thinking that you know what this could be a coincidence. There are a lot of reasons that the surgeon VPN downloads may have happened. It could have been a certain sports channel or certain Netflix show. That was not being broadcast in India. But Trust me. This was no coincidence. And it was causally linked to the porn ban a similar web and Israeli web analytics firm found out across more than twelve hundred porn sites. The monthly average of visits to these sites from Indian consumers consumers was two point three billion between January and October two thousand eighteen note right before the band takes place now this number rises to an average of two point eight billion which is roughly an increase of five hundred million in the months of November two thousand eight hundred to January two thousand nineteen again note note. These are the first three months after the porn band. And we've witnessed an increase of roughly five hundred million visits on porn sites born hub. which for those of you? You were going to pretend that you've never heard of that. Before is the world's largest platform four x rated content and found that sixty million visits to their site. We're from India alone in the month of November and December. Two thousand eight hundred. which again is the first two months immediately after the porn band takes place four knob estimates that this was pretty much at all time high for visits from India for the calendar year? Two thousand eight hundred further google trends. which is Google's official tool to analyze analyze data patterns at Google searches found that searches like porn? VPN and porn proxy sites went up by seven to ten times in the months following following the porn. Back so what are the implications of this porn bat. Or what are the implications. been thus far. Well firstly. It's not even having its intended effect of reducing the number of people consuming pornographic content the data I provided to you from similar web topped. VPN and Google Trans all demonstrate this fact secondly with no other alternative to consume such content users in India are opting to visit illegal platforms streaming sites which naught only don't provide the same protections as legal sites which will talk about in a second but actually profit off of disgusting and a heinous content in two thousand sixteen multiple media outlets ranging from Aljazeera to the Times of India reported that there was a demand in stores in rural or Turkish which is India's here's most popular state for rape videos that sold for less than three dollars and the shopkeepers of some of these stores said that these videos were often taken by the perpetrators to blackmail rape victims from filing complaints to the police. And we're done uploaded to these illegal porn sites ones. That did not have a strict. I guide lines as porn hub or any of the other platforms that were banned by the Indian government the recognition that sexual release and sexual desire are fundamental. Human needs is the first step to having the right outlook on sex education and starting the right conversation surrounding sex. The author British example shows us that people do not have an outlet to express these needs they will sadly resort to these horrifically disgusting measures and this sentiment was actually echoed by Mr Cory Vice. Who is the vice president off porn? He cautioned that India's ban of pornographic content would result in Indian streaming illegal platforms arms to consume the sad x rated content now again. Why is all of this dangerous? Well currently regulated platforms that host pornographic content such as porn hub uber. You porn are bound by strict guidelines for instance content that shows heinous acts such as torture or rape and not content. That shows abort acts like sexual intercourse with a minor to name a few are allowed on these legally regulated porn sites and again the example shows us that corey vices concerns of there being a black market for illegal pornographic content are far from unfounded. Did and this black market for pornographic content in tandem with our complete apathetic attitude to words. Sex and toward sex education is adding fuel fuel to the awfully depressing fire that we find ourselves in today. John Milton and John Stuart Mill who were both legendary philosophers from the seventeenth. Mhm Century founded a concept called the marketplace of ideas. The logic is this that all ideas should be allowed to operate in a free free market environment where everybody's exposed to all sorts of ideas without fear of censorship and where the best ideas outweigh the others on the face of their marriage. The moment that you censor or ban something that is fundamental to human curiosity you will create a black market for it. We even saw it with alcohol. Aw during the prohibition era in the US where speakeasy were created. Now I know speakeasy tend to be associated with these sort of hipster venues today in two thousand thousand nineteen but interestingly enough these were illicit establishments that served alcohol which came into prominence as a direct result of alcohol being banned and during the Prohibition Era American media giants a Andy Networks which is the broadcasting wing of the Walt Disney Company estimates. That there were more than and five hundred thousand speakeasy on the east coast of the US alone. History Dot com also owned by a and tells us how Al Capone the gangsters dominated take Chicago in the one thousand..

India Indian government Google India Indus Reuters Foundation Sarah Reuters rape Indian Journal of Psychiatry US Bangalore Al Capone Netflix harassment High Court UNICEF Bangor Banglore
"lotta" Discussed on How Neal Feel

How Neal Feel

14:43 min | 1 year ago

"lotta" Discussed on How Neal Feel

"Like six granny's it makes. It's the dumbest like can't believe what is going on. There's an doc doc net flicks right now. It's about Gene editing and it's like a million dollars to get certain gene therapies commandment. Just Chinaman I mean yeah. Because you'll just get the recipe right. Knock on your door. You make this so that was fucking pretty wild wild Chinese but the but the shows were really fun and I I think there were some feelers in Shanghai can't remember and and yet but the but just just thinking about the life I don't I like I don't do well. I don't know the rules like I get a little like even like no I'm doing this fucking can Ozlem Aleichem joke. Even if not like I was like I can't I'm a fucking. I can't not do the thing I don't think I I would protests in Hong Kong but I'll say anything that's almost like I'll say fuck it anything but the in terms will the Hong protesters are kind of fucked up. Because they're not they don't have. I talked to a few people that are doing it. That the drug kid was going the Hong Kong and He was saying like there's no organization. Yeah they have no. They've no hierarchy. They have no demands left after. It's all very specific like no we want this by this date and it's like well you know we could just fuck in rap Yup right right but they're so. I don't know what's going to happen. Yeah every time. I've gone to Thailand China Iran. You you start realizing how amazing freedom of speeches. Yeah it's almost like aging pat say so so by the way they had to before they could get apartment for me to do the show. They had to go through a transcript. Free Mike's to see what sort of assume that I would do three mice again. That's like the assumption because they don't understand comedy right so you have to throw your our out the Carlin. They don't understand that the rules but but yet you can't make fun of the government on television looking anywhere but even these types of governments there so everything is so controlled. I think my cousin wanted to perform a a song in Iran at on campus. And anytime you want to do anything for arts music movies anything if to send a transcript of the script song lyrics everything and most of them. Don't a lot of them don't get it Muslim get denied because they're usually if they're not against the government there I don't want to will. Yeah eight people. Yeah it's just an odd but the but the upside is this reliability. I mean the upside. Is You sort of know what to no one's GONNA be homeless. Do you know what I mean like. No one's GONNA be. There's it's all the social safety net like no one's going to go bankrupt because the medicine no one's GonNa. It's that stuff that there is. The train was ninety cents the subway to the airport. Yeah Ninety cents so again. It's like pick for. which ones do you want There's a big part right. I mean that's thinks America would be better off with with not with a social safety net like that but yeah for sure. Sure don't film everybody and let us say we want like Y'all want I want some of and then people get loyal to the way things have been. It's it's not better just because will we never had met. It's the American way that's ran. What does that mean it? It doesn't mean anything means freedom now it doesn't it means you can say whatever you want and the government can't have you arrested which tower for it's not. That's no small thing. No it's it's weird. Though when I was in China I realized if you're a government and you WANNA control one point five one point six billion people they have. It's really impressive. How uniform their culture is good for China? What's the funny thing is like lot of dude standing around in a uniform? Innovate uniform. Where like what what he did like? This is a green one. This is standing kind of looking around and I don't think they have any. They don't keep like you'll never know how they come to these decisions. No they just released some documents cables. Yeah and that's about the warriors and and And and it's like they don't know it's like cables in that one too. Yeah there's running cables today. Somebody gives so so. Yeah it's that's a weird thing did not be You don't have to adhere to what the people want an all but now and then here you go stupid so so you know. They got tricked into voting for a fucking moron and they're tricked into like believing that's a fake. You left on a good week. Such a week acted acted. Yeah but that's also why I don't understand when people go to North Korea because there are There are It goes to North Korea. There's vacation packages of that from America where you can go to North Korea. And I'm like why. Are you going to North Korea. I I mean who that Ottawa doctor. The WHO did all the tim must've went and he said it was fucking crazy like they had to turn the generator on to pretend that the restaurant was open. But like it's just like it's fake. It's like no one and then someone else just sat like just fake weird feeators of and you don't ever want someone with you all the time. I have a few times I think the Newark Symphony or some orchestra went and they wouldn't let them out twice if you had to. Can we get our people back. I mean it's I don't understand the point as we think Americans have it so good that they it's entertaining to go. Oh into poverty places porn. Yeah it's it's anti human rights point where you're like. Oh wait I am. Am I gonNA get in trouble. ooh Oh I better not say what I'm about to say. Yeah but I didn't I didn't I'm not in any hurry. Go back interesting. I also don't like going places where you have to get visas. Well all night yet. One ten-year visas gray would Vietnam. It's I went to Vietnam two years ago and the visa weight. And you gotta pay and it just feels it feels more. I get. Why Vietnamese aren't die and for Americans? Comeback Com guys lit loosen up the visa. You're really holding a grudge on this yet. But I don't I don't think I'm GonNa go back anytime okay. Inches it was just. This is not my speed. I really love China but especially talking to all my friends who visited China. I think it's because my brother was there and we did all all these really cool shit because he'd been living there for five years so he did all this really interesting stuff. I don't think I would have seen if I was just on my own for me. I loved it and he had tons of friends. Whatever so I guess it was just like laid up in a hospital? Not late wasn't laid up. I would just like read. And then they go okay. I had the forty five minute break in between each session and then I would just go back and maybe O of four the hospital with me in it. And it's all this Chinese El Show de it's fucking hilarious like pictures of me and they WANNA show now. Did you learn any Chinese Shosha. That's thank you she. She did total. Shame that's what I was told and I think Boulez no bull. Yeah we of course I liked that one and that was all I that I learned. Pay happy to have you so. Yeah but really it was very interesting. It was fucking very interesting and it makes. It's the point of travel which is like okay. There's some more context there's like okay. There's there's an absence of the values I'm used to or customs. I shouldn't even say values. It's like that's okay. There was also going to the airport airport. It was nice like other tours like we have to transfer here and I was like what now it's here. Everyone's helping you like. That's nice. I like Shit like I bet. Yeah like that next fucking theme. Well Shit yeah good `whoosh mm-hmm so let's go. Let's talk about this clown Prince Andrew. Rowe quick he's a black son. Does it right yeah. There is like the scandal when I lived in Europe. And it's just funny. I love those guys. Those big panico Prince of Monica now different Guy Prince Philip Prince Andrew Rooms. That's Prince Philip. Prince Andrew was epsteins front and he didn't interview and in any shot the best not good. He couldn't figure out how to say I'm not a pedophile and I shouldn't have been friend of the pedophile it. It was as bad as our Kelly. Gale gale gale. Might as well as your you're killing me for my life over yes so so What happened yeah so I was just thinking if if if you're pedophile and I'm staying at Your House you gotTa tell me you gotTa tell me maybe I'll spoiler alert? Maybe I'll put it together. But maybe you also tell me I feel like it's it's the sex offender lists like if I go to your house. You gotTa tell me like. Hey although he went to his house for four days to break out with them. It's fucking look crazy interview. He's like I didn't want to break up with him over the phone and so I went to New York to do it over four days. Who who let sorry man? I'm going to take four days. What he did was it seemed like he was like week anymore but before I do where was that little girl the real little girl where she no no no no the other one dark skinned one? Nobody nobody wants so whatever nothin- in nothing up top nothing below Yet so that's what I think happened there and don't be a pedophile Gal. And but also the fact that they are holding Prince Andrew as if these people are special in any way is so crazy. Yeah you definitely crazy. It's like the granddaughters of the revolution. Here like those like weird. It's like an East East Coast. But it would be like honoring the progeny of Abraham Lincoln. Still but worse. 'cause I think older than that like George Washington's great great great great great granddaughter. I love we. Don't give a shit like really. Where do you work so that so he go and give me another spin cavern? I told you this guy. Hi As to what. He's the roommate. Hong Kong burning that you don't that is it's not worth it. There's no woken up. There's no woke woke enough for cabinet guns girl there just isn't they you. He will feel like a the sell out what he was wearing. A KUNTI cantate shirt before that he took up. It's like I do. Yeah everything can be analogous to slavery everything in the world. Every job can be like this is like slavery right They wanted to the the sticking point was they wanted them to sign a contract contract saying I mean again. My reading contract was if I get injured during this tryout you guys are not liable it said It basically said he can't sue them for future collusion in the future for collusion and colluding against him. It had like that clause which his his lawyers were like. No we're not signing this and I guess it was different than something we'd sign in the past so he just made his own. which that I'm fine with I'm not banking the? NFL is giving him a real. Just a simple contract for protecting themselves against Colin Kaepernick. I believe it's not like that. Big of a stretch at being like..

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"lotta" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"lotta" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Lotta felt like a healthcare when he's tweeting a guy from la has i l things like that so he knows some once more about the tax code health care for everybody is complicate the tax code is as well but we know our area we know use we know what affects our family or business or on we really know it well in so from that standpoint his his he's been extremely valuable gonna go to a question from one of our colleagues column wilhelm who i think is in the audience on no i don't seem at the moment but now in the basque youths have seen him in the hallway but billion timezone figure one on it late at night after yep yeah yeah so we've stain great question so how do you reconcile house and senate again what's been incredibly helpful is that have that framework we agreed to i think the senate will take some different uh pass the hit that target of the framework which i think is healthy the the goal is to reconcile this at the am in their challenge of course has to move that through the senate since so i actually believe having slightly different or may be substantially different designs to hit that target that's that's all part of the process i also am hopeful as we market up in committee neck this week as we see whether aries we can approve we throwing a lot of new stuff on the international saive on the small business pass through side on introspective now we're we're going a significantly different concepts here we expect to be incorporating those improvements some fine tuning in we're helped they'll be part of the process so there there's been some was one of the things we've heard from the we've all heard from the outside groups is that there is a back door bat a border adjustment bility tax that's going to happen consumers across the country in this bill but why are they saying that my back is still sore from the discussion over border adjust nothing coming in any direction there so i think i think that's a silly notion but what are they tell us with what is in the bill so when we move because we after when we.

Lotta la wilhelm senate