19 Episode results for "Los Lobos"

Los Lobos Welcome The Holiday Season With New Album 'Lleg Navidad'

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

47:43 min | 1 year ago

Los Lobos Welcome The Holiday Season With New Album 'Lleg Navidad'

"The WB you are Boston. Meghna talk with Artie and this is on one point for nearly fifty years. Los Lobos has been mixing and matching genres rock or in being Mexican folk and now Christmas songs in their latest Album may scoured the Latin American Christmas Carol Catalog Songs from Columbia Texas to their hometown is called you giggle. NAVIDAD or Christmas is here. Ah Stop Doc that he two four becomes uh this hour point celebrating Christmas with Los Lobos. And you can join US letting American listeners. How are the holidays and Christmas in particular? If you celebrate it how do you mark them in your home. And do you have a favorite Latin American Christmas. Carol what's your question. Four Los Lobos call us at one. Eight hundred four two three eight two five five. That's eight hundred four to three talk. Also anytime online at on point radio DOT ORG or twitter and facebook at on point radio now. Los Lobos has been performing for almost fifty years. They're a multi Grammy Award winning group and their latest album. I'm is called Yego Navidad where privileged to have two members of Los Lobos with us today in the studio. David Hidalgo a founding member of the band. He's a songwriter. Long writer and multi talented musician. He sings and plays a myriad of instruments including guitar Banjo Cello and the accordion. David Algo welcome back to on point or your uh-huh it's great to have you and Steve Berlin. While not founding member he joined Los Lobos in one thousand nine hundred eighty four and is many instruments include saxophone flute and keyboard keyboard. He's also a terrific producer. Steve Berlin welcome to you much okay. So first of all tell US Christmas songs. Why why was this sort of the genre of music that you thought? Los Lobos has yet to do that. Let's take our Christmas well. It's it's been it's been and every every year it comes up you know. Should we should one of one of these days. What are these years? We should do it. Chris and The time around the concept of doing Latin American Chris- Christmas seemed to be good. It made sense so lead. We tried it out. I'll I'll be honest. I love Christmas music. And many of America's most people don't think that's partially because it comes earlier and earlier earlier every year get bombarded with. Yeah but on the other hand. Many of America's greatest musicians have done fantastic Christmas album so it makes perfect perfect sense to me. But how did you go about picking and choosing from the Latin American catalog of of Christmas songs. We we reached out to some friends. Who are collectors? Not Necessarily Christmas music. But guys who we thought we'd have a repository of ideas and We we managed to acquire about a hundred and forty some songs just to just like not no sorting whatsoever just like pile of songs to start the process. I think we just need to start someplace. You know. It's not like we had stockpile ourselves and basically that just kind of opened the door you know we sorta through some of that stuff was there's no way in the world we could do it but sort sort of informed the process and once we got rolling it was kind of like any other less lobos record were the two or three songs in brings in an idea and we we chased that around that that brings up another idea so it it was It was fun. It was a different in many respects but in many respects the same as any other record that we do track that we just third at the top of the show. DONDE ESTA Santa Claus. Tell us about that one. It's his name is augie real. I'll give you yeah he. I was a child actor back in the late fifties and he had his one off hit and But that's that's the only familiar one that I remember you know of all these songs we've W did That one little shanty songs. I heard that one before too but but most of them you know we just sir we just looking to. We found stuff that we thought we could do. Yeah so nine hundred fifty eight. I think. That's where notes here argue Rio. Es performed The Santa Claus. He was twelve. So you say you you remember that from when you'd be into like when it come Christmas season you'd be we driving around shopping. She has a station that plays a Christmas music. That would that would come up. That was part of the rotation. Yeah well let's hear another track from Yugoslavia Dodd. This is Laura gazillion Kazimi last. Name your got busy guessing was aww. That's Rama from Yugoslavia dot the latest album from Los Lobos. Now this is a larum comes from the Mexican tradition. Yeah it tells about it. It's Well how Mu- music because it was the guy how is the from recluse area and this is that's part of that tradition and it's just to most of the like the Mexican Christmas songs with religious At this is speaking about the loop so there wasn't a whole lot of wasn't a lot of really fun on songs from Mexico that's pretty serious and for For a church like I mean the river search Ellsberg. That's that's one of them that had some fun to If I if I have this right. So it's custom where people decorate occur eight branches with the Law Shamas and they carry them in procession through through their neighborhoods. You said that you Is a song originally from the very crews region or did you decide to perform in the style of music. That's the style that we've that's the one. We founded founded version. Okay so tell us more about this. This this This this book style of music. Is it fun to play. Yeah it's hard to what makes it hard. It's Well it's like I guess you'd compare it to anything it'd be like the Bluegrass of Mexico. It's a harp be small vetoes a little four string guitar sort of an instrument and and is a rhythm is typically cut on as those are the basic against her but it's It's usually pretty fascinating. And it's an improvised and provides versus and stuff. It's a off. It's a challenge. It's beautiful I WANNA be attrition. David I mean I think you guys are terrific musicians. It's hard to. I believe that anything would actually be in town and it is. It's it's no joke. Go ahead I mean you know that style. It's the the instrument the Dave places to Hereto. Replace it with like a duck telco turned on the pointy said. It's just a a workout. So would you describe it. It's well these a sliver of cow horn beginning with that was the pick but over the years but I still use them to but but You get a Nylon Barbara Comb shave it down and to the shape and you play with that. So that's it has because of thing to do you have to apply yourself to play. You can't take it easy and now that can succeed biggest. Challenge too because you your. It's it's your improvising. So you're playing against harp player or you know. So you're when you're on your toes you know. Well we are talking this hour with Los Lobos and their latest album which is gay. Go Navy Dodd. Their first first Christmas album. Where at eight hundred forty three eight two five five? Let's just quickly go to Alaska. WHO's calling from Detroit Michigan? At least so you're on the air. Hi How are you you greatly go hill okay so I was just saying. I'm really excited to hear this Christmas album. Mariah this year I'm hosting I. I I am a Lotta at my house for my friends and family and I'm forty one so I was a little kid. When the La Bamba found chat came out and for those of us who were like not in Texas not in California not even in Chicago to hear the La Bamba Sonatrach and to see like our parents parents and grandparents be so proud was really really formation? Oil and I'm sorry we really emotional about this So to have this album arrive after all this time and to be Re engaging with these traditions that were stripped us through assimilation or in some cases repatriation and So those of us who are really far from the bathroom is just phenomenal. Canonical it's phenomenal. It's it's more than I can even explain. And it's way more than like Santa Claus at least at least that we hang. Hang on for a second. So you said you're hosting your first. Tommy Lada did I hear that right. Yeah Yeah what is that. It's a it's a lot of work and it's a lot of work it's Tamale Making Party I got I've been like hosting hort shoulder for like two weeks and I've roasted like five chickens and I have forty pounds a mazda coming on Saturday morning graduates tonight. Blew up at my house. I went to a puddle Peres. Lisa thank you so much for your call. That's at least a calling us from Detroit Michigan. We are talking this hour with with two members of Los Lobos their latest album. It's a Christmas album. It's called Yego Navidad. We WanNa hear from you from the Latino community entity out there listening. How do you mark this season? What does Los Lobos Music Mean to you? And do you have a favorite Latin American Christmas song. We're at one eight hundred four a two three eight two five five. That's eight hundred four to three talk. We'll head into the into the break with the title track from the album. This is Yego Navidad. This is on point eight. Aw uh-huh Hi I'm David Folkenflik host of on point. Thanks so much for listening. Our show is made in Boston by a dedicated crew that relies on fans like you who contribute to their local. NPR member for stations. Why not consider making a contribution to yours just go to donate dot? NPR DOT org slash on to find your local station and get started and thanks. This is on mega truck Birdie and that of course this La Bamba from Los Lobos back in Nineteen eighty-seven we've got two members of Los Lobos with with us today to talk about their new album. Yego Nabi Dodd. It's their first Christmas album. David Hidalgo joins us. And so it is Steve Berlin as well. And if you've got a question for the Los Lobos call us at one. Eight hundred four two three eight two five five and St. Let me just ask you we. We had the snake this one in here. Even though we're GONNA we're talking about Yugoslavia died. Would you think it is about how those lobos did La Bomba that gives this song on such staying power. Remember looking across the last of the control of people still rocking out decades. After the song first came out you know I would contributed mostly to the magic computer. Sometimes just a thing just captures people some education in a way that can only be described as magical it It's why we do it. I think you know every once in a while you sort of achieve this moment of like it's indefinable but I had. I had a friend back then. Who was really legendary producer getting Paul Rothschild? Who did the the doors records among many other records and he afterwards ahead he? He had this thing like he was a very analytical guy like he kinda like analyzed wasn't just like you know magic to him him and he he had this theory which you proved that those court changes were a top ten if not number one hit every eighteen months so every eighteen eighteen months that he went back in time and sure enough. It was like you know almost clockwork that that that you know it's very. It's very simple coaching. But every eighteen months sure enough there was a hit. So we've we. We caught that wave right on time. I if we're still on that cycle maybe we're getting close to another other could be another eighteen month moment of Hank Williams also said he brought a song that simple for anybody to play. You'll be hit. You know what he's talking about. Well let's go to Karl Who's calling from Tampa Florida. Carl you're on the air. Thank you you. How are you good how you doing? I'm doing great. Listen I just wanted to let you know I love your music. I've listened to you for many years. Here's my ex wife and you probably know her. Because she's a grouping of yours she she followed you guys around San Antonio Repeatedly Hedley to every venue you went to and she loved music so much she turned me onto it. And I've been listening and I wish I'd heard more of your your earlier days but I love that you coming out with new music. I'm I'm planning on getting it and I just wanted to say. Thank you very much for the entertainment containment and if you see my ex wife and her husband you will know them by and Richard Okay. uh-huh thank you so much for your call. I'm David in St Louis. Just turn back to the the sort of founding founding songs that that that catalog of one hundred and forty latin-american Christmas songs that you had to choose from. Can you tell us a little bit more. Yeah I mean obviously Latin. America's a huge. It's a huge grouping. Here we're talking about Mexican central South American songs awesome from all over the hemisphere. Yeah yeah everywhere it. What one thing that we learned? Is that the Puerto Ricans love Christmas. This others on balance it was a sixty percent maybe more puerto rican sauce which fantastic. WHO's a Lotta amazing like? A lot of salsa stars had not one not two but sometimes three Christmas records over the course of their careers. I know it's insane so once we sort of had this this group large group of songs we we you know. It wasn't one thing obviously. We're not the salsa band so we had to kind of pick the the ones that made the most sense the ones that we could actually address in our own style so that Kinda removed Many many many songs from the rest of the list once we picked And then I think it was really just a matter are mostly just balancing the vibe like trying to get things out you know. There's a lot of there. Were a Lotta Minor. Keep stuff that we really liked. But we couldn't make the record on monarchy so and then balancing singers in sort of the instrumentation so it wasn't We kind of wanted to be a broad spectrum of sonic sounds Colors David you wanna add to that Well like you said about the Puerto Rican. That's I I've been I'd love. stringers is the Qatar instrument that that it's called the Guada- throw from Puerto Rico and I tried to play it in it and a big. That is a big part of the of the lobby or the Christmas tradition Asian. So I was kind of familiar with the style but we could There was it over the years like he said. Salsa artists have done records extra level Combo. Willie call along among people like that. You know so we listen to those records and it was a good way in just one well so there. There is one track on the album that was actually composed by you for specifically for the album. Ram Thinking about Christmas and you. So let's listen to a little bit of that not think This Christmas that's Christmas and you from Los Lobos. Oh bonuses new album Yego NAVIDAD now. David van made Louis Perez wrote the song specifically for the album. Tell us about it. Well We're talking about it. You know years ago. I want to see Chris Isaac do a Christmas show and Talk to Mafrij the the asks. Have you written A. Have you written a Christmas song. All you need is one. And that's a great the idea to start talking about it. and He came back with the lyrics and we put it together and worked out. Let's let's go back to the phones. Let's go to rob WHO's calling from Sandstone Minnesota Rob. You're on the Air David. Hi Steve Holidays. The voice you know I I worked these guys early on in. I think about one of the secrets with the band. Chemistry and a big part of family felt family and have some of the great fine memories and great experience At that time so I wanna see I talks great rob. Who are you these guys? These guys have have glowing faces recognition. But who are you. I used to be the guitar. Rhody attack we a lot of fun man with how you been man. Yeah very good. I'm just worked on some Christmas. Show stuff myself but nice. I still do tore down farm john and bomb cool man. You guys were great. Great players really appreciate your Your whole thing. Well Rob Thank you so much for your call. Let's go to the L.. WHO's calling from Baltimore Maryland? Airland audio. You're on the air. Hi How you doing Audio Just wanted my question Lewis first of all thank you so much for being a part of my life growing up as a Mexican American Chicano and United States. And I'm really happy that you guys are still playing music even today My question to so you got was In the early time but you guys were playing music. Was it a lot hard For you guys to get recognized as a as a rock band or were you guys. That's always turn that label as a Mattino them. Well you know. We started off the first night in ten years was was most all folk music. We were studying basically. We're trying to learn the stuff and Regional styles and as has it as time went on we but at even at that point we had We were able to somehow squeeze squeeze our way into the mainstream and And as time went on got into the tex-mex where the music in that red led the rock and roll again. We've been lucky you know that people accepted US along the way Well I want to bring in the L. by the way. Thank you so much for your call from Baltimore. I WANNA bring being in another voice into this conversation but in order to do that. Let's listen to a little bit of music. I because this is a track called me. Raunchy Joe it's from the first Los Super Seven Super Group Featuring Los Lobos and Rick Trevino who were about to hear from listen listen to me. CHEETO THEIR AW No More Talk A. That's me ran tito toll from the one thousand nine hundred eight album los super seven and you hear those logos thirty here here Rick Trevino. Who joins us today from Austin Texas? This Ricksen Grammy Award winning Mexican American Country Music artist. Third Generation Texan born on the banks of Houston's Buffalo Bayou his nineteen ninety-three debut. Single adjusts enough rope was the first mainstream country music single to feature separate English and Spanish language versions richer. Vino welcome to on point. Oh great great to be here. Hello hello brothers and you know Rick I have to apologize. I have been mispronouncing your last name Rick Trevino and I do apologize for that. I'm going to get it right here. So what do you think of Los Lobos is first Christmas album. Oh I love it I I love the the I guess my favorite is probably the kind of Colombian vibe Yugoslavia. That I love that one I just. I love the VIBE. I love it. But everything's great. And congratulations guys get record. Thank you well so talk to us for minute rick about your families this Christmas traditions. Well growing up. You know we would live in growing up. In Austin we go back to Houston every year and visit my relatives Dios Diaz and You know it was just it was just a big party and then now with my own family. It's kind of the same thing. We kind of go overboard here at my house. You've got about six inflatables like seven or eight inflatables outside in the yard looks pretty obnoxious. But we love it and It's just everything's lit up and we got Christmas last Christmas presents. And we've we've actually had Christmas trees in the house up since before Thanksgiving and so. Yeah we we kinda go a little bit overboard and I do For the past thirty years I've done a Christmas Eve services at my church and one of the traditions that we do about seven services and and one day and Christmas Eve so when I get home I'm pretty tired. And Carla always has later that makes demolished show has tamales ready to go with fried eggs on top. And so yeah. We're going to. We're going to the Detroit in Austin at the end of this. Of course the services have always been something. I look forward to every year but it's nice to get home and In hanging out with the family. Well David and Steve Tell us about what it's been like making music with rick and your because I think you you also have a forthcoming album or grit. You have something else you have coming you. Are you performing with Los Lobos sometime again next year with different versions this Sunday. While I'm going to be at the Kessler with with Max Baucus and text maniacs and we fortunately once or twice last year I get to see you know Dave and Steve some of the guys if it were not. We're not seeing each other passing through the airports like we've seen each other a few times go I gone from GIG GIG but Yeah you know we we get to play together a couple of times a year and I think we've got probably something coming up in the spring spring but just just quick some props you know I I came. I met Dave and Caesar and and Steve I guess around ninety eight and you know they they just so gracious to open the door to their kind of musical world for me. I kind of felt like an in some aspects. I was a little nervous going into the first super seven record because I was Kinda Kinda coming from you. Know Country Country Music Nineties Straight ahead country music and and I was a little bit tentative going into it but You know the guys the Los Lobos guys and all the super seven seven members just kinda opened the doors for me. Welcome me with open arms patient with me as I was kind of learning As as I was going going so That was a great time and that that album was Special everybody that was part of it. Was You know we. y'All got long lead lead a fun doing it you know thank you. Thank you brother for being there and I've always considered the guys you guys as my my my friends and but but I've also always considered mentors for me and I've always kind of felt that kind of role every time I'm with you guys I'm always learning and I'm I remember the first time and I heard day play country tune during the soundcheck at the House of Blues. I think he was lefty for cell song. I think it was. I'll never go around mirrors and I was like man that you know. That was those guys that was a pretty eye opening. Moment for me Careers Deputy Donald Goal. Doing a lefty Frizzell Merle haggard ten. So it was pretty awesome all right well. Rick Trevino uh-huh Grammy Award winning Mexican American country. Music artists in third generation Texan who has performed with Los Lobos as part of the Latin American supergroup. Los Super Seven. Rick thank you so much for taking a couple of minutes to be with us today. Thank you for having me guys all all right. Well we're GONNA take a quick break here when we come back here from a lot more callers. We're talking this hour with two members of the band. Los Lobos their latest album is it's called Yugoslavia dot. It's their first Christmas album. And it draws deeply from the catalog of Latin American Christmas tunes. This is it's it's Christmas time in Texas. We'll be right back. This is on point Christmas it. It's Christmas it's Christmas. mm-hmm Talk Talk Bon John Coming in this point. I'm making a chocolate Birdie. And you're listening to Lamoureux from Los Lobos is latest album is called the Yego Navidad. It's their first Christmas album. And I'm joined today in the studio by David. Hidalgo and Steve Berlin to members of Los Lobos. And if you've got a question and for Los Lobos call us at one. Eight hundred four two three eight two five five. That's eight hundred four to three talk and we want to also hear from more Latin American listeners. How you're celebrating the holidays and whether some of the tunes that you've been hearing on Los Lobos new album? This Christmas album might be ones that you're familiar with from your family's traditions again. At eight hundred four two three eight two five five So so David Steve Tell us about about this track about the mood ago. What is it It's a song from and it was on a There was an extra level almo total and Daniel Santos and really Cologne and it. I'm not sure it's Christmas Song Christmas album so we figured close snuff. I think It might be like a carnival song. Yeah Okay let's seasonal winters celebrate. Yes you want to tell us more about the Dick Dick covered. We're concerned for a moment that it might not be Germane but kind of worked it out the. Let's go to Let's go to a nerve or genetic from Portland Maine You're on the air. And how do you say your name. Okay Geneve I'm so sorry about that. Today's not my day with pronunciations. Give me go ahead. You're thank you well. Look my name's Meghna Chakrabarti. You think I should get the name with low slow most of Alo- Hello. This is such a tremendous honour. Let me tell you. My parents are from Mexico and Cuba. my mother was actually born in El Paso. And I lived in Austin for twenty years and I just I cannot give you enough Gratitude for who you are and who you've been for all of us and I love that. You chose to do this because bringing this particular kind of joy and and the desire could dance into to a a family holiday. I think is an extraordinarily beautiful thing to contribute my favorite Christmas song. Though is actually from Brazil. It's a traditional northeastern song called POLITICA. I think Brazilian music for about fifteen years. It was popularized by mighty someone she it's about a butterfly and I and it's for children and I love that that that you're singing to a butterfly in Christmas Eve And that it's a traditional songs around around we. We've missed a lovely song and I just wondered if you had given any consideration to any Brazilian traditional the music. I mean we would have. We didn't we didn't didn't find next album. Cool back up. They should have before you go so the in board bullet a you're the you're singing to the butterfly on Christmas Eve. What what is the song? What's in the Song Little Butterfly comes out of the Rose Garden a little little butterflies so blue so beautiful. Today is Christmas Eve and and then it starts singing as the butterfly. I'm just a little butterfly flying around you can someone who would love me lovely. Isn't that thank you so much for your call that tap that are sort of that. The hat tip to Brazilian Christmas music as well. Let's go to betsy. WHO's calling from Saint Thomas in the US? Virgin Highlands Betsy. You're on the air. Hello Mary Christmas one of my favorites one It's we don't have snow. Oh here. Of course Ho Ho Ho. How will Santa get here? There are no reindeer in my country. You'll have to borrow my neighbors donkey so so we have so many traditions And we have a lot of Latin music here too so in the Caribbean will will thank you so much. Thank you so much for that call. I mean this is going to come over and over again. David and Steve. Because I mean we're talking about an entire hemisphere. Uh of music here was were there. Any songs Caribbean inflected songs in that. One hundred and forty-six well stuff from From Columbia Yeah on the back there Puerto Rico Panama I think there was what glimpse about. I don't think we could pull that off. Why not? Let's outside of her purview. Afraid you know that's a world unto itself you know what we know we can and we can't do. I think that would have been a step over the line. Perhaps interesting because I was thinking of Los Lobos as Aban that like if you If you want to you could it would take some doing. I mean that was one of the other things. Making this record was We had a very like the. The timeframe was very compressed. Like we we started. I think we started in May and we had six weeks to complete it. While we were touring entire time as well so some of the songs on that big list were awesome awesome but They would have taken a lot of time so we sort of. I wouldn't say we dumped it down but we you know there's things that we could accomplish in a relatively short period of time and certainly offer authentic calypso might have been a spent a week on that fall short so well we are talking this hour with Los Lobos about the their Christmas album. Yego NAVIDAD. Let's just take a moment to step back in time a little bit because I want to hear from the one thousand nine hundred four album album. How will the wolf survive and here is will the wolf survive? Running they were the that's will the wolf survive from from Nineteen eighty-four. You guys are smiling and kind of shaking your heads here. Not what why a different time. Who I just some of the choices that we make just waiting to hear it again like Tom Late said picture yourself. Here's look too to big real funny haircut. Something like that for the okay so tell me tell me about what you think about the choices is that that you made for this track But it's a drum machine for one thing is kind of nutty. That's the biggest thing because it was. That's when that technology made its way into to pop music so obviously Germany. It's the symbol. Sounds just like the most inauthentic damage which they've never gotten symbol. Sounds right ever. There's never been a good stood extent that now like people are becoming love with the Senate machine symbols solid hip hop music basic for instance. But it to me. I just remembered that was that was German. You know it was all about like trying to get like new. Sounds sounds I remember going to burbank and different kick drum sound. You're Burnin e Prom back in the early days of Digital Technology Eric. It's just funny to hear that we made the choice to use a German. She instead of young as one of the best drummers under a panoply of germs to pick from but we chose stupid machine. Yeah that's a good point given the talent that you have right. Did she used to be in sync with that. That it was like it was a new technology. Those taking over you when you played with the shiny new toy your vanity. I think it was one. That was the only song. Don't record or anything like that. We're not GONNA do we pick the one. We're still proud of. Its a good sign choices. Well let's go back to the phones. Let's go to Roy who's calling from Fort Lauderdale Florida Roy. You're on the air. Hi and as each of your listener talkers. I had said I am truly honored. I was at a small club called Musicians Exchange thirty years ago listening junior wells and buddy guy and all of a sudden Los Lobos comes up and does an impromptu from the Dade County Youth Fair you you all were playing at the Youth Fair in Miami and late at night you show up on stage at this mall musicians exchange and I've been a fan and ever since living in Fort Lauderdale the Latin flavor. You all flow my question is how did you find each other. You seem to work so well together you I find it hard hard to listen to your music and not be able to move my feet tap my fingers or an. I'm just always curious. How did you collectively come together and say this is it? It was well we all went to high school together. We all met at high school. Oh so that was And back then on east side of Los Angeles it was the well all over. La There was a lot of young people playing in music and a lot of bands. You know everywhere and so we. We had a new well season. I went to school together and junior high school tonight night at Louis from art class and then the Conrado little older than the rest of us and but he's already an established musician in the area area. Everybody knew who he was so it was. It just took a little time. That's all I got. I don't know and you'd it's the same school you know. See everybody every day. Become friends and then you talk about music and that leads to one thing leads to another and you know we're still here and Steve Steve. When you go pulled in the I showed up later? I didn't go to school him now but when you showed up I mean to Roy same question like like how. How did you know this was it? Well you know the the the funny thing about Well my entrance Mike. The way I sort of showed up I mean they had I was playing with a group because the blasters and slow up for number for the blasters and nineteen eighty seventy nine and was You know at that point in the La Music scene. The old the band had been together the longest I might you know might have been three years among the Weirdos on. Ah but you don't like a lot of the bands. Even the blasters hadn't been together that long and sluggish is after they've been together playing together for the better part of seven years and it was there was a palpable difference in the the strength of the music strengthened their commitment to each other that no other band in the scene had which I was surprised. I know surprising to me and then as I get to know them I sorta understood that you know. They had sort of formed this bond in this culture while all of you know everybody else that I knew was just sort of still journey figurative. They were these guys had already started. Families there in in many respects like further certainly more grown up than anybody else I was hanging out with at the time that made a big difference too. Well Roy thank you so much for your call. Let's Jeff Who's calling from watertown Massachusetts Jeff. You're on the air. Hello Gentlemen I saw you last night and you could an honor to speak with you. Thank you thanks giving column I wanted to ask you very quickly can you tell when you're cooking onstage age. Does the audience always give it back to you. Because last night Louis seemed to be asking us. Where are you and the answer was we were blown away? So can you feel that you know when you're on. Oh I think so you go for it. Sometimes we try to we try to go for it every night we try. Oh you know do the best Greek or go somewhere. Different at least We we never do the same set. I tonight So yeah we can tell when you guys are with us. You allow us to goof around and the and and he go we take us there with it. We take each other to wherever we ended up. And it's it's a good thing we appreciate it. Well let's logos has been together together now for what verging on fifty years six forty six. What's been the secret to staying together for that long We don't know. Actually you know just not asking that question. We give each other a lot of space. You know we don't like you know we. We understand who we are disappoint so everybody gets to be who they are you know. No one's forced forced to conform. You know we we dress code clearly or anything else so I think part of it is just Understanding each other. And then you know like nights like last night where you have a really good show and then whatever you know if there's any like interpersonal oddness it just kind of gets washed away by the the next night show so it's it it's It's hard to answer but in some respects. You know this is what we do this our job. Well we're going to wrap up Today's our with a one more song from Yego Navidad and we're going to go out with Phillies Navidad. You kind of had to put it on album right last the song that's been done so many times and so iconic was it Was it fun or kind of a challenge to to make it into a Los Lobos Song. No we made made it fun. We we we tried a few approaches and then it just turned out a gang vocal was the way to go. We had like thirty people in the stadium singing the course and then we were using on the video. There's a we're actually walking around in a circle Mike in the middle so we're walking around the circle so you're GONNA try to make it sound like good bigger or bigger than it is well jubilation with low slow bus and felice NAVIDAD. David Hidalgo and Steve Berlin. Thank you so much for being with us and and again the new Christmas album is called Yego Navidad. We're going to go out with Phillies NAVIDAD. Happy Holidays everyone. I'm making Chalker Buddy. This is on point. MM-HMM MM-HMM Yeah.

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Episode 19 Top Three from the 1980s

Rooks and Becords Podcast

50:59 min | Last month

Episode 19 Top Three from the 1980s

"Hi there fellow music gietzen. Welcome to episode one thousand nine hundred the planet. lv podcast. This is the place where we drop the needle world of albums. i am tasks. Forget who my friends is john. Thanks chad i'm one of those music. You talked about earlier. Music geeks had kind of a ballsy. Your voice maybe. You could be like the ballsy voice. I'm just a guy ted. Ballsy voice music geek. Here ready to talk eighties with you. And michael michael is here. We'll introduce him in a second. But for those who are new to the podcast. John and i been friends for a long time and we both make our living in the same industry and that is radio. John is the host of the ninety five three. Kyc morning show which anyone with an internet connection can listen to via kyc's website or just tell your smart speaker to play ninety five three. Kyc what time are you on in the mornings. John i tell you that thing off at five thirty a grueling four hour workday and i'm usually done by ten pacific time folks. We live and work in northern california. Just fyi so wherever. You're listening to this. Just kind of adjust your time zone to california and you can hear john me. I work for iheartmedia and their news and traffic division or to put it another way. I'm a news and traffic reporter. I'm also a part-time Journalists and backer third time as our special guest star my coworker at iheart. Michael magali highland. What's happening good morning gene. Yes we are recording this in the morning Whenever you're listening to this that's when you're listening to it. But yeah they morning and we're all bright eyed bushy tailed and caffeinated so the three of us have been knee deep in rolling stone magazine's five hundred greatest albums of all time. Were picking our top three from rolling stones list and featuring them by decades and in this episode. We're spotlighting the nineteen eighties. So the three of us will dive into our top. Threes include one honorable mention and feature one record. The got left off the rolling stone list but should have been included. Which is why we're calling it. The snub comes with the sound effect. George or quarter. That's a little different one from last week. Last week is more interesting. The snow you wanna get in touch with us. You can email me. I met ted at planet. lp dot com or john. john is really difficult to remember. It's john at planet. lp dot com. And i think we're going to build out our social media channels soon but for now you can find me on twitter at t s forgotten. That's t letter. T. a. s. r. e. g. a. d. o. Facebook i'm ted asks forgot john a c. y. l. c. s. w. on the twitter and john young on the facebook and michael mugali to on twitter. I am also michael. Majali on facebook and I think i'm mcgaughey to on instagram. As well so come on. And finally i post lots of really pretty nature pictures and michael and i are friends now. John is following my beer brewing escapade damn right facebook. I i got a beer. Brewing kit love at its fermenting. So yeah stay tuned. It's time to ferment. This show let's brew. It shoveled into overdrive and head back to the nineteen eighties. The nineteen eighties were contradictory decade. While you had ronald reagan's political conservatism ascending to power for the entire decade. And that includes george h w bush was elected in eighty eight. There was this other eighties that revealed a lot of dissatisfaction with the decade. There is a lot of emphasis at the time on money materialism and status not only music but also in film and tv so when rolling stone compiles their five hundred greatest albums of all time and we look at the albums from the eighties. It's clear that this decade has a lot of diversity. There's hard rock there's post-punk there's new wave through some great so records. There's the rise of wrap. It really shows that the eighties were more than just say material. Girl or karma chameleon. So what are our top threes from the nineteen eighties. We start with michael. Magali for his number three dire straits makes my number three with brothers in arms number four eighteen on the top five hundred list. This album sadly is really kind of the end of the run for. I thought was really a great band from the late seventies with their debut album and that was on a short list for my seventies picks last week this album really kind of goes in a different direction because mark knopfler is the face of dire straits. He's the lead vocalist. He has that amazing guitar style. That is so unique with that finger. Picking it's so recognizable Anywhere kind of that rockabilly flair that he has but this album was recorded by really a whole bunch of different musicians and not really a lot of the original guys in the band in one of the guys that was not there was Mark's brother david they had a falling out so he wasn't a part of the recording they. It recruited a drummer who had a lot of backbone and a lot of experience. A guy named omar hakim played with guys Bands like bowie and weather report. He also played with sting. Who also of course is on this album and money for nothing talking about the materialistic element of the era But there are other people on here. That are just fantastic What this album adds it. Has these layers. That i really love. And especially the brecker brothers michael and randy. Who had the trumpet and sax element and the great tony. Levin is adding some base here. And there i mean everybody knows money for nothing. I mean that was just a huge. Mtv video gotta move. He's microwave ovens guys we gotta move this color. Tv's up sorry. Body knows those songs right money for nothing. Walk a life so far away but for me kind of maybe delve into some soft jazz Y worry but then at right across the river and the man's too strong and won world and the title track kind of wraps it up. I mean mark knopfler is not the greatest singer but he makes it work and just the layers of this album in the musicians that he recruited really kind of add a different flavor to the sound and it makes my top three dire straits. That's what a great album. I absolutely agree with you on effectively side. Two of the record from right across the river to the title track ending to me. That's my favorite part of brother. No doubt i mean you gotta have a hit right. You wanna you wanna move these color. Tv's you also want to move. These cd's admire mark knopfler for really just taking the rest of the songs that weren't the big hits and really just exploring the kind of textures and sounds and just totally anti-iraq in some ways it was just like a lot of world. Music is peter gabriel's very world s with mark knopfler was kinda getting into that so great road trip album and it also i feel dimension won a grammy for best engineered album so for for the sound quality at the time. It was cutting edge to all right john. What's your number. Three is los lobos. Will the wolf survive record. That came out in nineteen eighty-four. This record is a kind of a deeply personal record to me. My dad used to race dune buggies in baja and so we spent a lot of time in mexico and on the baja peninsula and my dad also grew up in l. a. and i lived in la around the time this album came out. It's a very east. La latin rock field for people who are not familiar with us lobos but you might be familiar with the hit off that record which was the title track. How will the wolf survive. This was the first blending i ever heard and more popular music of things like traditional mexican swing mixed with rockabilly mixed with rock that east. La latin rock for people. Who don't know real quick backstory. Los lobos from east la. They'd released an album and nineteen eighty-three kind of an ep. That didn't sell very much but sold enough for them to go and buy a dodge van and they went on tour across the country bringing this kind of tex-mex meets the blues meets traditional rockabilly country rock kind of feel all across the country and developed a fan base that way and when they came back to record their debut album the actually got t-bone burnett to do the production on the record and he wrote in a several of the songs with them. If you've never listen los lobos have steeped background in them. Listen to this record. Start here because you're gonna find something you like whether it's traditional mexican music whether it's traditional rock to guitar player cesar rosas and david hildalgo who are both just incredible in their own right and they play off each other. The songs are great title. Track is awesome. Matter of time is a great song about people crossing the border for a better life. It's a deeper record. But it's the first introduction of this kind of music to me. I bought the record. I love it. I still do. It's my number three for that reason. How did you get introduced to this band. Was it just played on the radio. And you heard it. I like this or were you just at the record store. Thinking this is just saw. Los lobos played or as i was living in l. a. in pasadena area. At the time this came out and they were part of one of these multiple bills with the band ex. I think the blasters ron that bill to dave alvin and got lumped into that group and i just remember thinking there twice the size of these rockabilly bands. They were you know they've got a keyboard player and they had a sax player. And and i remember thinking you're rockin but you're also mixing like mexican music elements that i remember when i was a kid. I thought who does this. So that's when i went out and find how will the wolf survive and they were playing on local radio too. So that's kind of how i got into them to start with and a quick side note. They're coming back on tour with ex. And the blasters and i got a ticket to the show down there pacific amphitheatre in costa mesa. So again just one thousand nine hundred and four bullet just so i can fit in to the crowd. It's going to be all teddy talked to me about your number three number. Three is disintegration by the cure which was released at the end of the eighties. May second one thousand nine hundred eighty nine. This record to me is there masterpiece and it's a masterpiece because it's one of those records where the band made a conscious decision to change. Directions occurs lead singer and songwriter. Robert smith is kind of a cultural punchline for being the stereotype of sort of this depress. Goff who could never find join. Well anything. I'm just really depressed right. But people shouldn't lose sight of the fact. That for all the slap and tickle that goes into making robert smith the butt of a joke or jokes to cure were a pretty successful band in the nineteen eighties of their previous albums. Kiss me kiss me. Kiss me and head on the door made them a boatload of money because of mtv and modern rock radio they became. Excuse the gasp but here it is popular like really popular so when smith starts to figure out his next move in eighty eight. He's hit with two things one he realizes he doesn't like fame all that much. And he was fretting about the fact that he was about to turn thirty years old in nineteen eighty nine know. There's another one. Oh my god. On what how kentucky. All right so what to do well. If you're robert. Smith you drop a lot of lsd. Which is exactly what he did. You get super depressed. Which is exactly what he did. And you vowed to write an anti commercial record. Well how do you do that. You start the album off with the lead track which is called plain song that has an introduction of two minutes and thirty seven seconds of just music. Okay did it work. Well no in fact the opposite happened. People freaking loved the record. They love this ethereal style. Synth sort of dreamy almost psychedelic guitar. Work by guitarist. Pearl thompson the lyrics. Have no real hooks. Rather it's just smith just kind of matching thompsons guitar feel with the dialogue of sorts between two people talking about bleak things. And i wonder if kind of felt like the main characters in that play in the in the movie the producers right. He thought i'm gonna make an anti commercial record. I'm going to alienate my fans. But instead he ends up. Striking a keynote with fans and the record becomes hugely successful. And so does the tour which this album not only planes on good. It has one of the biggest hits with love song which has been covered by a slew of performers. Like three eleven and even adele so for a record that was supposed to reflect smith's clinically depressed outlook on life and it was a record. He was determined to make a solo artist because he wasn't sure that the band members would like any of the songs that he brought to the table and he says well they reject them all then. Screw it i'm gonna make a solo album. So he captured something that really spoke to many at the decades end and one that really vaulted the cure into the realm of stadium. Acts making them unlikely. A-list act a late eighties and into the early nineties. I never know what it's interesting. If you watch the induction of the cure into the rock and roll hall of fame to hear robert smith's induction speech for lack of a better way to describe it. He he seems just the opposite of the guy you just described writing that record in nineteen eighty nine. He's great he appreciates the fans be almost like but he's still wearing you know we still got eyeliner and he's still got a skew red lipstick and his hair looks like it's exploded out of the top of his head with dark black hair dye. But it's a different guy. It just interesting now to go back and listen to to the record again. I'm a big cure fan. I love just like having and amazon and all this kind of pop ish hits. They had but he definitely went through some stuff that if you look at the end of the career maybe they're not completely over but he's got a different perspective after looking back on you know thirty plus years or forty plus years of music. Sometimes you have to be a certain mood to listen to this. Because i remember getting together with friends after this album came out. And we're all big cure fans and we're sitting around in the living room and just when it was on in the background and my friend says can we turn this off really making me depressed. What were we supposed to be having fun here. And so we we had to find something else. I just can't make people hate me enough michael dino this album i have nothing to add except i just i worry that he might run out of eyeliner. He get really depressed. All urge you to listen to the record. If you've ever going strong. I will say great groove great baseline and it really creates that mood I had a girlfriend at the time who loved the cure and she loved that song. I just remember that song. And kind of some intimate moments. Michael haven a good groove lit. See of your number. Two is intimate. You are a peter. Gabriel is my number two and it was so peter. Gabriel left genesis too. Big of frontman too outrageous in those costumes. And after the lamb lies down on broadway he was out of there. So going into the eighties leads seventies into the eighties. He did four solo albums and all of the albums. Were just called peter. Gabriel that's just kind of how he rolls but they all had different album art but this really all came together. Finally the so album. And i think a lot of it had to do with the musicians that he brought in kind of the concepts that he had and maybe a little. Bit more clarity. If you will in putting the pieces together a for this album. I mean he had had some hits prior to that like without frontiers and salisbury hill and shocked among gay. Yeah if you go in and you really listen to it. There's some really nice grooves in here and there's some really nice elements of funk in here and tony levin who. I mentioned before delivers on the bass. David rhodes on the guitar. And they had several drummers stewart copeland was actually brought in just to play the hi hat cymbal intro on red rain but they brought in this french drummer. His name is manu catchy. He's played with a lot of people and But he just brings it on this album. He just had the right musicians in the right places really elegant at times and kind of worldly beats he was also kind of into world music and he was doing that years before. Paul simon graceland. But then you bring in You bring in the big guns. Kate bush Does the vocal there. Don't give up and also a shout out to laurie anderson and excellent birds by bought this record. New was playing all over san diego state campus. When i was in college down there. I love it when mr i don't wanna be a star. I'm i'm weird on this. I'm that yeah. Now you're a big pop star. How does it feel mr gabriel. Because i'll tell you what sledgehammer is still one of the funky asong zebra. Wasn't your intention. Well too bad because we're all dancing to it at every on campus. Were digging it. Thank you stewart copeland for the drum work on big time. This is a drum record if you think about it as a drummer world guitar players and drummers and whatever this is a great drama album i don't even think about the guitars on this record. They are good. But it's a drum album. I just love the peter. Gabriel had this gigantic phil collins like hit record that maybe that was his intention. But that's what happened baby. Yeah all right john. My number two speaking of just amazing vocals were week. Will we will be now. Because my number two is whitney houston's debut album simply entitled whitney houston and this album was another one i bought after hearing i think the first single i heard was saving all my love on the radio and i thought listen. I'm a big fan of any vocal. Little blow your mind but if you think about when. This album came out mid eighties. Whitney houston's only twenty one when she records this record she's twenty two and it's released she quickly. I mean quickly becomes one of the top tier female vocalists literally of the era trying to think of the multi ability that whitney displayed on this record. And if you weren't blown away by your just maybe you're not listening hard enough because when you can listen to saving all my love. Greatest love of all. I think which is the third single from that album. I didn't realize this. But greatest love of all. I did a little deeper research into. It is actually george. Benson tuned from the late seventies. I wasn't aware so she was able to take that to another level like she did. Later on with dolly. Parton will always love you later on down the line but the maturity and whitney houston's vocal at this stage as a twenty one year old when she recorded these tracks. I remember thinking to myself. The range that this person has it's just different than other female vocalists of the arab she became might arguably still be one of those top tier female vocalist of all time. In the know doc and pop genre so this is the album that started it. That's why it makes my number sue brilliant. I love it whitney. Houston a tragic loss for all of us in amazing talent taken way too soon and i have nothing good to say about bobby brown and neither do. I meant to say everything. Seemed to be going swimmingly until he showed up. Don't be cruel. thank you tear. That is a surprising. Pick for me hearing that coming from you because you're such a right guy such a guitar based guy but i know you're a singer and you appreciate certainly a great vocalist and there's no doubting that whitney houston is a fantastic fantastic vocalist and at such a young age as well but just coming from you. I it's like. I thought i had your musical. Dna figured out. And then you throw me. And i appreciate. This isn't a ramiah curveball. Ted literal. When i first bought this cassette. And if you go back and just listen to saving all my love the groove of that song and the way she tells the story about this married guy that she's waiting for him to drop off the wife of the girlfriends. We can go spend time with her. It's a very sad song. Actually when she hits that final saving all my love saving all my love saving on my low. It'll yet you even as a rock nut which you know. I am in a guitar fanatic and everything else. I still get a little bit goosebumps. When i think of how she closes that song out. And that's the reason. I bought the cassette. And obviously we all watched as whitney houston's career went bonkers as it should and like you both appointed out taken from us way too early when she's still had the potential to do some amazing work. So yeah that's i feel good about that as my as my number two pick. It's it's album. That really rocked me in a weird way. My number two is kate bush's hounds of that. I think i fell in love with this record. From the first time. I heard the lead single running up that hill which hasn't parentheses deal with god has some galloping drums and kate bush. Has this very kind of close to the mic vocal technique that she uses for the verses sometimes and then she steps back for the of really kinda of sing as it were. The song really stood out as a unique composition in nineteen eighty five in. It's not for a few technical things. I would just like to run down very quickly. The first is that this is the first record. She made in her new studio nowadays. We've got pro tools and things like that and it's it's not that expensive to set up a home studio but in one thousand nine hundred. Eighty three eighty four eighty five when she was was building. This thing out actually was built out in eighty three. She had twenty four track studio. that's expensive. This album is largely taken from demos that she recorded her home studio. And so what you're hearing on the actual record or most of the demos that were enhanced with additional overdubbed in other instrumentation and she like Michael's pick peter gabriel. She plunked down a time of money at the time. It was thirty thousand pounds or in. Us dollars maybe close to fifty thousand dollars for a piece of equipment called the fairlight siham. I it's basically a synthesizer and if you wanna hear one of the most famous fairlight samples just listened to the opening bars of michael jackson's beat it. That was created on a fairlight on the music. Front the album is one of the better progressive albums of the era side. One the standalone songs like running up that hill. But there's the title track hounds of love. The big sky. Mother stands for comfort and cloud-busting all wonderfully sequenced. Then there's this other side side too. If you know if you had the actual lp which is called the ninth wave and it's taken from poems about king. Arthur call the idylls of the king which was by this author lord tennyson that came out in the mid eighteen hundreds so already. She's quoting tennyson. And you know if you're gonna put some literature stuff in there we're gonna get pretty deep and this was pretty deep for a rock record but not so deep for progressive rock record because progressive rock is known for that to get into kind of whether it science fiction literature. Genesis is a prime example. When peter gabriel was there that things got kind of weird and kind of psychedelic. But you're on the trip man. Just go just go with it. But in this tale were lulled into a dream state where we follow young girl or woman who falls through the ice while skating and what follows in song after song as either a long hallucination as she starts to freeze to death or it's kind of an out of body experience at either results in her rescue at the end or she kind of transfigure into this other realm. I'm not sure but in one thousand nine hundred and five. And i'm twenty years old at the time. This is some heavy stop on porn over the trying to figure out. What does this album side means. What is this. What do all these songs did. She die issued night. This other being. What is this like two thousand one space odyssey. Did i crack the code. No i never did did it. Put me off this album. Because i really didn't know what kate bush was saying. No do. I like answering and asking my own questions. Yes i i do get into some more coffee right away. You thought my number two choice which was inspired and a little off kilter. Owino look of you. Don't know this album. Just get to know what mine ablaze choice. I kate bush from a peter gabriel and so and also. There was an elton john bernie. Top in album came out in the eighties. Where people covered elton john songs and she did a cover of rocket man. I knew who she was. But i didn't get into her solo stuff. I love the first side. Which i i know more than the second side but for me is you're analyzing the lyrics in the meaning. I'm more interested in the sounds and textures. I'm blown away by her vocal but also kind of the the voices that come in at times kind of a little dark side of the moon kind of sounding stuff and kind of vocal tricks as well. I had never really heard before in kind of how it's all strung together. The background vocals at times On those first couple of songs or just really different and interesting. They play off of her vocal. And i just love. Kate bush good choice. All right we get to our number ones now michael. What is your number one. I'm going to graceland graceland memphis tennessee ongoing graceland. This album just hit me like a ton of bricks. I mean the eighties. There are so many titanic albums. This came out while. I was in high school and and really among just a handful of eighties albums. That just floored me. And really for paul simon at that time this just kind of opened a whole new door for him when he went to africa and got into these worlds sounds and incorporated his amazing lyrics and songwriting and concepts and mixed it with music and sounds and styles that i had never heard before i mean it was just a complete change of direction and reinvigorated. His career not only graceland but the album. That cannot after that the rhythm of the saints. It was just so eclectic and worldly at the time and kind of marrying that rock and pop sound with the african beats and rhythms but really it was the vibe. Two of the ladysmith black mambazo just their whole seen as the backing vocals. paul simon. Some of his best lyrical writing is is on this album and just the way that he presents. It is all so new and fresh. I mean the album starts with an accordion. How can that be cool. It is when boy in the bubble kicks in. Because i mean you're just like what is this you know. It was controversial at the time there was kind of a cultural boycott with apartheid in south africa and this was before apartheid came to an end so there was a little bit of backlash for that. But paul simon had this amazing breakthrough in his career and this album is still one of my all time. Favorites number forty six on the top five hundred list. It is such an inspired choice. Michael and i remember at the time. How the musicians who he had recruited and worked with on this record came out in support of him when there was that backlash of your appropriating african music for your own forty americanized capitalist evil desires and they came out very strong supportive. How paul. Simon brought this music to the masses in a way that maybe up to that point had not been done on that level and i think there's people that will still argue. This is his best record ever boy in the bubble just the beginning. It was a slow day and the sun was beating on the soldiers by the side of the road. Right a slowed. Only there's tension right. There's a bright light. A shattering of shop windows. The bomb in the baby carriage was wired to the radio. These are slowed. things are exploding. My god in that that chorus right. These are the days of miracle a wonder this is a long distance. Call the way. The camera fall is us in slo mo the way we looked to us all. Oh yeah it's like this fantastic lyric writing on this record. And of course like you have highlighted the plan. What a great choice. At graceland john number get rocking gentlemen. My number one pick. Maybe not a surprise to anybody who knows me is. Ac dc's back in black out in nineteen eighty and it's thank you for those power chords gauley. It's the best. Acdc record by far. It's one of the best hard rock albums ever recorded. if you ask me. I know that's high praise but mutt lengths production. Not only is powerful. It's very precise given that. These guys are not noted for their extreme precision playing. But you'd never know that to listen to the tracks on back in black pound for pound. And i'm a big. Acdc fan going back to the early more rockabilly kind of sloppy stuff. They did with bon scott in the early. And mid seventy s. These are the best rifts that angus and you want to give his brother malcolm credit for the rhythm work he did. This is the high water mark songs. Like have a drink on me. That riff go ahead and try to play it. Because everybody who's a guitar player. I can play. Cdc that simple it's Manina man in with a couple of the same blues lead breaks good luck playing. Have a drink on me accurately because it's just for whatever reason this moment in time with. Acdc showed them at the height of their artistic and even technical guitar prowess in my humble guitar player opinion back in black is a classic three chord thumping song but that little lead thing he does between the second and third quarters and that is brilliant. I mean it's what did that come from and again if you're not angus young. You're not playing exactly like he is but the other point about this album. That is so salient to me. If you're an ac dc fan somehow or another. They get brian johnson in there and he takes over for bon scott who died a couple of months before and in england from alcohol. Ingestation what do you call it when you throw up on your barf. You call it a job john bottom or moon. What brian johnson did on that record. Vocally not only. Is it extremely underrated. Go back and listen to what he does on. Shoot to thrill and go. Is that robert plant in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy. How are you even getting up there and again. This isn't super digitized. Pro tooled out. This is one thousand nine hundred eighty as far as i know. That's a real vocalist. Really doing that. Not pro tuning it up into the atmosphere there. He was never brian. Johnson was never able to replicate that stuff again. Tim me it's a unicorn of record. It's not doable again. They never could produce those songs live very well and one more thing about this record is as far as hits go other than given the dog a bone which is kind of throwaway who cares. This is a strong record. I mean from start to finish. These songs are all good. The rifts are all better than most acdc riffs and it was one of those albums i bought in wore out as a fifteen and sixteen year old wore out the cassette in my volkswagen beetle. And it makes my number one for those reasons mixing. Wanna listen to it right now. Angus young just his guitar tone. In distortion never made e. a. d. n. g. sound so good. He's not underrated. He's considered a great guitar player as he should be but guitar players and michael. You know this intent maybe to talk all. Yeah that's he's no randy rhoads. He's no eddie. Van halen and i'm just saying the re and they're always known as a riff e bandai cd. These are the best rifts. Just ask yourself this. Would you rather dance to an ac dc song or a lead break by eddie van halen. You can only danced one of the two. It's the grew. They are good. It's going to get you the dan. Thank my rhythm section. Feel road and cliff. Richard got thank them and look. I think sony that unite going to los angeles domestic guys. I did a couple of them. Yeah right all right. it's time for my number one. I don't think this is going to surprise you or michael. It is russia's moving pictures on our one. Yeah no no build up or anything okay. So this album comes out. Nineteen eighty-one all of what you would call side. One has been played on the radio to death from tom sawyer to read bar chetta which they exit accidentally mispronounced. The name we call it red marchetto. But it's actually read. Barqueta is a name of the the car y y z or is a saying canada why and limelight so all. Those songs get played on classic rock radio. Now you flip over the album if you have the vinyl and then you get the weird side you have this ten minutes. Sprawling song called the camera. I which is very synth based. But there's guitar and lot of drums and very positive about london and new york. Then you get this. Next song is very dark. it's called witch-hunt. If we look at it lyrically it. Actually kinda makes a lot of sense these days and then they'll ends with vital signs which is kind of new wavy and it also kind of signals. What's going to happen on. Their next album was called signals. Little side note about their biggest song. Tom sawyer on the album when they recorded it in nineteen eighty-one getty alex. Neil didn't think it was a very strong song. they thought mask pari one of our weaker songs on the record and the song was originally called louis the lawyer. That was the song worriedly but the lyricist who originally wrote louis. The lawyer was a guy named pye dubois and he was in a band called max webster which toured a lot with rush. Peer changes the name from louis. The lawyer to tom sawyer. Smart move you've got the song that was sort of like it's not that great or just kind of weaker and it becomes one of the biggest songs of their career in the one that sort of vaulted them into superstardom. And after moving pictures comes out. Rush is an a-list act. They fill stadiums and they never filling stadiums a right up to the tour of the end They filled the l. a. forum in twenty seven. Excuse me in two thousand fifteen so russia's moving pictures get it crank it and crank cranky choice when you hear tom sawyer. Come on the radio. Do what i do and you get to the drum solo. You turn it up twice as loud as you. Should you try to do that. Solo either on the steering wheel across the dashboard. I mean it's a good song just has had that whole record but man is just bring me back to where i was so in love with rock and roll in rock and roll. That had that smart edge to it that something scary going on with red bar chadha with air car coming over the office. Forget about those versions of songs are are four of my favorite rush songs. I love the storytelling read. Barqueta i love y. Y z Limelight to me is really interesting insight into neil period and rest in peace. He was the primary lyricist. But if you read the lyrics to limelight early gives you an idea that he didn't really want to be in the in. The spotlight is much. I mean he wanted to play his music and but as far as the fame and being recognized in public. He didn't like that. But one lyric in here really of sums that up living in a fish eye lens caught in the camera. I i have no harm to lie. I can't pretend a stranger is a long awaited friend. When you're big fans of a bam like this and you follow them you feel like you know them and you assume it would be reciprocated if you suddenly bumped into them or something. But but neil didn't feel that way now just kinda wanted to be a regular guy who just went through the world and he put it this way. He said it's not that he was being a deck. It's just that he was embarrassed by all the attention that he was getting. Who my god. Your lyrics is so great. You're drumming you're just like a drum god. This really makes me uncomfortable. But he said if you met me on the street and you didn't know who i was i'd talk your ear off but the minute you say. Hey aren't you that guy from that band rush. He would go like woo key time to go or he would say you know. I get that all the time you're right. I think he actually instructed alex and getting to do all the fan meet and greets. He wouldn't be a part of them if that rumor is true just literally what hide in his own dressing rooms. I just can't do these. That's you guys are better at that. You guys handle it. That happened after he came back from after his wife and daughter died in the mid nineties. He didn't wanna do anymore. Press and they said we'll handle it. Don't worry so he just was like thank you. I just don't really want to do. But he'd show up on rock line on on radio stations and do interviews like that. He was fine talking one on one. He just didn't want press asking him about his personal life. And things like that so you know. He was very much about his privacy. Okay so we get two honorable mentions now. This is the one album that would have made the list but for whatever reason it was the number four just didn't quite get into our top three so we'll start with mike my On our mention pretenders debut album which came out december twenty seventh nineteen seventy nine but technically enlisted in the rolling stone as nineteen eighty. Screw it. i'm going with it. Number one fifty two on the list. I mean what a fantastic debut. I'm not a big punk rock. Thrash kinda guy but when the opening raging guitar intro of precious kicks in. I wanna go dive into a mosh pit and just started banging around with people and just shaking my head only it just grabbed me from the beginning. The sound of disband and chrissy hinds just kick ass attitude. I just love the combo and they had commercial success brass in pocket. Stop your saban. Which was a great kinks cover. You know she was intimate with ray davies. So he gave her the tune. But there's a lot of other elements in this album and it's just the raw punk that people might not really know like precious. The phone call Up the neck tattooed love boys the weight. You know there's some great stuff on here. There's some softer songs on here too. But i love chrissy. I love the pretenders and rest in peace to james honeymoon. Scott who really had the whole guitar vibe in the early pretender songs and pete fardon who was the bass player both sadly Oh deed gray choice. Pretenders love him. That is a a wonderful album. And i love that song the weight. That's one of my favorites. I've heard it live a few times even live. It's it's much much more powerful than they do. It live sing with precious live version on epic called extended play that that they recorded in central part. And that thing just kills is low song kid on that record to for the light and dark that they bring to that one. That's one of my favorites soon. I've seen that one live saw and playing a in san francisco in nineteen ninety four with that band configuration and they played kid get open with it. That's one of my favorite records of all time. A great choice. Michael very good mr john. Young noble mission son Speaking of punk. I could really relate to what michael saying because i am not necessarily punk rock fan. I understand the anger behind. It understand the politics. I appreciate all that but my honorable mention is his debut album los angeles which came out in nineteen eighty and this to sum it up. It's basically punk rock with harmonies. Which is what brought me into it. the harmonies between bass player john doe and his then wife exceed survey They're off their odd but they the songs are written. They're not just that's thrash e hardcore like damaged by black flag or some of those other records around around this time this one able to appreciate this level of punk not only that but they had billy zoom. Their guitar player was black. Brian setzer before brian. Setzer was brian. Setzer you know what i mean. He had the regan guitar aerojet guitar. He played he played a rockabilly style. But could play those power chunk chunk Punk cords which this album is of and did it with your position where he's kind of its legs audi just looking at the audience and just killing it on guitar. This album is kind of a punk rumors record. It's the break-up of and john doe and they ride it out that on the album and so there's a little bit deeper level too if you want to go there but if you just want good power cord i guess you could call it punk to me. It's punk with harmonies. And i've been an ex fan. Ever since i can't wait to go see him in august down in southern california when they headline that show so that makes my honorable mention the los angeles love it. She had back John i think that you brought something to lied about this record that i never really do. Which is the punk rock version of rumors. I didn't realize that this was the was my own. That's my own analysis. They pay me for allience. Well i'm gonna go back and listen to this record. Because i have it. I mean i'm a big expert. He's like you. But i'm gonna start to listen to lurks. Listen to johnny. Hit and run. pauline. You're really we'll go wait a minute. What's going on with all right onto my honorable mention. And i'm just going to say ladies and gentlemen prince and the revolution's yes. Yep so it is a tour de force album. You can listen to this record. Write every song. Sounds like a hit because almost every song on this album was a hit. Clearly prints is at the top of his game. Not only did he crap this album that perfectly fit into the film but as a standalone album. Okay it really did blow everything else. Including any lingering. Michael jackson thriller mania out of the waters of lake mitochondrial. It's get not listen to this record and say yeah it's kinda weak or printed somewhere else better blah blah blah. Fu prince rules on this album. It is never not going to be a classic and i wish it could have made a higher ranking but for whatever reason and maybe it's probably because i've heard the song so many times and there's very little to add to the genius of this record and how well all the style sort of come together in one album but boy talk about lightning model. He really just captured it and certainly didn't have any kind of success. Like he did with purple rain after that but not to say that he didn't have hits because he of course he did. But this album alone is an honorable mention and should be within that top three so if there was a three eight category or one hey category would definitely be right next to russia's moving and enemy and there was a movie out of it two groundbreaking at the time but i will say that at a senior prom in high school. I slow dance to purple rain. Yeah you did. Yeah you and air guitar to. Let's go crazies. Lead guitar break about times. And that still isn't a solo. Dare you to try to play. The prints did it and recorded it. Forget about it now. We get to our snubbed up. Dubs michael mugabe. What's your side of the police. And they are represented here. Synchronised city is on the top five hundred list. But i am greedy and i want more police and they had a couple of other albums in the eighties and my snub is ghost in the machine in prior incarnations of this rolling stone top five hundred list going back to two thousand and three and twenty twelve. This album made the list but it has since been bumped off in the last decade by you know a lot of other bands that have come along since but the machine is kind of a different direction. I think it's kind of a bigger sound. There's more horns prevalent in the sound keyboard and since and it just kind of adds more layers to what is a fantastic trio on its own. There's so many great beats on hero. One world is enough with the reggae and the horns. A hungry for you re humanize yourself spirits in the material world. Demolition man. john. What's your so many snubs so little time. Thank you rolling stone. I'm gonna ask you guys a question. What album think made the top one hundred australian of all time wait. Don't answer that. I'll do it for you. It was men at work. Could as mrs usual that came out in one thousand nine hundred eighty two. It's considered at least by australian critics as one of the coolest most original amazing records ever. But i guess rolling stone didn't see it that way. Did they try to tamp down my anger a little bit and just describe to you how this album affected me as a seventeen year old kid when i first heard who can it be now on the radio which you have to admit is unusual and it's weird and it's rock but it's new wave and it's got a saxophone part that you couldn't do the song without not only did have the hit. You know i'm really sick of down under we've all been in radio. We've played that song too often. I get it be good johnny. Which was the third single off. This record was very strong but this album. Go back and listen to listen to that. What is this a seven minute song that closes it out called down by the sea which has big drums and big jangling guitars and really great lyrics and i i understand how the aussies went. Well this is great while they sat as if they were from scotland but they understood that this album was fairly groundbreaking and again. I've made this point on the podcast before. We don't have a truck load of amazing australian bands that have changed the world. And i'm not saying men at work did but acdc little river band air supply. I mean come on. You gotta be somewhere in excess. Excessive kick could have made me again. But i won't go there but the reality is a lot of stuff left off. I feel like this album set a template that rolling stones should have recognized. I mean this was. There was no other band that sounded like men at work. I think i can make that argument. Pretty concisely and pretty realistically and that just blown off. And you know. I'll have a sip of coffee and try to let it wash over me. All right. My snub is xt6 skylark thing. Which comes out in nineteen eighty six. This is kind of beatle. Esque psychedelic miserabilist masterpiece and got left off the list. So if you ever wanna see how conflict can sometimes produce great work. Read the wikipedia entry on the making of skylark. You'll see that lead singer and primary songwriter. Andy partridge and producer. Todd rundgren butted heads numerous times during the making of this record but the result was really wonderful album. That upon its release was greeted with. Kind of Shrug and ho- home but it wasn't until college. Radio started playing the flip side of the lead single delete singles grass. Did things really start taking off. And that was the song. Dear god which was left off the initial pressing of the record but once dear god starts becoming sort of an underground hit if you will or college. Radio hit getting a lot of airplay. The record label went back and repressed the album and a dear god slap a sticker on there and said featuring the song. Dear god and it starts to grow in stature. This album is really well produced. But for years. andy partridge. Who's the lead singer always complained about the fact that it didn't sound right. It's a binded sound better. We were recording this record and we did the final mix down but then when we did the pressings and got it back it sounded like then in lifeless. There was something missing well as it turns out. There's a story behind this and it's called corrected polarity for years. This has sounded wrong to andy. Partridge and so. They figured it out and he added a little lighter note to the rerelease of it. He said mastering engineer. John dent discovered a flaw in the original stereo mix tape of the album. He found that there may have been a wiring error somewhere between the multi-track machine and the stereo mix resulting in the stereo mix having a reverse polarity sadly at the time. Nobody in either of the uk or us. Mastering rooms picked up the problem all sec. Thought that this sounds kinda thin and distant well after a relatively simple procedure john was able to put things right and suddenly. The album sounded much better. The base was warm. The highs clear and the mid's thick and near in short. This is how the should have originally sounded so. That is the corrected polarity. So if you wanna get x t c skylark being get the corrected polarity version which andy partridge sells on. His website called ape music. Ap so there's snub and there's my story about correct. Get your midst thick as we say in the business. We've got a full plate of here for folks. Listen to so let's recount. What are top three are honorable mentions and our stops michael you find number three is dire straits brothers in arms number two is peter gabriel's so from nineteen eighty six and number one is paul simon's graceland honorable mention the pretenders debut and my snub is ghost in the machine by the police and john number three was los lobos how will the wolf survive from nineteen eighty-four number two is whitney houston's debut album whitney houston released in nineteen eighty-five my number one pick no surprise here a cdc's back in black from nineteen eighty my honorable mention also from one thousand nine hundred eighty the band x and their debut record los angeles my snob men at work's business as usual released in nineteen eighty two and still worthy of being on the damn last minute three disintegration by the cure number two kate bush hounds of love number one is russia's moving pictures my honorable mention is prince and the revolution purple rain and my snub is skylark x t c. Wonderful podcasts folks. That was good. I enjoyed that. Does that tell you something so so next time. We will be in the nineteen nineties as part of our mini series spotlighting. Our top three albums from rolling stone magazine's five hundred greatest albums of all time. Michael agali's been along for the ride and he will continue to be along for the ride and cool. Thanks michael for hanging out with you guys man. Thanks for having me john. Thank you my friend. For taking the time to spend some time with us chitchatting and getting angry and loving music and doing all the things that i would just like to say that i feel much more positively i learned more than i am angry. And that is certainly a credit to you and michael who always brings such great perspective to these records. Not only your records. I know but records. I don't know very well. And that's what i hope other people get a chance to to glean from this as you guys such great insight into records that we might not know a lot about it now we we wanna learn more and will we're packing it up in heading out for now own.

mark knopfler kate bush john whitney houston michael peter gabriel robert smith Gabriel ted facebook los lobos John Los lobos gietzen Michael magali michael mugali Majali george h w bush Magali omar hakim
Episode 1236 - David Hidalgo

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

1:09:02 hr | Last month

Episode 1236 - David Hidalgo

"Hey folks does. A nice vacation include view of the parking lot. No so don't book a cheap hotel book expensive hotel for cheap on hot wire with hot radios. You can stay nicer. Hotels ever thought possible. Just select your city neighborhood and amenities then get your heart rate. Better views king sized beds and maybe a minibar with high quality. Snacks deserve it. Don't you yes. Download the hot wire app now in book. Beyond your wildest means all bookings final all right. Let's do the show all right. Let's do this. How are you what the fuck. What the fuck buddies. what the fuck knicks. What the fuck toplitz. If there are any out there how are you. what's happening. everybody okay. are we good. I talked to david. Hidalgo from los lobos. Yes now the weird thing about me and los lobos is that you know like look at with any band. I know the albums. I know and then i listen to a few new albums but going back into the los lobos cadillac. I start to realize holy fuck. This is probably one of the best bands that ever lived. This band makes most other bands. Look like fucking novelty acts. These guys are hardcore pros paying their dues on the on the wedding circuit and dance club. Sort of a latino dance club circuit mexican music mexican folk music mexican dance music doing the weddings. That was right there. Hamburg for the beatles was the playing these events and man there is no ban. That's tighter and looser simultaneously than los lobos stands each other in such a fluid than connected way can create so much space such a beautiful. God damn sound of true american music. I i guess people compare them to the band because the band was one of the first kind of consciously in a way or i guess it was kind of hung on them this idea of american music americana music of a of a an indigenous music to america that kind was rooted in appalachian music country. Some some jazz in some funk but you know those guys were canadian not to judge and the one thing they were lacking was that the the latino foundation the mexican roots and that's where the true american music of los lobos comes and you can hear them. You know them immediately it's it's astounding to me. That people don't really dig in to the entire los lobos cadillac but this new album called native sons comes out next month but i got to listen to it. It's all kind of la related or based covers of music. That influence them when they were coming up. And i talked to. David bowden. Because i was pretty fucking excited about it. And we'll all you'll hear that momentarily we also we also have a new segment on the show that we're starting today. It's called get to know tom with tom. Sharp wing You'll hear that shortly as well. I would also like to throw a little love to these sparks brothers documentary. It opens in theaters tomorrow. Friday june eighteenth edgar right. Put this together. It's his film. The sparks brothers. I don't know if you know. Sparks the band. I've tried to lock into sparks to band. I can't say that i have yet. I did enjoy the documentary. I learned a lot. It was impressive. But i still have not quite locked into that band. And they've done like thousand records and there's many different sounds but it seemingly that and i respect them but i don't listen to them. I don't know this if the that this is necessary for the plug because the movie stands on its own and it's not a paid plug. It's ed grass me to watch it. I watched it. I was like holy shit. I didn't know any of this. I have a few of the records. Ah listen to them again. I now the new respect for them. But that was the last time i listened to them. Not that you're gonna listen to sparks every day enough enough. Okay enough can. I just say. Wpf is sponsored by better help. Online therapy may was mental health awareness month and continuing throughout june. This show is proud to join the cause of de stigmatizing therapy. There's no shame in asking for help and talking to professional about your troubles at some of the best help you can get. Whether it's virtual visit a live chat session or speaking on the phone better help can make all of those possible for you just log on to better help to get your needs assessed. And they'll match you with your own licensed professional so you can start communicating and under forty eight hours. It's also easy free to change counselors if you need to better help counselors are ready to help you out if you're anxious or depressed or having trouble in any area of your life it's not a crisis line. It's not self help. It's professional counseling done securely online. It's more affordable than traditional. Online counseling and financial aid is available. Wgn listeners get ten percent off their first month of online therapy at better. Help dot com slash w. f. that's better h e l p dot com slash w. t.f. Sometimes we haven't done this in a long time but we used to do short interview segments with people who you know. Friends are the show what night. But but this is. This is something different. This is a new segment on the show for a limited time. Only it's a where they call him a limited series of segments Called gatineau tom tom. Tom sharpe joins a dear friend of mine. He's He's been on the show many times he appeared at the beginning of one of my. Hbo specials thinki- pain. We've done several. And tom shows together that you can also listen to. So he's not a stranger but But the point is he's got this book coming out. What's it called. It never ends the the book. It's a it's a about tom. it's a memoir called. It never ends. And i read it and it's it's difficult position to be put in. Have to be honest with you tom. Hey we never know man you know some a friend years is like we do favor. We read my book. Yeah and then. I'm like was i've been in both sides of that now for the first time i life. I'm on the other side of that. What you want what do you do i have to i just where it without reading it. Is it a blurb is it. does he want notes. What am i supposed to do. And but but i read it and i've done that twice. It's it's happened to me a couple of times. Actually and i think maybe it's people have sent me books before and i haven't read them but i read the whole book and i you know i. I don't know you that long or your turns out not that well. Even i didn't know any that's stuff but why would i. It's not like when we talk. We're professional broadcaster. Yeah generally we're friends we dinner and stuff. But i'm not going to be like you know. Jesus what happened. Yeah you weren't shut. You don't just go like ten years old. Was that way what happened to you. Why why are you like you. Are you know what but the the point is. I guess there's many points but it's a great book and i think we should just sort of Like let's just just so people know like you know what do you do you. I mean yeah. I mean i know you host the best show host the show the best show. I've been doing that for man. Twenty years twenty years twenty years doing this and it started on terrestrial radio on a station. Wfan meal right and that was Standard old-fashioned radio right and then but like like in You know in the book. You talk about How your you were very excited to get the job. My god. i couldn't believe it was like just grow up. Radio was my thing was like idolizing and fetishizes just disc jockeys and when you get into like personalities new jersey guy. Yeah so here all the new york. Am over new york station there early. Talk guys early. Talk out there Bob grant he was a right wing piece of garbage on. Wabc but he was. He's one of those guys. Were just like you're really funny and great at this but you're evil you're using it for evil purpose so many of them so many turns out nice but some of them were. They always used to be guy. I had to do an evening show here. That was preempted frequently by Clippers games like a live show ten at night because it was some sort of like a placeholder when after air america fire me. They put me on on the era. I can't remember the name of the fucking channel. But as a night's show brendan came out here to produce it for a while. Okay and but we literally. If it was women's basketball season they had a pre existing contract with that every live. So we'd have to wait until the game was over to start show and we're in overtime was the guy's name and then there was a right wing guy named ziegler. Okay you know. And he was sort of on the same floor different channel but like to studios down and the worst most malignant fucking. Right wing douchebag but he was good at being broadcast absolutely if they are they are exclusive. Yeah right so. I remember this. One time at the urinal senator. Mike you know you. You really You're good on the mike. May i really. I mean. I didn't think you would think i'm like dude. I mean you know you're like all right just take it. You're a horrible human. That happens to be good at broadcasting but you just knew it was going to be your thing right. I mean 'cause. I know you cover this in the book and i. It's it's a it's a great story you know early on. You never can dream. It could even be your thing. You just love it. Yeah and it seems like it's a million miles away rightly pre podcasting. Did you ever imagine the do you. Did you ever think well it's different because you know you're you're unique radio guy. But let's go beyond just as you were saying. And this is off. Topic kevin christie route. You framed it in a way that. I never really thought about it like that. You know in light of the podcasting thing. It's like who knew so. Many people wanting to be mediocre personnel. Me scott the craziest thing when suddenly who knew everybody just wanted to shoot the shit but it's still terrible. There's some people that like are better at other things. Basically doing mediocre midday radio style. And they're not good at it now there. They have lowered themselves anything that i didn't even think they know what that was. They've gotten through. It's like three steps down there. They didn't listen to that. And say i want to be that they want to be the person who was influenced by the person who has influenced by that as a comic going into these places. You always know you're up against these guys these regional guys and you go in and there's always a side kick guys. I used to do stand up and you never wanted to be that guy that was like that was all things mailed. You hope you could be the you know the chuckle guy the guy you chiming in on some local radio show yeah. It's like in music. It's like the last refuge of the scoundrel in music. Is you go become a country artist. Because they'll bill apparently accept anyone that pretends that just like i like countries my favorite thing. And there's like we like you then comedy it's that yeah it was just like in and now i just like now i cannot get that framing out of my head that like you know everyone now is just like for some reason. They just forgotten. That radio was the end of the line. Yeah some practical way to try to get traction. No you like howard. Stern used to say it was the lowest rung on the show biz ladder for sure it and it was one hundred percent right about that with the largest egos. Yeah you should. We used to go in and do these Morning shows cockfight with joe. Nobody you know. Who's like you know he's got the drive time and the entire columbus areas like this fucking and they're causing trouble. They're like we're going to fuck with the comic mike. I'm just i'm a ticket. These guys are just terrified. That someone's going to just walk in and go like yeah. We're just changing the whole thing. Now we now. We're playing Latin station now everybody out like hanging over their head. Every tae when clear channel was that's not. I guess that's not happening. It's like that at cleveland story. We must have talked about that. When i go to do morning. Radio get off the elevator and there's just some sort of commotion run by not wearing a shirt and he looks exasperated. Mike what's happening and there came in. Just be cool the the someone wrong with the pew cannon and we're going to have to move into another studio the fuck is happening. I'm not sure if you should be happy or sad something wrong with the end of it. i forget the guy's name he's terrible and we and it's like yeah man we were. We had some guy drink milk. And then we fix altered a leaf blower and mike when you do. We like to me. This was like the the end of shock. Radio like you didn't device the they had gone out of their way to create a manufacturer to reinvent was ridiculous. The can it just blew up every puked milk all over their studio for no reason and nobody can see it. No yeah well. There's probably a video element but it was just so stupid because there's always nine dudes involved like those mornings tax bill. You'll get it. You want something to eat bill again something to eat and that guy. Were jon wurster. Who i do stuff on the best show with We'd do comedy seven. You know john. John growing up in philly listen to classic rock radio and then one week. There is a format change. Where the the the classic rock station tried to go like punk or alternative. Yeah and there was this old guy who would listen to on the station. And he's listening and now this guy on same voice but now he's calling himself mohawk john called in he's like wait. Hey are you Aren't you the guy who like your. That's your name is It's not me making me call myself mohawk. He's like i'm out of here but this is my last week. Radi hawk that an adult at some point say like i'm calmness of mohawk today but yeah but it's it is a specific talent. Not everyone can do it. And you're great at it and you and it was. It was something that evolved like the guys that are good. Do it like nobody else somehow. And you've kind of figured out this disown. Your own niche with the best show which is hilarious. And but how did that evolve it. Just sort of you just started. I can't remember. I know it's in the book. Yeah it started off doing rate starting off doing a show on. Wfan mu primarily music station new jersey new jersey jersey city was in east orange at that point doing a music show and then slowly the balance was like ninety nine percent music one talk and then just kept going to where i was slowly talking more and more than that just made sense and i was like. Oh my god. This is what i want to be doing. Not just playing racket and you really good at the music beds and the and all that but the appeal was to use the music as a complement to the talking and that then it just was like all bets were off. I knew what i wanted to do with it. But it's interesting because you come out of this this other part of your life where you know like Like stuff on the book. Where i'm like. Don't you want like what's that stuff about like your name like you know. Oh you know we've got to save something for the de i mean there's there's stuff about my name and all right and then the book all right okay. All right you're right. We should we even want more. Yes people should. If it's crazy man. That whole thing in the book is crazy. Don't you want to know. I mean right. No no no other things. I do want to get something to eat or yeah all right all right. We'll do it. let's do it again. I'll try not to do this again. Chur sure you know a couple more times. I want people to name things good. It's all right we'll do again. We'll do we'll do another one. Okay with save some So look folks you can go order thomas book. What is it calling. It never end. It never ends. I read more with nice memories with the i now that i know i know it's referring to yes you do. And that's also in the book. All right i'll talk to you. We'll do it again. we'll do. It's at Tom wrote a book dot com. And you can order it to other places to write a book places. Oh any any bookstore will take your order for this book. We're we're going to do this again. In thomas tell i guess some you know. You're just going to be selective about you know all we'll talk we'll talk okay. We will have another talk with with tom. Tom sharply in the amazing tom sharply next week. So you can get to know him a little better and then get his book. It never ends so you can get to know him a lot better like a lot pre-order it at. Tom wrote a book dot com. We're sponsored today by simply safe. The award winning home security system it's engineered with the latest technology to keep your family safe and all the features you would expect from top of the line home protection. But what really set simplisafe. A apart is it's people highly trained security experts. Who were always there for you when you need them. Most these are people who truly care about keeping you safe when an alarm goes off a real person who to call to make sure you're okay not an automated message when an emergency happens a person who cares about what happens to you. 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They are still out there working looking forward to going to see them. I believe me. And gimme gimme. Dan are going to go see them at the pacific. Amphitheatre with ex and the blasters. I think it's like the first of august may be The new los lobos album is called native sons. it's a collection of songs by los angeles based artists. That were influential to the band. The beach boys wore the blasters jackson. Browne buffalo springfield and more. It comes out On july thirtieth and they are going to see him on the next day. Yeah yeah this me and david hildalgo. I give weird about sounds. So i like i like this room to be more than it is but i got to put these panels up so the shit. Don't bounce around. I like it dead like that sounded. Just be dead. What kind of guitar you playing these days. what's your main one. I usually go back to a telecaster. Really telecasters threat and s g for awhile. Really still i go back and forth g. That's different sound than those offenders. Man right yeah well sticker the sticker but it's a i don't know the neck pickup on s g is just cut through paul's and try to get the i love falls too. Yeah right and but they ask. Jesus had to cut through. Yeah i guess it's because it's just that like that just that hun bucker sitting on the bodies so thin yeah right. I think there's the whole the whole makeup guitar. You know out here. Yeah yeah yeah. I have like that that one. I got it. That black one. That captain kirk when he he sent that to me. I'm not even that greater guitar player. But i try to get as many guitars as possible for free one of us. That's how it works. Man i talked to steve miller right about month ago because he releases this movie of concert he didn't the seventies and they're all playing these ridiculous guitars. I've been as guitars right. And one of the one of the guitar for had a music man and i asked him. I said what the fuck was with. The i'm in the music gives you an offender. Wouldn't give us any so we took what we could. There said. they'll make us anything. Yeah yeah iceman. Yeah yeah yeah right. The one with the big hook on it like it was their version of an explorer. Kind of that's what they were playing. I remember that so do you guys you are. Y'all still live in la. I'm in orange county now. I've been out there for sixteen years. Oh yeah and i. it's nice it's you know the sterile. Just i mean it's okay. It's all right you mikey choice. In the matter well etel more room out there. Yeah bigger yard. Yeah yeah i've grandkids. Now oh yeah yeah yeah see need then run around run around but you guys you started here you grew up here. Yeah grew up dollar what part east. La down the long beach freeway by. I thought we was. Did you come from a musical family. Sort yeah we music. Music appreciation was high in the found with your fa- how many how many people in the family Three brothers three brothers You know my dad. He had a few drinks like to say. Oh yeah yeah you. Like ink. Spots and louis prima. Oh yeah. Yeah yeah louis jordan and stuff like that. That was his that. So that's what you grew up with in tune hearing. Yeah i heard a lot of that. What he do yo man. He was a truck driver. Oh yeah delivered. Caskets for caskets were west coast casket company. That's heavy empty. you know. Yeah no but that's one of the things when your kid. That's kind of a heavy things. What your dad do he drops off coffins cascades and we lived in the he got to deal with the company. Yeah we live in the office and the warehouse was that was our backyard. Was oh man caskets so you guys can go play in the caskets. Yeah we play. Hide and seek caskets. Makes him vampire jokes all that. Yeah yeah i well. That's good. He was in the right business and wendy. When did you start playing about eleven. I guess that he started on guitar. Yeah well drums. I my brother drummer a really. Yeah so he taught me this basic where to put it to one two. Yeah yeah yeah. Can you do it now. Yeah i mean. I haven't played in a while. But i enjoy playing drove. Yeah but you start with the guitar. When did you pick up the accordion. That wasn't too later. Eighty s you know the lowest got into the mexican folk music back in the seventies and he's been a ban man since seventy three. It's crazy do know. How old were you when he started was nineteen and it's the same dudes. Yeah see four guys and you all get along still for the most part. Yeah i mean. I mean i listen to new record. I'm i'm a big fan. And i had like i. There was some records. I listened to in a while. But it's like what's amazing about. You guys is that like even with this new record with the native sons with all these covers except for the one the one new song i mean even though they're covers and even though we know some of them somehow or another they all sound like you know what i mean. It's good it's good and it's all through all the music. It doesn't matter what style of music you're playing which is sort of an amazing thing you know it's a it's a testament to how connected you are in. That just comes from fucking being together. Nineteen hundred seventy three. What is at fifty years almost just about. Yeah probably this year or next well is coming up man. Yeah so what how. How does it start your so. You're in high school or what just out of high school and you're all just you're playing. You've got at that point you just playing guitar. Yeah and you meet the. Where do you know the other guys from. We all med school high school. Yeah one or one of the friends that he's on the bed anymore He went off. He's like a year older than i am. Yeah and he came back from a break. Yeah he'd got into mexican folk music and it was you know. Come down and play. You know we're doing this stuff. I'd never i've been the music was around. I thought you know not on music but mexican folk museum. More like Like the regional stuff like central chicago. Oh yeah yeah you. Gotta strings and violins. No according no recordings right. So i always wanted to play mandolin. I was a good excuse to to learn. We couldn't play violin right so we were trying to play the violin. Parts mandolins and figured out mandolin on your own. Yeah we just kind of you know little by little. Yeah song by song. So that's so you worked out a mexican folk Let's set list. We had about five songs and we. We'd play one guy no it will. Caesar was there then. I invited louis down and the through. Louis conrad came down so before you know we had five guys guys five songs play mexican folk music yeah. What'd you do with that. But we look more like can't heat. They all had long hair and beards. And you like candy. I like they were great right. That wilson guy could sing and play. That harp didn't you do did you. Do you did you did that. Record man with the guy from canton. Ohio donohoe dog holy shit. That's a great record. Thank you what you can't get it on itunes. Oh yeah. I don't know well i had to find the cd heels the rights to it so he passed away and his family's doing with it. What's his name again is. There was mike huckabee. Was he what he can't he from the beginning. He was later later right here. 'cause i got like those guys at the beginning where i didn't realize it but they were all like There's a couple of those bands back. Then i think butterfield to that were just so. They were like blues nerds. Yeah yeah they record collectors. Yeah deep in. Yeah yeah so. So how'd you. When did you make that record. That was in the mid nineties or something. Yeah i think and what did that come about because that thing was like. There's no record that sounds like that man. It's kind of very deep deep groove. We met through a friend that had a music store out in the area. And we just start talking and he had a. Mike had a studio house. Yeah i guess the spiratou or the influence was a jimmy reed. And donna dewey. Like i don't know. Donna do what you should look into. And do it you sugarcane harris. Yeah he plays the electric violin. Oh wow yeah. I guy to come up with electric violin. Stylus of record player put on the bridgeable violin. Shit that was that was the inspiration. Yeah so we wanna do blues. But we didn't want to heart player right. You wanted to do so dirty. Yeah yeah and jimmy reed is like the as deep as gets. He's great man. Great poet to just waste. Oh yeah beautiful. Did you ever get to see him. No never do so. You guys are pointing mexican folk music and what. What did you realize. There's not a a big future in this. What well we didn't know what was it. What was the scene. What were you doing your parties or well. It started off. You know playing a you know a lot of. There's a tamale parties. He added for the vfw in the neighborhood. Yeah around the neighborhood and We met became our manager for a little while they went together. Yeah he will. He worked with city schools. Yeah and He's the one that started in and you could get. Do you know you could play. You know assemblies. You could play. Colleges do educational type stuff. Because no one's doing this music people learn about it. Yeah so that was our way in so that He's he got us our first gig a rally city schools and then we've started playing it East la college and friend We've made a friend who was down there from. Uc davis yeah recruiting students and he heard us play and he he took us up to like sacramento area and that led to the bay area. And before you know it. We were playing oregon california. But this was this very specific type of music. Yeah and so you got known for your almost like historians or playing some sort of Folk music that people had weren't familiar with you were you probably they. Teachers are bringing students to watch and we did that. a lot. and etta every single demayo. We'd have like you know thirty gigs. Within four days and dash for cash by that point. i'm. I'm assuming he had more than five songs. Branched out a little bit. Yeah so so. How long did you guys do that for. Did you think like well. This is this is it. This is this is what we're doing all. That work starts at dry up lately when reagan came in a lot of the programs were recovering. A lot of extra like these programs were cut. So you guys were brought in by teachers to inspire young people in a way and what we're doing that we're playing weddings and baptisms and stuff like that too. But all exclusively. Latino gatherings yeah. Yeah so so. Reagan comes in school. You know kills spirit of the kids out that's eighty. What is that eighty eighty one. And then what you guys ended up because we already had started families by that time. You know oh yeah and Had keep money so we ended up playing in restaurants like mariachi style. We wouldn't stroll used to stroll three. The light was well we did. We would split up. Yeah we'll go upstairs. How did how did it work with Like there was no drums. What was louis doing He's played guitar. he's a guitar player. You know like. I'm trying to think who that it's you in in sazor caesar. Who do the guitar playing Mostly mostly all three of us play guitars. Louis got off the drums. You'll play on drums and then it's all three during the guitar. Yeah wow man so we gonna play restaurants and and that got boring and we played this one place and there was a drum set and electric guitar for the band. That was coming on after us. So we started goofing off with it and it led to rediscovery ritchie valens and the music of riot midnight as east side sold some of the foundation of this new record right. I'm trying to figure out. I'm trying to remember. the settlers. Listen to a couple of times. But i think i got the guy here but you guys did You do like an interesting bunch of songs. But he did some real old ones Yeah there's at midnight or song on there but Yeah i don't even know those guys i should know. That's one of these things. Where i have a bunch of records and i grew up listening to my dad's music but there's some people on here. I'm like i don't know them. I don't know home farmer. John you did a lot right yeah. That's that's done do yeah okay. Yeah and so on sale. Or what but So you guys started playing that's You start playing the rock music. Yeah little by little. We worked our way. And that's what they according came in. And how'd you figure out how to play. That is it. Yeah it's hard. i'm no. I'm no good at it. I can play the songs. I know enough to get by but Well you know but we're listening to all this music and and right cooter. Done this record with flaco jimenez. You heard that record record. We flock will play then. I started looking for his records and not just as a according to right. Oh that's fast. The picked it up. Yeah i tried to. He was like inspiration and a friend of mine. He had an according to that he bought. Yeah angeles just laws. So he loaned it to me. And i started figuring it out. Yeah song by song again you know. What the vibe right. It's a feeling yeah. It's it's a good thing. It's such a beautiful shift into sort of old style. Rock music and country music. Yeah yeah yeah and you guys could sing in spanish so worked out important. Yeah so so what what. What was the shift. So then you shift from from restaurants to bigger weddings. You got you got drum. people can dance. We could play the recession and the debts. You must have done that for a long time. We we did for years and the at that time was when the roots rock things started having came out of the punk rock movement. Sure blasters and people like that. But like i have to assume at that time you guys spent together because you're still together now but that time was almost like the beatles in hamburg gigs. You doing like four or five a weekend right. Yes over a few years in your practice and it's like it's like that's where all the dues were paid. You guys were become like one mind you know in terms of how you play with each other right. Yeah yes pretty much. How was so the and so when the roots rock kit. That was a weird time right because there was this there. There's all these different types of bands playing simultaneously like like right because like i've talked to dave alvin. I've talked to john doe. I've talked to rollins. I've talked to a lot of cats. Who around then. But there was definitely like a roots rock thing but then there was like insanity right there. You're kind of on the same gig and sometimes there'd be a crossover right. Yeah it would be. The circle jerks the blasters. We'd play all of the place where or they are joe. Liggins honey. Dippers the old kind of like a louis jordan era musicians that lived here in la. They would play gigs really. Yeah on the same night same night and so what was the vibe. Then so you. You're coming out of a plane these wedding. So how does it. How do you transition. Who pulls you into that i cut. Does that happen. How do you start doing those gigs. Well it was a i think. Just the the idea playing you know restaurants. I is like Scared and at that time when the are doing their thing and everybody jealous content that reformed and So you know we didn't we. Were doing all elliott type stuff. You like that song mendocino. Oh man we've got to be friends later on. You've got to know doug you really. Did you play with him. Yeah he jan with him. He had he had the last texas blues band For a while there and he had this you know just a great great band we we were on the road. Then we'd run into them somewhere and we'd sit in. Hawaii got to know him that he did. An album called super seven. Yeah and he was part of that. Too yeah yeah. What was it was. He was original singer that of this douglas quintet do you remember that guy that was it was doug. Yeah yeah he was the writer and the singer and then Augie meyers was the the triplets player. Great band i. I don't know for some reason. I thought doug was just a guitar player. But he's saying he did all thing too. Yeah yeah so okay so you didn't want a new year staring down the barrel at a lifelong restaurant gig and you're like this. So then that's how we we went to congress garage. We made it because we were playing. Richard alan stuff by that time. A few a farmer john and and and and a few music you know with the recording so we made a cassette and took it to the country club in procedure Last playing met fill in the in the parking lot. Yeah pass the tape over to them and a few few few weeks later few months later dave calls me and this is you know we're doing. They were kicking ass at that time and they were like five nights at the whiskey l. y. And so they asked opened one of the knights. Yeah and that was. That was a big boost. Write their own and that. Yeah well that was a so like i would assume that they were playing five nights a pretty solid fouling of the type of this kind of retro minded. People must have been kind of kind of roots half rockabilly looking scene. Yeah rockabilly people dressed up green hair. Doing the homeboys. Everybody was that must've been exciting. It was cool. What you guys go out. Would you remember the songs like was it. Do reaching valance or do i think we did a commodity goal and little susie and then we did farmer. John and we did the that we play. We play doing faster. Because i try to punked. Yeah so i have that they reissued that record the just another band from al east. La the all-spanish record. And i got it you know. I don't understand it. But i like but that was. That was a set list before he started integrating. That was your restaurant and that was it. Still play that stuff right. Yeah we do. We'll we'll do. Tours will dedicate You know a tour to that type of music and so we are going out with ex. Are you gonna. yeah we have. I know we have a show with them. Coming up you guys you guys friends. Yeah yeah they they were. They were good to they would Include us some shows. You know back in the day. Yeah this. there's sort of interesting because the you and the blasters like are sorta dug into a root sing and xs kind of like tilting toward some other. You know like they're leaning into some other like area. You know that. I want to ask you that guy. What's his name. Carlos guitar loose. Yes i do you do what. He's autumn's mind he's he's a bay area guy right whereas he's from here. He's echo park. Because i was thinking about him. And i knew david helped him out because i bought that record when he kinda came off the streets briefly and they made that record. We want that record. Yeah i think so. You have dealt with data. But he didn't he couldn't keep it together yields in and out but he's a great player great songwriter. You know what's he like. What like back in the day. Was he like something to see. Kind of deal. Yeah there was a. They had a band top. Jimmy and the rhythm pigs and And we used to play with it. They had a. That was one of the first two gigs got to the called. Blue monday at Cathy to grant yeah and and it was. You know almost like an open mic kind of deal. Tabasco up and play a few songs. Yeah and so that that helps us to so we start getting front of all these people have got to know carlos and guilty top jimmy and it was just you know drunken mess right but it was fun. Yeah second battle of the bands. Yeah yeah it was. It was school. You've got to know those guys and must have been so wild to in like because the it was such a community. Everyone knew each other. And everyone's like going crazy. Yeah already everybody off each other's gigs and jam and now you guys become sort of these elder statesmen man. I mean you guys are like the guys like you've you've played with everybody must have play with all your heroes by now a lot of young and your peter green fan. Yes those i got into him like hard in the last ten years. I can't believe that guy. Yeah i grew up. He was like a jammed with a friend of mine that played us the blues player. Yeah and i. I found out. I didn't know anything about the blues. I was. I knew johnny winner which is which is cool. But it wasn't the real deal. Then you know. Peter green was the one that can put it together for me. Oh really yeah. 'cause it's interesting so when was that when you were like a kid doesn't high school in your peter green and the interviews like clapton. You know they've they. Were talking about otis rush right and albert king freddie king and be out so i started looking for the records soon right. Yeah yeah and you got. You got the hang pretty much more learn. No well i guess so. Yeah i think there's more to it. Seems like there's more to learn if you do less. Yeah that's the thing. That was the big lesson in space. Yeah man you know well you guys certainly know how to take that space. It's kind of mind blowing because you can go you go back and forth but even in the stuff you guys play faster such a A unity of of of rhythm. I don't know what it is. But it's it's kind of amazing and i know people have compared to you guys to the band before but it seems like like when i was in you guys like it's one of those things like i imagined clapton's a huge fan. Have you met clapton. refer we played the crossroads. He must love. You does he. I hope he does what he did. Did you play with him. I decided it was a couple of times that it was mind. Blowing was fourteen and playing to cream records in my bedroom. And there's they're right here. Yeah must be great. He can still lay out the blues. Pretty good yeah but But you know like. I know he was a big freak for the band like there. Was this idea that when that band the band came on the scene. That was like it's over. These guys did it. They reinvented music. They figured it out. Like what's interesting about you guys. Even from the beginning in the way you kinda came up and put together not unlike those guys but they were sort of appalachia and they're all canadian most of them and they're coming up through country western but you guys are doing a similar kind of route sing in terms of uniquely american music. You got all the stuff in there. They don't have any of that like you know the ban doesn't so you've got this whole other element this whole other texture. I'm just blowing smoke up. Your you know what i mean because you can feel that element of where you guys come from and almost all the music too. I was homemade kind of Approach like the band. yeah Did you listen to them. Yeah it's still you know. They they wanted to fiddle to pick up a fiddle. And you know and we're mandolin. We did that instead of trying to We did it in house. I guess we wanted to hear an an through all the folk music. There's so many different. Each region. mexico has a different set of instruments. All these different so we had all that stuff. You know figured it out. Yeah i mean we still working on it but yeah would We had all that stuff to pull from our stevie. Yeah and it's still shows up in the music like like almost every record. There's some of that in there. Yeah yeah yeah. It's a while to get to the two felt comfortable. We could try to write a song in that style also time it was just know we would. We would play the old stuff. Stay true to it. Where where'd you first start. Where i feel the confidence. What's the first song you think that you did. That was kind of drawing from that directly. Was it on kiko. I was on the neighborhood record. Oh it was a song called. Be still yeah. Yeah yeah and it's Really english but it had Six eight rhythm. That's it's used in mexico a lot. A lot of music from mexico pongal. it's called. Yeah and so we wrote a a two took a tries to stab at and it worked so it opened the door to two more stuff like that to the necessary in that record. That's a great one. I didn't know colossal head. That will and i had. I had to kind of get caught up on that. But how did the So when like obviously the first record the that i was how will the wolf survive. But how did that so that happened in that time in the eighties dry. It came out of the l. a. Seen what what. How'd you get that deal. Have that work. well again. It was a blasters are on slash records. Yeah they told. Bob biggs was the main guy. Yeah he's passed away recently but So you better to these guys man. Do something sorry. I was an ep because he didn't want to invest. Yeah much into a deal to make sure he didn't. We're gonna go right. He didn't know what kind of salad or anything right. And really even with the blasters. What were the blasters more defined to him. I guess so. He's always like what are we go to the latin market this mainstream stuff and just just dry out there and see what happens and it worked. Yeah so he just put it out there now. In in the in the kids came and then a lead to survive. Why i mean it's interesting because it seems like on every record. You do like at least a little one or two of each of what you do. Do you know what i mean. You mix it up. Yeah easy no like. There's there's a. There's a rocker. Swing rock know blues jump blues and then you've got a a a mexican thong and then you got like you know maybe a little countryish stuff but you kinda mix it all up right. Yeah but and then like by the time you get to kiko then. All of a sudden did some other thing like all of a sudden everything became wove together. And there was this natural sort of movement through everything. Did you feel that happening. Well you know we did a neighborhood record. Yeah and We wanted to produce ourselves in the record. Company didn't believe us so they they kind of just let it. Dial the neighborhood record. Yeah it's it's a it's a very thoughtful record a asserting. Get their push it you wanted. Yeah yeah so So we were frustrated at in letting worker was head of warner bros at the time. He always liked the band so he puts together mitchell from he says. I think you guys have worked well together. Yeah and and a mitchell's kind of in the same place with his career. He was like man he wanted to do something. You know something different producer. Yeah yeah what will he would he who else. He work with crowded house but he did a lot of stuff interesting. Yeah and and him. In chad blake whose engineer was another. I think he's an alien yeah. He's just amazing. So we all got together and had say mindset. Let's do something that you know. No one's ever heard and we knew we knew A good opportunity to write some stuff that we haven't done before. Try to write better songs or different songs at least and that's and it seemed to work. Well so that's interesting. So that the guy who's as a producer was he brought a whole other point of view to it right because he had his own way of thinking if he did crowded house and stuff. It's not. He's not just like doing rock music. He's got a vision of some kind right guys point of view and the engineers a wizard and then so that kind of encourage you guys to to take it to some other level and what was the process of of of writing that because i mean it's pretty much universally seen as a a a masterpiece of record. Did you feel like how did you approach it differently on that record well like the first first one was stuff that we played live in end Little survive we started. Okay we have to write some stuff. Yeah we can't just play cover right so that let got the ball rolling and The differences we didn't rehearse we didn't go into you know a Pre production i. Would you know right. you weren't taken on. The road is all studio work. Yeah so we'd come up with a night or caesar songs and an idea and we take it to the studio and there you know right just build it. Build it from the bottom guy uses studio like an instrument. Yeah so that was probably the difference. You guys weren't just work like as a like grinding out songs as a band kinda and space differently. That's a that's what we did. Yeah and it worked you know and having mitchell's You know point of view. You know he. He helps us refined stuff. Oh yeah and And then chad just recording through exhaust manifold stuff. It really. yeah you know these crazy ideas can make your child or tell them i'd say. Could you some backwards guitar on this song. So he flips the tape worrying. Okay go yeah. It was that easy. It's easy if you've got a guy knows what he's doing. Did you guys know weights back in the day or around. That time was when we met around kiko time. Yeah yeah see a fan. He must be. Yeah he's he's a good friend of yeah. Well he's as kind of weird shit with exhaust manifold and yeah. It was a chad worked with him too. So that was the connecting they got weights doing these oz manifold that allows well. Everyone's doing the exhaust manifold. And like after that like what did you. Were you guys able to tour a lot of those songs. They seem tricky to play and play. What do you play a couple of ones on there. What's on your set now. From kiko we still do kiko. Uh train train train. That wicked rain. Oh yeah yeah just a man. We can do most of them not not all of them but most of them. Yeah how often you tour. I mean like before covid. We guys going. It was crazy it was it. Seems like he never stopped playing. We didn't it was it was getting get real tired. You know like the point was a good to have the work but it was a run the time. Well i remember i last giggles march ninth of three days before the lockdown. Yeah yeah because we. We're supposed to play i think we're supposed to go to san antonio or something. Yeah and then the drummer. At the time his wife worked for the city of pasadena shannon. She says all manage this thing is. They're not tell you everything the news. This thing is serious and you guys shouldn't go anywhere so we we backed out of the gig and then that's what shutdown happened. Did anyone get sick. No van good. We've good that's great man. Yeah so like. How did you feel about the break. I mean even though it was it was forced. I mean did you need it. Yeah yeah not not necessarily that way but the brake but you might not have taken it. Yeah you're right So it you know it was great being home. It's great to be home now. You know because you got the kids. Grandkids everybody yeah. I haven't been home this long since the eighties man. It's a trip. will you lucky man. I mean like the roads hard and it sounds like you guys went at it pretty hard early on. I imagine you've all grown up out of that shit right. There were two old move anymore. So did you guys do most of this during the lockdown or no. Yeah we did. So were you able to play with each other. We send in stuff back and forth or did you guys just hanging When we did it We would you know we did the whole just as easily but we're in the same studio. We had mashed. Do the guys task before we go in. And make sure everybody's but you guys like i mean you hang out. You seem like. I'm always wrong about this but but i always assume that everybody hangs out even though you've been playing together for fifty years do you guys your family's all hang out together and stuff not so much anymore but a special events but most everybody goes through their corner probably better i guess yeah we need a break from each other too. But we're we're still friends you know we still get along. So what was the conception before. I talked about this. So let's talk about this. The disney stuff now the because they were i am. Which one did you do. The 'cause i know you did. Los lobos goes disney right but there was you did. You're on a record. I write that. What what what did you lot like me. Talk like i knew it. I don't know why because there have a memory that record and that was just such a great song that led to the disney record. I guess so. Yeah it was at that. Seems like a fun thing to do. Well that was a louis. Prima and phil harris two original tracks all so. We're like we're going to do on that one. Yeah it's it's great okay. So in terms. Of conceiving this record like was this did you was it because you didn't have late new material to new newberry or did you just think like why don't we do. Our influences like whose idea was that you know. I don't know who's who's idea was that he was pitch to us to do a covers record. And then we're okay. That sounds cool minute i. I don't know who kimmel. Jd to just la based music artists. Right which you know narrowed it down with. I think made it easier to do well. After we found the songs it took a long time to find you know we went through a lot of stuff. Well how many and then you did wonder you did one original one. The native san record the song which is great but so but these were like they are. There are some interesting choices you know. Like i sail on sailor. That was interesting choice right. Yeah as a beach boy. You know you think e. bazi think beach boys But did you listen to them. Yeah oh yeah yeah. There were a that era of beach. Boys has good Yeah i far good vibrations and in my room and that's later but even the early ones very. Yeah they cover bar brand that. I used to listen to on that party album. The beach boys summer. Yeah yeah man. And and then you did. Jackson browne's i just talked to jackson browne. Yeah that's another one. I mean we just went through all the Jamaica say you will get the name of the song ever heard from jackson and we just try to touch an an all out war another band. That's that was the thing that amazed me that war thing like because i can hear war in your shit what we learned from them. Yeah they were. You know from central la but they were big on ise you. There were other chicano. Yeah right because they always had that. Latin element the music. Yeah yeah yeah yeah. And so and through the years we became friends with the with the guys you know how many of them are still around Well the bass player just passed away but everybody else still the ad over the years that they lost the percussionist years ago and sax player died long time ago too. But it's so funny that that thing comes through because that you know what. Low rider was huge right. Yeah but i mean but like once you guys played that tuna. Mike how i like all of it makes sense to me like i think. That's kinda got me so excited to to sorta talk to you and also just to hear the record because like i've listened records. You have my life you know here and there. But then when i'm like someone's listening to this here's the new recommend the idea of all this being your input. It all made sense. Like i can hear all of this because you're playing him. I can hear you guys playing. But i can also your that stuff in your shit together like these were really. These are very thoughtful choices. We tried and for what it's worth. I mean jeez man that it's that sort of seems relevant. Now you know that song and that's hard song because everybody knows that song be going. It was hard. Yeah we're afraid you know what we're hoping that they would like buffalo springfield buffalo springfield and the war and Even you know sail on sailor to of your concern that That would be that they would approve. You know well. How many of them are there. Do approve of it. I mean i heard what. Brian sent a Something on social media that he liked that he liked it and and we we played with l. dean this last weekend in big sur. He came up in played with us. He did yeah. That's that's readable stance steph approvals. For sure says okay. Yeah we'll have you heard from stephen stills who wrote that one yes i heard from him one day ever played with that guy. Yeah we have. He can play to Yeah he's a great player music manasseh. Tv do you ever hear that stuff. The original van a band after buffalo springfield after solar stuff. And the manassas. It's else who's in it with chris. Hillman i don't know if i don't know if i know that stuff. Yeah i should check it out. It's great big guitars. It's really why he listened to that What's that one. booze The with bloomfield. Out cooper supergroup vote on youtube recession. Yeah there's some good stuff on there but there. A lot of those are separate songs by the guys. Yeah we feel gay. Yeah i can't. I can't like peter. Green listened to and like i get it. You know bloomfield. I get it but it's it's too much for me is mind blowing like he just like a. It's it's beyond my understanding but it's great. He's amazing yeah. Have you tried to work out those licks. I've tried you know still trying to get. Who who are your main guys is like as if you went to the king. The three kings. Yeah but is it. Who do you prefer. Those guys You can't judge. Can't they're all yeah. Did you ever play with With bb or any of those cats. We've done shows with him but they've ever actually played with never sat in with. Who are some of the guys that you know from like you know your hero's outside of clapton that you're able to play with. They will your mind. Did you play stevie right. Yeah we did. That must have been something to watch him. Play it was Were first time we met him. We were in in loomed in sweden sweden and he was doing the the big show at the college. Yeah we were playing a bar. You know evening so he we went to his show then. He came to ours and sat in with us. And that's how we met. You guys must have had a blast. Yeah it was fun and it over the years. We'd run into each other and then we did some shows in italy leave with the folks series ourselves. It's interesting lineups and because you guys towards much really like that was your whole life is hanging out with these guys. They all these different types of people the pokes. That's interesting billing. it's huge. Yeah i think it was the accordion the We'll see very was the headline headline right. And then the the according connection with the pogues and that kind of made sense it does make sense it totally different approach. I guess Yeah so what. What's the plan now. What we how many dates are you gonna do. Well as few as possible. I've got new sustained home. I mean well we did this weekend. We did four shows in big sur to a big sur and played in Santa cruz and up in napa. What were the venues. The big sur was just a small outdoor amphitheater and Santa cruz was at the dream in. It's a hotel where we played pool citing people they they ran always think think i saw some Some footage of that up on the balconies. All right yeah yeah. We did it earlier when the code was still locked down tighter so that was the only way we could do a gig. Uh-huh we just have driving gigs. But it's little by little it's opening up. Yeah but He did the driving engaged. Yeah yeah a comic. And i was like i can't. That's gotta be hard. I can't deal with the united stand there and wait for them to flash your lights connect with anybody. But i tell you well. That's like that's the that's why i via musicians like because of all these years you got me plane. Those parties putting those weddings this stuff. I mean you can play anywhere. I mean you know and deal with it right. Yeah and deal with some are better than others How do you to work in the future. If you don't want it to or you do. Are you going to do more collaborations with people or kind of way low or what. Well let's see. Yeah it's kind of up in the air. Still we will be doing more shows. I hope we'll try to spread them out and and not kill ourselves. Like we were it's sort of astounding. How much like how many things you were involved with. Do you look back on it and just go. holy shit. yeah. I feel grateful able to Play with a lot of people that A weird mired over the years and yeah. It's been good. Yeah i mean. I i wish you continued success and i love the record and it was great talking to you. Thank you thank you. Thanks go the new album. Native sons will be. Available july thirtieth. When when we're walking out. I asked him if he had any strategies because avid strat. And we're talking guitars on the way to the car you gotta strap donald strategies. I got one. I got fifty eight and my oh really. Yeah jerry garcia gave it to me. I'm like no shit says yeah. We were playing with the dead and he said You gotta strap you wanna fifty eight stratocaster and go says he has to go out of my range man like now. I'm gonna give it to you. And he gave it. He keeps it in the locker. So scott. Jerry strat is a little trivia. Just a reminder. This podcast is sponsored by better help starting with may mental health awareness month and continuing throughout june. Wf is proud to join the cause of de stigmatizing. Therapy start communicating with better. Help counselor in under forty eight hours wherever you are in the world. You'll get timely and thoughtful responses. Plus you can schedule weekly video or phone sessions and w t f listeners. Get ten percent off their first month of online therapy at better. Help dot com slash w. T.f visit better h e l p dot com slash wtn. Now i will play my stratocaster. Not fifty eight. Eighty seven not impressive off A boom our lives monkey in the fonda. Kansas everywhere and.

los lobos tom latino foundation David bowden Tom sharpe new jersey kevin christie jon wurster mohawk john Radi hawk thomas book Tom Mike jimmy reed david hildalgo louis jordan hun bucker la etel Bob grant
Deeper Digs in Rock: Chris D. of The Flesh Eaters

Rock N Roll Archaeology

1:02:55 hr | 2 years ago

Deeper Digs in Rock: Chris D. of The Flesh Eaters

"Hi, I'm Robert Hilburn in. You're listening to rock and roll archaeology have a great day. D I y and how studios present deeper digs and rock. Of the rock and roll archaeology project. Old show. Technology and rock n roll. Now on with the show a little diggers. Welcome to another edition of deeper digs in rock Christian Swain here. I am the rock and roll archaeologist and buying the Mike in San Francisco today this week's news of so if you haven't been paying close attention to the podcast feeds, we begin pulling shows out of our big pipe and giving them their very own feeds right now, you can find this show deeper digs in rock as a standalone feed for your listening. Pleasure. And of course, the big daddy the one that started it all the rock and roll archaeology podcast is now available on zone as well. So if some of you are a dedicated to just that show or this one there there for you. Of course, the the big pipe with all the shows will always be there for the dedicated digger. All right. That's the headlines. Finally, and this is the one that matters most to us if you truly enjoy what we do here. Then please tell. Friend about rock and roll archaeology pantheon podcasts. Find us share us. Subscribe rate review. All those other good things that spread the word. All right. Thank you. That's that's the housekeeping. So let's meet today's guest Joe. Bray? Flirts in fly. Why not stick? Oh. Jay is it. A tear. Bikes thinking my and some of you may have figured out. I I love my LA punk bands. Will today we have a big one for you, truly and L A supergroup. We are talking Dave Alvin and Bill Bateman from the blasters John Doe in DJ bone break from X Steve Berlin from Los Lobos, even Julie Christiansen who sung would just about anyone considered cool all very impressive. But really the band is centered on one guy the cerebral poet singer and author Chris D, I'm talking about the flesh eaters today. We sit down with Chris to go over his life and music, literature and film over the last forty years he and the classic nineteen Eighty-one lineup are back with the new album. I used to be pretty on. Yep. Roc records, and they are out on tour. It is a must see and listen. Chris and his compadres of the ban are truly unique original L A punk is not the punk of New York City or London never was hardcore. But more of a western attitude born out of rubbing against the corporate rock bean shield out of the record labels at the time of the flesh eaters are an amalgamation of that time driving rhythms and hard guitars with overlays of the'real sacks and the clattering marimba puts flesh on them bones. It's extraordinarily vivid music for the ears as if pulled from a David Lynch movie. So now they are back in in a big way the album is cool as a corpse on ice. Not only was I lucky enough to spend an hour with the Bela Lugosi of front man, but I was honored with being invited to one of the early shows on the tour more on that later, but let's get to the man himself boys and ghouls, I give you. And Christie of the flesh eaters. Ranger with nowhere. Welcome to deeper Dixon rock Christie. How you doing today? I'm fine. Just kind of. Recovering from the sudden onslaught of intense work that you guys get. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Fighting shape, right. Yeah. So let's start. Let me ask the first question. Just tell us a little bit about the new album. I used to be pretty which is set to be released this week. Okay. So this is the I actually haven't done any music since two thousand four any recording and the lineup of God right now of the plush eaters is from the classic the ninety one right era. Right. The nineteen eighty one album, which is the second plus years album, and there were many other plus yourselves over the years with different lineups. So I'm that would be consistent for two or three times. Sometimes it was a new one every album of sometimes some of the people would carry over some of them wouldn't had another only consistent member of the of the flesh eaters. Right. And I had another band for about four years between eighty four and d. Eighty seven with my second wife, Julie Christensen who we have been called. She was a co lead vocalist of being called divine worse thing. Right, right. Yeah. And it was still a rock band. But I mean plus shooters had kind of started out as a kind of weird esoteric punk band with jazz and blues influences and divine horsemen with more of a walk around with roots and country roots. And the. But the lyrics were were darker than usual country rock it was modeled more on the kind of songs. He would here, you know, American American murder ballads from the eighteen hundreds the kind of thing that Nick cave later. Did it also, you know, they're the kind of dark songs porter Wagner might have done like the cold hard facts of life that kind of thing. Right. But we we we did them in Iraq context. And and Julie had a or has had a real background in country. Stop. So that was my musical thing for about four years in the middle of the eighties. And and then when the band our marriage broke up I started doing more of the flesh eaters again. And then later in the nineties Julie started singing with me again on some of the plus yourselves and she's on this new album on five of the eleven songs. So it is her doing the backgrounds on. The the the recently released black temptation, yes. Yeah. And this new incarnation or re reincarnation of the nineteen eighty one flesh eaters as as played live of you times. We we started in two thousand six kind of at the request of mud Honey who were doing festival in England. And they got to pick all the bands that were playing with them that day, and they really wanted to nineteen eighty one lineup with the flesh eaters. Let's just every month. What lineup is it's John Doe and DJ bone break from ax Dave album, Dave Alvin and Bill Bateman from the blasters and steeper Lynn from Los Lobos. Right. Right. Right. Yeah. Yeah. That's that's that's bit of an LA. And let's say L A supergroup from those early LA punk scene. Yeah. You have to remember that in nineteen eighty one X was starting to become very pop popular locally, the blasters were just starting to have the bug about 'em Ray Manzarek in and the rock critic, Robert Hilburn, right? And the blasters were just kind of starting to get a buzz and Sieber Lynn wasn't even playing with Los Lobos yet, he was playing with a lot of other local bands that did kind of blues rock and roots music, and even some jazz rock kind of stuff that he you know, we weren't as well known and the other guys weren't as well known for their other stuff as they are now. So that was kind of the context we were all just friends who who got together for that one specific album only. It was always understood that they had their other stuff that they were gonna be busy doing. So. That lineup was only got it for about six months in eighty one and didn't play again into two thousand six and it was originally just for this one. It was Senator Honey show. Right, right. Yeah. And we did we did three warm-up chosing in southern California before the u u k gig with money, and we had so much fun doing all those shows. We we we're gonna try and do it again more regularly. And we try to do it in two thousand seven two thousand eight and somebody's schedule always kind of through a monkey wrench. That's always the with super groups. Yeah. So it didn't happen. And I was I had a day job all during that decade between ninety nine two thousand nine I was working as a film programmer at the American cinematheque because that's kinda my other thing is we'll talk a little bit about that as well. Yeah. So it didn't really come up again in two to early two thousand fourteen I found myself unemployed for the first time in fifteen years. And I thought you know, I'm gonna go nuts. If I'm not doing some in creative. So I reach out to those guys. And I was pleasantly surprised everybody was very enthusiastic to try and do it. Again, we did five shows in January of two thousand fifteen and once again, it was such a gas that we we vowed to do it again, even sooner. So we got it together. And we did eight shows of this time. Last year and halfway during those shows. It was so spectacular. I say, you know, we've gotta get in the studio. We've gotta find time in the next couple of months free up a week and just record all the stuff that we have in recorded before with this lineup, and you know, try and maybe do a couple of news on we've got three covers that we've never recorded referring to couple green manly. She the old Fleetwood MAC song is is one of them. Right. Right. Right. Oh, cinder will doing it. Cinderella from Sanju rela this Arctic. Yeah. We we had even done as long as far back as nineteen eighty one. But we did it after we recorded that minute to pray all them. And so we didn't get recorded at the time. We just get it live if you times back in eighty one so and that was something we started doing again when we started doing the live shows in two thousand six so we you know, that was kind of a natural. And then the other cover she's like heroin to me, but a gun club which was on their first album far above which I cope produced with you to Lereah was that love a fan LA punk band as well. Right. Yeah. And they had a very roots rock kind of of basis as well. Jeffrey Lee pair sue, and he took he had many different lineups of the gun club as well. And he he really got out. There and established a a big huge reputation in Europe, especially, but he unfortunately, passed away in I believe it was ninety four or ninety five and Keith Morris who is in the punk band circle. Jerks was a good friend of Jeffries, and he and robs Zabriskie who another local musician. They had started doing a series of gun club tribute shows Jeffrey Lee Pierce tribute shows in the late nineties, and they had they would have a. Consistent barracking ban. But they would have within a show. They would have like six or seven guests vocalist doing two or three songs. And I was always asked to be one of the guest vocalists 'cause I had been involved with the first album and rhyme. I always got asked to play to sing. She's like here went to me. So I sent that song five or six times in tribute shows between I don't know ninety seven and two thousand four two thousand five and then when the plus shooter started doing their reunion stuff with this lineup. We were the other guys. Yeah. It seemed like a natural the other guys they've been really good friends with Jeffrey as well. So it was natural. And we've been doing that when live too. So that was another seem like a no brainer to record that. It's always a popular song when we do it live. So oh, yeah. Yeah. I can imagine. Well, let's let's let's go because we're hitting a lot of of topics here that all revert back to to the formation of the ban in seventy seven. So let's let's go to the way back. Machine and talk a little bit about the beginnings. Because you know, you mentioned, you know, a lot of these all kind of came out of that. I it ration- of LA, you know, quote, unquote, punk a little more route see, it's it's not the Ratatte tat New York style. Punk certainly nothing to do like the remotes. Not definitely the very of testosterone driven later. Punk of LA. You know, best best example hard. Yeah. The hard stuff that came out in in this. This is this is this is this this early period seventy seven that that follows this basement club called the called the mask. And in fact, I think the first gig you guys did was there at that show at that club, right? Yeah. The first flesh-eater show was was. With a different lineup. Chito of was get tar player who when we already had his beyond the plugs at the time, and he went onto the Crisanto 's and then yeah, he doing Tieto Tieto in their tarantulas. And it's so, yeah, we played that I show, and we we played. I mean, it was a a kind of classic LA punk Bill at the time. We were playing with the nuns. What was the dance that night, the is which had DJ bone break playing drums, and he had had not he was just about ready to go and play with aks he wasn't playing with them yet. I remember what the other band was that anyway was per show like acts the plasters germs that. Go goes in. This club was only around for about six months. Are you know, it reopened in another iteration of for us and then find a few blocks away? But it never it. Never was classic subterranean basement club that it was right in the beginning. And so they're Nishel LA punk scene was very much. I mean, it was inspired by everything from glam of like Bowie in the DR dolls to any given the stooges to you know, kind of political really hard rock like MC five. And then there were the the British bans were coming out seventy five seventy six Sex Pistols today, the clash bands like that. But bands like the saints from us trillion those. All the the bands that were popular. And then there were the New York bands. There was like, of course, Patti Smith who everybody considered punk. And television, Richard Hill. The Ramones Ramones are very popular. And even though there were no band specifically. That's the played in that kind of style. Like the Ramones there were there were every day on. There was playing loved those guys. So in the the whole hardcore scene really hadn't happened yet. That was still. Years. Yeah. Down the line. Now, this is seventy seven when when the punk explosion. Or at least the great rage against the music establishment. If you wanna call it that and corporate rock or self-indulgent forms of the time. So so, yeah, it's it's a different sort of feel an there this this is know a lot of this. You know, you can pick up from from John Doe in the savvy as book under a big black sun, Eric and where where he really talks about how how this was a very cooperative type of scene and diverse seeing at that. And this is this is kind of where you kinda come from. Right. Yeah. And it was very, gee, I y saying, you know, do it yourself. It was not relying on somebody else bigger than you to pluck you out of obscurity was you going out just doing it yourself. It was like a like a lot of you know, sometimes. There's been in the film movements in the motion picture industry. He got a big surge of that in the early seventies. From a lot of the new blood filmmakers, Martin Scorsese and Coppola and various other directory from America's otros. But yes, I yeah. And and you've got to he got later in the nineties when of in that Cole crew kinda come out. Yeah. And then and then once HD video became the norm. It became even easier for a lot of indie filmmakers, so there's always been that kind of DIY spirit in the arts. Whether it's painting, whether it's music, whether it's film. Yeah, famous. This is how the impressionists come about. You know, they they weren't given access to the salon. Paris in the in the eighteen seventies. Yeah. There were a lot of those those those aren't movements. I mean, the surrealist certainly symbolist poets, which I'm very influenced by from the late eighteen hundreds and France, a lot of these movements were rebel movements within the art scene of their respective. Yeah. Their respective eras. So that's just a common thing. I think among artists down through the centuries, and it's nothing that's particularly unusual about punk rock. I think at a lot of the kind of naysayers, and you know, the sky is falling people who were down on punk rock at first. I mean, it I think it was a natural form just like role in the fifties was. Now. Anyway, Raox doing and reactions. Yeah, there's the backlash to you know, Elvis in his hips and things like, you know, there there were during the forties. I mean, there is a lot of great be, Bob and and big band stuff. But by the time the fifties were rolling around that was becoming less interesting to teenagers, and when people like Elvis in of the R&_B bands at the time to were starting to come out of obscurity, and then later champion by people like the Rolling Stones and even the Beatles who would cover a lot of black and be artists material raising a lot of that music out of obscurity and putting it in front of while, you know. Oh, yeah. White audiences the never heard that before. Or if they had it was kind of something that was on the back burner that they you know, taboo getting. Yeah. Something that they didn't know they had permission to like her God. So so once these young Rolling Stones really get a huge amount of vapor for these. You know, the, you know, they were on. I remember they were on shindig, and they that TV show in the early sixties. And they refused to do the show unless they could have held on wall other guests that's right on the show. And and they did that with some other African American blues artists who really achieve worldwide fame because of I continue to like the stone, and you can think of them. Yeah. Opening jeaner chitter opening the stone show help how about print said in nineteen eighty one in LA opening for the stones. So. Yeah, definitely. So there's always something like that. And so the to bring it back to LA so this DIY scene. You know, I think I wanna go back just a little bit further in that you you're actually I think you started off as a writer and journalist. I right. We are. You know, I had come out to LA in nineteen seventy I was seventeen of moved out from the home, and I was going to college at Loyola Marymount university. I was in the film school there. That was what I really wanted to do was be film director, and I just I couldn't really establish a any kind of report with an the the local filmmakers of being a lot. If I had gone to UCLA things might have turned out different. But are not able to get I was not able to get into you US USC or UCLA film schools went to Lele America about which was a bit at the time of the more vice elated as film school smaller institution. And I just was never. I never really established friends in that kind of fringe. The younger filmmakers in LA industry. But one thing I was starting to do. 'cause I still I would music was always my second thing. But I wasn't classically music musically client trained, and I didn't have a lot of hope of of trying to be in a band, and it wasn't really until the whole punk rock. Thank him around and seventy five seventy six, and I realized you know, what people are just going out and doing this. They're not waiting for a record company say say, it's okay, just going out and doing this the record companies notice some fine that they don't they're gonna they're gonna put these records out on their own and people doing it. And I was also going. Divinis poetry workshop, which was affiliated with the sorting J Shen called beyond baroque, which is a nonprofit arts organization down in Venice. And that's where actually met John go, and I actually met Xia this before ex came together. It was right. When those two guys I met also. So I had known these guys back in late seventy five early seventy six, and we didn't really become friends until they got X together. And I was writing for the slash magazine, which was a a new publication chronicling the punk scene. And I started writing for them on the third issue of their magazine and my day job at the time for about six months was an English teacher at a private high school in wet. Chester, which is kind of the one of the suburban neighborhoods down by Los Angeles International airport and also not too far from Loyola Marymount. Yeah, that's all too. So you know, and I was starting to go to the mask. I had heard about the mask from slash and the people I knew it slash magazine starting to go to the mass. It's where I saw X the bags the deals. The germs did beats so many other amazing bands in that period. And it was really just inspirational. And I thought, you know, this is a time where I could maybe do a band, and I could get away with it just by not having any kind of pedigree or any, you know, it gave me confidence that I could do. This is certainly because there were a lot of bands like X mean was really renowned? Not just for their music. But. The high quality of lyrics that John exc- would bright together. And that was something that they know I really bonded on because we were on a similar wavelength with our or lyric reading, and so that's that's kind of how it started for me. And I started putting line apps together. But I still had firings in the fire with other stuff. You know, I was starting to try and do some acting as well as kind of all over the map. I was a real focused. Although I. The the assassin in Kevin the Kevin Costner film. No way out from. A. Six eighty seven eighty five eighty six. Yeah. Whatever that was can read right around the same time. Allison Anders who's no much. Better known filmmaker at the time, she and her partners, Kurt Voss who was your writing directing partner and gain let who their cinematographer. We're starting out and they were gonna do there for seizure border radio. And they they came to to me to play the lead in the in the film, and because they were. Fans of the flesh eaters. I think by that time, I even had my first line of divine horsemen flesh eaters or were kind of on the back burner at the time. And and then threw me John Doe got involved with the movie also, and and then gave Alvin and so. This is very become. I every every everybody runs. Yeah. And I was very close knit, and and kind of incestuous, and, but that's just a lot of this stuff came from and a lot of other stuff and other affiliations with other people not just for me. But for those guys mushroom down of all that and and and came to be an proliferated, so. So anyway, that's a little bit of the idea of were all this stuff came from originally. Right, right. Yeah. And and you know, the the band it self you don't like we said at the beginning here with John Doe and DJ bone break from x Dave Alvin Bill payment from the blasters steeper Lind from. Los Lobos, all of which, you know, became a pretty well known bands. And I I hesitate to use the term punk because it's more route see, you know. I mean, the blasters come on. That's that's that's a rockabilly band. Right there. You know? And you know, X was while they had the punk label. You know, it was it was more just stripped back rock and roll. And now, you know that you guys put this together we do to circle back to used to be pretty I think what what we were were kinda getting down the road to was that that most of these songs. Are not recently recorded. The the music itself is is taken from from tracks in the past. And then you have recently updated them is that right? Well, soon this stuff. Yeah. I mean, the the whole album was newly recorded in April. But that you're you're right that the there were there's there's several songs on the them that have been recorded before and by other lineups in the flesh eaters. And but they were lineups that these guys were not in. There were lineups that came afterwards, and the Minhaj pray lineup was very special to time in eighty one because we were doing I been listening to a lot of indigenous African music like chance drum of music, and I was also listening to a lot of arm be like, but you know, kind of a rock and roll are and be like Bo Diddley blink create that those guys were big influence on the Elbe them. This is the album a minute to pray second album. Yeah. There were a lot of influence. There was some like New Orleans influence for sure like Dr John and I- tripper like walk on gilded splinters that kind of kind of Bob there was that whole swamp rock thing and. Jeffrey appears who had become a friend of all of its he was into that kind of style of stuff too. And he was starting to do the gun club around the same time. So there is kind of a little bit of a break off of a couple of bands. That were started to get interested in that kind of I dunno incarnation of rock music, and with all its influences from roots and the south, and and and even as far, you know, as far as ways Africa, I was very obsessed with trying to directly transpose African rhythms to rock music on on some of the songs, and obviously jazz stems from being in, you know, I it African American tradition. So it has. Yeah. But it had been filtered through. A lot of American, you know, Wight traditional music, and it kind of had its own hybrid stage back in the turn of this century in the twenties and thirties forties and gone through. You know, kind of the white bread versions and the big bands. And and there'd been hard core jazz, then there'd been free jazz and all kinds of other different incarnations of our in being jazz. So I wanted to get a direct cap route to Africa, and that's what some of the stuff like there's some songs on there. Like so long the song divine horsemen trying to think of another one pray pray to your sweat, very influenced by African drummer them's, and I built up some of the ATar rips from drum rhythms from African music. I was listening to so that was a big influence on that album. And then, you know, later, I got more back into some heavy rock music. I wouldn't wanna really call it heavy metal maybe heavy metal as in terms of some of the ends like motor head or somebody. But not the kind of cliche. Cartoony heavy metal like iron maiden and def Leppard and all those guys not the hair metal scene, but the wrong. Yeah. Rahmael right. The kind of gritty. Yeah. I mean, you know, there is a right. Even before the term punk of you know, was invented there were the ends like well, like even like, David Bowie. If you listen to man who sold the world there is an initial heavy metal sand on their you. Listen to MC five stooges before they were called punk how. Yeah, nobody really knew what to call them blues. Rock. Yeah. And they had a tremendous about distortion and high volume in their guitars much, like, you know, you didn't hear on the whose job him who's albums so much. But when you hear like the who live at Leeds, it was like, whoa. Yeah. This is the same guys who are doing these kind of really polish produced album. So I you know, Tommy is. Yeah. Yeah. So it was more in that tradition. And that is kind of where you know, bales? Kumble pie with Steve Marriott who had come out of a kind of a pop rock band small faces and he formed humble pie which kind of became. I don't wanna call them. Heavy metal to say weren't really heavy metal either. They're still very blues rock based they kind of got a little closer to heavy metal than cream. Or the initial Fleetwood MAC, but so there were bands like that that were influential as well. And then you've got that hold metal seeing that morphed a little bit before the punk rock scene. Good. And so there's a tremendous melting pot of styles. It was going on. And you can see some heavy metal influences in some of the other punk bands of the period. Oh, yeah. It was like, you know, metal on methamphetamines or something. So. Yeah. Much higher tempos. And there there's. So much kind of of cannibalization if each each other styles and picking and choosing. I mean, that's a great thing about that era because there were suddenly, okay, we don't have to play by any rules. We can do whatever we want, and there's a tremendous amount of creativity and original music that came out of that period. And and it was very analogous to win free jazz started happening and jazz movement. You know, intellectual film their music critics may not. Look at it that way. But I I just just somebody objectively looking at the seeing I see some similarities to how other popular music forms of developed and had their offshoots. As far back as you know, the turn of the nineteenth into the twentieth century. Certainly jazz was the when it first came out was the punk-rock of its of its air, and that was before even real rock and roll. At come at started to happen in the early fifties. So there's always been these kind of rebellious offshoots of and as we were talking very similar to in the painting world in the arts. And there certainly that happened with writers you got the whole beat school of writers. Fifties you got the people like William Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg and Greg records show and Lawrence Furlan Getty. All these people out of that era. He got even got it in the science fiction writing in the sixties with people like British JJ Ballard and American Philip k dick, you know, Philip k dick is somebody who really resonated a lot with the punk rock musicians. And I think it's a testament to Philip Kate. Wchs staying power. I mean, his work was evolved into blade runner. And then now that long running series on then high castle dance on whatever it is Netflix or Amazon whatever the originating studio, but so there's a lot of that kind of thinking outside the box in every artistic movement. Get is move things along and taking things into new territory, and you're always challenging the status quo the orthodox, and we don't we've retained a lot of that. When we've been doing this reunion shows because we have been doing the minute Cray material wive, and we we do have some feelings of that in the new album. But also we go back in. Some more kind of traditional rocks of we do the green mentally she which is. The way we do. It is is very unusual. I think because we've got his sacks and marimba in there, which certainly wasn't on the original Peter -greeing version, and but you know, it wasn't even. Yeah. I was just gonna say Judas crease get it covered in early nineties. And I didn't know that until we were we had already been doing it live when I found out about you priest having done it. So that was something that was completely unknown to me. I thought oh, this is something kind of unique that we're doing this. But they go well Judas streets did it and then early ninety in fact, some of the people that are some of the people in our live audience Judas priest wrote the song, and I had to explain to hurt announcing no Peter Greenburg from Fleetwood. Mac, right. Yeah. Who had originated Fleetwood MAC, so. And it was it was the the annual a lot of people didn't even know about depre- Buckingham. Netflix went back. You know, the blue the English blues rock band. Yeah. That's why there's rock and roll archaeology to to remind every as all this stuff. Definitely let me let me. I ask a lot of our guests, especially those with significant history in as a professional musician. You know, wh what do you think the state of music is today compared to that age of rock and roll? Are you know, I mean, we've talked a lot about DIY we've talked a little bit about these reactionary art movements to the establishment. Are we in a period where maybe something's going to bust out? I I don't know. I. Super hopeful. I mean, there's there's a lot of revival of a lot of these forms that were around in the seventies and eighties. I mean, you've got kinda paisley underground revival happening right now actually couple of bands. I produced dream syndicate and green on red than the rather bands from that LA scene like the bangles and rain parade along writers. That's wrong riders out of that long writers who were were equally influenced by the way. Country rock, and it was kind of. At it's time in the eighties. Right. Right. Right. Right. Yeah. So there there's a there's different styles and and stuff that's melding together. Still and there's other new bands coming out that are doing stuff. I tell you the truth. I am shamefully behind the scenes or behind the times as far as listening to new music. There was a lot of there's a lot of music. I hear when I go into restaurants, and of various other places that to me, I call it wimp wind proc, and I, you know, sounds like an old man yelling at a cloud, or by the kids, you get more lawn. But you know, I I'm not hearing a lot of originality. I think rap started go along. On down those lines. But it really got stuck in that singing about exclusively about gold chains and sex and money, and there wasn't you know, the bands, you don't you don't hear that were the, well, I, you know, I think I think on the hip hop side there. There's Kendrick Lamar and some others, you know, fit into that every every few years somebody like that shows up. But it's not like every week are not getting the job. You weigh? Or or or kind of the really angry political rap hip-hop came out in the eighties. And and and there was a crossover between to a lesser degree. But you know, there was a little bit of a crossover with punk rock. And that seeing as well, you know, and you got people like iced, tea and vice kidding people like that. But anyway, not seen a lot of it out there. You don't you're not not see a lot of here. Right. Right. Well, I think something will happen eventually. But the problem is of there's been so much modules ation, and it's so hard to escape it because it was so all pervasive now. And you've you've got the internet now, which was really just rocketed. In terms of of its proliferation since the turn them winning. And I think the internet has for all the good things about the internet. There's been a real kind of homogenization and a of culture lindane of cultures to the point where it's all sounding kind of you can't discover something new. Yeah. There is there is definitely stuff happening. I mean, I've heard of if you I was actually I'm a big fan of Flamenco music, and I was looking for some from Inco music rates online. And I found a few bands that are kind of hybrid bands that are doing it. And I heard some good stuff. And so they're they're bands out there. But we may not necessarily hear from them. They're not the bands. That are getting promoted the the bands that are getting promoted. Are still the really homogenize big pop music. You know, the are still adjusting bieber's and. You know, even you know, if you're gonna go safe gonna go. And then there's the kind of safe rebellion stuff like Miley Cyrus. He was is totally looked at as being outrageous that. How -rageous really is is your music. So, but I I do have a soft spot for somebody like lady Gaga who I think is. Oh, hugely tremendously. Yeah. Tremendously talented. And I I am a huge fan of that song. Born this way, I think it's an incredible song. And I I think it's interesting that what's his name not laying who get a lot of the ACDC albums was involved in the production of that song. And when you hear born this way, it's got that big big too. Yeah. Yeah. It's got a real rock down and her phrasing. And her singing is very rock, you know, with with the R M B influence, and it's very much. Also, where Madonna was was coming from the thing about I like about lady Gaga is there's not as much. Ego involved in there's a lot more kind of self deprecating humor involved with lady Gaga, Madonna. I who I think is tremendously talented person. There's a lot of of more of a centrist personality product of the times as well. Though. Remember, I mean, she comes out of the Reaganism years. So that that's what was being sold culturally, and she just happened to glum onto that. And you know, spit it back out to the people. So you know, I think there's something to be said about that. And I think the the long short answer from looking at you know, is where we're at today is, you know, maybe maybe we're in American empire decline, and the music is is basically, you know, art, reflects life and lifer reflects art. And and that's what we're, you know, we're that's what the mirror showing back at us is is there's maybe maybe nothing new to explore therefore, everything is. Just you know, just done on low. It's a it's a, you know, it's it's a flat line of of of of inspiration and creativity. As it stands today, which is not the case in some other art forms. I think you know, we're in a new golden age of TV, and and and in storytelling in that way of which we touched on a little bit today. But let's get back to the flesh eaters because I only got a few more minutes with you hair. And I I want to ask you, what do you think makes the band special besides being an L LA supergroup? Gosh. I don't know. I don't know how to describe it really the thing that that is special to us, and it's very special to me, and it became very clear after this album, especially with the new songs is that we've got kind of intuitive chemistry between us. I I've had this with other lineups, but not to the same degree as with these guys were able to kind of coalesce are different ideas and make them fit into this, jigsaw puzzle, and they transcend their become more than the sum of their parts. And there's a lot of into intuitive stuff going on in the room when we're applying when we're practice in. We're recording the album, those new songs came together, very quickly and. Dave, and I had worked them up in his living room and over only a few days work and and only each day a couple of hours at a time. So they'll songs were very noon just to the rest of the band, but today, and is well and making those songs happened in the studio a very short notice and getting them gun very quickly was kind of a revelation, and it's kind of I know is what makes it special to us. And I think that communicates to an audience and a lot of the audience is reacting there there there's a tremendous following for the minute to pray lineup. There's a tremendous following for for X as your commits falling for Dave Alvin 'cause he's had his solo career for quite a number of years. Now just had an album out with. Jimmy, gale more. He has a very much even though I wouldn't really call them, Americana. He's kind of fit into that niche, and and Steve most Los Lobos has been with them for good over thirty years. So and you put all that back together with us and get a lot of people out there. Even new fans were fascinated by that combination. And there's a lot of people that know my stuff to and even separately from these other guys. So it's a it's just a unique thing, and we're very fortunate to have the chemistry that we do. And that that communicates to an audience and the initial groundswell of interest of in this album from the public and the way it's you know, the the pre-sale. Sales and everything else that have happened the the way that Domino's of kinda falling and it's been so easy to do this and get it out there, which none of us was expecting. It's just the synchronous ity. That's happening. That is very welcome. And it's very to me it's caused back. I mean, if I'm gonna get it kinda corny about it. But it's it's the thing until you guys. Yeah. I mean, you know, this is this is when people talk about, you know, the magic happen. This is this is what they're talking about. It's it's a, you know, the the beautiful thing about playing in a band is. You know, you've got these, you know, four three four five six seven whatever minds that are all melding together at the same time. And you know, a lot of times it it doesn't quite work. There's something missing. And then every once in a while, there's just some crazy magic that that occurs. It's almost inexplicable. And we've been very lucky because we've had a run of very good fortune in this last year. And you know, we've had gave Alvin 's manager Nancy these come on board as our manager. And we've just had a lot of people. Join the band way. And. Yep. Roc has been extremely good to us. And it's the record Tempe that you guys are on right? Yes. And they really signed us site on seeing they had not heard the ovum yet. And after talking today belvin into Nancy and understanding they history of the band, and what we were doing they became very excited just on their own without having heard. And then when they got to hear it in the early summer, they were like to lead blown away, and it was beyond your expectation. So. So that's very gratifying that that everything that's come about. We thought things were going to go. Well, but then they would even better than we thought. And that's been the case down the line so far in the last year and knock on wood. Hopefully that that trend is gonna continue. I mean, the guys are certainly continuing with their own stuff the rest of the year. It's gonna if he after March, I if we're going to do more live stuff this year. We're we're certainly hoping to do another album with. Yep. Roc they have an option to another album. We're certainly going to do more live shows next year. You know, we we might pick up a weekend or two before the end of the year towards you know, fall. We'll just say Medax it is going to be busy Dave's gonna be busy with stuff. Lobos is certainly on the road all the time. So we're just gonna see how the wing Egil shakeout when you can get it. But yeah. For the next couple of months, you know, the flesh eaters are out on the road criss crossing the country starting I think Saturday, the the the the nineteenth here the twentieth. Should we're doing to we're doing Phoenix in Tucson on the sixteenth seventeenth. We're coming back. We're coming back to southern California. We're gonna do pappy inherits out in yucca valley, Joshua tree area, which is sold out already. And in the nineteenth. We're doing echo plex. And we're. We're doing that with mud Honey raw actually, mud. He's playing with set. Happy inherit show as well. The next night twenty it's on CNN. We're doing San Francisco, and then when taking a travel day, and then we're doing Portland and Seattle, and then we're off for about three weeks because the other guys who've got stuff going on. And and they were going to go to New Orleans and Texas and in February towards, you know, third week in February for about a week and a half, and we got a two or three weeks off again. And then in late March were starting in Chicago going up through the midwest and kind of snaking are way down Washington DC and then Philly and Boston New York. So yeah, we're we're gonna cover a lot of ground before the in the March. Well, we. Look forward to senior out on the road. Chris. Hey, thanks so much for being with us on deeper Dixon rock today. We'll thank you. I appreciate you have. I mean. Goes to sleep, man. Dead dog, MS. What an incredibly interesting guy, a great time digging into the mine of Christie lot of fun. And I hope you did as well. So yeah, I I love the new album, but what really got me. And of course, made it all come together. With seeing them live the show was incredibly powerful hate to bring a metaphor for a second time. But I I really kept thinking I literally wasn't a David Lynch movie. I could imagine people like William Burroughs Lawrence Furlan Getty or Philip k dick hanging around and do knows the Lawrence could've actually been there. I did see him fail of Soundgarden and said hi again. So if you are looking for something different if you if you really enjoy digging deep into rock and roll archaeology, then grabs spayed and go see the flesh eaters when they come to your town. Again. The new record is called a used to be pretty eleven songs from this LA supergroup check it out wherever you get your music. Take a deep. Listen and tell us what you think. Okay. That's it. I am the rock and roll archaeologists Christians, Wayne, and I shall catch. You all later keep up the Rockin. Stay. Looking for ways to help, right? The realms of social injustice. Oxfam America works with people in more than ninety countries to save lives developed long term solutions to poverty and campaign for social change. And we do with the help of our friends in the music world. The Beatles were Oxfam supporters back in the day. So we're the stones and through the years musicians. Music fans have helped Oxfam pushed hard to work for a just world without poverty, folks. Like, Radiohead Coldplay, Pearl Jam DJ shadow, and many many more have encouraged their fans to join the effort you can too go to Oxfam America dot org to learn how you can help. Deeper digs in role reduced in hosted by Christmas, Wayne all som-, design and incidental music by busy signals studios old quotes perform actors unless noted play list could be found at item Google play Spotify. Please purchase. He's great and important. Tracks all song clips and rubbers can be found on our show notes. Please R M R A P dot com. For more information.

LA Dave Alvin Los Lobos Chris D New York Robert Hilburn David Lynch San Francisco California Christie New Orleans Beatles David Bowie Fleetwood Bill Bateman Jeffrey Bela Lugosi
#22 John Prine 1997

The Tapes Archive

20:03 min | 1 year ago

#22 John Prine 1997

"Welcome back to the Tapes Archive podcast where. We release interviews. That have never been heard before in this episode. We have the great singer Songwriter. John Prime at the time of this interview in Nineteen ninety-seven Prion was fifty years old and was out on tour with the band. Most Lobos in the interview Ryan talks about his record label. Boy His Indiana connections touring and is yet to be made do it inspired by ourselves Known a Rainbow against-all-odds anywhere the big door Music critic Mark Allen at the helm conducting the interview. If you'd like to support the show please like follow and subscribe to us on facebook Youtube twitter and instagram. Their post other content and information not available on the podcast. If you'd like to read the transcripts for any of our episodes please head over to our website. At the TAPES ARCHIVE DOT COM. Will jump into the interview after a quick word from our sponsors. The tapes. Archive is proud to be sponsored by the true crime documentary. Deadman's line around trying to get a shot at me. I can go down. Nineteen seventy seven. Tony Koets is kidnapped. The mortgage broker and held him captive for three days of the first time ever the media was able to cover the event live to some. Tony was a hero. Do others he was a crazed son. Deadman's line the true story of Tony. Jarrett says this award. Winning film is available exclusively on Amazon Prime. One last thing before we get to the interview the Tapes Archive. Podcast is a proud member of Cyrus media community connecting passionate fans with podcast and experiences about artists and topics in love. Thanks FOR TUNING IN. And now it's time to open the vault pretty good. I'm late we're kind of on a move you're not Airport yeah well for Friday telephone. I've been walking around process. Twenty minutes per phone. Yeah well not a problem but I thought I was just sitting here thinking you know. I didn't think this interview was ever going to happen now. I know it's not you call. Yeah I know it's just that you know I not only At donut see many interviews with you. I mean I can't even remember ever being offered an interview with few saws real excited when they said that. You're willing to talk to my right that you don't do interviews very often. Just don't do them unless you know unless we get like a like a new record out after know. Yeah 'cause Just hardly ever do because I just don't see my than I'm always worked out good but I. I can't really see the reason why I think that the thing you know. Okay well try to make it to miserable for You know these days immune responses I hear people raving about your music as always I people are always talking about you as a businessman and oh boy and how how great this is and it is oh boy a panacea? I mean this is the perfect the perfect thing for you. The as opposed to working for Major label it is. I never really had any of the horror stories of the like the bands and other individual artists had on a major label. I it's not anything like that. That's why started. Oh boy I just come from a working class background. You know and I couldn't really to work. For Warner Brothers. What could they do for me? You know like nothing because then money before I make and I just didn't see any sense it didn't make sense to me. You go after all you have to do is go through it twice. I went to Atlantic and then I went through it in an asylum for three records and I knew everybody I knew it all the problem and look like a new faces. They just changed suits and change Labels you know and there's always a guy that's hanging out with you know Tonya. Like each gonna freely tell them what the stuff is about the label and then there's another guy that obviously doesn't know you the guy working for him so like the only thing he does is tell me who you are. You know like you know just couldn't go through it again. That's not really I didn't want it to affect me making music and still but I I have a way to get my records out. Even though the records were the main thing with me sick during would have made more friends by by Going around and playing in a club or something or concert hall the records You know just kinda big it out there. And they're self supportive definitive paying for themselves and they they sell slow. Insure like jazz records. Do Yeah but you know. Everybody says when they're talking about you businesswise. They said well you know he gets to keep five six bucks a record comparative to the average artist on a major label. Mike at a dollar. Yeah true but to make it to the bank. You know we're doing. We're doing good right now. and pickers not a good time for independent labels lot emerge get rid of fallen are getting ready to because all kinds of thanks mainly the distributors get bought up. And you're doing good if you're supporting yourself with an independent label right. Now you're doing excellent and I'm sure there'll be better days and everything but we're doing all right. We're we're staying above water and everything's working. We did spend more money on his last couple of records and they sold more but we were able to get played on radio and stuff. What are you typically selling now? Actually Lost Dogs did oh lost dogs. Bit around. Three fifty years was around. Four twenty now the Laverick devout right now is showing slow. But it's good. We can't really tell with a record like tells been out for a year in the bottom line on. This sounds great. You get to keep more of your money. You get your artistic control. And you don't have to answer to the to the major labels truth and are there downsides to this and on top of it like The you're a all the stuff on the road. I it took a while to catch up. But because of the excitement and Sean the records This has been great. You're on a road all the places I've gotten better. The jets rooms could prettier. And the money's just thought double. Wow so like and that's all I'm sure a cumulative thing of what we've been doing over the last five years with two records and the Constitution and everything stay the truth mark. Things could be a great time attack. Got a great home life now and I'm enjoying the shows and Everything just fine you know. Great do We haven't really announced because we have all the participants. But I'm I'm writing for my next record. And then meanwhile I WANNA do do ads record me. All girls like doing sheet song. Wow and WE'RE GONNA RAISE. Start on it as early as next month. I just haven't got everybody as from ballistic girls are GonNa do it during the country's chancellor talk to you about doing so But that's kind of what I'm working on now other than that. I'm going to start Christmas shopping. This is great. I really good just spent six weeks with my family in Ireland. We had a great time. Watch from there and Sala relatives shirt off the babies all over the place. Tv's got a son who slugged Suma and all that happened to an power man. Okay ask one of the question about the label and that his body. You think more people having done what you've done and then would you advise them to do? Yeah would Tell you we seem to do the perfect time. It was just You know we we thing about the mid eighties is when we started boy the reason. I say it was a perfect time. 'cause things are different now like it's even harder now What I tell people to do if I was going to get hit by solid like familiar with dead reckoning will. I think it's good to right now. I think things are so tough that people need game together in order to start something and it also good for the music. It's good for everything but four or five hours together under an umbrella and go into war that way you know I actually I mean this is pure experiences come up in conversations that I've had with John Mellencamp and I've asked me to why don't you jump Ryan does and I think it's just? He looks at as a too much work. Not Really And it's a lot more satisfying even for the for the people that do the actual day to day work which is all and denies that you make a little move in an independent thing and it's a big thing it's a it's very satisfying to everybody. Do you know what you're and we've had a Lotta a whole lot of helping. Novoye see particularly from the from the media. You know everybody was really behind one hundred percent for the get-go when I decided to go into You've got a lot of Indiana connections. You assure got a guy right now from Blue Jason Wilber and he came David Steel Got Jason. When David went with Steve Earle and I got both of them from Larry Crane so I the Mendieta connection and then John Mellencamp but I just go up there around the mid eighties done. It was just before I started. Were maybe I just started it and go up there? Sa- John and I could write something and just hang out you know. And he introduced me to a lot of people around there and Larry's not with you now right as a Larry. Crabb Larry. Matter of fact Larry's taken he's Kinda abstained from the music business group out a year. He's gone out with a race car driver really. Yeah how man. I had no that who who is at the show and produce him and get him and Eddie plays and you had the role in the mellencamp movie to right throughout the song and yeah and stuff. So yeah it's just it's weird here in Indiana connection all over the place. I was reading up some of the things. You're press kit which are cut interesting and one of the things you're saying there. There was that guy at the post office at. Don't take your retirement pay because you'll be back story the sport and I wondered. Did you take your retirement package? Yeah you did. You don't understand it as a business workout. Ain't coming back here. 'cause we asked me what. I was going to do like why was leaving. That's it will. I'm going to play. The Guitar Sang for living. He looked at me like you might go spread wings man. Don't take your take your time and I said why so you'll be back because there's no you don't understand that I come back here and did you Do you ever see that guy again. No no he's back there next parcel post. He's probably saying Chom pride he'll be back. It has your career gone you expect against the dead. Never have much direction with ever wanted to do is work things around pretty much where they're today like going out really enjoying being there and enjoying doing this show and join the crowd and having a A personal life but equal and that and no bills man. I don't think what else today I mean. The the cars all look like shit so I don't want to buy a car out there and I and I like what you said in the press kit about people. People have the mistaken impression that you're angry because you never became a huge star. I'll tell you I really like playing about no more than four or five thousand our and unless play the laws only hold eight hundred nine hundred and they're beautiful they're plays they're made for music. You get bigger than that. You're playing in the sports centers you know designed for their coup six of a basketball guitar. I Dunno I guess there's a lot of money and everything but it takes a lot of money put on a show to keep the guy sitting up in a balcony satisfied. I hopefully like the state you right about round where besides place and I'm playing you're playing a four thousand seater here this time as that's comfortable for you. Yeah Yeah Yeah. He really seemed to have to have retained or kind of like working class. Roots and attitude and stuff. How did you do that? We'll just never good bye into their husband. Stuff was it was it. Was it ever tempting. not really no. There's no one sex sure good particular. Okay have to move to three more minutes express. Okay Twenty six girls that all right thanks. Sorry no not a problem. This you know of listening to the to live which. I think sounds really good and just throwing realizing that that a lot of your songs just have really simple messages. That speak to people. I mean the the the get right to the heart of people's lives is that I don't know few make a conscious effort to write that way or is that just what comes out a lot of times if as long as seems to be saying anything it's usually springs out of me trying to explain something to myself and I guess I must like things in fairly simple terms so however long it takes me to break it down to that Some of the steps also the subject matter is not something you want to make a big flowery speech your best you WanNa Kinda cut to the heart of the matter and get it over with and Also like their answer is I don't know you know I mean I don't know anymore about right today than it did when I picked up pencilling twenty five years ago. It's still when I finished. Look right and everything that I got on the show right at the time. No idea how to do something that just comes and goes but a bus. Come naturally or it's an interesting way to live your life. Just walk around and think about stuff and that type of music here or interested. Yeah just kind of get a hold of you know and you go for it and Maybe it comes out in the form of a song and then when you sing it to people and they react. The way you do with your. I got this emotion. That's amazing it's amazing process sensor really happy and things are going really well right now is a good time for. Songwriting are probably be right now. Liberty Dude I saw. It might be time to take I and be loose socks for a little bit. You know I'm much too. Happy for for suffered songwriter. Probably be writing a different person and What you're here or between any new songs. We are called the guy next door like a series that poor guy and our idea of do songs that you're going to be playing this time. No I'm just working on stuff right now. Kinda pretty crazy stuff usually easy. I wait till I can figure out a reason for right now. Finish it present and you have an electric fan with your age and play some electric. Someone could've said Yeah. Yeah Okay we do a couple of hours and we cover all the years pretty good candidates out. Can you say who some of the people you're these again for that? So that's why I kind of feel a little premature tone. You better kind of that I can't really say the people on the person I can say. Is Iris. Dement 'cause we've always said a date with the other people to talk to their record companies and find out if it's possible and everything so I got A. I got a pretty big list too because I figured somebody can't do it. For any reason we just keep on moving Like saying Oh boy girl thanks and some of them will be achieved as long some of them. Just be love songs. Because you can't cheat without love you know but I always liked the interaction and socks you know like where the girls think something and then the boys except and then they think together. Wait sitting on this for years and years bigger. I might as well do it now. Do not ain't GonNa do it. Is it new material or cloud classics like George Jones? And Tammy Wynette and Loretta Lynn and Conway twitty stuff. Wow okay is it. All country Most of it is on my pick one. I got an idea. Big One broadway. Show tune to big production. Such file. Any idea what might be no. I'm working on all this and the producer and Precious few other people know about it just But it is getting underway within a month so we will be like a more information on seven couple of weeks. Once it gets more people committed to another Indiana connection that I don't know if you're aware there's a there's a four women Capella Group in Bloomington called Fida and they recorded a first set. Angel from Montgomery had album which I hope you get to hear it and it is just stunning. Got Me about these BLOOMINGTON. Yeah I don't know I mean the songs already been done great but you know a couple of times but this is just an unbelievable of it. I think I'll get a hold of one call. Vida Vida D. A. Okay Yeah and let me see just to one or two other things I could. One is for another story. I'm working on. I've been asking everybody I interview. If you became the overlord of Pop music. What would be the first thing you would change will is the first thing I would change per spending with gene? I'm trying to make it a positive. Oh man like everybody would be off much together through the great man boy. That's true isn't GonNa go course and your plant here with Los Lobos like that idea. That can be great. Yeah out of always loved. Both Lobos. Didn't tell me too much more about the GIG when they said the lowest. We're GONNA play together. Yeah this is This is like the one one show. I've been looking forward to also anything else going out with you that you want me to mention. No I can really think of it and I kinda got to start get moving. Because I can gration and everything now McKenna's okay we'll go ahead and thank you and now. I guess I'll see you Saturday. Okay thanks very much for listening to the tapes. Archive podcasts please. Remember you can always find more information about the show and the individual episodes at our website the tape archive dot com until next time. The vault is closed.

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Prince 1999 Part 2 - Dez Dickerson talks

The Rhino Podcast

37:34 min | 1 year ago

Prince 1999 Part 2 - Dez Dickerson talks

"Ladies and gentlemen records retired plate spinners and millennials who want to impress their parents with their record collections. Welcome to the Rhino cast. PODCAST brought brought to you by Rhino records get ready for new releases detracts and conversations with your favorite artists and bands and balloons for the kiddies. And now your host with the most which may have and Dennis the menace on this episode of the Rhino podcast. We speak with Dez Dickerson. About his time I'm in Prince and the revolution and the recently remastered and expanded nineteen ninety. Nine uh-huh hey rich they dennis. We are deep in the holidays. And did you get any great gifts yet. Well you know every time that I get something for Dot Com. It's a little bit like it's my birthday or Christmas or Hanukkah so yes I recently got the fleetwood Mac Act nineteen seventy five thousand nine hundred eighty seven colored. Vinyl box said. It's all the albums. In between those years. Each one is colored a different color which is Kinda cool collectors collector. So I wanted to have that you dance fans out. There are going to love the Madonna Clear Vinyl editions. That are coming out. That's something really cool anything out there that you've seen gene you're digging. I gotTa Tell Ya the Soft Parade Fiftieth Anniversary Deluxe addition. The doors comes with a LIPO. and Oh my gosh not only does is it sound great. But there's all these special vocal mixes and things like wishful sinful without horns and strings. I mean for someone like me who loves that album album. This is is truly amazing but also it is that time of the year the holiday season. We've got two great brand new Christmas albums albums that are available. We have Chicago Christmas. It is available in a mixed red and white vinyl which is Kinda cool and there is a brand new Christmas album from Los Lobos. Oh boast their very first. So if you're looking for some new Christmas music to spend your holiday party check it out people new music from Chicago and Los Lobos And speaking of parties today we have part two of the nineteen ninety nine podcasts conversation from from Nashville with Dez dickerson original member of the revolution and he has as you can expect some amazing tales else to tell us he worked very closely like they all did with Prince and Prince really wanted to be a band as Dez will tell us does played guitar alongside prints and and he has unique perspectives to offer about the music about touring with France. And what kind of a guy he really was so. I think everybody's going to really enjoy this because because I certainly did myself. Yup I got to zoo given you it. Would you introduce yourself please absolutely my name is Dez Dickerson. Among other things they have some best known as the original guitarist with an obscure band from Minneapolis culprits. The Revolution Yes yes very obscure. Well welcome to the Rhino podcast. This is kind of the the official chat about the remastering. Mastering of one thousand nine hundred ninety nine. I think you've heard of that record before I have I have. What do you think any good you know? Oh I always thought that you know that the kid had promise there's there's a demand for that music and is there we wouldn't be talking if there wasn't so elizabeth so a little history. Let's go way back as they say when you were fourteen I speaking of mm-hmm and we we use the words. I use those CD before we actually got on on on camera here but you brax practiced guitar six or seven hours a day. Gay I I did. I mean I was was then and still the kind of person that if I decide doing something I'm hyperfocused so it got to the point where my parents were talking about like you know arranging for me to see somebody to find out if there's something wrong with me But you know it was all about about making certain that I could prove to myself that I could do it. You're in a different band but tell us about your Fifteen minute audition that you had for Prince in seventy eight so you know I had a history actually going back to age. Fourteen of starting sort of local bands became regional bands. And you you know there was the front man and the booking agent in the you know I I turn off the lights and locked the door and left And I came came to a point where I was in a band. That was clearly dying. You get to know the death rattle when it comes down. And I saw this ad in a local music paper that it said Warner brothers. Recording artists seeks guitarist and keyboardist. Well there was only one person within six hundred miles of the twin cities that had a major label deal and I knew that it was this kid print so I hadn't met but I'd heard about it was kind of an urban legend in town and so I was living in a house with the rest of my band at the time. You know the veritable band house. So I had to like kind of sneak off to a phone booth because there were no cellphones back then and kind of make the call and I arranged for an audition on a day when we happened to be leaving town to go play Gagan and you know East Buzzard South Dakota or someplace so kind of pulled up thinking okay. The time you're gonNA work out perfectly. They were two and a half hours. Slate the entourage was like horribly late and myself and a bunch of other people are in the parking lot waiting well for me. I had to be somewhere so when they did roll up walked up to one own Husni was prince's manager at the time subsquently managers well and said Hey. I'm so sorry but I have a Gig with the band later on and I have to get into town. Would it be okay if I went first. So we we had a small window of time fifteen minutes so I just kind of walked up plugged in. Prince walked up kind of shook hands said. Hello actually. I don't even think he said. Oh you just nodded and sat down started playing keyboard award and I just kind of fell behind him. It was him under Simone Bobby Z and myself and just kinda played rhythm until he looked over over nodded when he nodded I kinda Solo for a minute said what I thought I had to say and went back to playing rhythm that was it fifteen minutes later had to do the. I'm so sorry but I have to go. Prince walked out to the parking lot and had questions. He was like really really deep questions for a guy that was like nineteen eighteen twenty years old but ultimately what he said was. What would you like to be doing? You know five years down the road. I said well I'd like to be doing what I've always done John. I mean frontier my own bands and and kind of doing that but on a larger scale so he said. Would you be willing to help me do what I'm doing. And then when the time comes I'll help you go back out and do what it is you do and I said Yeah. Sounds like a good deal and that was it. We shook hands. I left and started getting calls from him and the rest is history while and it's never been so easy since has it and it's like no and it doesn't work that you know what I mean it just. It doesn't work that way but that one time it did Cali phone so one of the things things that you've talked about is your musical rapport. And how the two of you gelled and I'd like to hear a little bit of an inside side story because you know the two of you meet in this amazing way. And he's you know he's the quote discoverer but then he really kind of found out what you were capable of two did he not. Yeah I mean you know in the beginning part of why I got the GIG. I found out subsequently what was two things it was that there was a kind of a front man. Dan Thing and what he Andre talked about his having like you know three guys like three frontman instead of it being like one guy and the fact that there was a vibe Hi Bharati. It wasn't one of those things where walked in and they had to imagine me with a different haircut and fifty pounds lighter. You know what I mean. It wasn't one of those things. But what he he. Subsequently found out was that musically we had a lot of things in common in terms of kind of more of the rock side of his interests and the things that that he found not exciting. But also that I was probably a much more accomplished player than expected which turned out to be a major bonus because he doesn't didn't fool fool around with people who couldn't play if you're gonNA play last long so there was a respect that happened really early on and remained you know throughout the years. It does. We're both playing guitar. How did you work together? So you didn't step on each other and you found complimentary part it did it become natural was natural or did you guys sit down and chat it out. I just played louder. Just know it really comes down to a kind of a natural cheryl sort of a dividing line I mean prince was one of the most amazing rhythm guitar players. There's that I'd ever been around. And he kind of fairly quickly developed a respect for my lead playing so what it really broke down to. was I played a lot of really while he was singing. When it came time to solo even on the stuff that you know especially in the years leading up to me actually sleep playing on the records later on I mean he just kind of deferred to me on the soloing thing and it was always it was predetermined kind of who was going to do? Do what where. But a lot of it also was kind of on the fly and if he looked over and nodded. Kinda just like was in the audition in the first place. If you looked over and not it you knew you were on so it. It worked itself out pretty smoothly. Really you got it is stop. Well these you've talked about as being kind of goofy kids having fun before kind of the mystique became a brand so where was that. Cj where did you know that the fund really was turning into something big. You know there were a couple of of sort love like checkpoints along the way. It's funny because early on and I just told somebody this story the other day early on like our very first photo shoot is a band and it really looked like somebody kind of you know pulled up at you know curbside in like a window van. Random points around town put like a dark bag over people's tracked him into the van and then dropped him off at a photo studio. Now your band I mean it was it was that like disparate. Right and weird you know but Over time because there was so much focus and energy just put into playing together and laughing together and kind of doing that thing that gelled and the look developed and the sound developed and a lot of it was purposeful. Assuming there were some times early on where I spoke up a few times and said you know what we really don't look like a band so we really do. We need to. We need to do something about this and and and prince was into just doing everything that could possibly be done for us to be the best. The most amazing performers warmers the most amazing image CETERA. So there were points along the way where there was a show we did in in Denver at a place. It's called the Rainbow Music Theater Rainbow Music Hall that was like a radio sponsored thing. Fifteen hundred capacity theatre. We'd just un-american bandstand and at that point really we didn't know if people were paying attention or not you know. We thought we were awesome. But you know you back then. You really didn't know so we do this. Show the show sold out. It was like a hard day's night I mean it was like nuts. We got chased by fans like a caravan of fans. It's the dead of winter in Denver Colorado which between cold and snow so I mean at one point there had to be twenty twenty five cars chasing at like high speed on side streets. And and you all always think it's like it's like the dog chasing the bus. What's the dog and a do when they catch the bus? Yeah but really. You don't WanNa to find out right so that that was. That was a hint. I mean that that night was absolutely amazing. I mean they broke windows trying to get in the dressing room. It was just insane nine and then we had those moments kind of going forward from there and we knew at some point that this is bigger than than we imagined it being and we had some pretty big imaginations we thought we were GONNA be stars but we we just. We had no clue they are the along. One of the things you've said is that prince surpassed his tutors who daughter music and I thought that was a pretty interesting thing to dig into. He was you know the veritable sponge and he had a real all sorts of I don't know childlike curiosity. Kind of melded with this Uber. Borderline Alien Scientific ability to analyze. Break things down so you know if you were doing something that he wanted to know how to do or understand Dan he would ask questions. He would watch intently but there would come a point quickly where he would surpass. Whatever it was he could learn from mute and you know if he respected you then you kind of became? Here's if he didn't respect you. You were kinda rolled out to the curb and that was was that he learned what he needed to learn. Now you could move on but He was just a master at and I say this with with a great deal of love and respect. He knew a good idea when he took it because he wouldn't make it his own. He would see something he would hear something the light would go on on but then he would kind of take it into his musical chop shop and you couldn't recognize it once it came back out. Okay aw speaking of musical chop shops tell me about the pocket. The pocket was everything you know and the penalty for violating the pocket was severe. What it was you know staying after rehearsal for six six hours with the lendrum going on the background I mean it's funny because I was accustomed. I as I mentioned before I played in bands led headbands for probably close to ten years before connecting with Prince. And you know thought I understood. Meter knew it wasn't something parked next to you. Know I thought I understood but it was just a whole other level and he was relentless about it. And that's one of the things that I'm forever grateful. There's kind of a he he took me and all of us behind this velvet rope of the pocket and showed us something that I think. Few people at that point in time can had a grasp of. But you know again again. If you weren't in the pocket you know beatings would commence no not really but it was. It was intense. Did he have his own vocabulary for describing describing how he wanted to feel to be. Yeah I mean there were certain things you know one of them and this is like obscure but one of them that that kind of came to mind One time recently when some of US got together is he would he would use the term Grab this cord right here. Because there were certain from Qatar standpoint. There were certain chords that he used in his sort of recombinant way a lot. And if you listen to the music if you don't know it from the inside out you really wouldn't be able to tell but on the inside you knew that there's a certain our language which had a a limited number of characters in it to some degree. Yeah so it would be like Ed grabbed this cord right here and you knew which one he was talking. Oh grabbed that one. Okay Yeah Yeah grab this one here but played up here. So we'd have a specific voice or or inverted. He wanted US okay and there were other things I mean it would be you know. So if it wasn't stinky enough you know what he was talking about. But it was more it was the pocket and the groove and you could tell by the sound of his voice Where you were on that spectrum okay but and yet and yet despite the pocket he called you over in nineteen wealth route for nine thousand nine hundred nine and said you know come over and try some things and what happened? Pretty fast was the sixty fourth best guitar solo of all time. Hi according to multiple resources. So that's that's kind of wild that there's the pocket and then there's the Improv the turned into that Right Guitar Solo on Little Red Corvette. Which of course was multiple solo so lots to talk about their Kinda my ultimate forrest? Gump you know outcome. I think because for us I mean we had our routine down by the time that album rolled around. And you. You know we've been in this rhythm of you know Prince does record. We rehearsed the record in an infinite number of of iterations is in variations. We go out we tour that record we come off the road you know. Prince goes back in the studio over time that more to the point where the band was is more involved in the process and a lot of the songs Started to be worked out kind of in rehearsals and even an on the road and sound checks. You know in the back lounge of the tour bus you name it. I mean wherever there was place for us to make music songs are being written the band. Thank you so. By the time we got to the nineteen ninety nine nine record that cycle that rhythm was well established. And you know we'd come off the road. After controversy and had our break Achon he started. You know working on the record but this time he did everything at home and didn't really in the past he had left in either track some of it out of town or mixed at town. I literally got a call while in fact it was earlier than I expected expected for it to happen. I didn't think he was that far along yet. I thought I had more time off. No just kidding no. I'm really not getting. I'm not I had more time. So I this call to drive out to the house and You know he wanted to hear the stuff and he he played me I. He played me nineteen ninety nine and wanted to know what I thought about the song you know from the beginning I mean we and I I really mean collectively we he. He wanted to have a banned from day one. He didn't want want it to be. You know Prince and you know over here is the you know the highlights or something. He wanted it to be a band so he was really excited. I can tell about the fact that he felt that he had like really fallen into something with this one and some of the things that we talked about some of the things that he he was after in terms of kind of combining this different out these different elements in such a way that there would be no excuse for it not to be huge. It's weird way to describe it but that's really what it was. So when he played me that Song I knew what he wanted to hear from me is did. I think that this was a radio. Hit and of course I said Yeah. You know this this is it this Kinda hits all the buttons and lights all the lights and from that point it was like okay. Well you know. Here's some lyrics to go in. And he played me a guide vocal that he had but he actually had me sing the whole song. I mean at that point in time and the whole structure of it that everyone knows from the actual single wasn't in place and there were a bunch of vocals by by different people. But it wasn't yet okay. You sing this line from this verse and then using that line and then you go to this harm and of course it was none of that it was just sing it and and and then after I kind of saying down the whole thing. It's like well do this harmony here and he always gave me space He always Kinda Again he played guide vocal or kind of. Say you know. Throw a harmony here but he didn't like dictate it timmy. We kind of moved on an interesting thing thing about nineteen ninety nine though. Is that everybody's familiar with the. Don't worry I won't hurt you at the top of the song and you know correctly people assume that that's Prince but there's a reprieve of that pitched down like you know double octave low voice on the vamp out just repeating the word nineteen ninety nine yes swell on that pass that's actually me wow That was kind of one of his. You know after thought not afterthought things because no song was ever done until it was done and even then it wasn't done so as I'm doing this other tracking. He decided wait a minute. I hear this other part. Try this so I I'd lay down that part and it sounds like it's the same voices at the beginning of the song but it's not Eighteen so this re master has literally thirty. Five tracks attracts various sorts. That have never been heard before. And it's got every version it's got the you know the dance. Mix in the single mix and and so do you remember like as record was being made any discussion about some of the things that ended up on the cutting room floor. That that may maybe prints in you. You know new back then. We're going to surface in conversations like this one again. The EBB and flow of of how music music was made in that ecosystem at the time was such that it was like a faucet that was always on so I mean there there was there was always something he was playing for you or wanting you to play on And we didn't really there was a point. Wait where we stopped expecting that. Oh well this is GonNa be on our record and maybe that'll be on the record and it was just all music and the water was up to our necks This again was something amazing to me because I used to play nine hundred ninety nine next to hungry like the wolf when I was in clubs and so when I heard that you mentioned the nineteen ninety nine was princess reaction to the new romantic movement of time. Duran Duran Spandau ballet those kind of bands. I was like wow that that I never thought about it that way but that makes perfect sense because I used to play those things next to each other and it worked but I think Oh. Yeah but I think for the fans to think that a funky record like that and its connection to these kind of new romantic bands. That were the thing of the moment that this is. This is something unusual to them and the funny thing is and and to some degree I mean you have to understand prince you have to understand our band also have to understand the town and the milieu that we grew up in two different than other places and even when I was coming up and I was going out to see bands and I was you know in junior high and high school and an inspired to learn to play. I mean they were cover bands ends around town that were multiracial in the sixties. Sure and bands with like black lead singer singing rock music and white it lead singer singing fuck and it was this whole mixed bag. And that's what we grew up with. So the idea of of prince loving all kinds of the music and being inspired by all kinds of music is just natural to those of us that were kind of in the in the eye of the hurricane but also so the other thing is because funk was just in his DNA that was the groove is always going to be there. The pocket was always going to be there. But you know man I would see to would that I would introduce him to as many rock records of every kind that I could because I felt that was my duty in my role all in the bed. So you know new romantic stuff in punk stuff and pop punk stuff and man. I was always trying to get him to listen to everything I could. Because I knew that number one he'd be interested in hearing it and that one way or another he was gonNA find a way to incorporate the things that he loved into what we were doing Yeah when I was talking to Bobby Z Z.. The Petri dish that that became the revolution is a formula. That no one's no scientist is going to be able to go back to those to the petri dish and stirred up an ever. Come up with that again. There's no way A and and a million different levels. I mean one of them and this is one of the obscure ones is just the dynamic of how people come about the pursuit. The piffle that this is what I am making music and in doing this is what I am and then setting about the business of just giving themselves to it without the secondary or sometimes primary agendas and and head trips of. WanNa be a Popstar. When it'd be this I wanNA have all these instagram followers blah blah blah? We did it at a time when none of those things existed and it was really about being the best the you could possibly be at doing what you did and then finding an audience for it that sort of ecosystem that's gone a whole different thing thing that yeah you've said before that you were able able to give him some of the most honest feedback and I think again. That's probably surprising to people. Because they probably don't see him. Someone who who really sought that sort of communication. It's interesting because early on when he was more surrounded with people that he knew and he trusted and I think had a greater depth of relationship he was more open I think over time he became more closed but even within that subset of people there were only a handful that he would be not not only completely open and willing to hear but he would seek out your input. I mean even even after I left the band I remember getting a call and this was back when he himself would call rather than have somebody somebody call. I'm getting a call. Hey you know there's going to be we're GONNA send some some airline tickets in and leave some tickets it will call you know we're we're we're in DC. And we're doing three nights and and I want to hear what you think about the new show to come out and hang out you know. We got together the next day and he said you know so. So what do you think and there was an. I'M NOT GONNA mention into my name. But there was a very very well-known studio. Mix Engineer that somehow prince talked into coming out and doing in front of House and I said now hand. The mix was horrible. Oh no I said the the low end was just out of control and it just swallowed up on the nuances of the music. I love the record but it it sounded horrible. Live so literally with back and talk to the engineer and said Hey Mike Guitar Player said the mixed sucked you gotta fix but that was the nature of our relationship. I mean you know. He wanted to know what I thought he knew. I adult thought and he was okay with you. You have. Yeah so what songs shall we go out with. You know what man. That's a tough one. That is is really really a tough one. You know what how come you. Don't call me is now again. I don't know that wasn't on the album. Nobody I know. But we've got live and Masonic Hall. It was the late show in Detroit. So we've got that there we go. I mean that was one of my favorite moments because obviously obviously that was where I stepped off stage. Kenna stepped into my little side stage cubicle and changed in this dry clothes and I would just I would just be a fan at that point and listen to that was always a moment for me every night during the show nine. Now you go to school This has been at least you know for someone who's both been fan but was also playing this music at the clubs and and seeing this live which of course we were talking about age when we started out. And you know we're not kids but this kind of stuff makes me. We feel like a kid again because the memories are just so clear and all these years later and that is a tribute to obviously the work you you and the revolution and Prince did together so thank you so much for that as my pleasure. Thanks for having me well again I wanNA think does dickerson. For taking some time and sitting down with us and giving us his perspective on his time I'm playing with Prince and the revolution being a part of the revolution began a unique perspective being The other guitar player and being one that Prince valued to the point point where I thought it was really interesting. He said I'm GonNa Play Guitar. You're GonNa take all the leads because we all know what a smoke and lead player. Prince is indeed but that's solo that that Solo is pretty darn famous. The DEZ did stuff can stuff from prince with chuck it out people. There is the Super Deluxe editions to ten. LP APPEA- DVD set if you want the vinyl in a five CD DVD set if you'd like the discs also available to stream on your favorite streaming platform. Police check it out wonderful music from the purple one out of the vault so many ways to party happy holidays. Everybody be safe have fun. We'll see you soon. Thanks very much for tuning in. Don't forget to listen and subscribe on Itunes so you don't miss the next Rhino podcast executive producer for Rhino Entertainment. John News produced for Rhino Entertainment by Pop Colt and rich me hand promotions. All rights reserved

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#47 Checking in June 2021

Chris and Rick Talk Guitars

32:18 min | Last month

#47 Checking in June 2021

"Everybody it's chris rock guitars. This is ketchup. Time chris and i had been Kind of incommunicado for a while. Both been busy. Chris what he'd been up to bud. I'm busy like you said. I just looked to see what the last episode we did was. It was straight into the camp. I barely remember that one so since that time house projects there's been more of those started a new job so i've been doing four hundred seventy two hours a week just while you started so i haven't really got time. How are you would. What's been keeping you from Things oh yeah. We're i've been getting into woodworking projects as well Which has its taking up. Time and Yeah just the summer yards stuff planning gardens and mowing lawns. And things like that but Yeah i've i've managed to sneak in some guitar here and there how about you. I think you just recently got a new guitar didn't you. Yeah when i was the only one that we gush about that thing a little more about guitar right. I'll see if especially about my guitar. Huddle even start a new guitar. You've got to tell the game. I got into guitar. Because during the pandemic i kind of moved up made a lateral move in my career that i actually landed really cool job so when i when interviewing for jobs i was joking with my wife that if i get one of these jobs. I'm getting a birth year guitar. I got one of the first ones. I interviewed floor. I couldn't find a birth year guitar in my. I did have a budget that i sat 'em birth year which would be nineteen sixty one. Don't tell anybody really also could get that. Like of my interest is like a melody maker and there's nothing wrong with that. There have a junior. So i started looking at three thirty five. Which is another one of my guitars. Spend might lifts forever just seemed unattainable and from there. It took me. I learned a lot about three thirty five guitar. Which i realized even though i played a number of them. I didn't really know that much about that. So now i know more than anybody really should ever know about. Three and i'm Es three forty five which is a cousin of the three thirty five. And i got that because it's basically a three thirty five with some extra blaner similar gadget but it is a three thirty five at its heart. It is three thirty five. And that's why i wanted. It's an excellent guitar. And what what is it specifically as a. It's a sixty one reissue or a or What is what's the deal. It's a memphis historic sixty four b. o. s. three forty five and the good job with it i really wanted to. I really wanted to find an old one. Even that played some from the seventies that have been really nice. And i played like three from the late sixties and early seventies didn't really do anything for me as soon as i picked this up. I could tell that. I'm like i could deal with guitar in so far i've had in a month than it's it's everything that it looks killer but it is killer amazon one thing wrong with the amendment. Try it believe me so i wanna see that thing. I want to play it man. I need to play it. Needs to be played out as the thing about. It is two thousand fourteen fire. It's kind of like the lately aged. Look to it because of that shit that they do whatever that is whoever had it before me hardly played it all. There's zero like you can't even tell that a string of hit of fred like the edges sharp where i always liked to take them down the factory so it just. It's got a thin finish on. It is gonna get Now so it should wearing really fast. And i think it will look great of you. Played it through all pretty much all your amps. Does it sound great through every an outright you like. I said i haven't had much time at all. Took to it too much. But i have heard it through my princeton sixty four princeton sixty one champion. It sounds fantastic through both of those. I'm doing. I'm getting ready for john. Prime tribute show on the twenty six th of this month i think so. We started so. I brought the priest in the first rehearsal Champ and that sounds really good. That's perfect for this lineup. And i might use that y two but let me show. It's a place called drunk. He two shoes in white center. Be heard of it. No that's cool. It's a little dive outdoors at. We go outdoors very cool man so you list. So is this so so this new guitar is it. Do you think it's going to take the place of of the the junior. Pretty much for awhile. In terms of being your number one or i think so i mean junior does what it does really well and it's great. I couldn't see not having one but this kind of guitar right now that i got I kinda wanna bond with to be the one and only definitely wanna break it in in. I wanna see what can do. And i think you know. The risk brokers have been to p. ninety band guitar band for a long time and that's great and we found a way to make them work together because we have different tone things going on but it might be nice to bring in. you know semi hollow. Humbug yourself to this to the mix. That's cool so far. It does the rupee. Twangy stuff really. Well i'm really pleased with the way that stars. I'm not really missing the telecaster. Like i think i would be to do like these country bends and things like that. It does really well. That's very cool. We should do an episode sunday on street. Thirty five like i said i. I know a stupid amount or should about them. If i don't do it here. I'm for lawyers life with. I think we should yeah. Let's do that. But i'm curious. Have you messed around with a little switch on the little eichel bit. Switches that switzerland. It's called the very atonement as a source of much controversy contempt and all kinds of other shit. Because it's kind of it's it's of its era back when they were trying to use electronic to do anything different to give different sounds so it's kinda cool if you take it on. Its own terms of your like a recording situation because the problem is is the further you go down the dial Dial which is a series of capacitors or resistors networks or something like that in uses some sort of a filter almost like a wa pedal where it kinda shifts out frequencies morning the quieter gets because it's shifting you're listening shit tone these frequencies from these wherever this range is so you can expect it to keep its level. There's nothing there's nothing for any makeup game so it's not very usable in contact played. Guitar hit sounds great. And you turn the same. And there's like a cool kind of timber to open. It's too quiet so people who do make it work like bb king is one. I mean that nasal sound he gets. That's the various very lot allow people will use like some something for makeup up gain like a compressor boost pedal. I played with it but not too much. And it's kind of cool. I mean it's definitely remind you of the seventies just been you know. Can you think you'd find a use for any of the sound zor. I can find us for just about anything depending given the right that you should get a recording situation Everything in stuff doesn't word what's cool about. It is academically seasick. Nasal e settings like really punching through the midst. If you just put it up the volume up volume probably pretty cool but again i mean you can also go telecaster recording so back then i guess very Gets cars evolution. It was always like looking for the swiss army knife. The most you know the most sounds from qatar when they went to. You know all kinds of gadgets that they played with a taurus Election it so at the end guitar players are pretty conservative. So soon as he starts strain and gibson's you know this this bunch you start straying from just about this guitar plug in sounding like you know they i mean. They kept repeatedly trying to get like active. Pickups or low will be biden's pickups and all kinds of shit like that electron ix. What were those. What were those guitars. The jeez i can't remember is kinda like blah they were kinda like blobs like blobby. explorer oriented rb artists owns already. Either artist had the active electronic lows and they put him in. There was three thirty five. That had the currency. We're just trying to make people like them and they didn't know just guitar that you plug in. We'll take care of everything when it comes out of the guitar wanna will handle that exude but that said the baritone. I think is pretty cool. Just i mean it looks. Great on guitar is such a piece of its era and it functions. I mean you can take around with you want. So that's very cool. Well did the scratch. The itch of the berthier guitar pretty Definitely did yeah you know it. I mean it's really for me to get a really really cool guitar like this for my birthday. It's just never going to happen. It's like i want to be able to take this guitar junkie shoes and not worry about it. Yeah gonna worry about it because at worry about any guitar ahead with me. But it's not like i'm gonna lose a twenty thousand dollar guitar or something like that. So yeah i mean it has to be playable. I don't want any guitars than playable by playable. They need to giggle. And you know any to be able to record with them. Take him out of the house. Anything i can't do that with. I really have no interest in. Yeah that's cool. is this one feels. It looks like real vintage guitar. But it's yeah you're not gonna be freaking out acting like it's so precious like a fucking thousand guitar. I thirty thousand. That's cool man. Yeah what have you been playing lately. Even plants in qatar. What kind of instrument are you bonding with hanging out bonding with my les paul. Classic man the honey burst. it's started. it's got that sinn neck. Yeah i've really reacquainting myself with tara. It's so funny. Because i hadn't played in a long time it's been at gyms you know has been at the house then. I kind of picked it up when i was out there for practice. One night and dan. That thing is cool. I dig it. It's heavy but it's you know you you. I don't mind it The neck is relief. Thin profile super cool. Yeah i use that for rehearsal once when it was down at a space. Did you dig it out for riffa entire. That was great. I was like i really wanted it. I had hard time putting it back. Almost just took it selects Do you need a chiropractor after after planet. I don't have a problem with heavy guitars. I don't remember that being heavy is probably what nine pounds or something right on your cars. I i have eleven powerless fall and my rehearsal space guitar for years at sat down the rehearsal space and i went there and rehearse other than the black one where you rehearsals are where you have a guitar on for two hours a lot of times. It's like forty five minutes. You know maybe an hour on show when rehearsals is not hard to do two and a half three hours with the guitar on your shoulder. I've never had a problem. I mean i have. I don't think it. Which is something i don't think about. I do love the old guitar. Is that heavy. Because i love. I've said this before. I just love to take atari. Hand it to somebody. We'll get to the look on their face like holy sh- folded in honestly. I don't think about. I think it's i mean i know there's a lot of people that will not by advocates are and i commend that. That's cool but i don't. It's not something i think about. I don't want it twelve petar. i wouldn't look for one. I would seriously consider it. But i think twice about eleven pounds beyond that weight that they can't go past some people don't want to get past seven to Gibson melody maker yeah. I'm the same way i don't. I don't mind too much if the guitars heavy if it's if it feels good and it sounds good. And what. is that your heaviest guitar. I think so. Actually i think it's even heavier than the explorer. That i have is a big hunk of mahogany but adds a cool guitar to man. I've been in that as well. I mean in that. I've been going down the rabbit hole man. I've been getting into los lobos lately. Like crazy like a reacquainting myself with their ship and the guitar stuff. They're doing shit guitars their plan and shit those who were strat Which all kinds of different shit like. I think the rhythm did plays a les paul allott but it i'll go plays like tallies in strat s- for for most part some. You'll like japanese reissue stratocaster. Yeah that he put together some cool. Yeah doing that Reacquainting myself with yes. Which is cool. I totally appreciate that man. But i just never i i have friends. Who like their their rush. And they don't get rush does but i will say on of similar songs are just undeniable like in the context of like film or something when they play as a backdrop. I'd like i love them. But i bought that record knows collecting records intra Even after all these years wanted fragile or tails of of graphic oceans and I couldn't make it through. Glad i just. They're just they're like somebody else that you know for me like nick cave or something exactly but i just don't connect with for some reason. Whatever gap interrupted you when you had to forget what it was gonna stay man. Oh we'll just steve how man that that dude. Yeah i just love listening to play man. He's he's so out there but it was great. So that's so. I've been kind of doing that. You know just kind of like plan a little guitar. Here and there in the numb listening to Reacquainting myself with guitar player is an engine music. In general that. I haven't listened to a long time on television. I was listening to the marquee moon album again. God that's good a pretty good record. It's damn good of even listening to new music or reacquaint as my biggest downfall. That's why i don't haven't written song in like three years younger. I don't make timeless records. And i got to get over it because my thing is i can't just record on like were clean a house. I wanted sit there. And listen to it and i haven't had that current time lately but i think if i need to surround myself with music for even if i do say all right. I'm not gonna sit here and listen to this Do whatever because if you're going to write or or just even be creative thinking of like musical ideas if you not listen to music. You're just like nowhere so you're doing this commendable in. I should be doing more of that. But have you found that if he found that listening to a bunch of this stuff in your approach guitar again s. That's what i'm looking for that. So cool yes. Exactly because you get stoked listening to steve how rip through some similar tunes and yeah and then i go grandma guitar. Sit on the couch while in space out and play some shit anna stuff in eight sixteen time and shit so or whatever yeah slide will rock. Yeah we'll let you need to do that i. I'm the same way. If i put a record on i i get distracted. I listen to music rabbit. Yeah i just get sucked into it. But i forced myself to do it just because i do. I wanna listen to. I wanna keep that like you're saying i kind of want to keep that channel alive. You know. yeah it's important in like. I said that's why i've been like kind of stagnant in creative writing while but the actually a new guitar can give you. I've got a couple of things that i came up with guitar. Wise like an melodies shit but as far as like just feeling that zone where like write song. It's gonna to is gonna come to me. I'm gonna get an idea taken through the course because they'll be inspired that comes from listen to to shed. Is that kind of how you right do. Did you ever go through periods where you tried to get disciplined about writing or do you just kind of are you of the school that becomes to me all right down. And then i'll i'll address it now. You gotta be. I think you've got to be in the zone. I mean you just mean you start thinking there's things out there that when you putting stuff together that stuff just happens and if you're in that mode where you kind of listening in interacting with music you know you're kind of in your head like even if you don't have music on in your head you're kind of going through phrases melody's in different things in ideas and also cook. Something will stick. You'll get inspired new going there and you get like even it's not a whole song get like maybe a course in verse but other times. Yeah i mean you'll hear something record will affect you in such a way that you have to The next thing you have to do is you have to spend time with your instrument. Maybe if you're not writing anything it's just like you're open to new shit because you've been listening to us right now on the worst as i go to my room a i've been kinda to because we've got some gigs coming up. Which is another thing. I want yeah where where is it. We've got we've got to east of the mountains coming up in july and then also which is super cool. Plan the tractor july sixteen. The that's going to be frequent little. If is going gonna be in town drag her to that show i will. I mean she's got a you to fan totally. I will see if i can make that happen. Ligne dedicates a couple songs tour. I think you can go and buildings again Isn't this thing. yeah we're done. We're over the hump man until mellon tillers variants get us or whatever other implicit really. No coming back from this. I think i've i've got ptsd from this now. Now that i'm starting to venture out a little bit goes a long way out. You know it's like i haven't seen people it's great talk talk talking on all right. I need to go Amsterdam used to wear a mask like i have met. I have so many masks in my car in the house everywhere. Like i'll still wear a mask all the time which most places required anyway. Still if you're gonna go into ace's but yeah it's kinda crazy. I hear you too man like we ventured out lake Now anon it's overwhelming like being around other people. You're tired really fast. You gotta go home. Take a nap. Well i mean the that standard for me anyway. But but yeah. It's i mean. I think many people didn't good during this. I mean i would like to maybe created more but musically. But now what are you gonna do. You should reflect on what you did over your covid vacation episode. We can reflect. Do we did london. We did we do a little unbeaten there. So do you have. You've got the john prime thing coming up. Do you have other gigs. Coming up with rip brokers. That seem like there was some mention of something that i don't know probably i think the general feel is that things are starting to open up again so i think a lot of the clubs are calling around and getting bills put together. I'm sure we'll have some stuff coming in it's awesome. Are you stoked about it or you still kind of. It'd be interesting to see how i do. Actually out in the club but I'm excited for that. Delete is outdoors. It's like a an open bar area. That will be cool. It's close to my house. I could just you know. Go out the back door renounced. Look happy training. Come right home. Nice sorry no. I am excited. So what's so you said east of the mountain so where spokane or what. Noche lan land okay. Whiter is man sweets winus east of the mountains. Bring your fly ride. I know right. Well it's going to be cool because the first one My aunt and my cousins are coming out. Which i never see so. It'll be kind of cool to connect with them. And then kelly gonna bring my mom's ashes and we're going to dump my mom in case. Yeah so that's possible at what she wants. She wants to be land. So we're gonna. We rented this boat. Pontoon boat will go out there and then you know it'll probably be where you'd toss her out and it'll all come back but yeah it'll be cool man. I'm psyched about. I'm signed to play man. I and kind of i've been psyched. I keep telling myself this. But i i'm trying to write more so i'm going to try to write and record. Jim and i have been trying to put together. A studio hotness place you know and it's as as we slackers do it's taking forever but slowly but surely maybe will eventually record sounds out there. That'd be great yet. A draw you do have a drawing is is. We have a german that ban. But yeah i mean we might involve him or whoever you know. I'll play drums. But i don't play drums you should you should write more. I really wanted to i will. I'm just going to do it. I'm just going to quit wyan to start doing the be. Nice yeah i think the world's ready for another batch of kline songs therapy they'll come on now so let's see what else is new in the world of itar. Talk to me man. I wanna see that guitar on. Apply our our. I just saw tonight as a matter of fact. Some previews of that Peter action beatles moving on through. I wanna see that footage is really cool. Really gross said they're just babies by now man will the cool thing is like i saw an interview with him and he was saying what really struck him as you know a lot of the stuff that came out of those sessions was so negative because they you know they were on the down slide if their career but he says he found so much footage of like them joking around or having fun or so. I think that's cool because that's always been my perception of that of the beatles. It's like it was just so down and everybody just didn't want to be there. So i'm like to see that you gotta wait 'til thanksgiving just found out. Will he keeps adding. We keeps adding footage. Right i guess he's got like six hours of yes. Three two hours standings. I love your music thing because one of the things going back to my three thirty five three forty five. Because that's the most important thing here in the three forty five i learned is kind of like the zelic of guitars. Remember that what he'll yes. Everybody played one. What you've never heard of it kind of. I mean you've heard of it. I mean i know that much about the es series. I read thirty four. Three forty five was in three. But that guitar is short. George harrison for awhile played the same exact same color. Same one for like a very brief amount of time kind of obsessed with it. They're always like look at just twenty guests where we got that guitar in all this other shit. But it's just popping up everywhere it's like. I haven't noticed in my friend. Nick pointed this out to that when soups Become aware of something. You start to notice if All these people playing three forty five will that. You're right to because i i mean i was pretty ignorant about. I just thought all those semi hall bodies were three thirty. Five's i didn't know until i started to see. Oh that one's got like yours has the double we're Inlays and things like that. And it's got the switch and then i started to go. Oh that's different somehow near like chuck berry played three forty five at times freddie king. Yeah so yeah ads. Pretty funny the guy in yes see again. That guy love it. That's cool. yeah that's what's funny. Well it's funny since you been talking about this guitars that's all it's coming into my feeds now. Are three thirty five forty fives in. It's like okay. Is that my next guitar. I should judges not. I mean you can stay at about qatar. I could say that. About telecast junior. But it's definitely and i said this when i first got my les paul junior. I've been playing telecaster for years on guitars guitar as soon as i got the junior like right away. I'm like my plan is going to change. I could just tell that. I started playing a different way and this gives me the same vibe. When i'm on it you know just like this is kind of unique in just the way it responds. It's great unplugged guitar on because it sounds kind of like a mandolin or something. I think this is going to change the way that i play the neck like is gonna junkie or is it kinda like It's not it's not very chunky but it's not really skinny uber Unique about I really fell for is kinda rolled. They ruled the edges of the fret. Board so There's like fred edge binding But it's very tiny because it's rolled over Your hand is around really well. It feels like a played guitar or anything. Yeah so excuse me. You're excused so that's about it. Just wirtten are got the new gig so more guitar is probably sense enough. As long as his gig holds out. We're going to wait for a long while. I mean i. I don't need another guitar. I wanna get to know this one. Let's just say that you're gonna see her kind of saying you. You thought you might be at that point where you've got to get rid of some. Did i miss them away. When when you get to that point you just you just don't do anything If you got you got to pick a yes six months later if you still have that feeling then you start looking again and then you give it another six months after a year and a half. You're still thinking should get rid. Get rid of the just wasted a year and a half. I mean everything's going to go to the estate sale. Anyway so roy. At gets into a google sheep for tracy and i that says what lowest mark showed when she's using the label maker to get ready for the estate sales she can broke really alive. I'm gonna go that sale. See if i can work a deal. Then i'll probably be dead before the new way. No deals cool dude while it's good to catch up with you man and yeah. Let's we're going to get back into irregular canes once. Chris settles down in his new gig and And we've got some topics in the hopper that we want to talk about. Also i wanna do some shoutouts to some people next couple of episodes. Because i had we've chris. I've had some cool interactions with you listeners. Out there it's really touched us. It's so cool to know that you guys are out there listening But we'll do some shout outs man and then also i would. I think we're going to plug guitars in placing depar- we should do a rift Trade rifts like here. You told me that you really sick on that. You do all the time that you can't get rid of that. I do all the time that really sick of i want to get rid of 'em will trade him and kind of lane how to play them so other people can take these things if they want to two and we can get rid of them. I'm gonna get like an earworm like i can. I had this song in my head or I like that okay. We'll do that. We'll do that either next time or one of the next episodes okay. Awesome also like to add. It's i really want to get back into now that we can go out again and i would like to get back into live in the. Yeah but i wanna have. It's all torn apart and they have to put it back together. And i just haven't had time so do it zooming slick website. You put citing on the shed awesome. How long had it been without citing fifteen years. Not only years. I don't know it lasts a long time. I'd have to go up there every two years running another role of tar paper around it but it made it. I love it good looking now. Well thanks for listening is always Social media check us out on spotify. I tunes Any parting thoughts food for people. Out there chris. No just play guitar. Be safe and have fun. Awesome until next time. Everyone by

ninety band guitar band qatar chris rock paul allott white center swiss army memphis princeton los lobos Chris chris fred biden john prime steve switzerland amazon
The Wit, Wisdom And Awe Of Fiona Apple's 'Fetch The Bolt Cutters'

All Songs Considered

17:35 min | 1 year ago

The Wit, Wisdom And Awe Of Fiona Apple's 'Fetch The Bolt Cutters'

"From NPR music. It's all songs considered. I'm Bob Boylan. On Friday April Seventeenth Fiona Apple released her stunning new record called fetched. The bolt cutters been waiting eight years to hear new album from Fiona apple and it was well worth the wait to celebrate release. Npr Music San Powers. Mersal Rousseau and I had a live online listening party. We played the full record on. Npr Music Youtube Channel while tens of thousands of people joined in they commented. Listen too long and it was all over. We talked about Fiona Apple's new songs what they meant and where they fit in with her remarkable career but I am powers offered some context for the album. And how we finally got to hear it as you said Bob. I the on apple record in many years. Eight years originally slated for October released but in March Fianna offered a little instagram posts in which she said in sign language. My record is done and of course things started to just bubble up and go crazy right at that moment because her fans they crave music so much a month later a little bit more less than a month later she announced that she was moving the release date of the record up from October to April. And we need it. You know I mean here we are. We're all alone together. These days in our crazy world situation. And what do we need more than a statement from one of the great artists about the power creativity making art in your home? Chaminda's record in her home and end about self determination. I was on twitter last night when the album dropped and people were losing their minds. League like I. I rarely seen anything like it immediately. This is the best review record of the year. A rare perfect score on pitchfork That publication with its notorious scoring system especially women. I think were exclaiming this is just what we need right now Mussa. What should we be listening for as we all listen to this record like there are three things in particular that would be good to listen for? The first is the percussion of nature of these songs in a profile of Fiona Apple in the New Yorker a little while ago. Fianna talked about how she kind of built these songs from the ground up the ground being rhythm there's a real rhythmic drive to a lot of the songs on this record. The next thing that I noticed about it was just how funny it is. I think for you know as much as we often praised Fiona apple for being is really intense really introspective emotive songwriter. She's also really witty. And I think that that really shows up on this record and the third thing is the dogs. The ONA's dog mercy is a featured performer on the record as well as several other dogs in her general orbit so I would keep an eye out for the dogs too so at this point we played the full record. And if you haven't listened to it you should. You can listen. Now Stop the podcast and come back but fans left comments and thoughts and questions during a live chat as we all listened and when the album finished we tried to make sense of what we'd heard and what we'd learned along the way starting with an powers I learned so much from the Folks in the chat room so many interesting connections you know whether was hearing beyond saying Erica by do the music or hearing you know Samba. Rhythms are so many different things people bringing up. I feel like I know the album so much better now just after that. Listen with alcohol you talk about the rhythms. I mean that that's SORTA central melody is not central I. She is the melody where there is melody. Let's talk about some of that. There are or credits that went fiona on share as in hitting a chair. I would say I mean one thing I was thinking about as I was listening to. This was the fact that she really drew from the things that were in her home. Like in and around her space version bilby songs and I think it just struck me as a person who's been in my home not going anywhere for so long and it'd be the ONA's apple artist who would see that kind of experience and turn it into a way to make music as opposed to a nation is really beautiful. Some interesting connections Has Been Associated with this scene in Los Angeles around the club. Largo for many years and some connections with that scene. Tom Waits I think is a big influence on this record and also Chad Blake. Who MIXED THE RECORD? Did allow the engineering on the record. Worked with Los Lobos members on a really amazing record years ago called Latin playboys. Encourage everyone to go. Listen to that record because it does very similar things with rhythm. I think Yanna has such open ears in you here. You know so. Many African the asper influences on this so much hip hop influence on this record and also dominate Garza. Mush out one of my favorites for many many years. Who whose own music is also adventurous? In this way you're great Austin based musician. We had a question from somebody. Wallace was playing and they asked about our thoughts on a funeral. Funeral chapels use of black musical traditions on this album. I definitely always hear that in Janas music and I think grounding this project in rhythm brings to the fore a few people in the chat mentioned lemonade and honestly who could not have been influenced by lemonade or at least aware that we are living in a universe where beyond says. Lemonade is such a primary text. So book for Fiona this is going right back to her her very beginnings in her childhood in New York City. Where coming up as apoe. A young poet and aspiring musicians. She would set Maya Angelou poems to music. That's how she learned and thanks to whoever reminded me of that in the chat. That's actually learned to make music so I think this is right back to her. Absolute ROUTE ISN'T TRUMP. Set like a song that was from when she was a teenager. I think oh another thing jazz. Let's not we can talk about later and I'll just say the word jets Jones is gone. It was all those still here scrape while they take it to take it all away. A guy is though with me. And you don't WanNa talk with me at all I saw. I don't believe I don't believe it in your reasoning. I understand your Celaya and you got to get what you how you wanted to Solo. Why did you not to try to take it all away? Bouncer child to take away bonsor. Try to take it all away. Why would you not want to try? Take the way I was thinking about the idea that how so much for past is part of this record in the words but it really brings you to the president on who she is. You WanNa talk a little about how she sees herself now through. Those is of the past experiences of the past. Yeah I think you know the very first song on this album opens with her thinking. About how like time is fleeting and everything is meaningless? But that doesn't mean that the desire that she feels for love for connection is any less important and it doesn't mean that she feels that any less and I feel like that kind of wisdom. Fiona has always been a wise songwriter. Who's trying to look for bigger truths than just you know what we experience them every day but I feel like that wisdom is so present throughout this record Tom and despite the beckoned. This long sound Brown wants Sony. Now I know in interviews around this record. She's talked about you. Know thinking about her younger self when she first started making music on his kind of pushed into the spotlight and treated pretty terribly by a lot of the press for being a young woman who was emotional and intense and made really vibrant. She was thinking back on that version of herself. And how you know. She wanted to be kinder to that self and also stand up for herself more in a way that her eighteen year old self wasn't able to do in that you can really hear that in this record. I think that the songs you had mentioned this in the chat that are about relationships with women are very crucial and going all the way back to the songs. Amiga about a a middle school experience and who knows if there was a real sh- AMIGA or if that character is a composite but avai experience of being bullied by other girls in middle. School is such a universal one Jamaica. Said attention should make a Sarah attention. Should Meek said I had potential Sumika Sarah. Heb Tasha from the windy windy sidewalks slept with the riot and crop thinking mimic. Come off so tough mom because a smile always seem to her wasn't afraid of the bullies and that just made the bullies worst. Pass the time Jonah slash retiring secondhand went by a group of five twelve times with a minute to me. Caserta Heaven. Mika Salo have terminal Shumita sir potential so may have potential and I really appreciate that. She's reaching back at the level of maturity she's that having compassion in a wave for her bully also seeing how much she invested in a simple statement. You know someone in the chat said I bet the phrase Jamaica said I had potential has been informed apple's head for decades and we all of that who doesn't have that you know yeah and I think to wisdom and compassion here but she still has moments where she's wrestling with jealousy and confusion and frustration with other women Fam- and trying to like battle with both of those impulses the impulses to forgive and be open and warm with other women and the way that we're conditioned to compete and feel jealousy With other women. I like that. She brings us through all of that instead of just kind of giving us this like well. Now I'm enlightened. Here's my wisdom and you all can learn from my experience. She really wants us to go through those experiences with her. In these songs I love that the one thing that I kept seeing over and over again because I love that comment and I think that feeling all of this as a little community today meant so much to some so many people someone said is. Is this a return to hearing full album as intended? The emotional arc of a record has covert nineteen self-isolation. Brought us back in time to attentive listening. And you know look we have this moment at and is love that and I hope we can have more moments like this who knows that it will last but I do believe and think that we don't do that enough. Well Bob I was also thinking of you making music with others alone together during this period because I think the model for music making that this record offers is also so important that she made this record in her home with a abandoned she selected who she knew would be the perfect collaborators to experiment. And I mean that's already been happening. I for a while but if anything this crisis is going to bring artis back into the ground of their process and I feel misses. That is another reason you know along with the politics of Women's liberation and self expression of this record represents it is that active music making that so liberating about this record in offers. Something for Future Studies Marissa. Ud To pick up your guitar. Start hitting chairs and making record in in in your home. You can feel inspired. No I I read somewhere. That Fiona said that she has never really been comfortable with the concept of jamming which I also have never been comfortable with so I loved that but that these collaborators were people that she felt comfortable taking risks and trying things and you know hitting a chair for percussion. And I think you can hear that on the record that that it's like ext it's in process and it's an experiment and it's not super polished and they're like you know if the dogs are barking in the background. She kept that in because that added to the song rather than trying to go into a studio and make everything perfect and shiny exact and that and that's speaking about making music at home. I do that all the time. And the beauty of that is time on your own time. The olden days when I first started making records with tiny desk unit. Was You go into a studio? It's a couple of hundred dollars an hour and you are like? How do you get the emotion? I don't know how people did it. How do you pull the emotions out of you without fakery? You know without like pushing it in a way. That doesn't feel genuine when I'm at home and it's eleven o'clock at night and no one's around I feel so free to make the sound without judgment and people on the other side of a piece of glass and all that stuff and I think that's what I sense from that music making. It's why the dogs are running around the house. She just was doing stuff and making stuff and the door was opened. The dogs came in. It wasn't like there was intent for the dogs to be on the record. It's just you feel the room you feel her life and I love that about this record in. Gen Kelly's review in pitchfork. I think the last line of innocent. This music is free. You know it represents freedom in so many different ways. Exactly what you're saying Bob. The process of music making the permission. She's giving herself to say things both inspiring things but also sometimes kind of you know ugly things or challenging things confronting her deepest traumas and struggles. But also you know as you pointed out the humor. The jokes the playfulness. This is what you know. A free mind in Seoul is really about is having room for all of that and and you don't always hear that on the recording things can become so polished so streamlined so a directed toward affecting us in a certain way and it's a gift that he owns giving us and it's evocative of many artists who've gone for her. Of course people have mentioned Diamante Gloss for example. Pj Harvey Or. You know there's so many people you can mention but Fiona is uniquely free. I think people lack of swift play with heavy balloon game built the NPR music fan powers. Marissa's Larusso talking about the new Fiona Apple Record during our live listening party. The ALBUM FETCH TO BOLT. Cutters is out now for. Npr music. I'm Bob Boylan. It's all songs considered to keep up to keep the Devil Bay but it always falls way to spread Marissa and beans up so spread like strawberries.

Fiona Apple Npr apple Bob Boylan Bob NPR Tom Waits instagram pitchfork Mersal Rousseau ONA twitter Los Lobos Pj Harvey Seoul Fianna Mika Salo Maya Angelou Chaminda
Growing a New Body Through Science and Shamanism with Alberto Villoldo

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

59:34 min | 2 years ago

Growing a New Body Through Science and Shamanism with Alberto Villoldo

"Welcome to the doctors pharmacy. I'm Dr Mark Hyman. And this is a place for conversations that matter. Today's conversation is with L burnable Aldo who's a close friend and extraordinary healer an advent guard thinker about spirit and body in a way that you don't see around too much, and we are now at Los Lobos sanctuary in Chile near San Diego. And we just finished an extraordinary program doing together teaching together called growing a new body. Now, you might be wondering what that means. We're going to get into that. But most of us have kind of issues with our body, both our physical body and our spiritual body and they're both connected. And we're gonna talk about how to heal and grow and transform based on the latest science a functional medicine and healthy aging and ancient wisdom that actually matches up perfectly. And I just wanna tell you a little bit about all Berta. We have been friends for many years and we've been doing this. For many years, but he's he's been described as the Indiana Jones of the spirit world by the New York Times he sought out in benefited from the wisdom of ancient shamans. And the story you told me was once just fascinating Berta, which was that. There was this small group of Incan shamans that kept the wisdom for five hundred years that lived at seventeen thousand feet, and they preserve the ancient traditions. They were completely unknown to the rest of the world and about fifteen year, maybe sixty years ago, they came down from the mountains they were spotted by somebody. 'cause they saw these ponchos that were actually part of this ancient Incan culture, they thought it'd been extinct, and then they started becoming into the world little bit more and you had the privilege decades decades ago of actually going and working and teaching learning from these people and teaching they're teaching the rest of us really brought this whole world of somatic healing and schmuck. Understanding an ancient wisdom into the modern world by bridging the sort of little bit of archaic in two and weird stuff into more simple and clear teachable language and practices that can help. People work with their motions work with their spirit work with their their what you call their luminous body. How do we become more luminous alive and connected? And you you, you know, or just a guy running around the jungle, which I'm shaking, rattles. You have had pursued her doctoral studies, it's Cisco state you were studying Interpal policy, and you were really interested in my body medicine. You had really done your spiritual journey over the last forty years looking at how we can bring these teachings from the ancient world back into the modern world, and you created a school those the light body school and the for win society. Now bring these teachings around the world. And now, there's literally thousands and thousands of people bringing this wisdom and ancient teachings and energy medicine, which wouldn't talk about into the world. So you you've been around the block you've written seventeen books, which is impressive. I'm only at sixteen. I gotta catch up a little. Many of them New York Times bestsellers, and you in your later years you've sort of come to appreciate. A different set of of energies, which is physical energies that allow us to express our spiritual energies and how we can correct those how it can rebounds. Those and lead you to the world of functional medicine, and that is really how we sort of got to know each other through through this work, and we started doing these programs in in different parts of the world and detox programs and people we didn't really know we're doing just bring people together and have great experiences. And if you have extreme transformations in just one week and created this new book, which is coming out in March right twenty nineteen and it's it's called growing new body for those who want to check it out. And it's it's really this wonderful compendium and map of the physical and spiritual world and healing both though. So so tell us how you sort of came from, you know, just those initial experiences you had around creating program with me to now creating the. Sanctuary in Chile where people come from all over the world to experience this idea, and it's experience of growing new body. Welcome alberto. Thank you. Mark. Great to be with you. And what a great week we had amazingness beautiful to bring the the energy medicine the ancients together with the energy medicine of of of today of, but we know about my Conrail health, but I don't want to tell you a little bit about my story. I yeah. Started out in a brain laboratory. And we were looking at endorsements in how endorphins can help, you know, can we influence endorphin levels through moods for meditation through suggestion through energy healing and endorphins are the happy mood chemicals like the opioid natural. And the amazing thing is we have receptor sites for them. We had in the brain. So the only laboratory space that I could get it at San Francisco state university was in the biology department. In where they kept the brains. So nobody wanted to work there. Because of the stench of formaldehyde lab space is really hard to come by. So I had two hundred brains around me, and I said if I ever needed a second opinion, I only need to turn to one of these see what? Being on what I realized one day that I was looking at the wrong end of the microscope that acidic getting smaller and smaller that I had to get bigger and bigger into in depth point. I close my lab, and I took the remaining research funds head, and I went to the to work with people that had no MR is. And they had only the ability of power the mind to kill or to heal. And I I myself and these studies and found that they had they were the first neuroscientists that they had the scuppered plants and herbs that would up regulate our Killian repair system and triggered on Jeb jeans. What we call today, the Nrf2 activators these were their sacred plants, and I asked him how did, you know, then they said to me the plants told us, they still have an active dialogue with all of creation. You don't wanna mix up the wrong plants up. End up dead. So the the what I love about the shamanic teaching says that they were systems based and us the functional medicine as well. You have to look at the entire system. Not just the the garden the brain and the the organ dysfunction over once the entire system, including the social system, and including your relationship, the nature. So it's a big system and the west before we can understand the workings of the universe. We have to understand the workings of a blade of grass for decent visions cultures before you could understand the workings of a blade of grass. You have to understand the working so the cost so the systems are very very big. But they were all founded on the notion that we're energy beings that we're luminous beings were energy beings. And we have a luminous energy field surrounds, the physical body and organizes the physical. In the same way that a magnet will organize iron filings on a piece of glass and this field this information field, and you know, we have electrical signals going through our nerves all the time. And we know that are hard our brain muscles. The network signals, and we know that their magnetic fields that are created by electrical fields. And this is an information field that we have to work with that today is very weird and strange and toki, but it's the same thing that happened one hundred and fifty years ago when people started talking about microbes and invisible creatures and viruses that could right. We're making progress moving towards incorporating nominally might Conrail energy and the the body but the energy of the field. Yeah. I mean, it's abstract idea. Right. Luminous energy field energy body. It's nothing. We talk about in medicine. It's not something that people really understand our access. How do you sort of bridge that gap of confusion between what actually is it? And how do you access it? And what does it do like, it just seems very vague? I think most people listening like a sounds cool. But what do I do that to the laboratory with with the Equipment's really sophisticated equipment squids superconducting quantum Peterson ISIS that will measure field. We think of this field is energy in fuel. But that's changing in the same way that we used to think of food as calories. We're now understanding that the field is information, and that it contains a blueprint for your health that you this is what you inherited from your family. So when I was in the Amazon, I got to work with some of the sources and the sources were the ones. That that harm people that hurt people. And I asked one of them, how do you go? How do you hurt someone if you want to do away with someone what do you do? They said, well, we'll track there, and we don't go and punch him in the face or put a brick through window. That's we track their energy field. And we go on this per there's there's breast disease that runs in this family or heart condition, and they find that imprint that that dark Quanta of energy, and they find it in the activated like double clicking on a program. Your computer that person will to see? The shaman and the other hand blew the same thing. And we'll find that. There's an imprint for generational imprint that comes from the mother, maybe for a breast condition, and they can cleared that energy. They can upgrade the quality of the information in the field to change the probability of that person getting a heart condition, accept each networks and affect not only are we modulating genetic expression to our foods, but energetically through stress is one of the ways that we recognize that also we have the ability to upgrade the quality of the. Yeah. People may John sound abstract. We'll know you walk into room got good energy. They've got bad energy that got toxic energy. They're full of light their full of happiness, joy, you actually can feel it when you walk into a room, and you're talking about a culture that has really deeply understood this and deeply mapped it out in a way that they learn how to work with it to facilitate shifting that energy to clear it to move things through to to get unlocked from locked emotions and toxic thoughts that actually impair your body to be awake and engaged. And when you call luminous for their actually what happens in the feel this even more important than what happens in the material world. This is the invisible world that the dream time that the interact with and if with but for us for our health, not only have to eat, well and drink clean water and sleep well and exercise, but also upgrade the information in the field. Which has got to modify your genetic expression. See I thought only one body to take care of my physical body. But now, I've got my luminous body take. And what's what's so great about your new book? Is you talk about both of these in the same space between the interfaces might Qendra turns out that it's the energy and factories in ourselves the power plant the power plant, but the other thing that might Conrad do besides produce energy. You said they're in charge the death clock. They tell sales when they need to die. And if the Monaco Andrea not functioning properly, you have cells that wanna live forever. And it's what we call cancer cells die too rapidly. In excel A-Rated aging, and they communicate through fourth bio photons, they communicate through light were in constant communication all these hormones and other communicating Mada molecules, and our jetty where a constant dialogue with the environment. And with the. Other the energy screwed. You wanna be with someone the energy is bad. If feel that it's your your gut instinct, and a lot of it happens with your gut flora, so that's the relationship between the energetic, and the what we call spirit, the spiritual now today, unfortunately, we think that the spiritual religious and religion as nothing to do with it because you know, religion gives you EC answers to the tough questions. You can be a piece and not think about spirituality confronted with these tough questions which there. No. Yes. Where am I? My doctor my showman, and my healer, my father, and my brother more than any of those things. And once you begin to ask these questions, then you actually go in a process of self discovery. But you cannot ask that if your thyroid is not working, right or if you have a much mercury in your brain. Well, find it fasting that someone who's come to this work through working with spirit and energy and ancient traditions that help to activate the healing response in the body or do the opposite that you've come to understand that our fiscal vessel. The body that we inhabit has to be a fertile soil for us to be able to access that energetic field. And so you were hinting at it before you said if you're confident working every networking if you're mercury poisoning, if your gut flora is off if you're nutritionist terrible. It's going to be very hard for you to access those more subtle fields of of energy that actually are the things that we need to access to be fully hole and to be happy and connected and alive, and is essentially when you bring those together, it's powerful powerful. Now, the things that shamans one hundred years ago never had to deal with the talks that we're supposed. Today. We're no pesticides are no GMO's. There were no environmental toxins. There was no unbound. Mercury all the mercury was bound in the earth and maybe became unbound. Winnable Quesnoy exploded, not when coal burning plants in China are contaminating all the west coast of the United States. So we're dealing with things Shamas were not prepared to deal with and the basic principle in the energy medicine practices is that you can grow new body. You can grow new body. Can we know that you can't because you did? So we got those destructions. But now they're in password protected. Do over yet totally with you gotta be able to hack your biology because their impasse were protected regions. And and these are the sacred plants of the shamans the NRA to activators the curcumin the risks. They're troll broccoli seed extracts four fame, but also the energy medicine. That's what gives you access, and I'll tell you how it works because we're part of an experiment and intelligence their forty million species in the planet and only two of those species, the female live into menopause and every other species when the female is not useful for rep reduction wiped out only two species orcas dolphins and humans because we had the most complex brands and nature favors intelligence sober, muscle and brawn and claws and teeth and these. The two species that are the forefront of this experiment in consciousness and intelligence. This is what spirituality about in fact, our premises that if you can repair your brain be talks to body that what we call spirituality is inevitable. You have to begin to explore the nature of the cost most. And that's where the fun really begins was fascinating the analogy us, which I love is. You can upgrade your software your energy software, your biological. And you know, when you when you you have old operating systems that bugs get clunky. The get garbage. I happen to me with my computer. I literally had to reinstall everything fresh because at all this old clunky operating systems from software that was screwing up my whole, computer. And I literally just Jared of all that. And it was like, I grew a new computer. And I think we you're talking about in human biology is ability to to. Unlock through our DNA through our diet through our ways of dealing with stress through regulating sleep through regulating, our gut microbiome through using certain nutrients using certain foods in these phytochemicals up regulate these ancient pathways that we can actually literally activate the cleanup system. So literally get rid of all the old crap and bring in a new set of operating systems that is a new body that literally will help you to reverse the aging caulk and increase your vitality at any age. Really? This is what happened to me. What happened to your computer happened to me six years ago? I had all these viruses and bugs s an anthropologist had been in jungles in Africa, Indonesia, Mexico, Brazil, and picked up all of these spare sites on the way. And at one point my system collapse. I had I had liver was dead. Basically a heartless. Full of holes, I pay sites in my brain, you remember that? I remember you helped me through that. I did face. So I have to grow new body. You know, I I did the western medicine to kill all the parasites mugs. And in western medicine is really good at killing things. And then when I growing, you know. You know, but then I had to go and grow new body. The doctor said to me you're never gonna be able to hike up a mountain again, I love going up into the high mountains and doing an visiting ancient archaeological sites. I grew. New body. New grew liver grew Newhart, and they told me to go and get in on Liber transplant list. And I thought we'll probably I can get a new liver. Maybe maybe I could get a new heart of what was I gonna find a good brain. My now for sale, I got a few holes in mind. I got a brand new liver and hide and brain now that I'm really enjoying basically. And we can do that. We know how to do that. If you can download Herschel seven point one of the software, you can grow new body. And if you don't and you're gonna grow new body every seven years anyway. And if you don't download the new software, you're going to just repeat the old operating system, which is how your mother died of breast conditions or your father of heart disease or the case that runs in your family. It's interesting. I'm fifty nine now. And I just did my telomere length which is a measure of a rough measure of your biological age. And I'm thirty nine some twenty years younger, and I did about five years ago, and I was forty three then so I've actually gotten older but gotten even younger because I've gotten smarter about the things that I know how to do to grow new body that also with my telomere length. Right. When I sick, and I was sixty-nine in my telomere lay. And when I did recently, I was forty six so telomeres repair. And these are the little end caps on the ends of your chromosomes that we used to think we're fixed, and they shorten and shorten shorten as you age until there's nothing left to shorten the you die. And then you have bad replication your DNA that crease a bunch of pathologies in the seas. But this is by the way, this is solid research. This isn't just wacky stuff. This lizard, back burn Nobel prize. Winning research that showed how you can use meditation and food and all these factors to actually increase telomere length and reverse your biological clock. But that's just one thing. You know, we're talking a much more robust comprehensive program that I don't think exist anywhere on the planet. I mean, you don't you can detach the buddy. But if you don't be seeing motions at the same time, you're going to retire. So where were you find physical toxins, also, emotional toxins? Terrible relationships people you still angry with you haven't forgiven. The Stasi motion baggage extraordinary. And if you don't get rid of that you're going to you're going to go back to repeating the same old story. Running your family. Yeah. I think Caroline may sit at your biography. It's written in your biology. So your life story. Literally will regulate your genes. Your might a Qendra your gut flora your Munich. System. Everything is regulated by your bag or for your beliefs. Your thoughts attitudes, and these this lineage that you come from which is what spirit medicine is so powerful dealing with C. You can't really change your mind and to change your brain. And most of us have broken brains today because at a pesticide who've been exposed to the Floride in the water, and the if you wanna if you can upgrade the quality of the brain out to fix it. So the we're all our brains are swimming in a sea of cortisol and adrenaline cortisol is deadly to the brand and it steadily to the region of the brain. Where you have the ability had learned something new memory, the hippocampus memory and having a new experience in waking up with the person you've been married to for twenty years and going well who is is personnel making up with antastic. And when your. Hippo campuses damage, you go who is this person in my bed. You can't have a new experience. You can't have new series of health, you upgrade the brain. And we know you can repair the brain of six weeks. You can repair the hippocampus of six weeks with the D H as yoga three fatty acids, and in the shamans knew that they would put your special diets to upgrade the brain. So you could have an experience of the divine. And then the alternate experience of the divine is one where you're luminous energy field informed, your DNA because Selena what it does is manufacture proteins and the field. This software that instructs the hardware what proteins to express. And this is the seats. I have the opportunity to grade science of the bring it on a little bit. I mean, this is an important point. You just you just said it was so much in their on pack a little bit. Because what you're saying is that your spiritual life, your thoughts, your feelings, your emotions controls, your DNA away that changes the expression of it for good or bad. Health or deceive disease, and we know this from research, for example, in social genomics, which I talked about before which essentially idea that you can change your genes through a social interaction if we're having a heartfelt open connected interaction. My good genes are getting turned on my anti-inflammatory genes. My lunge, Eddie jeans, my jeans, they're all getting turned on my bacteria are listening in my gut to my thoughts and feelings and are changing in the minute to minute basis based on what's going on. We have actually know the scientific and converses true. You know, you talk about the sources putting out energetic imprint that actually will have a negative the we're source rewire. Having today is the news the news, you know, they're predisposing us to die early to get sick too. Because we're only getting that. I think we need news fast. But. They see the showman's have practices that help you to change the quality of your field. And I want to share with you one of them's a breathing practice where the inhale you say to yourself. I am in the sale you say my breath. My breath. So you do a sign Levy. And then you posted the very top of the breath. I am. And at the very bottom of the breast of my breath, you plus the very bottom before the excelled turns into an inhale again. And then the very last day of your life that very lice moment of your life. You're going to go. I am my breath. I released yourself with the breasts and not be stuck in the all of the stories and beliefs of who you were in this life and move on to to experience in Infinity, and this is actually a daily practice at the shaman stone to know, the because whatever you put out to the word, I am is going to define your entire. I am sad. I am hungry. I am angry. I'm restless luminous if you just alternately you come to. I am. My breath. So this helps to change the quality of your life of your being and it affects you might O'Connor your your thanks your energy levels in the body. But if you look at balloon in the past evolution happened in between generation should children were smarter. Hopefully and better looking than you are. But during times of great crisis evolution happens within generations co quantum species. And today, we're facing an amazing global crisis and mother nature has taken the foot off the brake stepped on the accelerator because the loss of species that were experiencing so we have the opportunity today to take a quantum leap within our generation in our health, not just to maintain our health to even get healthier than we ever were doing our lives by unfolding that the DNA strand. Another twist and by downloading the coats of the new human, and these shamans you spoke about that came down from the mountains fifty years ago, they came to the liver prophecy, a prophecy of a new human being born in the planet today and more than the prophecy. This call it, homo luminous, not homo sapiens. And that new human is us, not our children, not the child will be born not indigo kids, but us we have the opportunity to quantum leap within our life spans. But even more than the prophecy for the shamans, the important things were the processes what other processes, how do you have great the field. How do you detox to body? That's what we have to contribute to it because you can't become luminous and lightened full of talks in your body. So this is really important point. How do you how do you feed the body 'cause you can't grow new body in French fries? Very strange body. And we have the opportunity to do that today in our programs that grow new buddy program, we can start that process in this in seven days. And that's what the book is so beautiful as you know over. I mean, I I started doing this. I guess in two thousand and four five and then brought you into this. And then you've evolved the program, and it was a very -clusive private experience. But we refined and refined it in you've taken in creating a sanctuary here in Chile where people can come and have experience, and it is exclusive. But you've also taken what we learn and what you've learned and translate into this book growing new body, which is subtitled house spirit and power plant. Nutrients powerplant is your motto Qendra can transform your health. And you've taken all that wisdom, intelligence and knowledge over decades and put it into this practical. Program that people can do at home, which may not have all the bells and whistles fire ceremony or you know, but don't do fire. They do at home. Okay. Your backyard. See because the ancient brain the candle with a candle the ancient brain needs ceremony. The change. You cannot change your mind, particularly this old grain that we have the brain of fear, and scarcity you cannot change that brain on this you ceremony quite people get married and birth and death writes that creative ceremony so you can change. Once you do that the ceremony then becomes a sacred act that you create not somebody else's ceremony, but yours so let's break down. What what we do here in what's in the book. Because I think it's very interesting people understand the components that we provide the structure to grow new body and start their process new weekend. See the transformation because oh, you know, if this or this problem really sick. Like, it's going to take months or years to get better at. Is amazing. How change happens in a week? You probably see fifty percent of the change you're gonna see in seven days. And then the next few months the rest of the fifty and it's powerful. So talk talk us through the components of the program and how it's designed and what what we expect. Well, first you've got to work at the physical level because the physical is this is the best that whole spirit, and I you got a detox body take away everything that poisonous. So the allergens we take away the dairy. Gluten the the corn anything that may be a potential allergen, processed foods, processed foods, we serve natural organic picked that morning foods that we do a particular focus here that we protein loaded the beginning and at the end of the program, and we cut out most of the animal all the animal, proteins and. So they are actually cycling your proteins. You have your protein lauded the beginning at the end because you need the proteins to build a new body. But then we put the body into what it believes a star bation mode, and they're really not starving because we're getting raising who's incredible. We have Macy's chefs that the body thinks is starving. Many kicks into repair. Swiss you trigger starvation system, all of the repair systems go on. And then this is what this is what allows you to grow new body. I shoot that you detox. And then you switch on the repair genes that are switched on by the super nutrients that turn on the at these two, gene salon job. This is powerful breakdowns. There's really two steps. One is we have an embedded biological mechanism. That's well described scientifically that's the garbage truck that comes and cleans all the waste out. It's called a tough achieve which literally means eating yourself. So you eat all the waste and get rid of it, and you have to do that through restricting either restricting calories through restricting sugar, restricting certain kinds of patterns of intermittent fasting ketogenic diets fasting make us they all do this process. Even the whole idea of eating dinner at six and not eating till like eight that's a fourteen. Our fast, right. But but most of us don't do that. Will we can do a sixteen hour fast? But it's in that period that the body naturally will clean up and then begin to repair process. But then you supercharge it with another aspect, which is these powerful neuro nutrients and updates and might contra boosters people in health with starts today. You know, I I was in the Amazon for twenty years ABC's barks roots that were disgusting horrible. Now, you can get the stuff of an alpha star will trigger all of those with their systems and be systems have been dormant for many of us because after the age of thirty five many of these systems, shutdown nature. Invest heavily in the reproductive years. So if you're thirty five you're I production zero your superoxide production is almost nonexistent and these power plants turn on your any oxidant productions inside the cell. To the level. You have when you were eighteen this will happen three days. Yeah. So that's the power of this is you take away the things that are going to be causing wastage mutation and you activate healing pathways through an anti inflammatory, low allergen, Fido nutrient dense, toxic finding diet that's low in in certain proteins that can trigger pathways that you want to put on pause, not the proteins bad. It's just it's just that you have to understand the biology of it, and then you step in with a whole series of hock tells of phytochemicals nutrients and supplements that actually activate these pathways. That's it. And we know how to do that today. So one of the one of the some of those things that you would do in the second and the Shawmut's did in the Amazon that I work with the Twitter new, which plans would triggered these three toffee once you were fasting for five days, you're already eliminating waste. But how do you switch on those genetic mechanisms that will get? Hugh to up regulate production of resign on a super oxide. These are the master detoxifiers to the way you had it when you were twenty years old, and this is a key. This is what they discovered things your body naturally makes. But some of us are able to make them because of our jeans because we weren't having to make huge amounts of detoxifying things before we lived in a blue world and often we aren't eating the foods and the raw materials and that actually make those things in our body. So for superoxide anion, zinc, manganese, copper for glorify on you need a lot of the crew service vegetables, you need certain high. Sulfur containing amino acids, like Sistine, glycemic, glued Amine. And these are things that we get from our at are often deficient wanna be able to do this at home, and how do you how do you do this at home because you're growing new body all the time anyway, and you know, when new body that's getting sicker or a new body. Generally is a body this getting sicker. It's getting sicker. So the I remember in college we used to think when I was that that the brain didn't produce any any new that then repair self little brain cells couldn't get an you brace sells, you got new skin cells. But every shot at tequila was twenty thousand neurons goes your Alcorn away. I must be. But today, we know the brain produces stem cells every organ in the body has cash ace of stem cells. So how do you switch them on? How do you turn them on? Now. One of the things that turns some on the omega three mega three fatty acids DHA in particular, it turns on a protein called BBN f rain be rive neurotrophic factor like miracle grow for the brain miracle switches on the production stem cells in the brain and grain repairs and every organ in the body, you can has his own pockets of stem cells the things how do you turn those on? And this is what? The jungle people's discover that these up regulators that today we work with curcumin that everybody should be on anti inflammatory amazing, but they're also signaling molecules rest virtual Sephora fan. Pretty amazing. I actually. Did a spec scan which is a brain imaging scam. When I was very sick years and years ago, and they were like holes Swiss cheese, all of my brain areas where under functioning specs get looks of blood flow in the brain is Swiss cheese, brain, and I felt like I had a Swiss cheese brain. Now, I'm smart, and I could overcome in and I could fake it. But I knew that my brain was Swiss cheese, and then I implemented these methods over long period of time, and I had it redone recently. And I was like, oh, my God Swiss cheese is gone. And I'm like this. This is, you know, twenty years later, my brain looks thirty years younger, you don't wanna breathe either that's kind of syrup for you know, right? So the point here is that you know, using these ancient technologies and these discoveries in modern science about functional medicine how the body works, and how to create health you actually can repair and renew all the systems and organs in your body. No he'd that. For sample one of the meditate. Nations in the book takes you to to rewrite your genetic destiny. So it takes you on a journey to follow your time line back to the moment of your conception. And to imagine yourself inside this beautiful luminous, and your your mother's spotty. And you're sitting there meditating because the nation times before you're conceptual. Your mother would be attended by the women this. She would be based and your father would go up the mountain and do vision quests, but you know, when I was conceived my father had a little bit too, much whiskey. My mother had no experience. So here are my genetic destiny was selected in this moment of too much, alcohol and fear. Imagine what that imprinted me twenty three chromosomes, so Alko, whisky and fear. So you're scared of whiskey or whisky scared of you. So one of the meditations should go back to the moment of your conception seeing yourself inside this luminous ache. That's huge your mother's Egas. Check Gant under all these tiny sperms and biology tells of status the fastest swimmer that gets there. I know the goes you I like you come give me all your genetic material, but keep your Mitra Condra. This is only the mother that has the might ponder. And then you could you call you summon strong heart clear, brain good bones, and you can Greece elect I don't know if you can really travel to the past. But I know that this exercise is an MP genetic regulator that helps you begin to select for strong bones. Good brain good memory, good heart, strong heart because we know we can model weaker select for those chains was beautiful. We can say eat this food take the supplement. But you also practices in the book that allow you to access these more esoteric realms that are pretty simple straightforward and get into just that. We're never trained in them. We don't know how to do them. We talk about meditation yoga, but you're taking this another level. Totally see the thing. Is you upgrade your intelligence? You're not operating from this fear based brain lists scarcity and this brain loves sugar run so sugar, and you can upgrade to a higher brand new cortex that prefers to fats. Love the fats burns fat for fuel. Then you can participate in creating your chin selecting genetic testing. Yeah. So you're you're say what I wrote bookie fact, then, but it's the idea that sugar is brain poison totally. And it's a mighty contra poison. And you cannot it's a liver poisoning too hard poison. Yeah. It's a gut micro poison steals your future. So that you today we're living longer, but we're living longer. Sicker health span is not been increase in the last century. But the morbidity those last years where you're sick is. What's what's growing? And we don't want that we want to take by talented or sexuality our humor with us and till one hundred twenty and actually does studies on this is a guy named James freeze who studied. Long Germany and habits and this idea health span in lifespan, right? Your health span is how long your healthy your life span is how long you're alive. You want them to be the same right? Not your house span being sixty years in your lifespan being ninety and you die after being bed nursing home for thirty years. That's no fun. And when he found was that people who kept their ideal body weight. Who didn't smoke and exercised actually could what we call. Rick kangol survival or meeting you go along super fine. And then just boom you fall for cliff as opposed to the slow decline. And and it was it was breaking the idea that we've had that. If you have a culture people who live a long long time, they're going to be sicker. They're going to be more services. They're going to cost more to society. I mean, you're you're talking about your ninety six year old mother and her ninety seven year old husband or taking a trip to Germany, and you know, like run around the world and and their late nineties, and my mother, and I put on a program five years ago, she'd been living with pain for twenty years and she's saying oh two on flight only paint see for the first time in my life. I'm pain free. And this is you know, I did. You know, I did five years ago, we went to see a a spinal surgeon because she she was having a lot of pain and our lower back and spinal surgeon said, well, you know, there's inflammation here in this nerve. We could go in your ninety four years old that are know that we can do surgery, and I asked him, well, what about putting her in anti-inflammatory diet and Mediterranean diet? And he says to me, I'm a surgeon. I'm not a nutritionist. I don't know anything about it on us. So I did her pain diminished by eighty percent. This thing. But the other part is what's in the field is our emotions, and we have to heal our emotions the shaman only, motions or toxic. You gotta get rid of them and replace them with feelings, which are Centric. So so people are used to therapy to coaching to certain meditation practices to help the all of these things where you're talking about as a different way of handling it this based on ancient wisdom, Shmona keeling. Can you kind of break it down a little bit because I'm really curious about how how you apply it. How it works with people? And how do you start to release those emotions knows toxic things. I've been here this week. We've been doing the program, and we've been going through all sorts of interesting ceremonies and rituals. Whether it's the fire ceremony or the spiral ceremony or the cord cutting ceremonies, and they all are symbolic all ritual Listrik, but I can really feel shift in places that I found. Was stuck in around family issues around? What is coming up next for me in my life? How I want to design the next fifty years of my life because I'm going to be sixty and I'm thinking, okay. And I feel like talking about it doesn't always do it. So tell us about it actually reinforce an old story. That's no longer useful to you. Are you believe is truth? Part of what we help people do is to write a new story for themselves and new story about their health story about their relationships that person that really hurts you that may your life miserable that abused. You. How do you find what the lesson was for you and practice forgiveness? So forgiveness is really key. And this is a knack the power to you make I choose to forgive you. And the next step is practice gratitude. So I have one of my students come and say, I finally forgave my mother. My mother was so abusive. So horrible. I finally forgave her. And I asked her I said to have you asked her to forgive you as she said, why should I she was to me? I said, well, you lived insider belly you were like a parasite you sucked. All her might an incident. Calcium from her bones. If nothing else thank her for bringing you here because until we get the play to the place that we can go from forgiveness to gratitude were not done. Now, the shamans work with an energetically. They say that we have energetic cords that connect us to people that we have incomplete relationships with or we're angry or that we have toxic emotions around them, and they're able to cut them energetically, and and severed that cord so you can then change your mind about this relationship. Not reestablish that toxic connection again. So they see it energetically luminous court like a fire hose connects you to a Knicks you're still angry with and you've got to cut the cord, but then you also have to practice forgiveness and eventually gratitude thank you for teaching me. Hurt a lot. I don't ever wanna learn that way. And so those those practices and things are in the book the book. Yep. And if people wanna find someone who can work with them personally, how do they do that? We have a directory and our website, which is what which is WWW. The four wins dot com before wins dot com. Four wins dot com, and we have a practitioner directory in forty countries. So you can work with shamans that we trained some of them are medical doctors psychotherapists lay people massage therapist, you can work with the local shaman that can help you deal with the emotions and with the karma. So the field contains the karma. It can help you to clear karma operate field. But the key is you have to learn the lesson. If you don't learn the lesson you're gonna keep repeating the grain dramatic work help you learn the lesson. That's shaman will would. If you are hurting the shaman will say, well, what what is it that you had to learn? But I'm hurting I'm believing. I'm not stopping the bleeding until you tell me what you learn from this experience. So this sounds all amazing. And I think people can probably pretty well grasp the concept of growing new body Grundel luminous body, I think a little more abstract. Mold you say that people listening. This sounds like hocus pocus shamans, rattles feathers chanting. Like isn't just just, you know, magical thinking, and isn't it just but not an applied way? But isn't this just sort of old traditions? How do you respond to that the science and the book all the sciences there? And there's an invitation to try it out some experiments like meditation people say that's hocus pocus. And now, we're discovering there's a whole world meditation. So the exercise is an invitation for you to try it. Try to have a taste of this invisible. World that for the shaman this world organizers the physical world the same way that your field. Organizes your body this invisible world fields and of energy is what creates the material world, especially I you know, I read some external studies of distance healing and things happen at long-term effective in rigorously done in a goal trials. Which stockings like how can you have a bunch of people praying for? Somebody and they get better. Whereas other people just talk about the weather, and doesn't has doesn't get better. Share them story of the rabbits, where they tell us the story about the rabbits and the submarines this this when you enter into the space space is non local is not local time or to start distance. So they took a rabbit and assess Deepak Chopra's Email non-local reality. This is modern physics now locality. So the field is non local. So you're sitting in that chair if I wanted to sit in that chair with are you moving it would be difficult because to objects cannot occupy the same space, but our fields cannot keep by the same space. So what the shaman say is that you know, who you are today because you're some body somewhere. But the field is everywhere than the are you going to know who you are when you're somebody everywhere. So when you die you step into your field state, you're not in your particle state anymore. This is the big debate in this one hundred years ago. Particle or wave the photon or particle expose to we're in our particle state. When we go back to our field state, which is everywhere. Are you going to be able to take your consciousness with you? Yeah. Pretty powerful. So it's an invitation to experiment with rabbits rabbits story is that they took a mother rabbit kept it in in Moscow, and they took seven baby rabbits in a submarine two thousand rabbits of that. Mark that mother and hooked her up with electrodes brainwave monetary Keiichi, and they sacrifice a baby's one at a time Christmas Berman, but point this is so every time they sacrifice one of the rabbits that the brainwaves would go crazy. Even though the behavior the mother didn't change but on consciously, she was registering. The factor whatever babysitting killed now women, mothers know, this. They know they're connected to their children in some way. But here they were doing the experiment of how there is communication over distance without any apparent physical carrier. No telephone line. No internet, all of us have had that experience. Right recall coincidence. Right. You'd think of somebody they call or you. I mean, I have it all the time wherever I need to talk to this person. I just walk in walk in straight into them or call synchronicity synchronicity synchronicity is different from cost. Salvatti causality is causing affect synchronicity is for no apparent reason. This person just called. Or you have you have a feeling dream or you have a feeling that someone's in trouble or someone sick that youth close to her love. And and then you find out it's true. I mean, that's a relatively common phenomena. Mary call. It speaks to what you're really talking about is that there's this non local non linear field that we all live in. You know, I don't know. Control with your ordinary mind. You have to be part of the dance at this cost make dance that when you're in right relationship with people call you when you think about the or you get all the green lights and the sense being in that space your life becomes richer. It'd become happier become healthier and and the ground on which you build that has to be growing. New body TOTO, which is optimizing your health with function medicine and working on your luminous body, which is the energetic spiritual emotional psychic part of your story. Yep. Which is the most elected part of our of even in functional medicine, there's this quarter to spirituality that nobody knows really how to handle the shamans which were the first neuroscientists. They've been around for fifty thousand years careful observers of nature they discovered that the invisible world including are invisible field. Old was essential. And that you could upgrade the quality of your health by upgrading the quality. The quality of the information in the field and food is information food is it FOX or information thought forgiveness. I think that is the biggest challenge for people because people can change their diet. They can more broccoli. They can stop eating gluten but changing your thoughts. That's a that's a big one. Katie your belief systems changing your bullet because your belief systems are would drive your thoughts. And then tries your behavior, which drives all the consequences of your life. And who you are and those belief systems bedded in neural networks in the brain. But also in the field, and if you can change in the field, and you cannot change that Alicia create a ceremony around it. So you cannot be eventually if you're with your partner, you wanna get married so you have a wedding ceremony. And that changes everything you have a wedding ceremony or no longer dating someone and keeping your eye open for the other person that may be better for you. A commitment. And then there's a big change that occurs. And the ceremony out the Chamonix ritual is something that you create that bring sacredness to the moment. Ninety candle clinking glass of wine with a beloved with I contact instead of just banging the glass, 'necessary Moni. How do you reach out and touch someone? So these are the moments that make your experience sacred and not simply practical transactional one, you know, it's really important because unless you create these structures or sacred moments or rituals. I think it's real get caught up in life, and it becomes a rush distraction disconnection, and my wife, and I started doing this practice called what's up below. So every day we create sacred space, and it might be five minutes. Ten minutes might be an hour depending on what's going on. And we listen to each other. It's not about responding or fixing or having a conversation. It's just like like don't tell me what you did today. How me what's up blow? I wanna know what's up below. And that creates a stronger connection and immediacy in currency in your life. That is really hard to to to create just in the day to day running around of the details of life, and it can be done with yourself, whether it's journaling or whether it's certain meditation practices, whether it's time in the woods by yourself. But creating that sacred space. That keeps her relationship new you keep renewing it. And this is a grow new body about it's it's because you can renew renew is so much easier to do than repair when you try to repair relationship while huge about a worker keep renew Ian daily basis. It's the stays healthy you can renew your body. If you have to repair your body, this massive and renew Meese, how do you grow new body? How do you grown field? How do you grow new wariness of who you are? And what your journey in this life is about insulating for those of you who are listening who would love the full on experience. It should go to Los Lobos, sanctuary dot com and read about this amazing sanctuary created in Chile where you do the growing body program a number of times a year and to learn about your book, I would go to your Amazon page. Four wins dot com. And the book is the program that we do here. Los Lobos that we did together. And how you can do it at home practical their recipes or struck shins or protocols for working with the supplements. Chamonix meditations, how do you go into vision quest really important? So today, we need a new vision for our lives, collectively. And personally a lot of books out there. I've been ally you've run a lot. But this is one of my favorites out there because it combines two worlds seem not really connected, right? This Chaumont world scientific world and the truth is the same map. It's just different language, and describing the same phenomenon using different words and the and the. The biologic map of the universe and the schmuck map turn out to be very similar, and you created a container where people can actually expensive very well done book. It's practical it's not too long. It's really clear, and it really takes me through the the work that I've been doing for decades and the work that you've been doing for decades, synthesize it in a way that I don't think this out there. So anybody listening I go right on Amazon. Get the book go the four winds society dot com to learn more about boroughs work and stay tuned for more from because he's not going away. He's just getting younger every day. Thank you. Mike. Great to be with you. Great to spend this week together. We just did. Yes. Been quite amazing. So thank you everybody. You're listening to the doctors pharmacy a place for conversations matter. I'm Dr Mark Hyman. If you love this podcast, please share your friends and family and social media leave review we love to hear from you sign up. If you haven't already as scripture to get the podcast. Every week. And we'll see you next week on the doctors pharmacy.

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Tom Cruise in Space?! Nicolas Cage as Joe Exotic?! Happy Cinco De Mayo!! | The Pascal Show - Part 3 of 3

The Pascal Show Podcast

31:42 min | 1 year ago

Tom Cruise in Space?! Nicolas Cage as Joe Exotic?! Happy Cinco De Mayo!! | The Pascal Show - Part 3 of 3

"That's out of really wrong. Actually thinking about that what I just said but you get what I'm saying that made no sense does sounded wrong on all levels but anyway I get it but I mean I think most scientists are saying that the corona virus has mainly just spread from person to person through airborne. Particles is not so much surface stuff so as far as I've heard you really can't get it from eating stuff it's more just it gets into your respiratory system so I think you're probably safe to eat meat. You're probably just not safe to package it because you're going into these facilities where everyone's got corona virus right so. I think that's really what the danger is for the employees at the packing plants. Yeah well you know we that doesn't make sense and you know we'll definitely have to talk about that more as time goes on because you know this is always this is still a in development type of story. We're learning as we go and of course people are people are worried about their meat. You know what I'm saying. I'm worried about my metoo. Just keep your meat clean. That's all we ask does keep you clean simple guys. You know what I'm saying. Where protecting good good rule in life where where protection where protections chemically and keeping me. Anyway we gotta go into a quick commercial break but when we come back we'll be getting the musical stylings of Doctors Vegas. I was trying to throw up this this flyer but this thing is being pain there we go we at Doctors Vegas performance live on the show here very very shortly so stick around. We'll be right back. This is the Pascal. Show back guys. You guys can stay on if you want. S Gal Shah It's really choppy really really next. No it's going to. It'll get through it. Stay on it'll get able to get through it. I promise it does this like at the top of every hour for like the next. It does this for like the next. It will be doing this for the next five hour. Five hours five minutes and then it will go back to normal. Is there like some? Is there like a background process? That maybe runs on your computer at the top of the hour. That does this or something. Or maybe it's saving no no. It's not that it's not the is not. You said Tom which is a very smart suggestion. But it's not it is straight up. I literally I mean honestly I have no fucking clue I just. I don't know I wish I wish I really wish. Do you know I just. I just don't know if If we don't get callers for this pop quiz hotshot. You just want to make that a game. We play between you to by after Doctors Vegas or got about ten questions. We already answered one of them earlier in the show so nine nine questions. So we'll do. We'll do the the the names nine times we'll do the the performance what I said. We'll do the performance so bad. No it okay. So we'll do we'll do the performance then. We'll do the game then. We'll do celebrity the celebrity thing and say by. Okay all right well. Welcome back guys. Thank you guys so much for tuning in and of course like I always say this first time checking out this show. Please go click that like button on our facebook page. Please hit that button underneath the feed as you're watching as we speak down below and hit that subscribe button if this is your first time checking out this show on the Youtube Channel. Y'All all my family was good and thank you guys so much for tuning in to the show anyway. I do have something very very special going on a day right now. Coming up here very very shortly. I have the very very talented band of very very talented bands stationed out here in Saint Louis but they are worldwide. The Doctors Vegas. They are absolutely amazing. The guys got you have got to check him out sometime but what what are the things. That's really great is that they gave us a really great performance to check out. Live on this show today so it is. I know that James Asses this repeat interview it is not an interview is a full on performance so without further ado please enjoy the musical silence of the one the only doctor. Zhivago yeah baby anyway man like I say you guys have got to go check out. Dr Joao biggest. They have their happy hour every Friday at six. Pm Central Standard Time. You guys have got to go check them out. They're super talented. And what you just heard right. There is this a snippet of their sounded. They just they sound really really amazing and they are very very very talented band. So check them out. Doctors Vegas happy hour six. Pm Central Standard Time. Anyway I'm with my brothers was good guys. Hey really tight right out of a do that when they're all in different places. I don't get it you know it's a crazy. It's on these national shows and they don't sound tight. Yeah it's it's a Lotta like corona virus. Like fundraisers yeah. Yeah it's it's. It's a lot of magic a lot of post magic. That's all I can say they`re. They're very very talented. Let alone just very talented. I wish I wish I had that kind of skill to be able to do that kind of stuff from home because that is unbelievable some really unbelievable stuff but yes so I love. I love how they sound. I love how talented they are. And I'm hoping that they they give me. They send me more stuff in the able to come in and perform live more in all. Those guys are super super talented and I appreciate the love and everything anyway. Something to do a little pop quiz hotshot. Of course we have the number three one four seven six six four five eight one. Give us a call. Don't be shy. Be a part of the conversation. Oh if you want to win. Something really cool calmed down that Tom COM below. Give us a call at this number and see if you got what it takes to be to win some dope something. How's that dope thing? But Anyway let's get. Let's get the the game Rolan showy all right. I've got I've got nine questions here. We already answered one of the questions earlier in the show. So we're go that one but We have nine questions here. These are about Mexico today. We're obviously celebrating our neighbors to the south. So let's jump in okay in this TV comedy. A family starts the holiday. Cinco DE CUATRO TO SPITE Mexicans celebrating. Cinco de Mayo. Simpson's no say that again. Cinco de Cuatro City. Say the this TV comedy a rich man in this. Tv comedy a rich family starts the holiday. Cinco DE CUATRO DESPITE MEXICANS WHO ARE CELEBRATING. Cinco de Mayo. Tv Show or movie TV. Show hold on. I think I got this rich amyloid. Fresh Prince of bel-air can you? Can you at least give us like a Like a decade the twenty well the original run of the show was during the two thousands and then it also was rebooted in the twenty tens. Chitra no reap too many types all right. Well I'll just give it to arrested development. Oh I'd even guess yet. We all had ample time on that one. Fine next alright. So question. Number two this nineteen eighty-six comedy saw lucky day dusty bottoms and Ned meter lander right into Mexico to save a small town from the bandit l. Kuopio goes remove. That is correct. The three Oh ooh Amigos okay. All right This Mexican filmmaker has directed such films as Krona's blade to Pan's labyrinth in the shape of water. Oh Guillermo del Toro that's correct right. We are tied cool next question. This is the name given to professional wrestling in Mexico in which participants often wear colorful masks. Naturally Debray A no. No no no no. No no no the first word not not. Not Not Nacho Macho Macho. I'm trying to think that's what the movie is. What let's the actual thing I can picture it. Can't at the names come at me now. I don't know any thoughts. Lucia Lee break. Lebron writes yes right. Erie our next question. It's it's still all tied beginning. Her career in the Telenovela Teresa. This Mexican actress gained fame after starring in Desperado and is perhaps Tonio Bandera playing free to follow just going to let that hanging there. Antonio Banderas. Let's see Jennifer Jennifer Lopez no not Jennifer Lopez. It's I can picture her. Oh Oh oh Oh my God oh my God. What's her name? I don't know why I had a male in my head. Don't sinking picture her. She's some Hayek some. Yep Take One pascal now even with the leg S. super leg like Super Lag. Right here we are next question. Although not as popular as Tequila on Cinco de Mayo this Mexican liqueur is often found in mudslides and white Russians. That is correct right. We're all tied up again. This song was was often play during the Mexican revolution and it describes an insect that is unable to walk very popular this song very popular on. Cinco de Mayo was often played during the Mexican revolution and it describes an insect that is unable to walk Caterpillar Do the worm. Oh Tequila Spanish Spanish language songs. Now Gosh it's a very very very popular song. Played probably will be played everywhere today. Were there celebrating? Cinco two mile that one. No I know low rider Berber Broiler. Shoot. I don't know La Cucaracha CIA cockroach way the cockroach can't walk. Yes I guess. If you translate the lyrics of the song the song is about a cockroach cannot walk and step done and there are actually many different lyrics to that song. It's changed very much over time. So getting the actual official lyrics to it but I think the through line through all of the different versions of the Song Zach. Cockroach CAN'T Walk cars? I can tell you drank too much. Yeah I think there's a version over where they talking about like marijuana mar or or something or like so. Yeah there there are different versions of it but I have two questions left. You're all still tied up all right. Let's get it all right. I one easy one in one that I guarantee nobody's GonNa get okay all right. I'll do the easy. One first. Soda Aficionados prefer to drink soda products from Mexico because they contain this ingredient. Okay we'll sugar cane sugar. Yes all right so Jack Jack with the lead now. Three two three two okay. Alright is final question. This one's a hard one but it shouldn't be but it's interesting. This man is the current president of Mexico. You son of a whore president. Yes yes GUADAGNO. Is we share a very long border with this country. I guarantee you. Most people don't know this man's name a Los Lobos note. Los Lobos kicked into our space. Last name even really common Mexican. Last name like Like SOME PEOPLE. Latino people he has to last names one of them is common one less so Lopez. Good Guti Gutierrez. Oh you know what half of that was right. Allie that to thank you. Which have the other part of it was very wrong with so. Lopez that part of it. Yes you tell you. Yeah Andres Lopez Oprah door. I opened the door. Open a door over daughter. S that's a heavy way of Saint. Open the door. You know what I'm saying don't D- astounding. Well that's a good question. I feel like Pascal. Get partial credit the Lopez part of that. But that was a wild stab in the dark. I don't know we could say you're tied or we could say do tie-break point tiebreaker. If you gotta break okay I got okay. This this'll probably well. We'll give it a shot here. Figure out how to word this. This treat often eaten in movie theaters is thought to have originated in ancient Mexico. Yes thank that's not fair. Okay no no. It's not lag tie. There is no lag. Now there's no lag now by gets finally like now it's good. I no no no. It's just not fair that's all I'm saying. It's just not seeing anything further so you know it's time to go into birthdays. 'cause we missed yesterday and we have today so we got some celebrity birthday. So let's go ahead and get into that really quick. I'm not playing the song because we get hit up so many times and I'm just avoiding all of that so anywhere. Hey happy to you know what I mean. So celebrity birthdays drill guys. If you watched the show enough times you know the drill jackets going to. I'M GONNA explain it any way. Jack is going to describe some celebrities that are celebrating the birthdays from yesterday and today and we get two guests who they are so common down below and let us know if you are. Listen to see if you're smarter than me and Tom. Let's go all right so from so keep it clean like for yesterday yesterday and then today today does that make sense if that's not too much that's not. I got an order. I hear so awesome attack. Now from Excel. I type pronounced from Belgium. She was born in. Nineteen twenty nine Yesterday she returned. I'm not sure. How old was she died at the age of sixty three? This kind of star. That's was in breakfast at Tiffany's Audrey Hepburn. They guard Hepburn. Correct one Tom. All right so we got from. Toronto Canada We were talking about this show just a little bit ago. And he earned his Fiftieth Birthday today yesterday. And he's a TV actor. He played George Oscar. Gob Luth a Patrick Bateman. That's oh shoot. I'm a blanket on Dude's name Mr Perkins and the heat of the voice and Mr Perkins it is. Let's go to prison. Yeah I know who you used to be married to Amy Poehler. He does recess commercials. He's Never Batman. He's Voice Batman in the Lego Batman. Movies thirty rock. He's also in that Lego. Show if you asked me this question two hours from now. It ends up all night and a Miller's not Farrell. Oh will. Arnett correct all right From Lara Mississippi Forty one years old yesterday. This pop singer is the member of the multi platinum certified pop boy band instinct and he has a management group called free his last his first name entertainment and other media in. Burley. No no he. Cutting into your insight work for NASA LANCE BASS S. That's I got that one. Freelance get it Lance No. I got that one I said I with your leg. You didn't you need to play back this show. I'm serious. I'm not trying to win. I mean of course. I'm trying to win but I'm not gonNA cheat. Don't I'm not GonNa Cheat if you what Jack and I heard. I answered that about five seconds. Well that's not fair shoe all right. Let's see we got here turned forty two years old yesterday this sportscaster and TV personality also appeared on a number of programs including ESPN's College Game Day and ABC's Good Morning America. She has co hosted dancing with the stars. She goes on to stars season. Ten and competed with Are Against Buzz Aldrin. I feel like I know who this is. My sure don't remember her name. Yeah don't know Erin Andrews. That's that's who I was thinking Yup okay From Tapa nook Virginia turning thirty one years old today this Torres was born Christopher Maurice and has a self titled Album Went Double Platinum called run it that reached the Chris Brown shirts in two thousand four. Chris Brown we got from London England turning thirty two years old today. This pop singer has four times platinum selling album and won the Grammy Award for best new artist. In two thousand nine. She might say hello. We set it both at the same time. No no no wait no hold up. We set at the same time that time okay. I'll go to go play back. The show after off. Hume Sir Donovan. Gun in the cat got four booker. Here Okay Kick. So who gets that point turning thirty eight years old? I WANNA give it to you. Pascal. I'm okay with it. We both said at the same time. It was a tie. The hosts gets the Thai. Okay that is fine. Go it turning turning thirty eight years old today. from California She was married or is married to Kobe. Bryant She was in man on fire and Colombiana. Vanessa Bryant Bryant correct. We have turned thirty nine years old today from a Mesa Arizona this TV actress played to Pango Lawrence on boy meets. World endorsed days. I don't know his name that she revised her role as to Panga in girl meets world. See looks like Lauren. Her Name Danielle Fisher Daniel Fisher Damn. You're writing okay. Last year much tree Air Germany Born in eighteen eighteen in passed away to sixty eight to sixty four and eighteen. Eighty three this philosopher political theorist philosopher and economist E- pen both Daas Kapital and the Communist Manifesto Marx remarks them right and here is our final. Unfor- today from Jersey England turning thirty seven years old This popular actor is best known for his role as Superman in several DC films including man of Steel Injustice League. He's also the cable. Yes stay on CATASTA. Yeah Happy Birthday. Did all them famous people out there and I hope that everybody else. Seven birthdays is having a great day on Cinco two mile yes And of course that wraps our show big thank you to everybody who came onto the show. Big Shoutout to wavy Wayne for being on the show. Of course big shot out the Doctors Vegas for being on the show performing on the show and everything that we really really appreciate that as well of course fellas thank you so much for being on today really means a lot. Thank you guys. Yes but that wraps up our show man. Thank you guys so much tomorrow. We got a very great show for you tomorrow. We have the owner of best wardrobe solutions. Cedric COBB will be on the show live to talk about his upcoming stuff. He also has these masks that he's actually doing and the proceeds are going to a specific foundation which I'm very excited about him. Coming on to talk about all that. And he's manufacturing those himself so he'll beyond the talk about all of that and then yeah it's going to be just an action packed. Show so be sure to tune in. I will be on at seven PM tonight seven. Pm Central Standard Time. We're doing a new time now because five. Pm is way too close right after this show is just not enough time for me to do everything I need to do. Get ready and then be able to do that. Show so be sure to tune in seven. Pm Central Standard Time. I will be on live again anyway. It's time to get going. Be Good to yourself. Be Good to one another and I'll see you guys at seven. Pm Central Standard Time. This is the Pascal Shell but right right good show Gaz. Let's see tomorrow question even make it to the question today. We didn't realize that tomorrow. We don't have a musical guests so we most definitely have time a guy who let's talk all right talk about hot sauces.

Mexico Tom COM Cinco de Mayo Jack Jack Cinco Doctors Vegas Lopez Doctors Vegas Pascal Cinco de Cuatro City Jennifer Jennifer Lopez Gal Shah facebook Youtube Audrey Hepburn Saint Louis Desperado Guillermo del Toro Los Lobos Antonio Banderas
Festival Nation Ep. 13: Hardly Strictly & Fall Festivals

Pantheon

35:18 min | 10 months ago

Festival Nation Ep. 13: Hardly Strictly & Fall Festivals

"WHO's in their vote amount? Of Water election days. Now. Biggest Swain here from deeper digs and rocker archaeology John are you registered to vote. I know I am. Headcount is a nonpartisan organization that works with the music and entertainment industry to get fans to vote. Top date or check your voter registration status, go to headcount dot org or you'll find all the information you need to be ready for election day. At Headcount Dot Org, you can also check your registration status because I don't know if you know this, but millions of people get purged from the voter rolls every year. Everyone should check their registration status every year. The deadline to register to vote in some states is as early as October, fourth. So you want to check before that. You can also request an absentee ballot, get INFO on early voting finder polling place and see what's on your ballot. Headcount is a nonpartisan nonprofit that tours with musicians to help concert attendees registered to vote. But you don't need to leave your house to register to get voting impo, just head to head Count Dot Org. And I'll see you at the polls. Ya. Brain from new. Star. Welcome to festival nation on the Pantheon podcast network. Here's your host marlow. Davies. Hey. Now it's MARLA. Davies your hosts a festival nation where we celebrate the magical world of music festivals, and as we head into the fall season, it's usually festivals Galore, and in fact, in twenty twenty, some of the major festivals from earlier in the season have rescheduled for September and October with great hopes, things would be up and running by now. But as we roll into the fall of twenty twenty, we're still finding mass public gatherings not happening, and for those of us who love festivals the harsh reality is twenty twenty is virtually festival less. Life festivals that is, but when it comes to festivals, there is plenty of virtual. I'm grateful for my music fix and I'm yearning to head out though and live and breathe the live festival experience. But for now we're enjoying from home. Coming up, we'll talk to talent buyer Chris Porter from. San. Francisco's hardly strictly bluegrass festival where the music will play on virtually on Saturday October the third. Over the weekend, there were two big festivals, farm aid and Bonnaroo virtually of course, and for those of you who loved eight Matthews, you gotTA double. Shy? First. Farm aid. which was Saturday September the twenty, six, twenty, twenty for thirty, five years far made has been working to keep America growing the annual music and food festival celebrates farmers, eaters, and music, and all this coming together for change this year farm aid was a virtual at home festival experience on the bill the usual suspects, Willie Nelson Neil Young John Mellencamp. Dave Matthews. The event was three hours featuring some twenty bands plus Bonnie Raitt and boss Gags who seem to be popping up together on the virtual concert circuit. They're actually gonNA play at the hardly strictly bluegrass festival coming up this weekend. Brandi. Carlile on the Bill Chris Stapleton Ibra Cal and Charlie Tim Jet Johnson Lukas Nelson and promise of the real and more. I've never been to farm aid and I've always wanted to it has moved and grown over the years it started in Nineteen eighty-five at Memorial stadium in Champaign. Illinois. And his move all around the Midwest and beyond from manor downs racetrack in Texas to the Hoosier Dome in Indianapolis to the Superdome in New Orleans to Burgas town Pennsylvania outside of Pittsburgh to Alpine Valley in Wisconsin in two thousand nineteen but it's always been one of those festivals that I've wanted to go to and support and actually did support this year financially by making a donation online in solidarity I stand with family farmers for me farm aid is a perfect festival that combines good times good music and a good 'cause. Here's Dave Matthews on farm aid the concept of a farming is. In the original sense is to take care of the lands of the land takes care of you. Looking forward and back with can't only be defending small farmers we have to also be. Pushing, the envelope and find him bring. Font new farms to the land and improve the possibility of small farmers and family farmers of staying on the land. William John and meal all together. We're being a voice for the people who are here to serve, which is the farmers and and the people that are trying to. Take care of the planet at the same time as they take care of us if we can improve farmers year by when we have. FARM AIDING IN SILICON SESAME Concessions out here with with far local food than that's perfect to everything we can do. I'm an example of someone who's had their eyes opened by being involved for me. Feel confident that in my lifetime people will. Wake up more and more about food we. Don't. Festival nation celebrating the Magical World of music festivals. Also last weekend was the rescheduled Bonnaroo, which was a combination of live acts and archived sets. Some of the best of past performances we're the beastie boys from two, thousand, nine, Metallica from two, thousand, eight at the annual rate live and Alabama shakes both from two thousand fifteen. There was the Dave Matthews Band from two thousand and four James Brown from two thousand and three my morning jacket from twenty eleven and the white stripes from two, thousand seven. Also segment centered around health and wellness and creativity. You can check out cocktail tutorials and Dance Party with your dog according to the Bonnaroo website unique original programming was a civil experienced true to rue the three night broadcast brought from Manchester. Tennessee. Into your home transforming your living room into your very own stage and pits. Just announced Bonnaroo has rescheduled next year to Labor Day weekend. September second through the fifth twenty twenty. One The original rescheduled date was June seventeen to the twentieth. They pushed it out a couple of months. The announcement says we want to thank you for being a loyal Bonnaroo Vian and we appreciate your patience as we navigate the best option to ensure that we can be together on the farm in twenty twenty one. Ticket Rollover options are available and so are refunds. To Lizzo anti, impala are still set up to be the headliners. And as we round out twenty twenty with much promise for festivals in twenty. Twenty one without a vaccine and a cure more and more early twenty, twenty, one dates are beginning to be pushed further into next year. This coming up weekend was also the lock and festival in Virginia and there was a plan a few months back to have all concert goers Rapid Kovin test and with negative results, get into the festival and stay for the entire three days. The promoters did think better of it and the festival was cancelled and rescheduled for October twenty twenty, one, this weekend Joe. Roussel's almost dead will perform both on the relics channel and FANS DOT COM instead. Coming up next, we'll talk with a talent buyer for the hardly strictly bluegrass festival Chris Porter, he'll share how San Francisco's free festival will play on virtually this weekend and how you can enjoy the festive won't from your living room or on a tarp in your own back yard more after this. Vegetable nation celebrating. The magical world of music festivals. Hey now it's Marla Davies host of festival nation where we celebrate the magical world of Music Festivals, and for twenty twenty, that's turned out to be a virtual celebration for nineteen years fans from around the world gather each October for the hardly strictly bluegrass festival in Golden Gate Park in San Francisco and this October will be the festival's twentieth anniversary and it will be like no other. With the coronavirus pandemic in full swing, the hardly strictly bluegrass festival is reinventing itself like all other festivals or forced to do this year. This festival will be an online broadcast called. Let the music play on. It'll be on Saturday October the third from five to eight eastern two to five Pacific, and it will be virtual and inventive. The date will be filled with new performances, archival sets and crowd sourced footage from the first two decades of the festival. The plans for the twenty th anniversary of the hardly strictly bluegrass festival were announced on July the twenty fifth align with a livestream afternoon concert from Los Lobos. The band performed at a park in southern California, socially distance with masks on you can see the entire show on the hardly strictly BLUEGRASS DOT COM website. The event was hosted by the legendary, Bay area. Dj Bonnie Simmons who is also the artist relations manager for hardly strictly Bluegrass who Toll Festival lovers for the twentieth anniversary. It'd be able to put down their tarps anywhere you like nobody no restrictions on beverages and no long lines for the bathrooms. Are some advantages to virtual festivals the hardly strictly Bluegrass Festival will let the music play on in your own living rooms and backyards. You'll be able to see new performances by treasured regulars and some first time artists to with footage from their hotels and favorite venues here today to tell us about the upcoming hardly strictly bluegrass festival is talent buyer. Chris Porter. Hey Chris Welcome back to the show. Thank you. Great to be here. I know where together again I know last year we chitty chat it and there was some changes with hardly strictly when you guys put up the fences for the first time after the Gilroy garlic festival shooting, which was just a little you know little over a year ago and now lots more changes will the whole world changed now we're all we all put the brakes on everything that we're doing yes we'd entry a Lotta reinvention yes, indeed. Yeah. I mean I've kind of well depending I work on the number of different events and some are just you know fully off and then some. The hardly strictly bluegrass case are kind of pivoting from all live gathering event to television production in a way 'cause that's essentially what we're doing putting together big webcast broadcast. To, present to the world as some other festivals have also done your. Little Baby Festivals here we had a festival festival in San Jose just a small street fair and they went was April. So they went virtual and he and I was just really interesting to see how we've embraced all the new technology and. I watched you know I've watched a lot of streaming I. Think we all have. You know it's been great, but it's not the same, but it's been great anyway to have something. Yeah. Absolutely. I, mean I appreciate everybody's ingenuity and and Oppressing on to keep the music alive and get out there, and it's been a lot of fun to to watch a lot extremes all over the world. But you know a lot of it's of course A mix of quality level and everything you've been a lot of things that are you know as I call them the bedroom or livingroom sessions nothing wrong with that. That's actually kind of cool. I serve Richard Thompson doing things from his couch and it was wonderful but but we're hoping to do at hardly strictly bluegrass is is. something a little more ambitious where we're having our do crew productive some of our production staff going to treat it at cities, going to Nashville to Austin and to San Francisco and Essentially kind of being H. be to a lot of artists and recording Performances from them to put together for a whole show. So it's just a one day event then yes one that's enough right because. I just wanted to tell you I'm sure you already know this. I wanted to tell her fans that this is this whole thing the pandemic and the streaming is basically causing you to have a lot more work I think right I. Mean it's probably more work than it was just throwing a regular old festival. Well. For some people yes. Some people know depending on what your role is certainly from my colleague Sheri Sternberg Who's our executive director she's been swamped. It's been reinventing the wheel you know time to tenets cases you know and and working, and really you know doing something that's not really in our wheelhouse generally it's far is this sort of thing but we're making our wheelhouse and it's going very well so far. I mean we're just in the early stages of putting it all together in a lot of ways, but it's Things coming together very well, and I'm confident. We're going to have something very, very special to present the world on what would have been hardly strictly bluegrass weekend in Golden Gate. Park. Will have something on your computer screens are I watch you know it's your twentieth anniversary first of all. So happy anniversary. Thank you. It feels a rather bitter sweet. I mean we're to be twenty years in Recife to be putting together what we're putting together for this the wonderful present presentation. But we really hope and obviously to to be with with all of our friends and fans Golden Gate Park. So but you know we're aiming obviously to do that and twenty. Twenty one yes we're all looking have some absolutely just putting everything to twenty, twenty, one and hoping we can have some normalcy by that and then you know when I was I guess maybe will make an extra special not that we wouldn't have. But maybe we'll make the twenty one extra special save. But that's because my wedding anniversaries this year to my twentieth all. Anniversary. I was planning on something a little more extravagant you know and and it was so funny I was just telling someone the exact same thing conversation the other day and I said where does not gonna be able to do that anything really extravagant and then someone said, well, there's always the twenty fifth. Thing. That's right. That's right on that. Well, we're all about our multiples and five and ten. Every year to me should be very special and I you. Excited about that, but the world looks at it that way. So we we try to address it accordingly. So but with making the you know make the best is to make the best of it making lemonade out of lemons year and making a really special. Presentation of they'll be very unique. That will present A in early October at it will not only be you know. Of of a lot of fantastic performances but also be telling story about hardly strictly bluegrass. It'll be maybe some little documentary aspects to the presentation to because a lot of people. Still don't know the whole story and it's a fascinating story. Howard started so As. Well, yes. That's what we're aiming. Well, I feel like you guys have serious high production values for first of all. I think it's really smart that you're going out with your crews to capture. The audio and the music and the concerts. So you have control because I haven't seen a lot of streaming and you're right. You know you just don't know what people's Wi fis are going to be like or sound quality lighting. There's so many aspects to these all. Right yeah. Absolutely I. Mean I've seen some things I'm like in the you know. What are they thinking departmental name usually, this is more like local ban type stuff but I see some things and it's like one little light the whole thing's all dark. And then the microphone is only the MIC from their laptop. Some cases can be sound better than you think it's going to. It's okay. But then sometimes in such. Wow, this is just a really painful and people just tune out you know and so those that have kept me, you know hooked me in I wanted to catch like two or three songs. Then maybe I'll go off to something else and they kicked me in I watched all half hour. Whoever's presentation then you're like, okay, they were doing something special quality. The quality was high from sound and and visual quality, and that's certainly a big big thing. We're very sensitive about that. That's a big goal of ours attaboys high production as we possibly can. Right. So that each swarm it's is GonNa look the same I know. It's an evolution thing for everybody just going through this I felt you know because I of course, I do festival nation podcasts and I'm always keeping my eye on festivals and I've been waiting and waiting to see what you guys were going. GonNa, do you know because you're you're in the perfect position in? October and everybody was moving their festivals. To that same exact weekend, right everybody was the first weekend of October all of a sudden. Rock came over there and I was thinking boy that's going to be a busy festival weekend. I think we all held hopes and I think you guys too because I kept looking have they canceled yet? What are they doing? What are they GONNA do? We. A little bit not so much because we thought we I think we all kind of. In the Proverbial Mirror and near that we all along have ago and then we can do this or at least not do it at the same level that we normally would however I think we really wanted to have a lot of ducks in a row and be able to not just tell people. Okay. We're canceling this and then come out later with but we're going to put this online presentation. We wanted to be able to tell people what we were going to do a hence we didn't. You know we're Los Lobos broadcast we had on recently and that was our announcement. They did a recording down in southern California forest. Did a marvellous us. Catch it on the website. The hardly strictly bluegrass website. It's right there and it's if you missed. The yeah it was done so well, i. mean it was not. You know rinky-dink legit and they I guess they were out at. I. Don't know there's some outdoor location the royal. Theater in. Claremont California. Not far from where the guys live at. Yeah. Got To get the record there, and then we had our own Bonnie Simmons who has live long history on radio and as work at hardly strictly bluegrass sincere two. So she's you know she's been a part a big part of it for a long time and so we thought. You should you should be the host through the interview. He did a great job is really She's great I used to work with her the eons ago many moons ago we work together when I was just starting in radio and she was in the legend you know so it was great. Yeah. It was great to see her and I love which she said she said now you can watch this stuff from home and put your tarps anywhere you like. No restrictions on beverages. Along the lines with the bathroom. So. There is positives to you know these things and that being those wonderful things I mean of course I miss being with. Being out there and just being with people and you know enjoying it altogether but. I. Think you guys who really couldn't create something wonderful and plus what do you tell everybody a little bit about how if you've went to hardly strictly you WanNa know about folks memories and you're gonNA share all that in the and the broadcast to. Yeah I mean we're we're. We're I mean we've got a lot of archived. Interviews of from you know obviously from from performers in an awesome thing patrons and people working on it. So a lot of that'll be some of our archives up that will will present the you know how much of that is still being worked out? It's Stola Hall is still a work in progress, but they're going to be working. I know second I get. I think probably yeah yeah. Not Wealth of you know we were looking back. Okay. We'll show you are type You know moments and we're like we're just. Countless where do you start that We're GONNA screw you know that the families are involved with this and our whole crew in every everybody's you know helping out and so we're we're going to have something very special I. Think you're right I'm not even in doubt I mean I'm sure you guys were already I'm sure after the nineteen th which was last summer you already started planning for the twentieth so you didn't even realize of course you couldn't predict this pandemic. So you had a lot of stuff in the works are some of the artists that you had planned. To perform sure you had your lineup, you're the talent by assure you had all these. You were pretty much ready. Yeah, I was somewhere between two thirds and three quarters booked when I had to put the bureau like, okay. We're GONNA put the brakes on this and wait and see for a while. Then I was almost going to start up again and I was like Nah no no forget it. Some of the artists I did have booked for this year summer our legacy act some have played performed for us in the past so you. Know. We're familiar with everybody and You know that doesn't preclude that we won't have them. You know other years next year your half whenever. But you know also just had the timing you know the the artists were trying to be very careful with protocols for the pandemic be making sure every performance everybody safe and everybody needs to be in that comfort zone and So you know it was I couldn't assume. Everybody would be willing to participate. In a lot of ways I, I had a little bit of a head start on programming for who is going to be part of the webcast still a lot of work involved with it and you know Oh yeah, and just logistics. So with all this craziness and I know you're immersed and you you do more than just hardly strictly right you do other festivals to your involved. I work on someone from different parts of the country I have I produce a small festival in Lowell. Massachusetts called the town in the city festival which happens in late October. So I've been very busy October every year Do No. It's not gonNA happen, not an nothing. No festivals opening always nothing I'm working on. It's happening this here. There's another event called the South Lake Union Block party that happens in Seattle where I live most of the year and that get. Pushed to next year as well. I'm already booked were half booked on some of these. Some have a heck of a head start next year. That's the one silver lining year. So you have those and neither of them are happening, and then I do some consulting work on some an music venue as well. So yeah, my hand, my hand, a lot of things, but this year has been more you know working on the hardly strictly bluegrass hardly strictly broadcasters were calling it. And and then just kind of just get you know catching up on a lot of different work and personal things and getting ready for twenty twenty one. That's you know. Trying to trying to make the best of the situation right sort of putting a pause on things we as you. If you could look as you you really somewhat of a festival expert, I would think I, mean you really you. You probably have your your your finger on the pulse and all that. What do you think? I mean twenty, twenty, one I. Mean I know it's hard to say but. Festivals are going to have to change and evolve in a different way. I mean I was just telling someone they. I felt like festivals even though hardly strictly still had that organic feel you could show up even if he didn't show up, you know the minute it started you can shop anytime of the day and you could just it was still had a freeness because it's a free festival to but you could get to the front of the stage if you wanted to things like that right but festivals regaining huge. So do do you think there's going to be a trend of things sort of maybe getting smaller or what are you kind of see? Well, I mean, I think you know some some some of the more successful festivals ones that are making more of a mark. These days are a little smaller although I don't think that has anything to do with the pandemic that was something that was starting I think some people are except for maybe very young much younger people you know the big crowds in the overhead that you know the bigger, the festival, the more the overhead you have, and some of the some very huge festivals were starting disappear in over the last two or three years and the so-called Boutique Festival is the people. In the industry call it and that would be anything from say ten thousand people are less. Those have been a little more attractive I think as far as you know the easy come to your point about hardly strictly even though it's a massive amount of people in Nessim amount of artists it does have a very relaxed feel and I feel I get the impression. A lot of people are are seeking that out more not to your point about the pandemic though I think you know the certain protocol I think we're always going to want to be you know K- k- keep you know. Keep things as sanitary as possible. I think you know the human beings are going to think you know that's GonNa. Even after we you know we get a vaccine for this we can start to give me get some normal because festivals not gonna come back until the Vaccine Ryan made and distributed but I think. You know as far as cleanliness and sanitation, and all that is really going to be a real important. I mean the ironic thing is I did get on a plane not too long ago at night was thinking to myself. This plane is cleaner than the planes have ever been in the history of aviation. Ironically right and so I think that's going to be in our consciousness for a long time and that's a good thing. You know let me say though Chris I don't know how much cleaner those outhouses can be because boy are they cleaned not those are those are all polls. So that's GONNA be interesting. I will some some that you can only do so much but there is certainly. Can Find Yeah but yeah maybe it'd be a lot more Cheryl stations you know sanitizing stations the much more I. You know. It's hard to hard to say, but I think it's something that we're GonNa. It's GonNa be in our consciousness as much as putting fences up for security and giving security and having electronic and all those things. That's GonNa be something that's GonNa be on festival protocols moving some degree at least. But you know one thing I was going to say that I think we might see more in the future and tell me what you think a lot of people like the streaming. Events I mean I feel like I feel like now that we've introduced these things that are not going to go away because a lot of people were so happy that they don't have to fight the crowds to go see these bands I, love it and thrive on it. But a lot of people were like, Hey, I'm just as happy staying home and watching this music. So do you think is going to be something that's GonNa be added into the elements in the future? I. DO I mean it's been. It's been around before the pandemic I. Mean there was a couple of companies I know stage it is one of them and as I think a couple of others were around has been around for few years in doing these strange things but obviously, it wasn't that very popular was just kind of like a little novelty on your computer or whatever but Now. I agree with you. I think this is going to be a thing I mean I don't know if it'll be as prevalent as it is now but will it Will continue on absolutely I. Imagine I don't you know one idea is actually with with smaller news for instance and this this could be a old of revenue stream for let's say you have a point of capacity venue and you have a sold out show you know everybody paid say thirty dollars for that ticket but then you open it up for a livestream for this kind of ticket he can't be there it's going be quite as good but you can still watch the show for say fifteen dollars or whatever, and then all of a sudden you have hundreds more people watching it. So your four, hundred cabin venue all of a sudden becomes a six hundred cap. Or seven hundred or whatever depending on how many people want to watch. That could be something that could be You know can could be worked out a little bit in the future I think would venues with festivals I think you know it depends i. mean you don't want to take away from this -essarily from people showing up to your event. That's what you really want more than anything. But you know as an element for other artists to to do special special broadcasts or collaborative. I Dunno I think. Yeah. I. Think it's going to be with US I. Guess is the Short Answer yes. I agree. It'll be interesting to see. You know. But I, you know it it'll be a it'll continue to be around. Yeah because I think some people. I have some friends that are introverts and they are I said how you doing okay. With his pandemic they're like we love it. We're at home but Mike. I'm dying. Bodies Love It. And then. That's another point to it's like. Know Transportation Issues or whatever, and you know some some places that you know half hour away and you know maybe there weather issues what you gives you an opportunity or gives you an option to watch absolutely, I could see some people wanting to do that for sure. So that the it'll always I think always be an element here and it'll be you know it will continue to be used and and I also think also the quality of what you're saying. Going full circle equality I. Think is going to keep improving and improving over time to the point where you know some people might be like you know Why do I wanNA bother going all the way? The venue it's GonNa look and sound grade computer people. Of course there's just nothing like going although I'll tell you I am definitely spent saving money. My entertainment budget is stacking up because I'm ready to I'm ready to go to some festivals when this whole. Twenty one and we're all going to cherish that and we're going to appreciate it more that time that we all can be whether it's over Big Table at our together with a bunch of people at a restaurant to going to festival to going to the show in in some small or whatever venue We're GONNA those first few times we're going to be cloud. This is wonderful. I'm C. You. We're going to be so grateful when we can. And I think that's good. Having appreciation and gratitude for things. Is is important. I. Think. This whole thing may everybody slow down and RESP- reflects and appreciate the little things I know I I'm not the only one that's been cleaning my house like a nut. I'm going to lean now and going through boxes and weird things and I emphasize my vinyl collection I mean this bizarre things I never had time for before I had a lot of reading the cash still have a Lotta allies pile of magazines the. Take, cut that down about halfway and some you know probably about a dozen books had read. I'm catching up on a lot of that which I'm grateful for Chris always a pleasure to have you on my show. I can't wait to talk to you again and look forward to see in. which come up with this year. Thank you so much more appreciate all your support. Positive Vibes and Yeah we'll keep in touch. Okay. Great. Thanks Chris. You bet take care bye-bye. Festival nation celebrating the Magical World of music festivals. Thanks to Chris Porter from the hardly strictly bluegrass festival. It is happening this weekend October the third on the bill or some of my favorites looking forward to seeing Bonnie Raitt NBA's gags there they are again. Check profit you Lauderdale Emmy Lou, Harris John Doe Jimmie Dale Gilmore and Robert Earl keen and so many more. The link is on the show notes page and you can check it out at hardly strictly BLUEGRASS DOT COM and please check out the show not to link to all the festivals that I've talked about today to get the latest information and updates. Coming up on the next episodes of festival nation, we'll talk to deadandcompany. Bridge Jerry Garcia Bans Melvin seals and rock and roll photographer J Blake's Berg. These are some interviews I did before sculling roses the festival was forced to postpone to their twenty twenty tour in April, and now they are rescheduled for twenty twenty one, I know you'll enjoy them. WHO also be keeping the festival spirit ally featuring upcoming episodes, doing retrospectives about some of your favorite past festivals. Please reach out and share with me your favorite festival memories shoot me an email festival nation podcasts gmail.com hit me up on social facebook and Instagram at festival nation or on twitter at Nation Festival. And check out all of our pipe past the Pantheon podcast network at Pantheon. Any music use indispensable nation podcasts and owned by the artist and his US for education illustration. Only. Thanks for checking out liking sharing, involving festival nation on the Pantheon podcast network it wherever you like your pipe. Just. Remember we will get by. He will survive. Next time. Peace, love and music. Thanks for being part of the tried. And everyone here at festival nation until next time to. Turn on.

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Robert Mailer Anderson interview  on "Windows on the World," music and San Francisco

Datebook

50:11 min | 2 years ago

Robert Mailer Anderson interview on "Windows on the World," music and San Francisco

"Hi I'm Susan Schlesser and I'd like to invite you to listen to my podcast as plus. It's a fun look at the Oakland. A.'s and you can hear the personal side of many of the as players coaches and team officials plus analysis every week on as plus from our nine. Oh one mission street studios. You are listening to the San Francisco Chronicle. Welcome to the PODCAST. I'm chronicle Nicole pop culture critic Peter Hart Lub here with reporter Dean very welcome. I Dean thank you for having me so we have Robert Mailer Anderson today. Interviews already happened happened. I had a really good time quite a bay area character. How'd you guys meet well? One time I made a list of the worst bands in the history of rock and roll as you do. It was a pop music or they got a ton of letters and the number one. We should was once stood out in pretty. Oh the number one band was Pearl Jam. Yeah okay okay disagree but go write a letter but one of the letters that stood out was like has there been a worse writer the history of mankind riffing bring on my <hes> riffing on my list and it started you know listed a monkey with a typewriter and then out of the blue it said Robert Mailer Anderson so I had to meet him because there's only two terrible writers in San Francisco so we met we hit it off and we've been writing terribly ever since you've left that you bonded over an angry chronicle letter writer not the worst writer in the World Moonville was a great great novel people locally we love it and beyond he had a movie pig hunt which I remember it was like a drive in horror thing and he's got a new movie windows on the world. I think people will be we surprise totally different direction yeah. It's it's I mean it's a topical movie into addresses the current immigration crisis and but it it's set around nine eleven and it's about a family in Mexico where the Patriarch Phil feels the need to provide for his family so he finds his way Erica ends up working in the windows on the world restaurant on the top of the twin towers and then the planes go into the building and so here's this person who's undocumented unaccounted for an his son comes to find him <hes> also undocumented coming up cross-border. We're going to go spoiler free with this but there's a lot of great surprises in it. <hes> you'll we'll have to wait to see it. It's on the festival circuit now but the soundtrack with members of Los Lobos the S._F.. Jazz collective and Charlie Musselwhite who's in the movie a lot of Bay area ties. That's out on August second yeah. It's it's a wonderful eclectic soundtrack that even though the movie is not set in the bay area it feels like a Bay Bay area soundtrack. It's really cool yeah and <hes> Robert has mentioned in the recording. You will get to see this movie. It'll be out later this year one and final note. We had a little bit of an audio problem here transition near the end apologized for that day book podcast. Thanks for listening hi. I'm Greg Thomas Travel Editor at the San Francisco Chronicle and host of the wild West podcast if you like getting into the outdoors and exploring California Wild West is a great listen tune into here exclusive interviews with the world's top adventure athletes like rock climber Alex handled old who came onto talk through his incredible free solo climbing El Capitan in Yosemite big part of the film is like the whole love story with my girlfriend and all that but I hadn't even met her when we started listen in wherever you get your podcasts wild west welcome to the San Francisco Chronicle great to have you been here before we brought you through. I have been a couple of times yeah. I've come come over to to see the newsroom to see how the news goes and greet other other friends here over the years. Ah It's changed. It's changed a little bit in my memory isn't so great either about about that but you have a news background <hes> in your family <hes> <hes> absolutely my uncle Bruce Anderson is the editor publisher of the Anderson Valley advertiser <hes> he started publishing me when I was about fifteen after he took over over the newspaper and fully believed that <hes> you know a newspaper has no friends and you have to be as radical as reality itself he sort of took on Mendocino county like a beat cop like everybody's sort of used to the newspapers and <hes> I think a lot of people thought it'd be short-lived <hes> he would burn out or someone would kill him. <hes> and I think he's done it now. He just turned eighty the other day. I think it's over thirty five years and still working still still working working. Is You know and people always say you know did that happen on specific articles and we always say last the way we're telling what were some of the earliest Scienc- gave you when you started started writing for his newspaper <hes> <hes> I did movie reviews and I would do <hes> one of the things we called that just taking out the garbage was the M._c._A._T.. Meetings and so he at one point <hes> for the second time got in a fight and punched out the superintendent of schools who was my former our principal at U._k.. High and he was banned from the meetings and my other uncle Robert Major Anderson had done it <hes> and my dad Ken Anderson had uncovered those meetings and I think my cousin Zach had also covered those meetings and so it was clearly might turn to take oh take out the garbage and do the meetings <hes> but I would write very thinly veiled poor stuff like fear and loathing Yucai a high <hes> you know my my version of Hunter S. Thompson and bad attitudes and <hes> and I would do interviews with Kelvin Chapman who was a local baseball player. I remember doing a restaurant review. <hes> and I remember you know at a a certain point. I was scooping Anderson during an informal internship. You know a piece of airplane would fall on a farm in Filo and you'd you'd go out and check it out. Sir You do the local elections you know I cut my teeth doing that kind of stuff but I was always playing fast and loose with the facts <hes> and always an opposition addition even of of Bruce not not a you know I had my own ax to grind and Bruce would be around the table sometimes with all the other kind of <hes> local heroes from around the bay area that you guys are probably familiar with people like Fred Gardner and Warren Hank Hall and his only real friend for ever really Alexander Cockburn and and you know Bruce would not run pieces of mine and instead of just reading keenum he would just pull Joseph Mitchell or you know off the shelves or he would give me George Orwell would say this read this. You know that that was kind of like your practice for writing your first novel Moonville though is kind of your training ground writing for the newspaper right well to my father was an English teacher <hes> before he was <hes> kind of soundly run out of <hes> Tampa applies high school he taught Nevado high and he was kind of <hes> there was a period where you could be a jock and kind of an intellectual who is it was short lasted. <hes> <hes> brought on by recently death. Jim Bowden is kind of one of those guys or the professor <hes> Jim Brosnan <hes> and so if you remember those Burt Reynolds films as you know like of a semi tough for the Gentry <hes> North Dallas forty there were there were kind of wise Acre guys who who were kind of doing too two in the thing and somebody my my uncle and my dad they all kind of fell into that and so my dad helped unionized the first Teacher's Union in Marin County and he was the president of that and then you know times are very radical with the free speech movement in Vietnam and the Brown Power Movement and the Black Panthers and he was completely involved with all of that got to the point where he was accused <hes> never convicted of <hes> helping one of his students set four bombs off to be surveys <hes> and then along with a lot of other stuff so he was sort of drummed out of that and him and my uncle both started homes for juvenile delinquents so <hes> <hes> one of the kind of interesting things about myself is that I believe that by the time I was eighteen my folks were divorced and so by the time I was eighteen my mom and Dad Todd separately had about twenty five twenty six different residencies by the time I was eighteen so we moved a lot <hes> and then I was partially raised by my grandparents. The parents <hes> on my mom's side and my grandfather was a prison guard who fought in World War Two and then re up for the Berlin airlift and then Korea tough Guy <hes> <hes> the my grandmother is half Mexican <hes> born in rust which has since become El Cerrito but it was rust at the time rushed California California <hes> her mom died she was raised in a convent by nuns here in San Francisco and she's the Mexican side of my family and you know her her family family my my family. The Martinez is and <hes> the guerrillas in the Ba- Rhonda's <hes> some of the first settlers to California so I'm like ninth or tenth generation ration- we fought against the U._S.. Invasion of Mexico <hes> otherwise known as the Mexican American War we had to surrender in Monterey <hes> so my dad always said well. It's all good writing material so <hes> as much as I'd like to credit bruce with with with with some of that my dad always gave me fiction. Can't my dad always told me to kind of I don't know if it was a defense mechanism but to look at life as a as a narrator to kind of remove yourself away <hes> so that you could you could see what's happening in a way to kind of bear witness and then to try to to to translate that into film I mean to two sentences sentences two words to language story so that you you can corroborate what you're seeing is is actually happening and so things became very radical very very crazy very early in my life and I was trying to piece it together and so as much as Bruce was giving me those <hes> kind of people to read my dad was giving me a steady daddy diet of Flannery O'Connor and John Steinbeck and other sort of handbooks about how to read the world and radicalism too you know from autobiography of Malcolm X. Felix Means the enemy man child in the Promised Land I mean this was all just sort of standard equipment and we read to as a defense mechanism before writing. We're going to talk a little bit about your no. Don't don't ever apologize <hes> we're gonNA talk a little bit about your new movie windows on the world which <hes> <hes> I greatly enjoyed. I mean a collection of artists and personalities both on screen and behind the screen <hes> behind the camera <hes> but I wondered like did you realize when you were young that collecting these personalities in your life these families stories this history might benefit you later on as as a writer and even as a filmmaker were even thinking about film. I was always thinking about film to. I was raised at the movie theater. <hes> I think you said that you're a couple years Close with and so it makes sense to continue to talk about him also in terms of windows on the world I co wrote that with my cousins Zack who's his oldest child <hes> and and so they not to get more into family history bruce after you know being juvenile delinquent somewhat like my dad he was given a choice to join the marines or go to jail essentially and so joined the marines came out of the belly of the beast and then <hes> joined the Peace Corps went to Malaysia and his radicalism machoism there <hes> got him in trouble where he was given rumor. Has It twenty four hours forty eight hours to get the hell out of the country because the beginning of the domino theory over them and they apparently killed everybody on his basketball team and he got out of the country but he had a son Zach and a wife my aunt Lang <hes> were there so we had to send for them and when he sent for them and they finally could come they lived in a Chinese tenement building so we were raised in and around Chinatown to we being means act and I and my dad would go in there and being a good beat remember North beach is right up against Chinatown so uncles and oil boys and all that was you know stomping being grounds and also cheap seats for according you could get a pork bun which doesn't cut into your moving money so <hes> so the theaters then were were some of the theaters market street. <hes> we did hit the Castro. <hes> I remember like the Strand the cannery there would be all these kind of art house <hes> places as well and he would take us to see things like Claudine you know a you know other other sort of <hes> you know problem films or you know like <hes> <hes> other other things that captivated needed him and then the rebel theater for sure and then every theater in Marin that had their own name of the town Really Fair Fox and and <hes> we also had the drive ins to the cinema and we would also over here near the cow palace. We're GONNA those drive INS Geneva uh the Geneva which lasted a while a long time passed passed its day <hes> and then he moved up to Mendocino County and we're talking about seventy five and my uncle was already there and so the Yucai a theater and then you drive in and then the cloverdale theater where Zach and I saw Robert Mitchum's Yakuza you know because it was just a hot day and we just went in you know our parents didn't really care was it looked upon that way or we were not getting that kind of guidance. Were you reading like at a young age. Sirvan tests but survived tastes is a is a framing device and I'm not GonNa this is going to be a spoiler free podcasts but survived. His quotes are a Don Quixote. Quotes are a framing device in the film. Were you reading that at a young age. What types the things were you reading early on? Were you Kinda. We weren't weren't reading survive. I wasn't really savant. Zach Zach had different reading reading list than I did <hes> <hes> but we were eating early on <hes> anything we could get our hands on including the newspapers newspapers to in commerce working at hurricane and <hes> <hes> we went. There's a point I think like fourth or fifth grade. Can you just we just made the switch and so at school. There's like I would either be getting into fights or I would be reading in the library alone. Just with the same sort of intensity that you might throw a punch you know our duck <hes> and so right around fifth grade I remember making starting to grab like James Bond you know and then that leads towards to you know all of a sudden you're reading like Mickey Splaine novels you know and then my dad giving me stuff like you know the the primer sources of of like John Steinbeck and not the Grapes of Wrath but you know <hes> sweet Thursday oddly first and then cannery row and then you arena pony and you know the Perot's never my favorite but <hes> you so that becomes adult fiction right. I just a lot of us read those books because we had it to somebody put them in front of us and it sounds like right when it voluntarily which I think is one of the things that happen when so Marin did have better public schools than <hes> Yucai in Mendocino Sinoe County and Bougainville and so most of my life. I've been reading the tax before it was given to me in classroom so it's all a training ground so then when you're fifteen fifteen and you start writing from Uncle Bruce <hes> are when you're eighteen or nineteen twenty start trying to write a novel and I felt Moonville if I couldn't make <unk> sense of the characters out of Bougainville and the constant flow of information around the V._A.. And I should just give it up you know I mean that that's pretty pathetic <hes> <hes> but <hes> poor follow through in the second one <hes> but but working working on it and have done a bunch of other things in the meantime but again never never stopped thinking that it's all good writing material. I'm curious what drew you to telling the immigrant story <hes> based on on a story around nine eleven what why was that the peg <hes> for telling the story of windows on the world well there are so ah La Lottery nine eleven was the big you know a big event in a way and the big biggest event that to hear our country tell it in a really longtime so that made an interesting focus also there was a whole you know why us how can people hate us like you know <hes> and it was the world the trade center so you're talking again we were we were we were raised his communist Socialist and social anarchist. You know get back to what we had to read. We had to read co <unk> homage to Catalonia. Almost you know be able to recite what the different parts of the Spanish revolution where <hes> in terms of party structure so we looked at commerce and we were always trying to tell working class stories in a way because that's who we are for the most part <hes> <hes> and so that seemed like a really good spinner also I came home from a weekend away <hes> with the kids and and the New York Times had a <hes> New York Times magazine had a photo essay of of families holding pictures of loved ones that they that were <hes> they said we're in the building and they were from all around the world and I was just I was hugely. I was moved to tears. Yes and I was like and I zack that's our story. That's our way and not only are these working class. People never you know that we know we went to school with and we are kind of a little bit <hes> unseen and underappreciated <hes> especially the migrant workers <hes> around <hes> Anderson Valley <hes> the whole workforce all of labor. You know all the Eugene debs stuff. We got all the you know he here's a way to look at Labor and here's a way to look. We're not just in America but America affects everybody you know and so they were like well. What do we know and where can we set it makes the most visual sense and everything and so we're like well Mexico of course because that's kind of what we know a little bit more and it's a we always pictured that scene in the desert of of a crossing of of various kinds kinds you know to get here? <hes> the trick of course is the wide New York as you know. I lived in New York for five years. I think they're really sixty thousand Mexicans there but you know people people always have a real reason to get somewhere and if you talk to immigrants about how they ended up in Des Moines or how they ended up in Portland and you know there's there's usually a trail Elena train sometimes not sometimes somebody just knows somebody in it like anything else sounds like a good idea you know and so we we went nat we went at it and we always knew that there would we always knew there would be a reckoning between father and son and so with with that proposition we we set out to try to tell the story right so for those who haven't haven't seen the movie yet. It's about it's based on the windows on the world restaurant at the top of the World Center World Trade Center but it's about this family in Mexico where the Patriarch leaves comes to America crosses into America legally to <hes> to provide for the family and he's undocumented working in the World Trade Center and the planes hit and then from there becomes his son's quest to find out what happened to him because there's no record of families in Mexico Toco and there you see everybody stunned like we all were by the the attacks in the buildings going down and then one of the family says that's dad worked and now they gotta see if he's okay but there's no way <hes> except for him calling and he doesn't call <hes> and so they you have a hard time because he doesn't exist in America figuring out what happened to him and they kind of assume that he's dead until the mother who's a little bit of an unreliable Bob Narrator at this point due to trauma <hes> swears that she sees him getting out of the building alive on news footage so are the the youngest son takes his savings across the border to look for someone who's either dead or does it want to be found <hes> also for possible closure and for for other other reasons but but with great challenges because there were so many services then but he can't he can't use them all because he's in the same position as father was in that's right yeah and he's literally living seen on the streets because he doesn't he doesn't have he doesn't have New York money and again. You can't just get on a plane for any particular reason and then they were also cutting down the you know the the crossings of the border anyway so he doesn't have that kind of money has to take a bus <hes> and then he has to to look look for his dad and a pretty low to the ground hardscrabble way <hes> <hes> and then he gets a job <hes> from a Nigerian gentlemen to wash windows to extend the metaphor of windows on the world and instead of maybe your angle white guy you know <hes> riding shotgun or helping you know we decided in the end that it should be somebody who's WHO's country country has experienced a civil war <hes> and where to me and people were dead in satellite five years to give a little <hes> <hes> scope <hes> and other outside like idea of what what the rest of the world is going on there and you know so that's a Nigerian immigrant that comes to New York the sees this kid and helps them and to make to make the movie you actually had to recreate these scenes in New York of post nine eleven with with the <hes> pictures of the missing people on the on the street <hes>. How did that go over so again? I lived in New York for five years and I was waiting for <hes>. I would say maybe half the people to be angry about it. <hes> it. Certainly you know someone's going to be angry about something in New York especially Ashley if you're you're making these <hes> I'm ago. What's the word whenever we made the what we call? Shrines were making shrines thank you we had to make the shrines especially and they're very public as we constructed them. <hes> not one person complaint and people came up to us and we paused because we were we were trying to be sensitive to it and we had to here and did hear their stories. We we bore witness to a lot of other people's stories a lot of tears <hes> and a lot of people telling us <hes> at the time before we even made the movie movie before it. was you know they could see anything <hes> just by what we were trying to do <hes> thank you and that it was Cathartic for them to see addition to re-experience this You know really resonates with a lot of people not that the other stories don't 'cause they. They certainly do but our story was. You know <hes> much <unk> much more closer to home I think <hes> in terms of again being immigrants and a nation of immigrants and and in one generation know generation five generations generation's off or something you know and so it became tapped into everybody's psyche about what their story was and why they came and what they wanted you you know and and here we were and here we are are grieving you know here here's this trauma. How do we get through the trauma after the other trauma <music> of crossing and leaving and disrupting family you know how do we get through this other trauma of being being attacked for for for what what we are what we become dot com? What what we <hes> we want to be <hes> and I it just resonated with people <hes> that's partially when I knew we were right on the on the right track <hes> with with the film into a deeper resonance when we've been playing at festivals I haven't we haven't had one screen where I haven't seen somebody cry or that? Somebody has come up to US afterwards instead we've cried and in fact Zach and I were crying when we wrote the which is a little goofy and we have a graphic novel version done. It's going to come out <hes> via fancy graphics and the illustrator John Sack said that he just reread back through everything because we do a global at it and he he he in fact cried again Dan <hes> and it's different places because it you know the immigrant stories big <hes> father and son stories are big in terms of family disruption <hes> and then you know nine eleven is is just just backdrop. You've taken this film to different distributors. It's an it's been a challenge selling ailing it even though you have Edward James Olmos in you have this fantastic soundtrack with the members of Los Lobos and members of the S._F.. Jazz collective <hes> and it's the you know completed finished beautiful film out what are why are some of the reasons people are not willing to pick it up the these major videos. There's a picture here. I just happened to see a boots Riley on the wall. So I mean we're up against corporate America Gotcha and we can talk all we want about who should do what and where but it gets to be a small number of true distributors that would put out a film like this <hes> and they're not going for it <hes> because they're are the same people for the most part that told us that you couldn't have a girl as the lead in an action film you know until you have the hunger games or you know the MOCKINGBIRD. Whatever the hell right are you certainly couldn't have a girl in an animated fell because boys won't see that either until you have frozen right and you damn whoa can have a black guy you know in a superhero fouled because who's going to see that you know so the universal truth is again like kind of a Hetero normative white male and we'll all see that and and basically that's who's in charge studios in decision making and then they have to <hes> decide that Lo and behold you could see truth yourself humanity in another sex another ethnicity than their own? If you go through the ORG charts not just in Silicone Valley Oy but if you go into the ORG charts Hollywood you're not gonNA see Latinos in charge <hes> and so it becomes very difficult and you're not pitching that many people people and in Hollywood is historically full of cowardice. Just you know rampant with it and it hypocrisy <hes> for all of their celebration celebration every Oscar year or something you know it's a corporate it's a corporate world and they're also under siege by net flicks create any huge power play a monopoly <hes> since the forties. I believe you know they were trying to separate. You know the distributors I mean the the <hes> what do because the basically the movie theaters from the people that make them right because that's monopoly and they have their one in the same now <hes> so they're streaming own it and they have the means to put it out there on top of that they're buying several theaters so that they also qualify for academy award so little films that were working the margins by people who believed that they had quality right would occupy. Maybe that space and Netflix is eating add up to you know they bought the corruption and some other other stuff and so it's it's really difficult again. Latinos mean different I I went to you know. Cubans Cubans in Florida are not you know Mexicans in <hes> southern L. A. or Northern California or Guate- I it's a different thing to say Latino but sixty Bela Dido's biggest group ethnically that goes to movies you think somebody would economically push the by aside from the fact that the film works but the loss of tell you to your blue in the face that oh well. I guess you can do crazy rich Asians but so because Rom com the Chinese Rob GonNa to work but God forbid like Latino drama especially around people raised on telenovelas especially around a whole nation that could use some catharsis from the news you know where were where people families are being. You know <hes> separated at the border kids are being separated from parents <hes> that we could use a little amphitheater and catharsis versus in a conversation starter the Dow would fly so what it's not. What's what's your work around? How are you showing it to people out there? <hes> <hes> there's another kind of industry that a little bit familiar with from having done a lot of nonprofit work which is basically the festival industry <hes>. I'm kind of like you guys are writers. It's <hes> in the same way that you write your novel often and it's difficult to get an agent like that becomes a whole process of its own an agent may or may not get your book contract even but you have to go do that dance. That's what the festivals are sort of like so there's this other adjunct of again mostly upper middle class white people in charge of of showing the film that that usually the festivals run <hes> <hes> or nonprofits that run very much like my experience with jazz or I was on the board of <hes> as if opera or the ballet and other things you oftentimes on a cocktail cocktail napkin run fifty percent donations fifty percent you know attendants ticket sales right. So who are they looking at to show to show what are they looking at for advertising and then who are they looking at to be the big donors back to corporate America back to to to to org charts and they don't see it as being that Latino stories are gonna going to move the needle but you walk around with you jail Edward James almost and yeah. He's a hero in those communities they know everything he's done you know and from you know from zoot suit via battle-scarred Galactica <hes> to American me and it's super important <hes> or or you'll get a reverse thing about Ryan Guzman our lead <hes> where here's somebody that was in the last couple of step up films that made you know I don't know one hundred twenty million in worldwide and yet you know his on <hes> the show called the number one drama on Fox called nine one one and somehow that doesn't equate to it but if you were somebody that used to be in John Hughes film or something while now here we go and again I don't have anything against those particular stories or those particular people people but it just seems that the bandwidth would be wide enough to show something else and independent film has been something that's been a misnomer for a long time you know if Clint Eastwood's which making independent film I don't have chance yeah and we have these discussions. I'm in the San Francisco Film critics circle and we actually created a committee <hes> <hes> and several people of Color on the committee who are just looking for films that you that are hard to find <hes> and and I think the the negative is that you know those films are hard to find for a reason that you just mentioned the positive is that we now have have the resources when a film is good that people can look and find those films and tell people in a way that doesn't have to involve the corporations nations and I I think that's the that's a tough flipside the absolutely right about yeah which is at some point somewhere especially given the net people just bootlegged us and watch it right and that's and that's in some ways partly fine with me actually. I've I've never you know. Don't tell anyone but I've never done anything to actually try to make my my whole life. Just never never been my outtake ever. I've chosen chosen projects once in a while thinking that this might have a little bit more viability or something so why not this one is opposed. You know all things being equal <hes> but I I've never done anything because of the money that way <hes> so if it gets out there and has its effect great we we made this film film also because we sold it to Miramax a long time ago I like two thousand three like we had this idea and we wrote it <hes> and then it went into turnaround around turnaround turnaround and doing a lot of work <hes> political work and some of it <hes> a little more conservative than my family would normally do you know I I did a bunch of work for UH Obama and trying to help holder gerrymandering and stuff like that <hes> and other political candidates they continued to tell us including our Attorney General Hey hey we we have to change the narrative. Aren't you a writer. Aren't you a storyteller and so we need films like this to be out there so that we can change hearts and minds so that everybody's image of Latinos isn't gang bangers in maids or something <hes> so you know in my head. I'm like well all right. We got gotta change fifty thousand votes across those three states right so it has to play those malls so there were concerns about that as well that we did do. It's not in Spanish. You know it's not dot it's with the American cast you know they're they're not from Mazatlan where it set so there. There are those kind of considerations <hes> and so I I do think it will get out there. The downside is I don't know how many people like myself there are and I don't mean that in itself congratulatory way but if you can't do things it's not viable for profit <hes> then that's GonNa cut way way way way way back. <hes> and there's a design here to lessen the value are you is something because it's Hispanic because Mexican you know like that. Just you know take five bucks off to you know <hes> in the same way way that like you know you get Chinese food. How would you pay for Pork Fried Rice? That's only it's got a Cap French food on the other hand or you know what I mean you can you can you know thanks to Charles Fang for you know changing the some of that around a little bit <hes> but <hes> the slanted door but you know it has to be viable <hes> in right now especially freshly Amazon and Net flicks and people they've created a system such that people will do good work and they'll snap it up for nothing and it just makes it hard for other people to do that that because then you go back to Hollywood with a good product and the first thing they look at was. How much did it make and you tell them? Nothing and they're like we'll see you don't get to do it right now now that I'm you know super very very happy about what's happening. Mostly in Oakland seems to me <hes> with <hes> you know sorry to bother you and blind spotting line spotted. I really like blind. Spotting Yeah my best friends growing up we had a lot of those conversations and being black and bb way and that was there's fantastic important moments. It's in Africa digging deep into the quay hamburger stand that was I still a couple of blocks from there. We used to go the serenade her. That wasn't wh let's <hes> if you don't mind let's <hes> let's talk about so you you live. You're working. You're living above Yes in a S._R._O.. Writing absolutely and but your your personal fortunes changed so you'd come up you know lower class and Moran and and remarriage you came into money we we always joke that my wife and I made our money the old fashioned way she inherited ferreted it and I married it did that. How did that change your values or your perspective on on the world? It's always hard because is when you get older. It's not one one particular event you know it's a lot of things that they put you on different paths and so as you go along those pass you learn different things <hes> so yeah I I I never really lived in San Francisco and wanted to live here but could really only afford to live in an S._R._O.. And so I I want I didn't go into there was a murder in like six weeks later and the one I chose was a pretty benign place in north beach which fit me perfectly and <hes> yeah I said about writing and I Jack coffey Trieste <hes> which was fantastic and then I met I met my wife <hes> I did a lot of personal work <hes> to to get to that that particular place and then yeah when for my family was very difficult very much. Guess WHO's coming to dinner like if you fall in love with you know <hes> <hes> somebody who had money that's the enemy and all people with money are horrible people and and so it challenged me that way. I think it's still challenging my family because some of them. I think who didn't think I was a horrible person. You know the day that you're you're you have a bank account in my horrible person then okay. I didn't have I didn't I never had a checking account until until I met my wife for example in so that threw me into a different world of challenging my perceptions and misconceptions conceptions of things and in some ways <hes> you kept me away from the darker parts of myself in terms of trying to to to right I mean that's that's the truth I've <hes> so <hes> I took on other stories and Zach and I started to write together as well because I start having children and that change if I didn't meet my wife I wouldn't. I don't think I would've children <hes> <hes> and so I could only handle a coffee and eight hours of doing that with somebody and and writing scripts is you can do that together. There's not a lot of grace in sentences and it's good camaraderie and Zach and I were two peas in a pod and finishing gene each other's sentences and <hes> it's not lonely <hes> but then it you come into this sense of what can you do to try to change. I guess your own nature but the nature of your community to and as occupied a lot of time and then also how does money really work pass you know some some Bernie Sanders type broad approach which is not very nuanced or my my parents not very nuanced kind of approach. I used to do my dad's taxes when <hes> fill them <unk> out for him when he was when I was sixteen seventeen and even then I was like these numbers don't work you say just put the numbers in you know they didn't they weren't good with money <hes> and they didn't really know oh how work even on a small budgetary level let alone on a large global level let alone on a personal level and so you know I did my wife to set twenty two years of marriage and I've spent twenty years time in financial meetings and also seen how things work <hes> in terms of economics and terms as of possible that you can do in terms of arts <hes>. I clearly did a bunch of work for for S._F.. Jazz to try to raise sixty five million dollars for the I stand a little building for jazz in America congratulations on that that's a wonderful building. It's awesome <hes> again. Not I'm not the target demographic. Go there because it's just got a good vibe and architects did a great job as Randall as did jazz. I mean we knew that was viable. I mean there's another thing that we we heard you know you're not going to be able to make the building and with you make the building. It's no one's going to calm and I think we're dealing with a it. Crazy ninety six percent capacity both both <hes> venues and this is our sixth season so all the naysayers including a lot of people were on the board you know we we kind of proved them wrong and <hes> but that was really wonderful <hes> and it got me involved again in a hardscrabble way of of how to raise funds what that means and nonprofits done some of that before <hes> and then also I got to use my skills to to come up with campaign paint slogans like the world is listening to see that there's a cross pollination of donors between the Moma and US potentially and that we could steal those donors by <hes> putting together photography books you know and that off otographer worth their salt seemed to be listening to jazz in the dark rooms so they were donating stuff no problem and then we'd have to get bared their patrons to see what was motivating now we can we can close it all up bringing it back to the movie. <hes> people who listen listen to the soundtrack or see the movie. You're going to hear some familiar voices and Charlie Musselwhite is in the movie <hes>. I believe carrying a Shotgun Yep. AH which is fantastic. My parents live up in Healdsburg and see him at coffee. <hes> and there's a lot of other people to <hes>. It's it's not a San Francisco movie. It goes from Mazatlan to New York but it's a San Francisco Bay area movie with your ears. I feel like it's an you know we we were I I was raised at clinically and so I've always had friends. Luckily they're artists and stuff too as well as just you know <hes> no my friends who literally you know parents Rand Georgios pizzeria and stuff like you know so. There's there's there's a combination of people but Eileen really having vision rents. That's because the budget got killed and we had to use the Song New York New York in the movie because I couldn't figure my way around it and I even asked my musician friends well what other song is like it and the answer is none so we had to get to work writing songs and <hes> and recording them and so <hes> <hes> Charlie who was actually also in our owed to the drive in pig hunt <hes> we automate. He's like you know he's like a brother. All these are like brothers so it becomes. It sounds like it's something to say like in Hollywood but you know I I lean on these people heavily both artistically and otherwise so Eric Harland right away onboard. What do you need? How can I put this together? Okay Sing. The song as well as you can into you know Jr is phone. We'll send it out. Let's talk about it. Who can we get? I can record at New York. The collective five guys from the collective came in and Jeff craftsman one of the recording engineers S._F.. Jazz you know they gave us time two hours or hour and a half before they went on stage and they you know recorded. <hes> you know this every tear cry for you song. Don't break my heart again you you know and then gave us other stuff Ethan Iverson comes in you know before his gig with the bad plus and has written something for me and then we play stump the band kind the thing of I tell him a scenario and he makes something up on the spot that we record you know and then yeah <hes> Eugene Rodriguez from listens only Salaam mazing Latino Cultural Center and a band that he started doing music and Eugene's in it and I've been Los Lobos Fan I saw them <hes> play New Year's Eve at the fillmore when I was sixteen and I'm fifty now Dwight Yoakam Open Forum and they've been my favorite band for for ever you know and so when I wrote I had to write the kind of anthem it starts off the movie for the credit sequence and stuff. I always heard David he'll dogs voice and so through Eugene we got the word out to David and I had met him before for doing a fundraiser for listen someplace and he agreed to play guitar and do it now. I asked Charlie if he would he would jump on for harmonica he said absolutely and that's inside of us all inside of US ause <hes> working in we'll finish off where can people get the soundtrack and our bay area residents. which is our core listenership going to be able to see the movie? What's their best last thing best way to do that? So the soundtrack is coming out April August second soundtrack will be out August second Europa Dope nope and in fact snippets are dropping now. We have a really amazing new version of Newark New York. The poem by the last poets written by Donna Kelley who also is in the film has a street poet and again that goes back to my youth. My Dad had the last poem albums around around the House and he came to the first S._F.. Jazz gala that I ever hosted so when I knew we needed a counterbalance a book again to the New York New York we call him to see if he would spit that poem and indeed Sanchez's music behind it makes it sore so <hes> that has is already sort of dropped online <hes> but rope adult August second <hes> you can get the soundtrack <hes> that is pretty wonderful <hes> uh-huh and then to see the film we are probably going to figure out how to release it by November so she'd be in a theater near you by November otherwise there are festivals inter coming up and you know you probably could just call me. Ah Hopefully you have a festival for you want to see it. Hopefully there's distribution some of that has to be wrapped up clearly. You have to keep a tight ship around that stuff but again that's not the way I go through life so I'm not worried about. I want more people to see into experience it and to spread the word all right well. I I <hes> looking forward to it. I enjoyed it and <hes> my I mother and <hes> my mother my grandfather's from months of lawn and she's GonNa love it. I immediately saw this GonNa Watch it again with with my family so when it comes I'm going check it out and soundtrack on August second. That's absolutely yeah. We should probably get a quick shout out to Richard Crubaugh. Who's WHO's fantastic in the there's so many people who were fantastic aside from Edward and Ryan <hes> Glenn term is in the film is up for Ami Right now who's in Cooley Hi and before that was in the first production of A. Raisin in the Sun City Party Ivy? He is fantastic. I'm glad I didn't wouldn't you said that his name blurred out a different world visit or he's known as mayor. Willie Brown told me that he saw them in town and he said as he said No. You're you're the mayor mayor on the wire and Chelsea Gillian has this

New York Zach Zach writer San Francisco America Mexico Uncle Bruce Charlie Musselwhite US Robert Mailer Anderson San Francisco Chronicle Hollywood Yucai California Los Lobos Oakland Mendocino county Anderson Valley Mazatlan
Episode 323: Woodstock '99 (Entry 1441.IS2808)

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

1:19:54 hr | 7 months ago

Episode 323: Woodstock '99 (Entry 1441.IS2808)

"This nothing we are jennings and john rodrick. We speak to you from our present which we can only assume as your distant past the turbulent time that was the early twenty first century during the great cataclysm that will surely befall our civilization. We began this monumental reference of strange obscure human knowledge. These recordings represent our attempt to compile and preserve wonders esoterica. That would otherwise be lost. So whether you're listening from an advanced civilization or have just. Reinvented the technology to decrypt our transmissions. This is our legacy to you. This is our time capsule. This is the paired you have accessed entry one four four one dot s two eight eight certificate number two seven. Two eight seven woodstock ninety nine. Would you say when you think back to the dark ages. Would you say you're more interested in the decade of the seven eighties or the nineties. Eighty seven hundred. Eighty seven hundred nineties feel like the seven hundred nineties. I'm more interested in the cooler. Druids bit you know. The eighties were seven eight. Were more pop. The seven ninety s got a little darker reaction to the seventies. I feel like there's a when when thinking that far back in history and he sort of council is right in there and you kind of. That's a break point. Where when i think of it i want to i pretty well understand coming up to council and then i want a much more curious about what what happens. Afterward sick breakpoint. They didn't know at the time. Nobody knew there was a council going on in. Ics people weren't like there wasn't some extra extra read all about it kid. Right council reaches agreement on transit. and there's a tripartite agreement. Everybody's all the old churches are all the old gospels. Right gone gone forever. it's like neville chamberlain moment where like there are negotiator. Caved to the to the athanasios wins or the. I can't think of any heretics peace in our time. Do you the point. Is that time telescopes when you get back that far today we think there's a huge cultural difference between the parents of the fifties and sixties the kids of the seventies and the kids of the eighties but our listeners. Vote care they're they're. They're they're underwater tarantula. Men although i got into fairly protracted internet argument if you can believe it what with someone who was trying to trying to make a case that that you couldn't divide or i'm sorry rather you couldn't compress some historical epoch that just coincidentally happened to be there specialized field of study right university of pennsylvania. Or whatever thousand words about this. Let me tell you. I said well wait a minute. Don't you say ancient greece. Ancient greece is is a meaningless term by your by your definition. I mean you know they were. They were very very adamant that. I couldn't say something like communist china or something you know as a generalization and it was a thing where clearly they did say ancient greece in their own history but the way of speaking but but they couldn't they couldn't admit to being wrong which is of course my way of my primary way of interacting with people that challenged me on the internet to try and get them to admit that they're wrong and then i mute them. That doesn't really ever happen whether they admit that they're wrong or not. They're they're going to get muted either way just because they tried to argue. Nobody on the internet ever admits their on when people are wrong. They walk away from their computer and shoot themselves the head or they say my favorite way of saying they're wrong is you never hear from them again. Say beep. what does the phrase agree to disagree. But it's not that they say it's not good point. It's because it's because it gives you know. Praise it's rebecca deepak it back in touche. No no fair fair enough fair beep. They say fair enough which it's just the right amount of fairness it's it's fair enough is just such like it's just such such cold soup like it's not it it it doesn't give you the warm glow of you're right no. It doesn't confirm tonight. It's fair enough and it's like what do you mean fair enough. Just put you just run some kinda chrome macro or app that turns the phrase fair enough into. You're right as usual. I should do so the then. You'll get the same warm glow. I'll get the warm glow right before. Mute them just for convenience as time telescopes backwards than the pixels. Get so tiny. You just have to chunk them or you can't see anything right at the time. It did not make sense to think of the hundred years war as as a long one hundred and twenty year single single epoch. That we the hundred years war has little to teach us right. You're you're okay with a one sentence summary teach you it does not get into the phases of the truces. Now i'm gonna absolutely going to say that the hundred years war has nothing to teach anyone in this house. We are still fighting the war of the roses. Do you have that on your little. Your little seattle sign out front in this house. Sciences real water is valuable war of the roses matter. We are against 'bonapartism but some of us are lancastrian. Wow this is a divided house. Half your calf lancaster. That's right. wow the war is ongoing. It's still is what i'm saying. So this is all by way of pointing out that we have been criticized for doing a this is a this is a monumental reference work for the ages and yet somehow seems very heavy on the late seventies to late nineteen eighty s coincidentally a formative. Time for you and me. It was well. And that's the time i you know. In answer to our critics. I feel like we are not capable of doing firsthand. Research about the age of exploration and a lot of that stuff if it makes it into the omnibus. It's on the shoulders of scholars prior right the just encoding and by scholar. You mean prob- smasher sixty nine or whoever other pd entry but But the you know the The culture of the seventies eighties and early nineties. A that's still that's still being digested and we're here to digest. You could have the first take right exactly. And it's clear. I mean one benefit to me is clear now from our current moment in twenty eight which of those things went down the memory hole and which did not and i have a much shakier grasp of the memo stuff that happened when i was an adult because i can't really compare it. It's harder to compare the impact at the time. Basically we've had complaints from millennials. There's not enough. Ninety s material in the omnibus millennials have to acknowledge that the nineties were cultural desert. So that that would be the implication of saying the noise and vanilla deserve but end. Tb doesn't that's even eighty s no. Yeah you're right but creed and beanie babies do not roy roy meet. Where's the boy meets world omnibus entry. We could do a pretty compelling entry on beanie babies babies. I think is coming. That's on my ninety s. A good is that right. I mean there was a ten years ago. There were a lot of in some of the darker internet corners. That i that i- traipsed there. Were there were a lot of memes that we're like only ninety kids will get this and then there would be some pokemon thing and it's like yeah okay. Only ninety kids kids get that and only ninety s kids everywhere fair enough. Yeah no. I'm not sure i mean i have long made the contention that one thousand nine hundred seven is the year that didn't exist name. One thing that happened in nineteen ninety-seven young. I can tell you one thing okay. Computer came out name. Another thing clinton's second inaugural About which i remember right. It's nine hundred ninety. Seven is just a place where it's like a fukuyama hole where history actually did come to an end. And then i guess restarted history rebooted and by nineteen ninety nine. There was a new his. The history had was ongoing again. But i bet if we look at wikipedia it's been patched up by the matrix. The matrix is created retroactive thing. That's the thing that happened in. One thousand nine hundred. They didn't actually happen but The the universe arranged for time space to continue through nineteen ninety seven. It's like the thirteenth floor. Nineteen ninety-seven is. It's it's been ret conned. Princess diana died no no. She didn't really mars. Pathfinder lands on mars than what deep blue defeats casper. Now these things these actually happen. Go ahead find. Find a thing in one thousand nine. Maybe seven that happened. I do actually remember where where we're where i was. When princess di di da. I was in the exact same place i was. I was watching motorcycle. I was going. I was watching goldeneye at a friend's apartment. I was sitting at my job at the newsstand. Which is exactly where. I was when i will. Well when okay computer was released. So i mean i guess the one thing i know about nineteen ninety-seven is i worked at the newsstand. What else name of thing. princess diana. heaven's gate suicide because people are also allied with princess diana protocol. That really didn't happen. So i see what ninety kids are trying to trying to say that we haven't we haven't like four grounded. Even even the things that did happen are just echoes of better things to happen in different years. Oj's civil verdict. Yeah i challenge anyone to do to write a one page essay about the importance of nineteen ninety seven. Now you can. You can list a bunch of nothing's happened. Maybe but if. If i were to of told you princess diana if i were to tell you princess diana died in one thousand nine hundred would you be able to. Would you fight me. I mean if. I told you that that woodstock happened in one thousand nine hundred seventy you would say what the original woodstock i would be like. No john you're you're several months off right. That's been in july sixty nine. That's right several months off. And you know that. And i know that in everybody knows that but if i were to say the kyoto protocols can they happened in nineteen ninety nine. What could it be more nineteen ninety-seven than getting together with your with your gang gang and with your posse with your posse. There we go and going to see val kilmer as the saint at a at a multi plex near you remember. Remember all the good times we had all the val kilmer quotes and names as the saint. Yeah i mean i could. I could probably do a compelling omnibus on rave culture but even raver culture was over by ninety seven right now. They're a bunch of people. See this little slowly pulling the pacifies outta their mouths going. What did you know the kids are making candy bracelets today. Caitlyn's making those little my daughter's making these little bracelets that used to wave in the air raids if you had if you had something to sell but now it's just now it's meaningless like everything kids just wanna put you know. Blm or their name. Or or whatever too. And i'm like hey they're they are. Everything bad comes around but eric ryan a omnibus listener. Who donated up. Whatever we call the level. What do we call the dissentient cephalopod santee at aspen. I think bears fourth of these. Yeah and it's going to be great for. I have to actually record an about them. You could learn them or just. Write them down we. He requested woodstock ninety nine the day the day. The nineties died early nineties. Kids will get this. What are these kids. Anyway like millenniums. Yes but what would you say are the traits of the millennials. Are we going to do this at the scolding older person version of the of the millennial traits no. I don't. I don't think we should do that. That that's that if true. It's all their parents fault yeah. They weren't buying themselves. Those participation trophy sat boomer culture. Argument is is well trod ground. but what. what distinguishes the millenniums. They love val kilmer as the saint. They're like he's so much better than roger moore there a much larger generation demographically than we the the the off off maligned and forgotten generation x. Maligned yeah did you see the demographic stuff like currently the only generation a in which trump has a polling lead. We're recording this and they're into the election is generation. Yeah he's kidding he's way down with. He's five points down with boomers whereas he was five points up against clinton points dow ten points. Twenty points down with millennials. It's the same it's all it's all. Those fifty year olds that. That didn't have the i don't know didn't have the light of indie rock to pull them out of the grunge swamps and the grunge and and And contemporary country music. Those are the two the two pillars of generation x. ninety s culture post grunge for a lot of them. I guess the birthdays for jennifer as we used to call him jen because we like to find the next generation is like Inferior clone of ourselves. It's started in eighty two eighty three eighty one to ninety eight. I'm like that But every millennium that i talked to that was born in eighty one. Eighty two eighty three wants to make the case that there are cusp. Why are you because they'd prefer to be asked well because they don't yeah they're they're trying to like say. Oh but i watched the brady bunch. I'm not sure they wanna be x. They just don't wanna be millenniums. And they're trying to figure out a way and i think there's a case to be made if you're born in nineteen eighty one that you have less in common with someone born in nineteen ninety four and a lot of it is just You know where your pop culture was coming from if you weren't watching the right and then shows maybe you didn't have cable right and you're locked into whatever your vhs your parents had you're you're gonna feel a little older just like you. And i grow up with beatles. Music three to one contact started. When i was in sixth grade and so i felt like three to one. Contact was still part of my kid culture but three to contact got rebooted. And so there are millenniums. That are like three to contact totally. That was my childhood. And i'm like there was ten years between now. You know how i feel about val kilmer taking over the role of simon. Templar the saint. I didn't even hear about it. I'm still. I still have my roger moore. I mean the marks of gen x. are are well-known. There the slackers talk about it all the time. I guess that that turned out there. They'll go with the her. They'll do whatever they'll they'll Own midwestern used car lots and vote for trump. apparently one hundred percents the easiest. If that's the path of least resistance slackers. The entire time never ever ever stood up and took responsibility for their chores. They stopped they were just. They were too busy. Skateboarding is the main problem. We say but it's we were. We were skateboarding. What seventeen eighteen hours a day. I mean all the all the all the guys that that were more attractive girls skateboarding. Six or seven hours to read thrasher magazine now. So it's a tough no. We were probably royal playing. Dvd sixty seventy hours a day. Which leaves you six or seven hours to read dragon. I was just reading. Jane's military handbooks and and trying to identify what you what's the world war one generation call. That's what you actually were. i'm on the man. I'm actually a jerry or a bo. sure I can still. I can still look at the silhouette of of russian Russian fighter jets of the nineteen seventies. And tell you what. They are generation books. I remember all the vh1 pendrey. Degeneration bosa hated it The i guess. I believe the digital native stuff. Yeah they were in the nineties. Kids were the first people that never had to remember learning how to buddha home computer. Start a video game. The video game console was in the house before they were. I went back to always been there in when i was thirty. Two and i was in a seminar with some kids that were twenty kids and you know watching them with computers Was was the first time. I really noticed that digital native gap. I was gonna blow your mind just now when you wanted the spreadsheet to be in a different order and i said yeah you can do that. That's what spreadsheets are for. Yeah and then you did it right in front of me and i was like wow like seeing david. Blaine street magic. That's your urine. My age gap is just enough. We had a computer when i was seven. Yeah no they hadn't invented them. When i was seven it was a big big worrying wall of tapes but like when i was a senior in high school there was a computer lab in our school and i never went in there and only once i think peered in through the little square glass window and looked at all the people sitting at their sixty four k. Ibm pc's and shuddered in horror Because i think i think it was. There was still an association that to be looked to be taking a computer class was to be Preparing for a career in stenography. Or i mean it was a. You're going to have a job as a kind of a cursed one. Like data entry job though it was like making the new generation of of of insect drone slave typists at. There wasn't a sense that that learning computers was going to be creative At least i. No one ever made that case to me until i was in college. So anyway what. Yeah watching twenty roads and this would have been in the late ninety s Watching them just navigate all the pull down menus. I was like how did you find that. Where where was that. it was just like. Will you pull down set grandparents. Make you any kind of but i mean i was thirty right. I should write in and i was more flexible probably than i mean. I still have plenty of people from my high school. that aren't on the internet. Like pearce high school girlfriends. That just have zero. You can't find them. Zero presents murder them and buried in the back in the early nineties. No they just didn't they didn't make the transition the it does raise the question of what the big looking back. What the big technology game changer will be 'cause we even our parents were raised looking at. We're even our parents are part of the science experiment of what happens when you just put a baby in front of a glowing rectangle not my parents. But you're right exactly boomer parents. Yeah and that was the first generation experience with that and gen-x is kind of the first generation to experiment with what happens if it's a scream. They can control what happens if they if they have if they have video game. I thought genetics was the first generation. Where the experiment was. What if there are no jobs. No prospects i mean that's that's every subsequent generation. What if there's no retirement say that just because they think we're the last ones that had it. Good oh i know. I know i know they do. A both have mortgages so that puts us in the camp of people should be up against the we. We are the enemy for sure but we had no jobs. No prospects no retirement no unions. But then i guess you've a generation where the The latest generation. The the the the rectangles hand-held and always with you and do everything now. Not just you know the. They replaced social interaction. I guess that's okay that's crazy. The millennials the millennials. Because they're the they're the internet natives or at least the early the fairly early internet adopters around the time they've got into high school. They were getting their message boards and so they're the ones that started to replace social interaction with tangles. And then the i guess. Gen z. My kids your kids are the ones that are going to replace every aspect of their lives with glowing rectangle. We for for a long time ten fifteen years ago. We were speculating that the our kids were going to be the vr generation. Right that they were gonna have heads up display cyberspace. Yeah they were going to have data flying around matrix like every time you looked at building. Ornamented reality there'd be some little screen that popped up and told you it was built and who lives there and i like your use case looking at get spectrum building stock you asshole but but that hasn't come to pass and i just. I wonder whether google glass like burned that all down for a generation. Or or whether it's yet i mean i know people are working on it everywhere. It just hasn't mainstreamed. it's. It's very clear that i don't know. It seems intuitively obvious that somewhere along this process you can break a baby's brain right to create essentially a new species news new baby by giving. Yeah that's new baby trade and maybe it's the maybe it's a new baby boy. It's like a crater nickelback baby But but somewhere along the line you do create kind of a new species by saying hey this is this is how while the brain is plastic and developing. Whoa and i don't know if you give that brain howdy doody or if you give that brain pong right or if you give that brain email or it's if you give that brain tiktok but somewhere along that continuum there's a we've created the newspaper you rewire. Yeah and so. Maybe that's why we don't do topics on this show. That would be like. That would be like covering lemurs well. That's i mean every future ling is post this transition and and we don't talk very often about the fact that our listeners may just be virtual intelligences right. The they're like. When are they going to fix google glass so we can arise from the from the new machine. I mean we could. Our our audience could be clones of our own Our own souls that are now reproducing infinitely and listening to us recur. Lar- listeners are our past internet and video game. avatars that have gained sentient and are still wander through the through the dungeon. Celeste ford body blow. Knock them out. Yeah it's wreck it ralph. Basically they all have jenner lies after the after the the knockout round ralph food but with our faces so this is who were addressing these odd avatar lemur so so what. I'm saying future distant future. You don't care about the distance between the eighties and the nineties at all to you. And it's it's worse than trying to parse the lancastrian war in the carolinian war. But right now it's a. It's a huge right now. Every generation is a generational struggle. What's the council. What's our council of nice idea though. Is it the advent of the personal computer. It's certainly not vatican two it's tech. It's one hundred percent tax. I don't know what's the what's the dividing line these right. It's prey chretien the worldwide web and ninety four. I don't know if i had to guess. It's either that or iphone smartphone. I guess. I guess the future. Now's they'll tell us what it will be crazy to the future to to even connect to the personal computer as a as a as anything other than a precursor to the iphone talk about ice houses in the summer. Yeah that's the thing you had because there were no refrigerators. All the great conversations you and i've had about ice houses over the years. Gotta the gotta get some sada's in there or it'll melt. That's what i think. So yeah i it's got to be personal tech right that's the that's the transition but unless it's bio augmentation which is something that we're that all of this tech is going to lead up to but it's really bio augmentation that or what if this is all a dead end and the epochal event actually is it's or it could be a dystopia in future with a civilization civilization ending event or could be jeans takeover or aliens arriving like maybe they're going to be like these guys are talking about smartphones like they matter but we all know on august eighth twenty twenty three that all ended in tears slash tears in rain. You never know or universal peace in harmony. When now can you have. You've made a big point over the years to explain to me that that That the large moon low in the skies illusion. And i tell you this. Every a every time. I come over to your house. The first thing i say. And there's there the earth is not hollow and nobody is living inside the center of the earth. But you should know that that a lot of future ling's respond very negatively to the suggestion that ufos are are extraterrestrial intelligence and much less inter dimensional. Which i think is kind of your take much They don't wanna hear about my. They don't wanna hear about inter dimensional photos. I was reading the other day. I guess obama was asked ones. Can somebody recently asked trump about area fifty one or whatever it is it's that and fifty one and unless you're positing that there's an area fifty two i really want. That's where i wanted to area fifty one and a half which is where they keep. All the magic hogwarts craft noah. Somebody asked trump something related to aliens. And i and i saw obama's similar quote on the same topic where he said i can tell you this. We've never made contact with a with an extraterrestrial intelligence aboard ufo. It seemed so legalistic and narrow out. Could you read that and not think wait. That's not the question i ask. Thank you for answering the question. You wish i'd asked but that doesn't preclude them having warehouses alien corpses so clearly. Obama is alien right. When he took off he takes off. Unhindered dimensional alien. Sure yeah you can look at him until he's a praying mantis under that. You think that explains the ears praying mantis in human close. This is all a native of making the case that the woodstock ninety nine was actually an epochal thing. Woo woo woo woodstock. Ninety nine woodstock ninety nine woodstock ninety nine. What are you talking about woodstock. Ninety nine woodstock ninety nine yeah. This is a request from a listener. Eric oh this is a woodstock. Ninety nine is a thing that i tried to erase from my memory. And i'm still trying to. Why are you doing this. This explains why you don't remember ninety seven this is this is just more about whatever. Your personal chemical state was well in nineteen ninety nine. I was a. I was a rock musician. A practicing one see probably knew all about the big music festival. I knew i knew a lot of these bands but this this summer was the summer that i inherited those people playing. I'm nervous bingo. Here's your senator square nazis. Nope that's the summer. I walked across europe out of the country and only hearing about this jain concert. That featured who stank and monkey but and all was who was named metal bands and weird. You know like a buck cherry and whatnot. So i didn't. I wasn't just smash mouth on every state over and over over and over. I wasn't here for the concert itself. I only after i got back i heard about it so you're not going to have any better than i do. Have how far down. The memory hole woodstock ninety nine is right now and i think the answer is not very for one thing. We recently had the twentieth anniversary in our era. So and that led to a reconsideration of of that moment and also just contextualising what it meant for that generation and making the case that it was in fact a pretty big deal really yeah. It's so weird. Because i think of all these bands with the with the exception of very few for example. You got the list in front of you. Who are we who was playing john. Well let's see the first night thursday There was a there was a pre show which is kind of interesting and it had what three six nine almost twenty bands eighteen bands and the first nine of them. Don't even warrant wikipedia entry. That's you know music festival is good. When there's there's no hyperlink on the yeah. The band called rattled basket. There's a band called in bloom which is just like. Let's name our band after a nirvana song. But the bands the bands that were on the the main stage vertical horizon g love and special sauce string cheese incident and then george clinton the headliner. Stick around for george plan. But you've got your buck cherry insane clown posse. You've got the roots here. Mo lit jamiroquai live corn about a lot of things about the music festivals of this era. I've noticed that they they are pretty. There's an attempt at diversity but it's very much a star trek diversity where you've got one. Token reggae act one token one token country act. And it's always really you know some fifty year old white promoters idea of what a reggae act is you know or what funk act is will and this is the rap here are the roots and ice cube. Although the roots aren't really wrap you got los lobos. That's like a quick name a latino band. Okay we'll get los lobos. Loose logos is one of the great rock band logos. Yeah but i'm just saying yeah. You can see the imagination that goes into checking off the the latino box and this is the these are these are the last days or at least maybe the last peak of rock cultural appropriation days. It's the it's the the new metal rap white rappers but also jamiroquai with his native american imagery. And you've got a lot of young white kids singing in fake blues. Voices you've got you've got adam dirt's in his in his dreads. You've got a lot while they're lotte dreads on these bands. Lotta white dreads at woodstock ninety nine so there. You see a lot of bands where you're like. I don't know if that would fly anymore. The con- the context of woodstock ninety nine per clear. Oh gust replay. I mean it's tempting to think of it is a generational thing because it has woodstock in the name. These guys are trading on the idea of the thirtieth anniversary of the original woodstock music festival. There had been a twenty twenty fifth anniversary concert woodstock ninety four which also had its logistical struggles. But was not the was that. A retrovirus like hips hippie thing. yeah it had. It had as many repeat acts as they could as as as drugs would let them have basically as drugs and mortality with let them have so you know. I don't have the lineup in front of you. But you know arrested development is. They're singing tennessee. But so is country joe and the fish criminals and asher there but like featuring. Maybe john sebastian or something who else's by that. I'm trying to think who the other original bands are. Joe cocker open dish and senate probably was there. Let me look santana's the one that could be an all these charlotte show was not there but there was so in between you're blind melon's in your cypress hill. It's like hey kids this woodstock and it was actually called two more days of peace and music to match the match. The hippie summer of love arab the hippie lovechild arab ranch cypress hill is bringing a ton of peace and love version of it. Well they're bringing some of the at least thirty some hits from their exactly. That's what i'm saying. They're bringing the kind of the relaxed the the drug induced relaxation that we would associated with sixty nine right although the year not the activity but actually the whole thing. I mean there's a few kind of there's a few. I'm trying to look at the angriest band. Anger is active ninety four. It's probably it's Peril it's porno for pyros. Not he's just super high gil. Scott heron green day played. I think that's part of the part of my issue with the music of the late nineties as represented by this bill. It's day right. Yeah there's a lot of anger. This is henry test ostro driven white male music. And that's not an attempt by the promoters to push that that's just what rock that was kind of the base case for rock. Yeah i mean nineteen not all of it but if you're if you if on the same day you've got insane clown posse corn offspring. Look at the saturday night main stage lineup after alanis. morissette machine. metallica metallica. Kid rock is on that bill early on. Oh kid rock is there. Yeah between between the tragically hip and whitecloud. But that's the thing the other side of that same. Bill is super. Like virginia hippy. It's wycliffe gene. Counting crows dave matthews band in atlanta's morissette. Some kind of throwback boomer chill this bruce hornsby for the moms and dads. All of this suggests to me big jeans. This is what so. This is what music johnson had become like. This is what rock at least had become in the post grunge era. It was what it was. It was the ingredients of grunge mixing with this kind of poppy punk that dared to be very commercially successful. Green day kind of stuff. A lot of yelling and a lot of rap and then wrapping country influences coming in contacts and this is not peak metallica and you wind up with kind of this awful rap rock. We've talked about on the show before and they'll you know not all the band's not all these angry bands are bad. I mean apparently corn set was great at woodstock ninety nine and i'd love to see you know. I wish i could go back and see rage against the machine and metallica back to back. We've got we've got the following night. Megadeath god smack seven s te creed chili peppers ever last. Let's kind of a weird schizophrenic thing about music festivals like this and i noticed it's still. How festivals are often programmed. Oh my god. We're elvis costello. We'll talk about that. Well he show up for the opening of suitcase. There is kind of something for everyone on these lineups. As you can tell when you just say willie nelson than elvis costello. Then the brian setzer orchestra then jewel. You can tell. It's kind of being programmed as you know this is not. These are not all your favorite bands. This kind of something for everyone lineup bumper. Shoot here in seattle did that for decades yes and was extremely successful at it with multiple stages you can do it becomes an experience you curate not a Not a single piece of art. You sit through right. And that's how music festivals music festivals did not start that right. I mean for context. You've got the the. The games of ancient greece were which in addition to the athletic competitions would have festivals for drama and singers and instrumentalists thing. United it was that everyone was naked. Yes yes no matter what. The event you suck ninety nine if everyone had been naked and when it doesn't matter whether it's just a really high note or a really high hurdle you're going to see some gigolo some gigolo aunts. Maybe hero bill gigolo answer on the emerging artists age which is very confusing to. Me didn't wasn't their first record like literally fifteen years earlier. But the gigolo aunts had what was there. I guess john entwistle is also on the emerging artists stage. Show it's it's very loosely. Three loosely curated emerge enrichment. My friend phil was guitar player of the gigolo aunts. But i don't think by nineteen ninety eight he was my friend fills a pretty good ninety span name. My actually my friend fillmore woodstock sixty nine after country. Joe and the fish. You got my friend phil just some easy going east big as let's see counting crows were on a co headlining tour with the wallflowers. They claim it happened in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven but somehow they That nothing happened in eighteen. Ninety seven so clearly. It's a cover. That's it's a cover for something for some some fo's can we've come up with some exciting t shirt designs in the last couple of months. What can you tell us about. T shirts going forward. I like the december ones years of requests. We have finally decided there should be an omnibus shirt with a mail truck on it. Yeah mail truck. Sure fun it's gotten mr zip driving the truck. That kind of nightmare inducing representative of the post offices zone improvement plan. And he's having a fun time driving his mail truck on its last legs and it says omnibus and then there's a different shirt. He's kind of ghost writing isn't he's a little bit out of the truck like he's only got one arm and one leg finding out the right side but that is correct. That's that's the right side. His up it smoking. He's yeah he's quite a he's quite a rakish young man he's a real daredevil and then this is the Beaver right you talk about the aviation works. I can't remember what this is it is. It's the it's the have beaver from the front end. It's landing on a alaskan lake with its with its see pods with pontoons at odds as we call it. That's right it's a. It's a float plane as we say in the in the parlance it shows. It's very distinctive and characteristic radial engine from the front. so there's no mistaking the profile of the beaver. These are some good looking shirts about some popular omnibus entries two new designs every month so these will be gone at the end of december. Don't miss out that's right. This ad is that has a time limit. You've got what to over two weeks so almost three weeks so the omnibus project dot com slash store. You'll always see the links to our two new shirts that our friend dave has up for us at mediocrity. You'll also find a link to our t. Public store where we have a wide array of stuff with the omnibus logo on it hoodies. The what else hats. i think. Mugs these phone cases. Yeah onesies but only in adult sizes haha if you show up at my house in an omnibus adult onesie. Yes you can spend the night. How does that sentence. And maybe my guest room but definitely you can spend the night. So don't forget if you're interested in omnibus gear for a limited time only had two omnibus project dot com slash store that's omnibus project dot com slash door but the modern music festival was born in the fifties in newport. The newport jazz festival for was and it was just. I think a couple of rich just you know well heeled jazz fans bothering local club owner. But they didn't come from the mean streets of newport rhode island. They were the ones who said. Hey we'll throw money at this. We think it would fund outdoor music. And he said that's not a thing and they were like well. Summer's are super boring. Wouldn't it be cool to just go to the park and jazz and so you know money talks and these ducks walk. The wealthy residents paid for it and the modern music festival was born. And you know it's early incarnations it is it's off a piece you sit and listen through all your favorite jazz acts in order because it works as a whole right and that's not true with the bumper. Shoot woodstock ninety nine model here. Where it's i mean. That's something else about the late nineties. Excess right right. Oh history's over and you can have. We all grew up in kind of the complacency of the clinton administration. Let's just do the most of everything. There were a lot of bands at woodstock in sixty nine. But there's some diversity right like you mentioned that routes reading. I think no no way that's That's modera- but there's some attempt at r and b acts. Well yeah i mean original woodstock had richie havens right. It had santana. But it's funny how that's like a white a white rock fans idea of diversity havens that jimi hendrix. Yeah andrew o. Slammed family stone was at the original woodstock sometimes are. That's who i'm thinking of. Otis reddings at monterey. So let's talk about rx. Richie havens plays guitar. Because it's very disturbing to me when i watched the the woodstock movie. Yeah we we can talk about that ravi shankar but you know we're like ninety nine is just throw everything at the wall and see what sticks right. How many bands played it. Seems like an impact. You could not possibly have seen all these bands simultaneous stages and it is over thirty a day. The was held between july twenty second and twenty five thousand nine so after the pre show friday saturday sunday in rome. New york the famous rome. New york upstate. New york is the epicenter of these woodstock's although ninety the original woodstock happened at bethel which is not that far upstate at all was like ninety. Four is at saugerties. Maybe seventy miles north rooms about one hundred and twenty miles north. So talk is clearly going to get to canada right at some point or or drowned in the great lakes ninety nine had not killed it And it's appropriate that it was rome because as we will see it burned. There's gonna be fiddling while it burns. It'll be it'll be anthony kiedis and flea fiddling but so you're saying that you're saying that this event woodstock ninety nine actually killed woodstock forever. You don't think somebody could resurrect this. What's the next anniversary way. Twenty nineteen there was no woodstock fifty last. They would have been last year and it didn't happen though. It must have killed it to cue. Agile fiftieth anniversary. And i'm sure there were plenty of think pieces and maybe one of those life magazine things that they only sell in supermarkets now like the square bound remembering jackie kennedy or whatever. I'm sure there was one of those for the fiftieth of woodstock music that i have to say that the last few years of a big festivals. I've definitely graduated to being one of these like generation x artists. That kind of doesn't understand. What the kids are listening to. But a lot of my friends are are the booking agents of these big festivals. And when i see the lineups coachella and and and sasquatch and thorough piece ashcroft's. Yeah the big the big festivals that defined my time in music. It's just one after another bands that i've never heard of an can't even tell what the what kind of band it is by. The name mean most of the band's if you see if you see insane clown posse you can kind of put together. What kind of vibe is going to be. But so many of these big. And so i would talk to my friends. What are these bands and a lot of the booking agents also. Don't know interesting because the band's have youtuber yeah they've become popular on the web and so they don't have a touring history really they don't. It's not clear what their record sales numbers are even But they've got fifty million views and so they so these agents like no. They're a big deal there on the list of what kids are clamoring to see. But they're not even really sure what it is and their back line. Which is you know. Like what their rider says. They need like to usb cables and a microphone not even a microphone and so so but their twenty thousand kids show up to see them and and so it's really changed kind of what festivals look like and and Yeah the the old senescent test where you could see how out of touch you were by. Seeing what kind of font size you would have to get to on the on the lineup before you got to a band. You didn't know a like really. I do the reverse of and i'm like how far down before i get to a bad i do know how can you look at a bill like that and find a band. You know the most famous how it ended it was. It was not just for the hundreds of thousands of people who were there. It was a live pay per view event as well an mtv covered the hell out of it and as most famous for out ended which is on sunday night. An anti-gun activist group handed out a bunch of peace candles for kind of a show of support for the cause. The peace candles ended up. Starting a bunch of not very peaceful bonfires on during the night with some rain event but the the final act on the main stage was red hot chili peppers on sunday. Night an as they're playing they can see just thirty foot flames. Starting to sprout up out in the out in the venue keita says holy shit. It looks like pockets now out there from the stage. What's crazy is that of all of the bands like the peppers. Do not espouse violence or their their their hippie. As as a band come fleet was naked for the whole set apart from his with a sock bass guitar. Yeah i don't know if he even had the sock. I one of the first live events. I ever did. I emceed and air band contest at my. I guess junior year in high school and the air band concert was one of the big events at my high school in the late eighties. Every there were probably fifteen or twenty bands playing tennis rackets gotta lip sync to get up there and lip sync catoon and they have a dance routine. The whole school turned out. It was in the big theater. It was a big event. People practice for for long time and i was the emcee which was it was the first time i've ever really been given the stage in that way like it. Show you you you bring out the bands and whatnot and at one point. I came out and i had a set of wax lips. Which was which was hilarious gags. It's pretty funny. Back in the day. And i came out and but wax slips got a big laugh and then i took the wax slips and just kind of hooked him out into the crowd like in with my most insouciant there you go and then i talked for a little while and like so anyway coming up next and then those wax lips came back at me at one hundred miles an hour. Some you know some baseball player got a hold of it and just and you know narrowly missed me. But when i walked off stage the choir director was standing there. He was staged managing it and he he leaned over and said never throw anything out into the audience. That you don't want to see coming back at you. I like our choir directors. Seen some shit man and i and i learned it so so yeah this this like peace candle thing it really resonates with me and it should have been should have been predictable at that point because even though sunday night was the big conflagration that ended in rioting and trailers being lit on fire all the merge got looted a big. Td control tower was torn down a mercedes. Benz got tipped over and broke. Somebody's leg in in in flipping. This car You know the writing went on for five hours and required five hundred state troopers to come in and put it down and the days that followed when this became a big a big news story the promoters and the mayor of rome. Anybody who had anything to do with this just emphasize how it. Actually it was a great event. There was of course a small number of hooligans. There was a small number of thugs. The may trouble on sunday night. But really it was just a great woodstock event apart from the unpleasantness sure and it came out in subsequent weeks and months as the oral history of this event kind of grew. It became very clear that that was not true at all. The event was disastrous in a near fire festival. Way from the beginning and it just happened to boil over when the chili peppers run stage. But as you're saying they are not the the kind of band that would incite that or delight. In it i mean they ended by playing a cover of jimi hendrix's fire as as everything bird. I don't even know if that was supposed to be there. Encore or not. I'm sure that they knew the tune right. And it was a callback. Jimmy lighting his guitar on fire when he closed the original woodstock right but it turned out to be very apropos deed but not something that they had inside they were reacting to it hendrix. Didn't light is guitar on. Fire at woodstock was monterey. Oh yeah woodstock he. He went on it dawn or something right. Yeah the it's they don't show the crowd because there's almost nobody there and you know that was so even. There was a similar scene at woodstock. Ninety nine people waking up on sunday morning. It was already a refugee camp. There you know it was the kind of vibe where it's just nothing but bodies and solo cups as far as the eye can see people sleeping on pizza. Boxes because ground was money and the crucially. They're white so you can tell if they've impede honor. Not raw sewage everywhere. I mean let's talk about the setting so it was held outside rome new york but it wasn't in kind of the peaceful pasture you would expect from you watching the original woodstock concert film walmart. Parking lot was decommissioned airforce base. Oh the best so worse than a walmart. Parking lot probably The former fort griffiths or something you know. Some forties to ninety s era air force base. But it was paved in portion. Lynn heavily paved very little shade shade trees. it turned out to be a superfund site I think well into the two thousand because of all the the heavy metals were trying to get out of the groundwater right And it was late july in upstate. New york's one hundred degree heat very little shade. What could go wrong. Water was very scarce. They're supposed to be there supposed to be free water but like many festivals of this kind. They're not incentivized. Piles of food were confiscated at the gate and all the water sources seem to be hard to find or shut off in the aid of getting people to pay four dollars for a bottle of water. Five dollars for a hot dog. Doesn't sound crazy now. Those airport or basketball game prices right. Yeah four dollars for a bottle of water when it's one hundred degrees though does feel user areas. I mean any amount for a hotdog and keep in mind. You've got a captive audience. It would take three hours for people to get back to rome new york if they wanted to come and go so basically. Nobody came so a baseball game. You can say well. The a hot dogs are are are ten bucks. I'll i'll eat later. Yeah where he'd water whereas here. Yeah people really had no choice and all the vendors were run by a one outfit. They were charging individual vendors. Seventy dollars for a case of water or soda. That would've cost five dollars in rome so it was a it was a whatever that is eight hundred. One hundred percent increase remarking it up and then they marked it up very slightly but everybody had to sell water for for for soda for for four dollars an upward or they couldn't make penny and people and people ran out of money very quickly at the end of the concert. At least a thousand people one single outfit arranged for rides for thousand people who were broke due to concession spending. I'm mad now i am. I'm already mad. I'm ready to to turnover among many super pro. Start ninety nine going in when you were like corn insane clown posse. This is a pretty good lineup. Come on free water. You gotta have water. It gets worse. Sanitation was a problem. There were twenty six hundred porta-pottys but There yeah the plan was to empty them at night and it turned out the party never ended. There was no night woodstock ninety nine only day. So yeah it's some kind of asimov's story so the porta-pottys were never empty. Oh my god and by by saturday. Sewage is flowing into people's tank campground. Oh no this is awful trigger alert. Everybody's nice new chuck taylors too late to put the trigger alert again and has public health ramifications. There were there. Were there were there. Was a real uptick uptick of stomach cases at rome hospitals now so then people are barking and pooping to from the bad sewage everywhere and these being young people a kind of kind of anything goes atmosphere is pervasive. Sure and i don't that would be true anywhere. I mean it's it's a little tricky. The pay per view cameras love because they are picking out somebody in the crowd taking off her top or flashing the band every few minutes. Yeah and the bands of course are encouraging it but in this kind of In this environment that starts to get a little rapi gets gets raped very quickly from the stage. Both flee and dexter hall of outcast or being like hey hey leave her alone like hey for is sorry. I'll be offering word i say. Oh yeah dexter. Extra three thousand outcast. Sorry dextra from the offspring. Both of them. Are you know yelling at guys in the crowd. You know you can't just grow just because she's wearing that right but it gets bad really quick and i don't know if we know to this day how bad it got somewhere on. The order of a dozen claims of sexual violence like lots of lots of rape allegations including literal gang rapes happening in the mosh pits in front of the stage. Which is and it's not. This is not because of the anything-goes free love woodstock vibe. No but the same kind of idea that hey this is not real life for these three days. We can do what we want. Definitely informs both things like. I'm going to make a bad decision. About how much of whatever i'm ingesting and then i'm gonna take off my top right but but you know can turn less carefree pretty quick well. A lot of the a lot of the music thematically is not. We're all in this together. Peace and love. That's the next thing i want to get into. But but yeah it seems like seems like those reports of sexual violence would be dramatically under reported relative to at any anyone that got reported. There probably five. That didn't yeah. The music is not incidental. it's not like the performances going on and then tragically. There's some weird refugee camp happening. I mean the two things are very much feeding each other. People are all here to see the music and You know there were there were The security the venue security was called the peace patrol. Assure i guess in a nod. Is that in a normal music industry. Term kinda woodstock love. I never heard of it before. Having heard it said well. There's a piece patrol about twelve hundred guys or something. Mostly local hires and some guys carrying baseball bats service with the word piece written on them. Some new york yes. New york city recruiting went on two different two different security agencies. We're test but By sunday they are down. Just hundreds of people due to bad behavior getting fired people just getting sick of the conditions and walking out so by the time of the riots. You have these guys literally retreating before anything that happens. Chain link fences came down so that people could pour in the initial reports after the initial media reports say attendance around two hundred thousand and more recent reports say actually four hundred thousand which i assume a lot of that is just illegal entry. Yeah right so it's kind of a it's now a free entry zone no-man's-land and they could probably secure that perimeter a lot more glove blah better when it was an air force base and they had air force guards but four hundred thousand people. Even if you've got even if you've got a well-guarded base it's hard to keep four hundred thousand people out of two hundred thousand tickets if it's huge and it's just a chain link fence. Yeah that's going to come down somewhere you'd think the smell would start keeping people to drive people out for a while. It didn't i want to say though it. One of the things that makes us sort of generation x. Here in reviewing this is our tendency to try and draw a correlation between violent imagery in song and band and violence in the world and that that for the last few decades has really come up against a strenuous argument on the other side. And this is the we were making that argument to against tipper gore and the video game ladies. Yeah right the thing. We're we're the generation that it was making the strenuous argument against it. But then we as we get older. It's harder and harder to when we talked about insane clown posse and they make the case about their own music. That there's this like like incredibly violent disgusting misogynistic kind of imagery in their songs and they're saying no no no. That's we're actually about peace and that's how we vent those feeling. Yeah that's right and that's how we attract angry kids and then we then we teach him about love and so it's the violence in video games argument right that and there are an awful lot of people that do not want to entertain the idea that that that produces violence in the world and so it right but at the same time. It's very hard to look at woodstock ninety nine and the bands on the bill and not see. It's it's a very testosterone energy and to try and make a connection between that and the violence that did result. But i think we're gonna come up against people that are that are going to say. Hey there's nothing violent about corn we've got some cover here because it's not at a few points it emerges from subtexts. I mean it's easy to say. Hey in hindsight these guys were all just yellen. Angry stuff. Full of a very white male energy and they riled up a bunch of kids. but in fact it's it's exp- it's it's happening. Express leaf explicitly from the stage like at one point I think district came on after alanis morissette and the promoters. We're starting to get worried about the a lotta the unrest and a lot of the violence. 'cause atlanta's morissette did not encourage any rioting not know but Fred durst was asked to. It's the worst. He was asked to encourage the crowd mellow out in. Just let's have a fun weekend and he actually said you know. They want me to say mellow out but guess what mother efforts. That's not what limp is gets about. I want you guys to go crazy and break stuff. One two three four. You had the bands from the stage literally saying the vibe is not. You can go too far and let's chill. I should say the disclaimer. Here i am. One hundred percent against fred durst in every respect infrared. If you're listening you're terrible and and you might be listening to you or a terrible influence on american culture. And as far as i can tell still. Are they gonna thousand thousand year olds fred durst will someday uncover this archive and i really distant future for his success in the world always baffled me and continues to baffle me. I really believe he belongs in in music prison. And i don't understand why west what wes borland saw him. I really feel like west should have should have been in a different band. I'm one hundred percent. Okay with the idea that alienated angry. Young kids listen to metal or punk or whatever it is and it really helps them through those emotions. I'm very pro. Zach de la rocha prozac. I'm prozac so it is really helping your emotional state it a rosiak really me. Are you part of prozac nation. I i remember you know dancing or not dancing but like angrily gesticulating with my hands and it didn't make you go burn down public property or have bad political opinions or beat up no. I burned down public property and had political opinions. I didn't beat up any women. See your only your two for three. But in this case if somebody is actually telling you i kind of i'm an official representative of this event and i want you to break things. Did it all for the nookie and he did. He did it all. For the nookie i guess. He was not discouraging the nookie and he encouraged people to take the cookie in and stick it up. There beep. you shouldn't be putting cookies. there don't put cookies are not sterile. Cookies don't take a little usually not in a in a sewage air force that we take a little yell fudge and put him up there. You'll fudge doesn't want to see that anyway by sunday morning. Predictably the place is a looks like a refugee camp and then it becomes a war zone. Sunday morning briefing. Looks like it's going to be okay. Willie nelson on the main stage. And it's like okay. Last night was nuts. But we're in good hands. Fill it out. Can you imagine willie up there and just the smell of the crowd. Just willy seen a lot. But i bet he wasn't that into it but he's followed by elvis costello who really kind of thinks. He should be an angry young man again out here and kind of pisses off the crowd. I guess he starts with a a really deep cutoff of spike. Maybe yeah he plays pads paws and claws or something like that which you know. He thinks of his one of his angry songs but the crowd turns pretty quickly into his dad. Rock and then it just goes from bad to worse and ends in fire and five hours of state troopers trying to what was there to burn like there. I've seen the images of these giant bonfires. But what do they burned. Good point. I mean the firewood to a no. I mean i guess they're just burning like the pallets. I wouldn't wouldn't infrastructure you. Can once you over power. The merch alley. You can take whatever you want pizza boxes. Maybe it's all about giant pizza box. Yeah i bet. They're burning trash is the worst thing to burn in terms of anything. You do that. Point is going to make the smell better not worse but But it's easy to see this moment. You know just because of kind of the testosterone music. That's gone as far as can at least you know there's many axes on which you can look at rock music but one is you know angry. Young white people getting their rage out and that can have a dark side as we've seen and that whole that endpoint of rock kind of burns itself out here like once you've done this. You can't go any further. Not just artistically. That somebody like fred durst has kind of push push that as far as it can go. Artistically in giant air quotes robbing air quotes. Like once you get bigger or dumber than that and so you kind of you can kind of see woodstock. Ninety nine is the beginning of a retreat. From that. And i don't know what would you think of. You think the stuff that came next could be a reaction to the dead end of that. Yeah i mean at the dead end of nookie ninety nine was i mean. Indie rock was ascendant. Then you had. I mean a cat. Power an exceedingly gentle kind of india and like Neutral milk hotel pavement. There was all this indie rock. That was that was happening and then in two thousand two thousand one indie rock just landed hard. You got you've got That was the year that the mass romantic came out. Two thousand one right. I think that's yeah so yeah late. Two thousand the i new pornographers record and does dot com record. Death cab was came out in the something about airplanes. I think came out in ninety nine but we have. The facts was two thousand so the shins came out right. Then to that for shins record two thousand one so it was like indie rock all of a sudden and indie rock complete antidote like in every around in culture in tone melodic gentles voicing femininity super super all elite seniors for guys it was it was a very gentle time and i think i think after after two thousand yeah. I don't think of of of testosterone in music at all for about twelve for about ten years. It had been drained. All been all been little accepted hip hop but you know like like whatever we would call rock culture which had splintered into thousand places by then. There's always going to be swedish. Death metal the kids wanted something angry to listen to. The mainstream option was now was hip hop. Yeah and compete indie. Rock was a place that you could go like anti anger. i think became a thing Because kids have those overwhelming feelings to the sweetness and love that you can finally express because it's now it's not for for your mom it's i You know impossibly attractive guy or gal from study hall meeting. it's the other. It's the other side of grunge that took kind of ten years to evolve of and like there's a lot of that was the advent of a lot of body positivity inclusiveness in rock cultures. That was when tall people started to intentionally stand toward the back of the room. You know a lot of like. That's the bright line for you. Message board culture where people were super supportive live journal. You know the dawn of a new era where where the idea of making rock concert safe for everybody kind of started to arise you never saw indie rock band. Stand up there and go all right. Let's see all you chicks. Get up and it was like completely different. Good point that it's the sense of community that comes out of the technology the that forms that you know these. These people showing up woodstock ninety nine. We're not looking to hook up with their fellow corden fans that they'd met online and in my career. I was continually astonished by the fact that a lot of times long winters would come to town and the long winters concert would be an opportunity for all these kids who already knew each other from the forums to finally meet em- person so you'd look out at the crowd and and it was like they all knew each other giving hugs and whatnot and this was the first time they'd met but they'd been talking on long winters forums or or bar suk forums for look at the internet people nicer. Yeah it was pretty nice. I mean before. It descended into like judgy cliquishness. Brian hiatt wrote about was that woodstock nine rock journalist wrote about it for sonic net because that's still existed and and has recently wrote for rolling stone kind of a look back at how woodstock ninety nine essentially created the next twenty years. And it's kind of convincing the later that year was the wto riots and that and then pretty much of an unbroken line of kind of protest and anger in the streets that lasts to this day. And that didn't start for woodstock ninety nine. Obviously that was just dumb kids who to water and porta-pottys but you know it did kind of create this. It was the beginning of this image of you know where the future is angry. Young people and where you know even well intended activism is going to have a dark side that we're going to have to deal with And he goes further than that. You know. it's a it was a hot and dry weekend just like are hot and dry future. You got to see a kind of a populist yoyo in a red hat. Standing in front of a crowd of people making a connection between woodstock ninety. Nine and bernie bernie culture and the other way long look at the genetics. Voting numbers a lot of these brian. All kid rock kid. Rock and fred durst fans grew up and to work on her own midwestern car. And they are. They're the same people at trump rally. Still still kind of hooting and hollering at the populace guy in the red cap telling them that That they got troubles. But it's going to be. Okay what's strange is that ninety nine is this moment where were the majority of those attendees gen-x or were they young millennials. Ninety nine if you're right on the cusp if you're twenty if they're high if they're still in high school they are glennon. They're they're old millennials. If they're in college they're young gen xers right. And that's that's that's a weird transition right and which which way half the people at that show became kid. Rock trump voters and half of them became the you know. The original bernie rose the older. The the elder statesmen among the bernie rose. Yeah i mean to. His credit fred. Durst has has yelled at trump online. I guess he really. Hey but it's more like hey come on man. hey man. what's the tone country. does you could be. You could be a leader. The country doesn't need this. He's one of these preferred nurseries. Who wants who wants a new strange new tone from trump for years and trump both did it for the nookie but only one took that cookie and that concludes woodstock ninety nine entry one four four one dot s two eight eight two ticket number two seven two eight seven in the omnibus huge rulings. We hope and pray that if you are a huge fan of any of these bands that we have sort of Denigrated in the show that you do not contact us at all with your defense. If you're telling me one thing we ever should've said even fifteen hundred years hands we're speaking to life are doing it for the nookie sure absolutely but that's a constant but you know like are they. Are they like wrapping and rocking at the same time. Like if you're going to wrap wrap if you're gonna rock rock to rap and rock. I mean unless you're really good at it you could. You could rap and rock if you're good at it if people are planned many of the people at the top of that field. They're not that good at it. That's the thing i mean. Not that great andre. Two thousand is for three thousand. I'm dick andre. Three thousand is pretty good at wrapping rocking hundred three thousand from from the offspring. But he's not but he's not currently producing a ton of music. As far as i know at least in this in our in two thousand and twenty is not sadly if you do feel obligated to defend limp biscuit you can go on our facebook twitter and instagram pages at omnibus project and scream into the void. If you really we have all muted the phrase this game at this point if you really really want to get into a conversation about it you can go to the future. Lynx fan pages at at facebook reddit tiktok and get into an argument with people. There who live who live science-based lives. And i will not. I will not visit the facebook page. During that period there will be a dark time. It would that would that will be the that doesn't exist. Two thousand twenty one. It'll take five hours and five hundred state troopers to get the to get the group back in order if you have any woodstock ninety nine memorabilia that you don't want in your house anymore because of the bad juju you can send it to us. Do post your stories. We would love to hear it. I'm sure there were four hundred thousand people there. I'm sure some of you were there. I bet that's true and have a smarter than ours. either record. yeah please do. You can send us your memorabilia. Po box five seven four four shoreline washington. Ninety one five five. If you really really feel like you need to tell somebody your story and yell at us for some thing we got wrong you can email can at the omnibus project gmail.com. But if you love the show. And i know you do and you'd like to support it. Please consider going to our patriotic patriot dot com slash andreas project and joining our supporters. At whatever level seems like it is the best fit. There's bottled water level. Four dollars. there's the hotdog level five dollars. There's there's a ten dollar pizza slice level all weekend. Pass to woodstock ninety nine cost. You had to guess. John hundred bucks hundred fifty hundred and fifty bucks if you were going to one hundred and fifty dollars to omnibus. It would be like you. You didn't have to see kid. Rock inland biscuit. Live the amount of raw sewage that you will have to stand in if you support omnibus- at the one hundred fifty dollar level is as close zero. It's guaranteed to be zero. Actually we will return your money if there is ever sewage at any point here at a live show. I guess we you. And i would have done a festival. Our word is bond this summer in a the sasquatch successor thing. We were scheduled to appear in the import comedy tint the angels but it got cancelled sadly that would have been our first music festival as podcast. Yeah i would have been fun sort of we kinda done it. We could've done ninety nine. It's really hard to do spoken word in a tent at a music festival. But they keep they keep trying to do it. It's part of the thing it's really now the there's got to be one of everything because then you'll get a broader demographic of ticket buyers todd berry standing in in a hot tent speaking is low. Melania tone voice while while guitars jerome l. outside right over his shoulder. There's you know there's some banned all in black pants plan super loud. Not that good. I've had tonsils pretty cool in kentucky listeners. From our vantage point in your distant past we have no idea how long our civilization survived. We hope and pray that the catastrophe foretold by the woodstock apocalypse may never come. But if the worst comes soon this recording all recordings maybe are funny. But if providence allows. We hope to be back with you soon soon for another entry.

princess diana val kilmer greece john rodrick rebecca deepak roger moore roy roy princess di di da eric ryan thrasher magazine pearce high school woodstock neville chamberlain clinton Celeste ford metallica los lobos ling wikipedia
The Silence Between the Notes

Health Hats, the Podcast

44:56 min | 1 year ago

The Silence Between the Notes

"Welcome to health hats, learning on the journey towards best health. I'm Danny van. Lewin two legged SIS. Gender, old white man's privileged living in a food oasis. Who can afford many hats? And knows a little bit about a lot of health care. And a lot about very little. Most people wear hats wanted to time, but I wear them all at once. We will listen and learn about what it takes to adjust to life's realities. In the awesome circus of healthcare, let's make some sense of all of this. Never of A. Straight! Hi enjoyed playing clarinet in the fourth and fifth grades. I, was second chair in the elementary school band. My mom was super strict about practicing. In, my infinite wisdom, I quit. Today I regret that missed opportunity. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine. I wanted a masters degree. I had an associate degree in nursing plus one hundred ninety scattered credits and no bachelor's degree. I could get a regents degree at the local community college. All I lacked was eleven credits in the state. Credits in anything. So I went to the music department I asked if I could get credit for taking clarinet lessons. I was told now not unless I was planning to be a music teacher. But just then a man walked in and said he needed another sax player in the Jazz Band. No I don't play sex, but if you give me clarinet and Sax Lessons I'll play in the jazz band. Done deal by. The second semester they gave me a baritone saxophone the play. In love. After I got my bachelor's I stopped playing while I got my masters at the University of Minnesota. I've been playing regularly since one thousand ninety four. That's twenty six years for six days a week. In jazz bands, big bands, a Latin Blues punk band. Sometimes no bands. Like peak experience in musicals out of Blues Cruise a few years ago. My oldest friend John gave us tickets for our fortieth wedding anniversary. The first night on the cruise I went to a pro am jam, professionals and amateurs. Except for me. The amateurs were local professionals. There were horn players from Los Lobos and a roomful of blues. They got a kick out of this old guy with a berry sex and said stuff like. Whatever we play, you play C E. and G or something like that? Wa was part of a professional horn section. Oh it. Was Heaven Vernal man? My Guest Gabrielle Pittman. Is a customer attuned marketer by day. indie musician champion by. Gabrielle used to dream of building a career as a recording artist who could sell out rural tours? Thank the attitude of Rena. With the lyrical. Prowess of Stevie Nicks combined with a little etta James and amy wine house. And as she began the process of promoting her first EP and booking shows in Austin Texas, the podcasting fellowship came along. That's where we met. Him Now Gabrielle produces the musicians can thrive podcast. This audio documentary explores the ways that musicians and other creative people in that industry make money and build careers that are sustainable long-term. She is setting up. The business is a nonprofit, so musicians can thrive can grow into an organization that champions Indie musicians around the world. Gabrielle still write songs in her spare time. So whether you listen to an episode of musicians can thrive, or you listen to the music that you'll be releasing this year. You can sink your teeth into the stories and the music. All may now. All. Man? I'm so glad. To you. Glad to be talking to you, too. This is really fun for me. Good I love your podcast. Honestly that means so much. Thank you, bye! Follow a lot of podcasts and I confess that I don't listen to very many. All. Or everyone. But Yours is one of them. Wow. Speechless because I understand that challenge, there is so many podcasts out there in so many interesting stories to listen to so there are a lot there's just and there's not enough time. And mine time to listen is low. And you know you just want support people. Yes, but. I'm just so, why do I listen to yours regularly? Well for one, I love music and I love. It's not my like. Brain music. I I'm. So what I've done professionally for. You know forty five years. I'm really good at what I do and not so much music. But I've been playing music. For. Thirty five forty years. Now while that's longer than me. She longer than I've been alive. So, So it's, it's humbling for me and it uses a very different part of my brain. And I really enjoy. Listening to people talk about the music. and. And so and your. Your podcasts are just they're so gentle. That's what I like you. They wash over me. I like that you know it's like relaxing to listen to him and it's interesting and relaxing. while. I'm glad to hear that. So you are a musician, so I'm an adult learner and I've never actually taken a music class. And my life, even, though I've had many teachers and I'd been studying with a guy from earthly. You know in Austin Berkeley College of Music for more than ten years. He's a wonderful teacher. That Dan Fox, no, no! No No, his name is Jeff Harrington. He's a SAX player. And now Dan is is a community treasure. You know that He. Yes, you know sponsor so much music. It was such a pleasure to interview him way. Such a pleasure to interview him by the way, thank you again for connecting the two of us, so you went from Montana to Austin right. I did yes, so, how did that happen? Well You know. It's funny the way that things work out because. As. A child you view things in life one way, and you may be aware of how things are helpful, but the degree to which things are helpful often doesn't quite hit you until you're an adult and so. I had just graduated eighth grade. I lived in a small town. I went to a small country school. And My class was maybe twenty people, and I was very attached to you going onto high school and having that whole experience of Bozeman Montana. So I was honestly really angry when my dad dolby that we were moving to Austin, Texas I thought it was this random place with a bunch of sand and a bunch of Cactus, and I was like great grew up in Montana I already know the ride your horse to school jokes like. Why why would I go to Texas? And then we get here and it is this. Vibrant place with music. Where you walk around, and there's music spilling out of almost every restaurant. or at least a lot of the bars, especially, he go to six street. And I just happened to be very fortunate and my father is an entrepreneur. So he basically chose Austin as a place for our family to come. My mom needed sunlight. Austin had interesting. Happenings with businesses involved with tech, and it was also a music city, and my dad has been my biggest supporter of music. The entire time that I've been a musician and so. Honestly I just had very very good luck. How long have you considered yourself musician? GonNa make me do math on a Saturday. Let's say. Fourteen years. I think that's about right. Basically, I was eight years old and I'm twenty three now for context and one day. I honestly can't even tell you where it came from, I just had this. Deep desire like I needed to play guitar. Pestered my mom until I got one. And that's where it started. Okay, and so you gotTA. Qatar and it was like I'm a musician as Well the reason let me tell you why I'm asking this question. Yes, is that okay so I'm sixty seven and I'd been playing like I said I've been playing music since I was in my thirties and I would say it's only this year that I considered myself a musician. Really Yeah because. Well for one. I'm not professional. I will never be professional. I am so aware of my. Limitations as a musician. That I never even. Considered myself as a musician. And then I thought Oh my. God I have been playing like five to seven days a week for thirty some years. This is. Like! What else communication? you know like I'll never make a business of it like. Well I think. There's something to be said for not placing DOT limitation on the definition of what it means to being session because that's actually something that. I began exploring as part of the process of making my own podcast. Musicians can thrive because. What what does it mean to be a musician? What does it mean to cross that line between amateur or professional or hobbyist or professional and so? Just in my own journey, it wasn't until I had to choose between dance lessons and guitar lessons around Sixth Grade, or so that I really decided okay. Music is what I want from my life and I don't know how it's going to happen yet, but. I'm a musician. And Actually as I started making my podcast, it was in the midst of. Realizing that I did not want to live the musician life that I thought. I wanted to spend over ten years. Thinking about how to build a career as a performing touring according musician basically trying to be the next Stevie Nicks. Riana. And realizing that I didn't want that forced me to go through A. Really. It was surprisingly long period where I had the sort of identity crisis. And what I've come to. Understand is that. Making money off of music does not actually decide whether you are a professional or not. I much preferred the even press fuel, okay, man, who wrote the war of art and turning pro so. I've yet actually finished the war of art, but. What I understand. Is that. The act of showing up consistently again and again playing your instrument performing music. That's what makes you are professional. The money is just what enables you to keep it going and a lot of ways. Yeah, but it's this showing up. That makes you a professional so by definition you are most. A musician and I'd say professional at that. Wow, that makes sense. So I, play now in a community, blues funk band and a Latin band. and. I played in a big band I played in jazz bands. And sometimes I think like. Why I. Why don't they check me out, you know. And I think I. Think it's two things well. I think several things one is I play berry sacks, and there's not that many berry sex players. And I'm not. I'm not technically that good, not a virtuoso. I don't have like really good shops, but but you don't need to with a very sex. It's not like playing an alto. and. And I'm a nice guy and I show up. you know the day? That's half the battle. Nice Guy Fun to work with. You can be relied on to show up when they need you. Yeah, and so. Right and. So much fun. Isn't it. It is I mean I would say that. The the Latin band is the newest thing and they came to me. Somebody came to me and said you know we need a berry player. Do you WanNa? Play and I'm like I never played that music. Good I know, and the first time I want while I turned him down and then I thought I've always wanted to be part of a horn section. This is my opportunity. There's an Alto trombone trumpet and. solids like four horns in one like everything else. I've ever played. Except the big Dan is Ben I bend the only Horn player and thought. Here's the opportunity, so why not and the first time I went? Oh, my God! I was lost they were like. Oh, just just listen and play just. Read the chart and concert see even though I have an e flat instrument. I was lost absolutely lost, and I got in the car and I cried. Like I cannot do this like this is just too much, but they're really nice. People and I've been working at it. And now good enough you know and I'm getting better. And they appreciate that I'm getting better and that I'm working at it. And probably that you're willing to come back even after that curse challenging experience that might my mind many breakdown in the car. I guess another thing that attracted me to your podcast. Was that your podcast? And and that we you know I met you through the podcasting community. and. A big part of what I think. The my the art of being podcast for me. is how I use music, and so just while you're just before we started talking I'm working on the episode that I'll publish tomorrow, and it's about medical ptsd in the world. I'm using the animals tune. Got, you, know! We gotta get out of this place bids last thing we ever. Do you know that tune? I wish I could say I did. To my episode annual here, but Yes von is like how to use music. Yes as part of the palate that you have. In this art form which is podcasting. Really light how? But if I was going to give you a criticism, I would have to say I would like to hear more of us. Well. I appreciate that I. That's been another part of the dirty figuring out. How much of my own story to weave into things? Eligible. It is but one of the things that I have come to. Appreciate more and more as I. Become both a podcast. And a musician, because that was part of my crisis last year do I say I'm not a musician anymore because I'm not trying to perform and make money off of it or do I, have a podcast or now. What? What do I do so? I realized that there's room for all of it and I am primarily a songwriter with which is probably a part of why I have the perspective on music that I. do because music and podcasts. Are Stories over. They are in that through. That's great music helps you tell the story does other adding ambiance to a moment in a podcast or whether it's helping. Take you into the context. Of something that. The person who is featured on the podcast. They're telling you a story in. You're helping the listener. Basically live in that moment through nothing but audio. Yes and I think especially. The state of the world right now we need stories more than ever. We need stories from all kinds of different voices. And Music is one way that we can do that. Yeah. And being a songwriter seems like year. There's a lot of poetry to your music. I can't say I've listened to a lot. Maybe three or four of your tunes, and you know on Youtube and were. Almost! The poetry is great. I mean it. It's I think your your lyrics are. Our special. Thank you yeah! I didn't realize that you listen to my music. How exciting is that? All right so. So You know who Sheila Jordan is. The name sounds familiar G.. Sheila Jordan, actually Dan Fox, who we have in common, now interviewed her a couple of weeks ago on his facebook page. She's a singer in her nineties. He's an old friend of ours. My wife was her massage therapist. And she still touring I mean not touring right now, but she interrupted at tour to go home, and you know whole up, but she's in her ninety. Still touring, we heard her in Boston and about. A year and a half ago. At all my got. She has got some pipes and. She was playing with a young band that was the local musicians local Boston musicians. You could tell the band was pumped. To play with her I. Bet they were like. Better than they usually are because they were playing with her. Fat Off her energy? Yeah, because she was just so excited, and she interacted with the band, and she is such a a voice as instrument. Cigarettes, and you could just see her. improvising off of what they were doing. a which is like sorta like anything. You know a musician that can listen. It's priceless. And actually I find for myself as a musician I've only begun. To figure out how to play. Less and listen. And loop space. It's much more satisfying. And and that's actually what I'm working on these days, but anyway so tell me what are musicians doing these days? WHO Like can't go play out. WHAT ARE PEOPLE DOING Get by. while. It's definitely been a challenge and dots probably an understatement. What I! Think my favorite saying that I've seen come out of this is. How? I've noticed a lot of musicians just in the few live streams that I've watched. Or participated in. Being able to have the audience. said a comment. Basically say oh I love this, or will you play this song or Even just as how they are letting them know that they appreciate the musician showing up and playing the music. The musicians have gotten to have. Direct feedback and interaction with their audience that. When you're on a stage and you hear people cheering or you see them dancing. Are you hear them clapping? Yes, that's. One kind of interaction and playing on stage and feeling that. I'm not sure if adoration is the right word, but just the love and appreciation that's coming from the audience enjoying your performance. That feeling is unlike anything else in the world, and it's honestly one of my favorite feelings. But being able to hear people's words are had them directly request songs as a different kind of interaction. It's almost more intimate in many ways. And I can see a lot of musicians appreciating that. But at the same time it's also incredibly challenging to. Adjust to this because. There is the challenge of demand and attention span because. I love many different artists, but if they're live streaming more than once a week. The odds that I will have the personal time or just mental bandwidth to go and find it and participate. Very low and so. One of the things that I've found is. Now more than ever. Musicians need us to support them with our money. Because we don't get. You get paid less than a dollar. Every single time a song as streamed, you get a performance royalty. It's less than even five cents for most of the streaming services. and. It's hard for me to reconcile that. Because on the one hand I've grown up the daughter of an entrepreneur I am a student of SAS quoted in and Tim, Ferriss many other was people who encourage you to give some work away for free to build the audience. But at the same time. It costs money to create the recorded songs. It's more affordable than it was before, but it's still money that goes into it and besides you gotta eat. Exactly, so how can? Support Musicians. Well, one of my favorite ways is buying merch. Artists okay. So I find that encouraging people, an hats and cups and stuff like that. There's all kinds of cool things. There's even an artist I love who wrote and drew a whole graphic novel. Actually it matches up with the album like I could go on a very long tangent about how genius that whole strategy was, but at the end of the day. I find that. Encouraging people to buy music to buy a CD, while that is wonderful, we all have all kinds of demands on what we are going to spend our money on and so. If you can buy a t shirt or like. People are going to buy t shirts anyways, so why not buy one? That sells the artists that you love and it shows to other people in the world or other people at this point looking at you on social media. That you're a part of this tribe. Help others find the others the people who do things like we do the people who love the music that we do. And I think becoming. Aware of what your smallest viable. is going to become more important than ever in part because of that. But. Word about our sponsor abridge. US A Bridge to record your doctor. visit pushed the big pink button and record the conversation. Read the transcript or listen to collapse when you get home. Check out the APP at a bridge DOT com. Aby are high, D., G. E. DOT COM or download it on the apple APP. Store or Google play store. Record your healthcare conversations. Let me know how it went. That was going to be my next question was. How do you think? Going through this Cova. And the dynamic of. Surviving is a musician whether it's emotionally surviving are. Financially surviving. What do you think musicians will stick with? Well! I think it's different for each musician. There are many people who. Their guitarist, who just plays in someone, else's band, and they are an incredible player, but they don't have the ability to go. Hey, I'm going to sing and play, and these are my original song. Come join me in this story. How do they get people to just listen to them playing instrumental guitar for an hour or so? And so there. Are Some really wonderful ways to support musicians and one of them besides Merch is patriotic on. Where musicians can build. That smallest viable audience, the people who go okay I love what you're doing. And I'm going to regular show up and support you with my money, and you're going to use that money to regularly show up and deliver music to me. And I think a complimentary way to do that is there's this platform called twitch? And it's primarily known as a video game streaming platform. But one of the really interesting things about twitch is. Because there are all of these video gamers. Who have devoted audiences by the hundreds of thousands who come in watch them play the video game. I can sort of understand it, but there's a part of me. That's like this crazy. But the the wonderful thing about it is. They become trusted curator's. So if they are playing music while they're watching while they're playing a video game. And the people watching. We're to go They like this song. How do I feel about this song? I think I like it, too. It's going to remind me of this moment ahead of this experience I shared with all these people on this livestream, watching my favorite Gamer destroy the competition in CS, cow or something. And so a musician could be a partner in that livestream in play live music. Instead of the Gamer playing recorded music in the background. So I think it's just going to. Force people to become really creative? In ways that we haven't previously considered so, are you on patron? Not yet there you go. I'm figuring out what I would want to offer. But that is something I will be looking into doing. To all right well. Why don't you do it like in the next month? Honestly I might have to just to get some. Ability to do more with these can thrive, so offer your new track. Start Small Kozelsk. Not a bad idea well, it starts with one person so I think here on person. Well honestly part of my delay. Doing this is i. was originally. Intending on music can thrive into an LLC. Okay, but. In light of. To Be Blunt, the. Killings and protests of the past week. I have done a lot of reflecting because I was deeply disturbed by what was going on. Disturbing. And honestly yesterday. I pretty much did the equivalent of like either burying head in the sand like an ostrich or feeding into my shell like a turtle. Because? It's it's Yeah. We are messed up. Basically, the results of putting sand was I got some quiet to reflect on. Okay, this is. Horrifying, and what can I do to help in some small way and what I can do is I can tell the stories of all kinds of musicians of all kinds of races and ethnicities and backgrounds. Yeah, and you're really good at it so. Yeah I'll bet there's some songwriting in that as well. Absolutely the political riot songs are GonNa roll out so. Get Ready. I'm I'm I'm? Here. In light of that musicians can dive may actually end that being a nonprofit so that I can help people better, so I just need to take some time to look into all that before I start. Earning money through musicians contrive. Well here's a different way thinking about it. Put yourself out there on. Fan so you can. Begin to get some experience with. Just the process of the money through Patriot Fan and then when you're ready to be an LLC be an LLC. You don't need to be LLC to be out there and start building a fan base. This is true yeah. Is An excellent point. Well thank you. Thank you that. So. What should we be talking about that? We're not. Well if you're interested in talking about songwriting and stories, I had this thought come to me in the past couple of days. So when I was a bow. I WANNA. Say Twelve years old I was just starting to come into my own as a songwriter and figure out. What I wanted to say. That was more interesting than which boy was currently ignoring me in the hallway. Because love songs are a great place to learn how to write a song the inevitably. It gets a little old when all your playing is love, songs and so. My Dad. Told me about. They Scottish philosopher. Who basically is known for saying something along the lines of? If I can write the songs. THAN! It doesn't matter to me. Who writes the laws? Where he was going with that is. The songs the poems the ballots. The stories throughout history are what truly capture the hearts and minds of people. And if you want to change something. Earning. People's trust getting their heart. And their mind, to, BE ALIGNED WITH YOURS Is Half the battle. I don't quite agree with that quote because I think. We live in time where who writes laws actually does make. A pretty significant difference, but the point of being able to. Change things through the stories that you tell that still stands. You Doing A! The oft attributed quote to the Eighteenth Century Scottish writer and politician Andrew Fletcher. Is. Let me. Make songs of the nation. And I care not who makes the laws. What he actually wrote is this. I knew a very wise man so much of cer- Christopher's sentiment. That, he believed that the man were permitted to make all the ballads he need not care who should make the laws of a nation, and we find that most of the ancient legislators thought that they could not well perform the manners of a city without the help of a lyric and sometimes of dramatic poet. And so. There are some musicians out there today who? bemoan the loss of the storytelling musicians, people like Bob Dylan and the Beatles who had lyric extent. Were political that basically drew a line in the sand and said Hey, this is not okay, or we can do better than this. Any any number of spins on that. There were a lot of songs in the sixties and seventies, even before then, and after that talk about. Hey, this is wrong or this needs to be made better. And I think that now more than ever. We need that kind of songwriting to come back. And there are people who have continued to do it. There's actually a rapper that I. Love has name is Jay Cole. And his lyrics tell some wonderful stories. They're not comfortable stories, but their stories worth listening to. And I was actually. Well! I was putting my head in the sand yesterday. I was watching a TV show that is based on a series of books that I love. The shadow hunters, and although it's really silly at it's angels versus demons and Vampires and werewolves. The way that they use music in. Television are film. To also help tell the stories. I think that's. That's how we're. GonNa make. That way, too. So, that's just where my creator brave is going okay, so if I'm a storyteller. Go about doing this. Well that's great. Outing I'm an eager consumer. I appreciate that. So anything you want, ask me. I listened to episode of Your podcasts before we did this because. Limited time don't get to listen to all the podcast. I Want I want to make sure that I. knew more about you and. Your episode on sharing the stories and helping the helpers. You started with this. Wonderful story about. This is your grandmother. who was a Jewish woman hiding from the Nazis? To us. And I think there's something to be said for preserving. Our history in a way that. I think we've forgotten about in the past couple of years. Past couple of decades this more accurate. And I'm just wondering if that's. Changed me. It seems like it's affected your perspective on. Corentin Kovin in how we move through this as a people. Yes, I, actually think more about my mother who is also in hiding during the Holocaust and I'm more in touch with. Her experience. Even though I learned about being in hiding I from my grandmother, because my mother didn't talk about it, but then when my mother did. My adult years, she never talked about it. In my young years I, think several things one is that I'm glad she's gone now. Because what's happening now with totally freak her out. And I think that. This is nothing compared to what she went through. I'll absolutely while I think it's important. To realize that? You can always find somebody who hasn't worse than you. It's still your situation white, still your tragedies. It's still your heartache. It's still your. Emotion it's all yours and. Comparing has mixed value. But, so what do I? Think I think that my mother survived. With denial. That's how she survived like four or five years as a teenager hiding. And or maybe it was three or four years and on the logic to that. 'cause I grew up with. And my reaction to it was no way. Bladder, self denial is not my style, so I'm the opposite. Is I wear it all on my sleeve? And that's what you hear in my podcasting is. I. Let it all hang out. A. And I do think that like the episode dead. I'M GONNA publish tomorrow on PTSD. You know when I think about what's the one thing you can do? It's like connect. Share and whether you're on the receiving end or the giving end connected share. 'CAUSE! It's hard. It's really hard. So I don't know if that really answers your question, but. It's a good one. And say you. said. What needed to be said? Thank you very much for. Chatting with me you're welcome. Having will chat again. Fan It was such an honor by Danny. Doing. A Mozart said the music is not in the notes, but in the silence between. I love that it fits with my outlook on life. Listen to the pearls outside the boundaries beyond the obvious connections. I'm pumped to be a musician continual learning. Minearology told me that he has nothing better for me than playing the sex. Good for my lungs, my dexterity creates new brain pathways and keeps me spiritually sound. I'm a musician. Thanks Gabrielle. Listeners and readers stay safe and keep relatively sane. A. Jarring. See The show notes previous podcasts and other resources. On my website, www. Dot Health. Dash hats. Dot Com. Slash pod. Please subscribe or contribute. If you like it, share it. Thanks. See around the block.

Gabrielle Pittman Dan Fox Montana Stevie Nicks Danny van Austin TA University of Minnesota Austin Texas Texas Boston Austin Berkeley College of Mus Sheila Jordan Austin etta James Lewin Los Lobos John Wa
Birthdays

The Children's Hour

58:00 min | 2 years ago

Birthdays

"Why did the man get heartburn after eating birthday cake i. I don't know why he forgot to take off the candles. Eh doc the garbage truck again. Barking baby stopped my day join the copy on and without the milk and within the go round going open the door and it began to rain but all the leading down day day hey <music>. Hey good say aw aw checked again ready for this day. Stuck in traffic. Jam wins mccovey hope it does stay muster. The run looking like address came from a marathon it. Did i forget to put on if you see me member. Stay way as some just can say say uh-huh it. It's it's a k eh. It's it doesn't yeah that was josh loveless from a brand new cd. Hey it's a good day and in fact it is a good day. You're tuned to the children's children's hour and we have a huge studio full of people in the room. Hello everyone great to have everybody here. I am katie stone. I am imaging hutton. I am maya lucille malone. I'm gray patent. I'm amadeus menendez. Hi leila hi. I'm c._n._n. Allen yellow. It's really hi. I'm just elliott in howdy then everybody. Here's celebrates their birthday at some point in the year. Do you or do you not today is a special day for the children's our our little nonprofit the children's our inc which produces our show is turning one year old today so we got to thinking about birthdays. What do we do on our birthdays today. We have a cake with a single. Oh candle for the children's hour all my last birthday. I also had a family dinner on my last birthday. I win cross country skiing and i lost my ski t- minds a little bit less exciting but i recently for my birthday went all around california going to natural history museums on my birthday. I adopted a re-live will but it does not live my house. Did you just say you adopted a real live whale yet quayle. This sounds like a whale of a tale or is it a whale's tail. She actually adopted away from the world. Wildlife foundation which means that that whale is protected. What a great gift. Every family has their own traditions but also cultures have traditions to when we think of birthdays is in america we think of birthday cake and ice cream with candles people singing the song happy birthday and getting presents but have you ever stopped to think about where this tradition in comes from why the cake in the candles and what's the deal with the birthday song people seeing it in their own language all over the world. I'm not children's hour. We wanted to find find out more so we did some research and we know that some kids don't even get a special day that marks the calendar day. They were born. Stay tuned for more birthdays around the world. <music> was born orange. Spencer spencer was born angel saying they blew on their horns and they they they smile on the day on the day. That isabelle was born. It is about aw it is the angels saying they blew their horns. Dan this bell was on the day cody was born on all the angels sang on their horns and then on the day it on the day the nikolaos nikolaos bar on the on the angels sang and they blew on their horns arms and the rest of the day <music> someone muncie and sunday singing their blown on their heart. Take out their hands right now. So on the day was born was born staying in the smile on the day each one of us <music>. I want to get back amazing amaz go. There's a chance the follow you would go to a quick when comparing pantic go to penn state still be they have they have but they you you happy happy but a fee but they do we wish utah where we they will <music> tinley happy birthday a single out of vietnam and before that you you heard cathy fink and mercy mercer from there all wound up cd along with brave combo on the day that you were born. You're listening to the children's. Hour in vietnam birthdays are celebrated one day of the year. Everyone celebrates on the exact same day called tech which is also the beginning of the new year traditionally family members. Give kids money on that day called lucky money. Vietnamese children say that they were born in the year of the symbol of the winner calendar for that year. I'm a bore and i'm a rooster. In india. A birthday means new clothes kids wake up early put on their new outfit and then honor their parents by touching their feet. Usually the whole family will go to a shrine for special prayers that are said. I'm the child is blessed at school. Kids give out chocolates or candies and at the end of the day. There's a special curry stew into rice pudding. Some of their families pop. A balloon filled with confetti over the birthday kids ahead birthdays around the world sure are different. Here's one india abetted hotel humby but muhammad governor of new york guy had people <hes> eh day to come but columbia get it but her couple bubalo kinda committee due to the unreal that time goody. I'm more keke like to be to be happy by <music>. The the uh-huh into a good the guy they didn't even in commanding <music> <music> act thank in the fetus <music> doc the food yeah <music> in saudi site indeed dot u._p._e._n._n. The lady keeping unclean beep yeah it in the background from joel from the greatest hits cd crummy sings happy birthday before that the rough guide the bollywood for children muhammad rafi asha bosley mono- day happy birthday to you. This is the first they show celebrating birthdays today. Well the good. The data <music> indeed <music> <music> <music>. You're listening to the children's hour and we're talking about birthdays around the world out sienna. What are you i'm doing. I'm pulling your ear lobe once for each year. You've been a lively la. This is what happens in brazil to the birthday boy or girl but that's not the best part about birthdays in brazil children eat candy shaped like fruits and vegetables on their birthdays and houses are decorated with beautiful colorful paper flowers and banners while i guess getting your ears ears pulled is better than what happens on your birthday in saudi arabia. Why what happens there. In saudi arabia people do not observe birthdays at all to distract spiritual beliefs. Nothing happens on your birthday there nope but people do celebrate in saudi arabia. They celebrate religious holidays and weddings birthdays. What's really interesting. Is that that just across the red sea from saudi arabia the egyptians live it up on birthdays. They have lots of friends and family over for a party and they served not one but the two birthday cakes one has candles while the other one doesn't plus they serve cookies individual cakes sesame sticks and small sandwiches in egypt chipped homes are also decorated like in brazil but with paper garlands called zina that look like chains of snowflakes there are especially big parties on a child's first birthday egypt lose singing dancing and flowers and fruits decorating the house symbolizing life and growth yeah uh-huh in the birthday song done egyptian by a band called mixed traffic traumatic. You're listening to the children's hour and we're talking about birthdays birthdays around the world and even birthdays around the nation can be a little bit different here in new mexico. We share many traditions of old mexico kids. Here often have pinatas at birthdays. These are paper michelle michelle animals or designs stuffed with candy. They get hung up at a party and one at a time kids. Get a blindfold put on and then try to hit opinion with a stick until it breaks then all the kids scramble for candy which goes flying everywhere. This is a song that often and gets stung when the pin yada is being hit with the stick. This is the pinata song done by los lobos act. I i love that now with the follow up with. I love i love your it turns out the pin. Yada tradition is ancient and can be traced back to china the tradition was passed onto europeans in the fourteenth century with marco polo and became associated with celebrating lent pinatas were originally made out of clay. The spanish conquistadors and missionaries brought the tradition of the panatta to north america. They found a similar tradition already here. It was a celebration of and i'm gonna let leela pronounce this. We'd still poached louis. The celebration always had a game with a clay pot on a pole decorated with feathers. I am filled with tiny treasures. The pot would be broken with a stick and treasures with fall out as an offering to the god but the minds also played a game that is much like how we we use pinatas here today on birthdays. The mind game was that the clay pot was suspended by a string and the player was blindfolded and given the stick to try to break the pot. It was the missionaries who added the colorful paper decorations to these traditions trying to convert the locals to catholicism in mexico and new mexico geico hispanic girls will celebrate a special birthday when they turn fifteen they're kenyatta which celebrates their entrance into womanhood there is usually a huge party the girl where an extravagant gorgeous stress and there's music dancing and food. It's often described as being as elaborate as a wedding one song you might hear. We're on a new mexican or mexican birthday. Is this one last month. Anyth- this is the mon- yanni geico reports. The two son to alaska can the speier. Maybe this spirit mehta data on this you yard <music> gum on luna us. Oh nice done. I'm on yana ebbing loss on on most those mongols blessed off phillies dot com nasty nas nausea about these don. Yeah i the only parallel petya from a cd call discotheque up a taya less money anita some before that you heard louis lobos from a cd called papa's dream with the pinata song they call it lapin lapin yata. You're listening to children's hour. We're talking about birthdays today. Everybody knows the birthday song. It's been translated into more than fifty languages since is sung worldwide but few people know the full history of the song happy birthday to you is the most recognized song in the english language. The melody comes from the song good morning to all which people think was written by american sisters patty and melgen jay hill in eighteen eighteen ninety three some belief that the sisters actually copied the tune from other popular similarly nineteenth century songs that predated. There's including a song by worst. I waters called happy greetings to all and good night to you. All both written in eighteen fifty-eight others say that kids probably adapted good morning to off birthdays reading the familiar happy birthday. We are in the process. It was first published with the we're experiencing today. Nineteen eighteen in a book called children's praise and worship. There's a long kind of boring story about this song how it was copyright by piano player and writer in nineteen thirty five and that copyright copyright meant <unk> anytime anyone sung song or played it on the radio or anywhere they had to pay the company for the use of the song of course people don't pay anyone to sing happy birthday but the copyright was only officially thrown out by a federal judge in two thousand fifteen. That judge said that the song is in in the public domain. Anyone can sing or performance or play anywhere for free. No one owns happy birthday. A in the usa san usa schwer were usa -sarily me. How about kitty cats only believe. Are you ready. That was great. How puppies <music> only take you use anne anne shwe your son eh. Let's say uh music for little people from the album universe of song right here on the children's hour in thinking about birthdays. We wanted to know why we put candles on a cake. That tradition goes back thousands of years to the ancient greeks ancient greeks would put candles on a round cake to pay tribute to the greek goddess of the moon arduous automous who was the twin sister of apollo and the daughter of zeus. The candles were to look like reflected moonlight. There are other traditions that i used candles on cakes in all germany centuries ago a kennel in the middle of a cake symbolized the light of life the first people we know who actually used candles on a cake to celebrate a birthday where the romans they may kicks out a flower all of oil honey and grated cheese. Um be per day had a birthday. We <hes> <hes> you be birds. They and may all your dreams. Come true through when you blow out the and one lied stay soglo <music>. It's the lao lighting your is where you go at berkeley the bird being a view and be a may god allowed both light stains glow in your eyes okay. Let's sing it one more time for everybody who has a birthday this be a bieber. Oh <hes> the lines blow your we. Are you go off the camel's. Uh a ah the candles around the k. Don't you know don't you know how come stay when a when a blow in how how our scream and shout bam bam dave a doggie and in you too but not a mom take a little spin and then you push the pin. It's the third they could share there is no i just one can be ma. The music bill is stop. The music's gone is star. It's your day long here. Comes the mom maman new. We've all been waiting for now on. Do who's running for the door. Everyone just gather round. The candles are the deep breath claws. Ma issue was iran iran uh-huh david <music>. I can ooh <music> now bird. They have a good time to pay now bird. They celebrate your jio dancer down run and jump on this wonderful day this time i need help now. We're going to get the birthday. Take up to the front and say hey. You're gonna shout out their name go. Hey it's your bird ed thing good to celebrate your donald dance around ham down luberon and playing on this wonderful day single women <music> now now bird but now it's your birthday. That's the sugar free allstars i from their cd funky fresh and sugar free. It's your birthday was justin roberts from his meltdown cd and back when happy birthday tom chapin we're talking about birthdays on the children's hour listening to shake. We'll be right back <music> <music> <music> <music> <music>. You're listening to the children's hour and we're talking about birthdays today. There are kids who celebrate a different kind of birthday. It's the day that they were adopted. In the united states the saturday before thanksgiving thanks giving is national adoption day and here's a song by john mccutcheon to all the kids who were adopted and have that date to celebrate too <music> all girls <music> could've seen who could have possibly known all these roads we have travel the places we be would have finally taken us and its use to are you an three cheers to let shouted hip four world <hes> so tattered and torn you came to our house that wonderful more and all of a sudden. This family was born. Oh happy adoption and there are things happening by chance mistreat their whole life but we had boys. I'd we had a choice we were working and weighty and it's news to three to shouted array or oh arroyo so you came to our house some wonderful born all of a sudden saw this was borne all happy <music> <music> <music> ladder no matter no matter <music> how you came to be. I know skin. We are all skin. We are all of us one one breach. Let's array brand food that verbal. Oh born earn oil and happy yeah. Let's show it so far from the sun. This fabio r._b. Was bar oh happy but oh happy <music> day friday judge for standing bear on to pay for my inside the shined on their head on win with britain do you i don't bowl or does oh stop it. Through the day for everyone was body. Zu swann heart say what uh-huh <music> glenn. I will go there with four rows. Rosen birthday read thing so through on the baby so your calendar turning away by bird record who hotter than friend. I'm never happy a <hes> be a friend. <hes> <hes> <music> i that was the hobbit birthday song from a c. D. called don't go drinking with hobbits by mark gun before that you heard cake for breakfast. Greg lee from the where in the world is carmen sandiego go c._d. While my birthday it's a pretty big deal for me. At least usually i wake up in the morning and there's breakfast in bed presence and kids come climbing into my bed and hand me the things that they've made me. It's a pretty fun morning and then. I usually spend the day doing whatever it is. I want to do on on my birthday but i can do that because my birthday happens in the summer for so many kids their birthday happens in the school year and so it becomes a lot harder to celebrate on the actual birthday doing exactly what you want to do but that doesn't mean you can't wait until the weekend to have your party however it's very different from what happens in denmark in denmark a flag is flown outside the window of a house to designate that someone in the house is having a birthday that day presents are placed around the birthday person's bed while they're sleeping so that they see them immediately upon waking up and if a man or a woman has not been married by the age thirty they will be called pepper man or pepper made and friends will give that person pepper mill or a pepper shaker to mark the occasion in denmark. It's a big deal. When you turn around number like twenty or thirty or forty you could have a party that includes hundreds of the people and even more you can expect to be seated at the dinner table at that party for up to six hours as people give speeches and sing sing songs and sketches are performed by friends all to celebrate the person's big birthday well. Here's a song you'll often hear on birthdays days right here on the children's hour celebrating birthdays. This is the beatles yeah aw thanks listen. <music> <music> yeah <music> aw marched on teams scene two weeks day say well go check it twice what jones so now as as you come on now say it maybe chocolate cake often aw outta to jesse yet it just uh-huh now from now say they you and you and you do now. Salad day is now al sabah this take that was the jimmy from a cd called practically ridiculous the birthday song before that birthday done by the beatles beatles off the white album. The children's hour is written and produced by katie's down withheld from all on the kids. Vanessa vassar asir and gary newell are photos and the kids crooned team team manage our social media sinus on instagram facebook and twitter. We're at teasing a radio. We'll be back next week with another addition of radio. We're going to go out with some destiny's child from her nineteen. Ninety eight self titled release love <music> it the time has come and it's fun and they have weaken celebrate because this too to thank you. Just ask me shit. Eh you bake this day. History <music> <music> <music> eh act eh <music> <music> <music> happy birthday and the children's hour is a production of the children's hour incorporated a new mexico nonprofit dedicated to producing high quality kids public radio support provided by the friends of the children's hour more at children's our dot org there you can find our social media feeds pictures from our shows rose podcasts and our contact form. Let us know what you think of the show. Meow wolf is a proud supporter of the children's hour. Meow wolf creates immersive experiences that transport audiences of all ages into kaleidoscopic realms of story and exploration meow wolf dot com our theme music was was written by c. K barlow got a great idea for a show. You can email us at info at children's our dot org. We'll be back next week with another addition of our case.

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TRR623 09 04 20 - Video Vault - UK Update - Ed Wynn

The Ralph Report

1:10:48 hr | 11 months ago

TRR623 09 04 20 - Video Vault - UK Update - Ed Wynn

"Hey they're Ralph garment here. Thanks so much checking out this free edition of the row report. If you like what you hear, do me a favor subscribe to the Ralph report. So we can put some fun in your ears five days a week, and you can listen for as little as three dollars a month. So subscribed today. So you know miss out on any of the fun. Go to Patriotdepot DOT COM, slash the Roth report and sign up. Welcome to the Ralph. report. With Garmon. Well how long they're boys and girls welcome to the last Ralph Report of the week because today's. Love Me. Some Friday shows that means we're about to kick off the weekend hell a long weekend here in the US of a if you're lucky enough to have Labor Day off on Monday hopefully, everybody will have a good time this weekend go out there and well, not go out there yarn good stay in there and or separate and go out there have some fun I don't know do something whatever it takes. I don't know. I don't know what the rules are anymore just enjoy yourself. All I know is it is a brand new round report for a brand new day. Thanks so much for joining his kids I am your old podcast Powell Ralph Garman sitting here the bat cave with me. The vice host himself please welcome Mr Eighty pence saver buddy. Time. The audience was want me to say any so excited they couldn't wait happy to see. Me Couldn't wait. They couldn't hold back. I. Was Premature Clapping Relation Young hope any I have that problem. Yoho indeed. Well. We gotTA show for you. Today kids. I'm telling you guys on the KINDA YOU WANNA know why Steve Ashton's on hand are UK correspondent will be here with the U. K.. Update also will be joining us for the video vault segment where we give you some suggestions of movies that perhaps you haven't seen or haven't seen in a while something you can maybe watch over the long holiday weekend as deliberating nice. The movie year is nineteen eighty seven. Three films from nineteen eighty seven will be taking a look at those later on in the show and I gotta say. Eddie pence didn't shit the bed Oh thank you. He picked a pretty pretty funny most fifty fifty on what you think of it I enjoy that. Okay. Good. We'll talk about that. He's choice as well as my own and Steve Ashton Steve always does all something from British cinema. He also has picked a good film is I gotta say of the three this week, the one that people may have the. Biggest problem with his mind. Oh, depending on how you feel about this film, I happen to love it because I love the star and the director of this film. But we'll see a little bit What else we got entertainment news of course, we got your phone calls before we get to any of that let me give you the lay of the land in terms of what the schedule looks like. For next week as I mentioned a couple of times, I will be taking a long holiday weekend not to relax and get drunk however as much as I would like to your own Labor and Labor Day we yeah and you know me I don't like to take time off for myself just to just to take time off I'd rather provide you. With the show it means a lot to a lot of you and you need something to keep going in these difficult times. So I'm trying to be there but I got this opportunity to be in this film and I haven't done any acting in a while. So I thought it'd be fun to go off and do this little film and the producers. Which happened to be Josh Rouse and his wife live who are very kind and longtime friends and coworkers of me of mine. they were kind enough to try to work the schedule around. So I would work primarily on weekends. So I'm starting off this weekend shooting for the next Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday and then it we'll be back Wednesday with a a brand new show. So I hope you don't think I'm leaving you in the Lurch I'm just GonNa be off working someplace else anyway we got to take a job off to take another job. Yeah that's what I'm doing. So Wednesday, we'll be back with a brand new show Monday and Tuesday I thought it'd be fun to go back and take a listen. To what was going on on those dates in prior years on the Ralph interesting to hear different world back then yes before for everything. So I'll be giving you some greatest hits shows on Monday and Tuesday, and then we'll join you on Wednesday. Now for the rest of the month, I'm not quite sure yet how that's GonNa play out I will be shooting definitely weekends whether that means an extra Monday here there too I don't know, but I will certainly keep you posted itself. They go what else we got going on a lot of people earlier in the week I made a joke. We were listening to someone's happy hit which was ballroom blitz by the sweetest. And they and I said at listen that I always was tempted to do a cover of that song as character actor Edwin because that guy in the in the middle of it, they're sounds like he's doing a bit of in there. So I just mentioned in passing and a lot of army members reached out and said, hey, that's would you do that? I'd like to hear that. So we're GONNA, kick the show off today. Here it is. Here's Edwin. Singing the classic hit by Sweet Ballroom Blitz I. Hope you enjoy it. Your ready. And? Yeah. Okay. All right. FELLAS. Let's go. It's been getting no hard living with the things you do to me. And Mike. Trains are getting. So strange I'd like to tell you everything. I feel bad in the back as a matter of fact is is, is the sun and a girl in the corner no ignore because she thinks she's the passionate one. Thing. Everybody. Was Things and the music was soothing and they all started grow. Yeah. And the man and the fact that everyone can it? The girls in the. One I did do a fall river would ball. Throw. A ball. Out You. Know. Ballroom. Oh stretch. They go Edwin. Long lost recording of Edwin. Singing ballroom blitz at a one hit. Wonder your hand either. I should slap that up on youtube or something I should probably get that out into the world I I'm. Wondering, if we're going to get a spate of request now where we're GONNA have. We're GONNA have Winnie okay or something instead. Of just started something I think we may have just started. If that's the case then so be it. All right. That's everyone who has for that. There you go. Kids. Now, let's turn our attention to the rest of the army members who called in yesterday looking for facts and ideas and making suggestions and making comments. He can always leave us a message on the Ralph Report Hotline Pretty Simple to do so and twenty four hours a day seven days a week. You just got a dial up that phone number, one, eight, three, three. High Ralph. Love it. When you reach out, it's so much fun to go through your phone calls a- grab a handful of them. We put him here at the top of the show in a segment called gummy on the line. Phone is ringing. The Only. Play. Now. What sound. Brooke. Speaking of taking the time off for the long weekend Josh called in with these nice sentiments. Hey routes. Yoho Eddie. Hey Ralph just wanted to say. To Star from northeastern Pennsylvania between thirsty Thursday and sex videos for this week. You have absolutely earned a little extra time off for this upcoming Labor Day so. You any the the whole the whole crew. Including the crew. Kick, back, have a cocktail do. We'll see on Wednesday. Thank you Josh well and he doesn't drink and I'll be working. But other than we'll take your advice and we will We'll see you on Wednesday the Pan Flute. What's going on? You're listening to their riding on a ferris wheel or something. I'm not sure what that music was speaking of the videos this week. Thanks again to Carl Beutel who put together the thirsty Thursday video yet the production value to. Opening now I think him and Cooperman gone together. So they're gonNA, use the theme song really off to the races. It's great to have that as a bonus video content for you to three and four star generals, and then there was the bonus sex you video content yesterday of me Zapping epipens with a violet. Wand. Lauda people reacted very positively to that as well. Thank you so much. No one more. So then this young lady. I walk alone when I say this, I think we need more. Sex Videos. Ralph and Eddie textiles my goodness that was. That was good fun. All right. All right. I have revealed about. Settle. We're not gonNA start using sex toys on each other entertainment madame low. How dare you know we're keeping it on the up and up here? Yeah. We're not crossing that line. I except for our only fans account for one hundred dollars a month I mean there's a price for. The right of money any now eddie now just bang each ought sixty nine whatever you need whatever you want just. For the right time for the right coin lock my van Mos- Eddie Dash Pence Roy ready lowers were just. Just one small step away from sexualizing the whole whole nine yards folks have been sending their or calling in rather with their food failures. I started off by talking about the fact that I ate at Amami whole for the first time when I first tried it we had a gentleman who eighteen tamale with the rapping in it or people are very forthcoming admitting their fails when it comes to trying foods for the first time even more forthcoming when it's someone else who did it in their presence like Louis here he couldn't wait to tell the story. Hey Ralph Lewis from San Antonio Texas. started listening back in. January. I food failures on our honeymoon we got on British. Airways. first class with my. New. Wife. And And that's flying star serving the food and they bring out those little round cheeses that are covered in wax, and so I had told my wife as have you ever tried when she said No. So she opened and I had told her that it was a really good cheese. So she opened it and she sticks her mouth, one bees, wax and all. So. Yes, she had. She had a mouthful of wax. Later I. She had the baby bell and she does stuff the whole thing and mouth wax covering an audit tasted well. This is chewier cheese and I expected it to be Oh. Yeah. You gotTa Peel that bad the wax off Eric called in with an interesting where did it come from? Hey. You know it's always confused the Fuck Outta me. Is Why do they called NERDS A. Like that. That insult I guess quote unquote like just never made any sense to me. If you could help me out with that, that would be fun. Also Man oh by the way this is Eric one-star. By thank you. Eric. We've all heard the phrase I get that fucking egghead where did that come from? Why would people that having an egghead make them smart within? No apparently, it started on college campuses where students would refer to their professors as an egghead and usually they were older and sometimes ball gentlemen, right so it made look as if they're heads were that shaped and larger that larger than than the average because of their brains were so yeah. But it didn't really catch on and I was blown away by this story didn't really catch on an American until nineteen fifty, two Eddie pence. That's when presidential candidate Richard Nixon vice presidential candidate rather use that phrase to describe Democratic candidate for President Atalay Stevenson. He called him an Egghead because Adelaide Stevenson was bald and also was considered by the Republicans to be an intellectual elite, and so they were mocking his intelligence and the shape and lack of hair on his head by Richard Nixon calling him publicly egghead and so it caught on amongst the Nixon's followers and so eventually Adly Stevenson, the nickname stuck during the nineteen fifty, two presidential election and even his followers were referred to as egghead but basically, it was in reference to Intellectual high brows elitist were out of touch with the common man. So it was a smear that Nixon was using against Adelaide Stevenson in the nineteen forty. said the spirit of intellectualism ever? I doesn't make any sense I always was taught to believe that smart was good. Yeah. But they can use it against you sometimes, and that's what Nixon they were. Man It work he called him an egghead and then it stuff from that point on we still use it today. So it was actually a political smear that's where it came out and we think you know here in Nineteen Nineteen here in twenty twenty rather. We you know we're we're going through it is it's unheard of politics. It's it's always been dirty and gross always been there. This is an interesting question and she has an excellent point. We haven't done one of these lists in a while. I arouse Yoho Eddie. So one thing you guys used to do, you haven't done in a while with like a top surrealist and one of the things that popped into my head with top three fictional character in movies that you just can't get over for me it Marlin from the second kingsman movie I watched it nearly a year ago and I still get choked up when I talk about it. So yeah. I was just wondering is like a top three list of dictionary movie death that you. That's still affect you. No matter what. Anyway Allenby looking forward to the the show great list Idea Merlin's death did affect me too and I saw that Donald really bothered me was very very brave fan day th death down mark strong character in that film. Fictional movie deaths that really rattled me well, the one that jumps off Right. Away off, the top of my head would have to be Mickey. Rocky's trainer in rocky three arche three that really affected me when I was watching it what other fictional movie deaths I mean got to me. Hans. Solo got me a little bit worse. Awakens new was coming but just to see have been but I think that was like losing a friend for sure and Julie the reaction of the characters around those character. Yeah. It really affect you that one bothered me a little bit Tony Stark. Of course they started an endgame was another big one that one got me. Try to think who else died in a movie where I really was bothered by it. bamboos mother. Oh, yeah that but when I was a kid that that broke me up, I mean Dumbo mother to she didn't die. But just that that whole scene where she's They're holding through the. Fence Right. Right. Right through the through the bars. Yeah. I think I think it's Green Mile. What's his face death when he got electrocuted our Michael Clark. Duncan that one stuck with me for a little bit. All Goodwin's yeah. But the one really the jumped in mind the minute she asked that question was Mickey and Rockies rockies crying over his body A- as devastating. Question. Bummer but good questions. Bummer. Question is, Hey, we love it when people call in and they meltdown and then they wish they could deleted it. This one made me laugh. Ship. Hung Up. Couldn't get started. Just bail more time. Ship. I wish there was always lethal best. That's what he was thinking. I mean could just hung up and said anything I know and never played it right. Up The fucking, Shit couldn't help himself. Paul called and he caught something on yesterday's show. I was wondering if anyone else would as well. I caught it in the moment I realized. Well, this is odd having to explain to a grown ass man what a pie is explaining the concepts behind pie that was that was weird for me and apparently Paul her to to. Hey Ralph Hall. For PJ four star general up in. Ontario. Canada I WanNa hear drunk eighty thoughts on the Pie because you can actually hear Ralph Sprain break when Eddie asks if it's in the shape of up high and yeah, that's just a classic drunk thought. That you listen closely. You can definitely hear something Ralph's brain just Brayton love you. Might might have been my spirit or my soul more than my brain. But yeah, we're talking about minced Pie mincemeat pie yesterday while referring to Oliver Cromwell and how Christmas was outlawed by him in England and I, just wanted to talk about men's Pie, and Eddie, for some reason had a hard time. It was hard to exist rest to explain to him sober what a pie was what it sounds like when he's drunk, it's time for Eddie's drunk thoughts I can't see that. Foot from your face, it's throw. Drunk. Caught. By my teeth. Oregon. To this day, the recipe from speed pie still involves raisins dried apples, molasses, cornstarch little vinegar dried onion, and excuse me dried orange and lemon peel salt spices and beef there still beef in the Pie as well to. Look like and the shape of Oh pie. is around his leg of high with crossed or is it more like a fruitcake Logan thing? Oh. I, don't know why why was if what what kind of shape they're in the it would be. I'm trying to get a visual of it. Is the look like a pie, but it's got it men Senate. Or immense, MacDill with. In like shape filler like a pie. Pie crust no pie right right at the beginning. Okay. Tiges some Bull Lewis let's say Apple Pie Apple Pie something out the apple par take out that stuff. The filling is mincemeat. Okay. mincemeat Pie. Put a crossover again. Sure. Chesler. Just like a regular Pi Pi was meant made immense meat is the feeling for the middle. Ages needs a visual just I I want you have as much into. This possible. There you go. Pie just it was a simple question. Really wasn't a lot of questions about why I just WanNa know if looked like a regular Pi, it's it's It's called a Pie. One of the things called pies don't look. Food terms where people just go into pie and you're like, okay, what doesn't look like a pie it's round, but it doesn't look. How high photo pies have you run across in your life could have been just a round looking thing and they call it a pie. Right like blood pudding doesn't look like pudding. Not are pudding right let us original puddings on the blind just say cooking likes to liberal what they're terming terminology flaky and shit very suspicious. I'm very suspicious of course. And we've also been kicking things off with your happy hit songs that make you really just dep perk up at the beginning of the show hopefully set you off on your days tapping your toes. Here's here's bobs. Alps. It's Bob here four star federal with A. happy. Hit suggestion. It's a it's a song I think you could get behind a lot of garment members. Because it's a simple song about getting drunk. And feeling. All right. And so if you could army pretty please. Pretty please on the rocks with a twist. Play I got loaded by Los Lobos. You got it by enjoy your long weekend L. MB. Los Lobos I. Love me the wolves. This song is so much fun. Here it is from their album. Will the wolf survive? It is I got loaded. All. Laura. Lobos love that band. Thanks so much for the suggestion. Thanks to everybody who called in I. Appreciate it. You too can be seek secret why not be secret secret but also be featured. Here. On the Ralph Report Hotline Garm e on the line segment. I got to do is call me. All righty now's time for us to take a look at folks who passed away on this day throughout history and look at their lives in their legacies in a segment called hello death. Did. You let yourself alright into show hello. Did you eat was a mold or just. told. You fall from the sky. Ya. Video for that I know like skeletons damn. Something tied like lava lamp. Stuff. Background like James Bond s what skeletons instead of sexy ladies. About sex skeleton sexy skeleton ladies. Alphabet work on either some make it. Let's take a look at who passed away on this day September fourth fifth Teen Eighty, eight Robert Dudley. The English earl of Leicester favourite of Elizabeth. I passed away the age of eighty seven who lives to the age of eighty seven Elizabeth in era about her her I was it. Now he was favourite. Of Elizabeth, the first from her ascension until his death he was a suitor for her hand. They were very much in love but they just never got married. He was married first of all time which was a problem. But then his first wife Amy Rob Czar fell down a flight of stairs died in fifteen quotes fell down well. There were some questions as to whether he arranged for his wife's den were not him suspicious? He was free to marry the Queen at that point. However, the resulting scandal reduced his chances in this respect because the queen couldn't afford to take a concert who would be protect potentially murderer ray. So they they never got married sadness. On this day in. Sixty Alfred E E green legendary film director died at the age of seventy one. This guy got into the movies in nineteen twelve while as an actor first, and then he started directing to retailers as they were known back in the silent era in nineteen seventeen, he worked with all the big silent movie stars Mary Pickford and Wallace Reid and many others, and then he moved into talkies and he. Started working in the forties and fifties he directed all the way up until almost his death. So it's quite a Arou- good run nineteen, sixty, five Albert Schweitzer passed away German French missionary. Who was well, he's pretty amazing dude he was a theologian and a musician and writer and philosopher and doctor Jesus Yeah mixing the rest of US look bad. Do One of those things Dick Albert Schweitzer was a Dick. Passed away in this day and nineteen as nine, hundred, sixty, five at the age of ninety. He received the nineteen fifty two Nobel, peace prize for his philosophy reverence for life. All thing was boiled down to this pretty much by Schweitzer himself ethics nothing other than reverence for life reverence for life affords me my fundamental principle of morality naming that good consists in maintaining, assisting and enhancing life and to destroy to harm or hinder life is evil. You broke it down. That makes them pretty much that simply so very impressive nineteen seventy-five actor Walter. Tetley passed away. He was a very successful character actor throughout the forties fifties. And sixties, and then he got into voice over work as well. He was specially doing a kids voices. In fact, he was a very famous cartoon kid he played Sherman of Sherman and Mister peabody on the rocky and bull winkler he died at the age of sixty. Here's a little bit of his work high out there shrimp hair. I'm doing a solo today. The reason is because poor mister peabody has laid up how do you feel Mister peabody not too? Well, Sherman I have a slight case of this temper. Well, don't you worry Mister Peabody I'll take the folks back into history today your dog's best friend Sherman. Always. Loved that. Sure Mississippi, body on this day in Nineteen eighty-six Hank Greenburg American baseball. Hall of Famer, passed away at the age of seventy five years the player for the Detroit Tigers primarily in Nineteen ninety-three Survey Villa hsieh's french-american actor. Of course from fantasy island. He took his own life at the age of fifty on at a very sad. He was in the fantasy island of course if you may remember him as Tattoo. From that show he was also knickknack in man with the Golden Gun James Bond movie. He was in a movie called the One and only with Henry Winkler about professional wrestling. If you ever saw that I don't remember that I wanNA thought, you would have seen their. Comedy starring Henry Winkler, where plays a professional Russell checks my box very entertaining film. He was in a ton of things in fact, trying to remember exactly how many different projects are villages starred in right? Who? Five? Six. Seven eight. Nine. hoppy fifteen sixteen. Nineteen. Well the Lard and twenty different projects active, very active career. In two, thousand, one, Hank, the angry drunken dwarf died however that he was, of course regular on the Howard Stern show passed away on this day in two thousand one in Twenty Fourteen Joan Rivers Merican comedian died at the age of eighty one after serious complications from procedure under vocal cords she was getting some throat surgery though she was under general anaesthetic apparently, she had a heart attack the. Eighty one years old and. I. Should be doing elective surgery type stuff eighties I don't Yeah. I think I think baby you gotta be careful that's a little yet be careful the anesthesia that she a ton of plastic surgery right now but it just seems like it seems unless unless it's vital I don't know if it's a good idea to go under anesthesia at that age I understand her role in comic sort of history in terms of making way for women in comedy. Cats ever particularly found her funny. Though No No. No Phyllis diller was funny. Very funny filter was very fine just to be the precursor of Joan rivers to me hiring I, think fill-, Phyllis, diller opened a lot more dares Well, she opened the door and then Tony fields and there were other female comedians of I'm also that it but and again, I, understand her place and she inspired lot of other female comedians just never would. Twenty Eighteen Bill Daley passed away American actor and comedian. You may know Bill Daley from his work as a major Roger Healey on I dream of Jeannie he was in Larry Hagman's best friend right not show, and then he went onto another best friend role played Bob Newhart S- best friend on the show the Bob Newhart show did gigging get it. Yeah. Not Bad being a second bonaly hit show he died aged ninety one he was best known on the NEWHART show for coming in through the door and going hi Bob you would just won't. Go nuts, and hi Bob became a cultural phenomenon. Not only the show was in its first run but in reruns all over colleges, there was a drinking game called hi Bob where every time someone walked in a scene of the Bob Newhart show and said, Hi Bob, you had to do a shot. And it became, it became a well known drinking game. Hi, Bob here's bill daily in an interview talking about the fact that Hi Bob became an international sensation. Bob Sent me that article in Time magazine was the Taiwan colleges they all become door. They say, Hi Bob. That's my dog's name is hi Bob and McCarthy license places. Hi Bob, we turned a lot of students in the drunks. And the kids know that when they know that high bomb yeah became quite popular. Catch phrases and even at the time. No not of course we did you know everybody comes into our High Bob Bob and I was the beginning I get you get more points when I came because I I. I love that. All right. At this point, we take a look at someone who passed away and we finding food related to that person, and then we run a pass daddy pants this even something that he would either eat or perhaps stick up his ass or pull out of his ass. And today is no different. The Person We talk about today this was a tough one. This was sad I remember when I heard this late. Great Steve Irwin the crocodile hunter passed away on this day in two thousand and six. He was an Australian naturalist and TV personality with his show the crocodile hunter. Insane in my opinion things that he would do. Yes. Seemingly fearless. He was attacked and killed by a stingray the age of forty four. He was that young young a little kids to I now, and now they've grown up to fall on his way out ups. They're both naturalist as well. Here's a little Steve Irwin in action, this is from his TV series the crocodile hunter he is a in Australia, which as you know, is the home of more deadly animals than any other continent in the world latest continent, the world. And he has A. Desperately venomous snake and he's holding it by the tail is pulling it back from holding it from running away, stopping it with its tail and the snake is getting progressively more and more pissed off, trying to rear round and bite him and kill him insane with deadly insane. These sites are not toxicity of their venom. Swing and agitated Knicks prop that record tongue flicking. It's getting sick. Mike. No doubt about. Fangs into me at any given. Case on and it's getting really really grumpy. Beautiful Nights. Trying to kill us. Let the snake go go of the tail of the snake I mean don't you like that? You know you're not long for this world has a he wasn't doing shit like that, but it's crazy all the crocodiles he wrestled and the snakes he. He. Got It under water with a stingray like sheer accident has happened to Pearson at the right place in the heart it was terrible tragic a nightmare. So Steve Irwin is the person we look to today for a food related moment in hello death and interestingly enough and he was often called out on this. He was an avid animal lover, but he never became a vegetarian and A. Lot of people like pita this tearing organizations pressured him said, why aren't you vegetarian and he would always say, look you know for biodiversity sake alone if you clear an area of wildlife for soya field or a rice patty, the only ones benefit from that or the humans and the insects the the animals that you're displacing gift by growing more crops is as damaging to the the Co sphere then. Whatever waste products or whatever that animals might create. He also said that he believed that animals were natural part of human diet and he never felt compelled to change it interestingly enough though his favorite kind of food was Chinese food really yes. Couldn't get enough of it. Loved everything China News especially. Want tons. He Loved Poor Kuantan, if you know what a Wonton it, it is pork filling that is wrapped in a noodle envelope basically then sealed shut and steamed usually eaten with duck sauce or plum sauce sweet and sour sauce or hot mustard. There's another great one called the Fried Wonton that he loved with a cream cheese and crab filling inside caught a crab Rangoon. So today we're talking about pork Juan Don's just delicious pork lawns. Is that something Eddie pence would eat or not only way for us to find out we pull the handle it's not fried right at the boy. Here we go just trying to get clarification. Yes. It's not like the crab brand new now that one is at the ride that's frost like the okay. That's cream cheese and crab wrapped in a in a in a Wonton then deep fried but the steamed pork one on are just sorta like. Filled with pork. And it's shaped like a Pie. Like a pie or Pi. We pull the handle of the patented Eddie Pens Jackpot Slot Machine. If we get a jackpot that means he's eating it however if we'd had no jack by then dislike like that venomous snake, bite us right on the Dick just killing us in the worst possible way. That is bad way. Let us down. Let's pull it handled. See if he's eating pork want only one way to find out. Here we go. One. SNAKY DICK SNAKE If you said, Crab Rangoon, I would have been all over this snake Dick was covering good I've been all over it because they fried is that the I just don't like the steamed one ton so. Doughy. Don't. Don't like it. It's like the thing we talked about before the one thing the thing that I've. Made me. Eat it a live show. You just said it was like the other thing it's Kinda doughy. Not a one time but the thing we just talked about dumpling dumpling. Dumplings Condom Yeah. Try You said it was economy and chewing on a column. Yeah I should've realized pork in retrospect I got to start keeping track of things you won't need and don't eat so I don't. Know what they are fine. But if you'd said the Crab Rangoon, I've been all over the pork is so tender and stuff and signed. A Little Pork Sandwich, deep fried it. I might eat it. I just don't like the steamed Wanda. It's just like bread base. Gooey it's just it's chewy it's like literally. Jabbed Brooklyn me condom chewing on now. Fan She the. ruined. The textures joined. It feels like it's uncooked like I'm eating something that's not quite ready to be you. That's what it feels like. You're a snake biting my ding once again, a sex you for the that is L. O. Death. S. Dead now. Shut up. Hey there it's Ralph Garman here I. Hope you're enjoying the show and if you are why not subscribe to the Ralph Report, so you can hear it every day. Monday through Friday for just fifteen cents a day you can be a one star general supporter and that will get you the show in your ear holes Monday through Friday. Of course, there are two three and four star general levels as well, which gets you more bonus content and more access to me. So if you like what you're hearing, why not subscribe go to Patriotdepot dot com slash the Ralph report that's P. A. T. R. E. O. N., DOT COM slash the Roth report subscribed today so you don't miss a thing. All righty time for us. Now to take a look at the entertainment news with a segment, I call the Showbiz beat. Well. How about this Batmans got covid I Sullivan isn't that crazy I the rock now Batman production for Warner Brothers Film. The Batman has been halted due to a positive corona virus test from. Of Its cast and was the initial report, and then we found out the inflicted person is star of the film Robert. Sucks in that. Really Sucks. The turns out that well, of course, no one knows how got it but even with all these. Protocols in place man it's don't know what they expect it to happen. This kind of thing is bound to happen going to have I, mean you shut it down for two weeks now and serve backup clear. That's what they're going to try to do here. They'll put him in isolation and then they'll retest them and once he's clear and they'll start at the world we live in until vaccine's ready to guess that's what's going to happen that man which is set to be released in October of next year had just resumed shooting in the UK prior to the latest interruption. So here we go again I'm GONNA have how far behind they are on that like how much they shot. Already because they're working for awhile I heard they only had about three weeks in the cam over really that much. Okay. So they've always mean everything you saw in that trailer was pretty much the stuff that shot up to that point disappoint as you mentioned Dwayne the Rock Johnson revealed that he and his entire family covering from corona virus He went on social media to talk about the fact that he and his wife Lauren and their daughters, Jasmine and Tiana. All tested positive with covert apparently, the little girls had a pretty bad cough but it wasn't that bad for them as we've been hearing that a lot about kids sometimes fare better than adults do some in some cases. Yeah. The two of them however rock and his wife got hit pretty hard according to what he said. He sounded bad in the video here in his voice sounded winded. Any sounded bad. Yeah. He's Jack Shit. He looks huge but he sounded bad he's not he's not swollen patrol level. But if it can, it can affect that dude if Batman and the rocking geddes. Series that we have to take it serious people come on and Batman wears a mask all and he's still got the wrong part of his face. She should change that master. Scheme of social media this is dumb. You know we were just talking about cancel culture yesterday said, some people deserve to be canceled? Yes. This guy doesn't deserve this tree who Tyler Joseph of twenty one pilots had to apologize for a joke. He made on social media he was being pressured by his fans. To use his platforms on social media to reach out about. Social issues it'd be more political and to speak out more. So he posted a joke. On Tuesday I guess it was on twitter saying you guys keep asking me to use my platforms feels good the dust these bad boys off and it was wearing a pair of platform shoes. Now, that's just a joke. That's all it is at the site. It's a sight gag. You said platforms I'm wearing platform shoes. It's judo's policies from Oh. Yeah. Oh my God I got slammed Eddie why human rights aren't a joke? And twitted. Back. that's not what we mean. We would like someone like you to speak up to the injustice in this country. It went on and on and on. So he had to go on and say that wasn't a comment on human rights. Our Lives Matter Excite Gag because I was wearing platform shoes man the word is platform, and so they're the same thing is said just in case there's any question about it I support black lives, matters I'm all about human rights I mean he had to go overboard and then he apologized I'm truly sorry if I hurt anyone he said regarding his tweet, he's a better man than me because I would apologize for not. That's a very different thing than putting wrong information or slamming one. Group or another if you're making upon a visual prime on the word platform at what point do people have to be responsible for being able to discern what is a meaningless harmless joke and what is something that can actually do there's terrible shit going in the world and stuff to so angry about how much. But you cannot lose your sense of humor over if you lose your sense of humor, we're fucked I would make that Joe. That's what scares me because if someone said, we use your platform and then I put on a picture of platform shoes absolutely something I would have done then I be. Held at the wrath of the somebody. Somebody, absolutely would come after you somebody and it's just up to you whether you want apologize rather or not I'm exhaust it's exhausting. Living is exhausting. This'll cheer me up though Francis Ford Coppola announced he has restored and get a new cut to the One Thousand Nine Hundred Film Godfather Part Three. Really it's. It's the Coppola cut is he gonNa make it Better Hall Stop It that Movie Get such a hard time? It's not that bad. It's not as good as one or two, but very few films are right across the. Board. It is not the film that those films were but at the same time, it's a very service it's hard to live up to fill godfather two. It's one of the that's one of the greatest films of all talk as one. Yeah, and so he was I mean if he had made a third one of equal quality, it would have been astronomically against all odds. Yeah. So it was bound to be a for a lot of people. It wasn't as awful as it got the rap for him I. It's it's it's okay. It's fine. It's fine but hopefully, this is better I'm looking forward to that his cut he said he's he's it's got a new ending. It's got a new beginning is rearranged some scenes. He's made some other alterations and he's really looking forward to releasing in theaters at the end of the year, and this is just before it goes to. Home video and streaming services time whenever it's No one came out. Yeah. So if you want to see godfather part three, the new version with Francis Ford Coppola, you can see it in theaters how come. He didn't get the Coppola cut the first time around I. Don't know after the success of one in to you think he would have been a call shots. I I've met the man and I had an interview with him and he told me. Even after Godfather to he couldn't get films made the start, his own production company. So trump studio so he could make films because no, one would give him money to make any films. He couldn't make even after Godfather to yes. Wow and eventually that's why he retired and got into the wine business. He said I just was tired of begging for money and slamming my head against the wall just wasn't worth it to me. I lost the passion for it because they wore me down that sucks man. So you know on the anniversary of the release of this film thirty years ago now. And Ninety the. The Thirtieth Anniversary of Godfather three they're letting him take a lack at it before they're gonNA make a ton of cash. On Home Video Because Godfather fans will want to see what his version would be new beginning hell. Yeah. Yeah. So we go. And speaking of movies yesterday the brand new trailer for no time to die came out Daniel Craig's final appearance as James Bond 007 I gotta say I haven't been this excited about a bond movie in a long time. This trailer is unknown me all the buttons. It's got the old music back. Yeah and he's driving the Aston Martin DB five and for for the first time in my opinion a long time we have a proper bond villain in Rami. Malik. Who plays a character named SAFM? Who just seems like one of those classic bond villains his is all. Burnt up and destroyed, and he's just a megalomaniac who just wants to cause global destruction. That's how I like my damage human. Yes. Yes. Here's a little bit of the trailer where we get to meet Rami Malik Bond. Villain just sounds awesome. James Bond. We both advocate for. To make the world and better place. I just wanted to your little. Tiny. Right. He sounds like a bond villain. That's very. Little Tidier. are very much alike, you and I both terminate people. That's what what's been missing is that that bill and that takes pleasure and being a villain and over the top you. Need Realistic Villains. On movie you need a memorable lunatic that when bond films are at their best almost every great bond film was made great the quality and capacity of all that their villain you here is only as good as your villain. So very excited that comes out in November maybe hopefully who knows. I would actually I think to you adventure out with the masses in the globe. Guy would glove up on on my has met suit and I would sit miasma theater to watch. That looks really good. All right. Let's take a look today celebrity birthdays all these stars born on September. Fourth. bubba night of Gladys Knight and the PIPS OH cousin bubba. Seventy eight years old today. Dan. Georgia. said he's going. George. Own. Isn't hers alone I should`ve Kyle Mooney from SNL is thirty six years old today multi instrumentalist Nee Pekka Rick from the luminaries is thirty four today. The. Email and? A. Falls. Lawrence Hilton Jacobs actor who played Freddy, Boom Boom Washington and welcome back Carter. He is sixty seven years. Old Today Drummer Martin Chambers of the pretenders sixty nine. Loved his drumming in this particular pretenders song is called precious and he just derives this. Steve Kazoo. Moving. Van Heat. Think the pretenders are woefully underrated band. They were popular in the moment but people really talk about that loveless the pretenders. Candy Alexander from Er newsradio is sixty three today actor comedian, Damon. Wayans of the Multi Hyphen Wayans family is sixty today like the barge level right man. So many way as multiple multigenerational actors, writers, directors there. Are So many guitarist Kim fail from soundgarden is sixty today. Actor Noah Taylor is fifty one today from game of thrones I only sky is fifty whatever happened I only. Remember and say anything. Fell in love with her and that Novi. deejay producer Mark Ronson is forty five probably best known for this big hit had with Bruno Mars. Via made it. Back. Channel. You. Up Southbound, don't give it to you. Fun, tune West Bentley from African beauty is forty two Max Greenfield from new girl is forty one beyond say is thirty nine years old today. Whitney Cummings actress and comedian is thirty eight and bassist. Ronald Lip read from the commodores is seventy. You WanNa Talk Baselines WanNa. Talk commodores. Then you gotta play this. Interesting. Off. allowed. Everybody knows this. Yes nine God took all the power I had not to play that song in its entirety may be multiple times. That's today celebrity birthdays. I'm Ralph Garment, I walked the show Biz beat. But we're not with entertainment. You've just yet all now we're gonNA take a trip across the ocean now. To our man in the UK are you K- correspondent? It's time for Steve Ashton and his update. Oh. Steve. You know you the money makes John Bonham like Helena Bonham. Carter. In court anyway. High Foul Mouth Golden Ramsey's in the news. With Gordy Golden, Ramsey's allegedly set to bag a multi million pound deal with take talk. The celebrity chefs already frequent use of the share video sharing APP and his master whopping ten million followers. Now, bosses in America, apparently looking to capitalize on his fan base with the big money deal. Now, apparently, they wanted to make sixty seconds cooking videos. A sole said they believe Gordon will be a smash with its current younger audience and crucially attracts older audiences to the platform. Fee thoughts are not no I. No. Young people dug a shit about cooking recipes especially, not Gordon Ancient Ramsey draw. Draw the watch some teenage idiot Dulce around mime alongside machine gun fucking Kelly songs. Ironically and non ironically. I were apparently, buses are trying to diversify bring a slightly older demographic to the platform because they spend money on the shit that we inevitably will try and sell them. So having the world's most famous chef on both is a huge coup for them. They continued site cooking content can be shed and sixty second Try that. Again, cooking concepts can be she added sixty second clips quick fund and Cleverly edited clips is what they want from Gordon apparently that because I know what you know people won't mess sure. He said they said he's already a big deal on a social networking service. Thanks to his golden reacts segments in which he judges people's cooking attempts on disparages the culinary creations of various influences sheds. Now most the harsh criticism includes a golden telling one person that his meatball source looks like Wolf. Very sick bone it's all is battling. At where worry could also can be seen berating another by comparing the the stake to his GRANDAD's cholesterol bag. Thought maybe food for the sounds like something you'd have a Mondays Grandad's colostomy bag. Walk. Maybe. That's the suggestion for next week, for Eddie, anyway Old. I need to do. The Ralph is cuts out the squaring. This is the joke of the pace by the way ready I'm really. Hold I need to do Ralphie's cuts out the swearing from of his TV shows in boom. That's about sixty seconds. Nick and Anna Anna Lindh. Hey. Look. We haven't had any for wealth. I'm not talking about blow jobs. News your rights. Now, the Rice to replace Daniel Craig has been heating up, and that's very much coming from tabloid newspapers and bookmakers. However, here we go again but the front runners like Tom, Huddleston Idris, Elba James Nelson highlanders. Sam Hugh Been. Holding on for dear life a new major competitor as just swooped in a bit like Batman. Oh Rob Pattinson. Yes. Now, the big news is a Christopher Nolan himself as being I take the right into the next bond movie and he he normally likes to work with the same actors again and again Nicole politicians styles in tenants, tenants tenants ten, a ten minutes whatever. Dr To by the UK bookmakers responded by having his odds British bookmakers line. Let me give them. Richie. But my voice, I'm British bookmakers said Christopher Nolan could advocate you out chosen in the next stop alive seven if the lightest worth around the director and on April Eight With a robot Pattinson clearly in. Every. Also, the star will be. Replacing Daniel. Quake via. In brush fine as always continue search on. Pope. I caught voice do anyway. So Robert. James Bond what do you think real now that's what I think absolutely in. No, he's an American and I think I'm right inciting. It's immediately render him out of the running now Doug, the meals being racist bond has to be British all from the Commonwealth out of push. So I'm thinking Hemsworth right he's an outsider for me but not a former colony like America I mean come on what's next right we go to not. You know we'll. We'll have an American extra playing Sherlock Holmes or an American remake if the Italian job, all American remake of the Saint starring Val kilmer. Track record all of those films were Shits Anyway I'm going to have a protest this week Ralph on painting a large mural on wall. Yeah in an area where Lord of the show Biz elite live. I gotTA SAY NO TO OPT PAT will be on golden sound outside will be rented and Doug Extra minutes of us. Yeah. I. Want to send a strong message to these people. I. GotTa go saw on the video volts buddy. And Steve he is joining us in just a minute as we take a look at the film from British cinema that he chose on today's video vault. Let's open up that video. Every Friday we each pick one of our favorite films from a particular year to give you something to watch over the weekend if you're looking for something to keep you busy and I think we got some good choices for this year hundred, Eighty, seven I will start off with the film that I love directed by Walter Hill Walter. Hill. Another guy doesn't get his do one of the Great Action Directors in cinema he did the warriors and hard times and the driver and forty eight hours which I still think is an almost perfect movie top to bottom. He also wrote the screenplay for the getaway famous film starring Steve McQueen direct by Sam Peckinpah. He was influenced a lot by second by Peckinpah working with him. You can see some Peckinpah in his work especially in this film, this homes called extreme prejudice is nineteen, eighty seven and it re teams Walter Hill with the Star of forty-eight hours. Nick. Nolte Nick Nolte plays a tough Texas ranger. Caught. Up in the middle between clandestine military operation and his old best friend from high school played the by powers boothe who has crossed over the river in New Mexico and become a major drug trafficker. So he's got these these Government operatives on one side of them. He's got his best friend, WHO's now a drug dealer on the other side of him, and he's trying to stay alive save the woman that he loves and not get killed in the process. It's great cast. You Got Nick Nolte Powers Boothe as I mentioned Michael Ironside is the head of the military organization Maria Cheetah Alonzo rip torn as his best friend William forsythe and clancy Brown who Walter Hill liked to use a lot in his films never seen this movie Asa love his movies. So entertaining extreme prejudice it's sort of a It's a western basically as a modern day western set in the present time, which is nineteen eighty-seven. In this particular case, Nick Nolte is never been Nick Nolte here. Then he is in this film powers boothe is always. So My F- is never is great and he loves being a villain s talk about like a bond villain he was Michael ironside had both do so good little seem between Nick Nolte and powers boothe as I mentioned there a longtime friends from high school. Now, they find themselves on the opposite sides of the law and powers booths characters trying to basically bribe. into coming over and working with him. L. CHECK UPS but this new. We rode the river together. Personally I'd just be tickled pink completed work out some savings both world of grief we ought to work together. To be one, hundred, thousand year man right now I'm the minute pays. Even by cash hell. Yours could to camp by the badge one without the other ain't no Goddamn. Good. What the hell else to do partners shoot each other. Cash haul, ass that's what I'm telling you. You can haul as close up your shop get out whether getting good. I'm offering you that. This film like Peckinpah, the wild bunch ends with one of the classic gunfights in all. kind of crazy. So good Steve Ashton as you know, each week picks a little something from UK cinema and today's no different here. Steve with his pick. While nineteen eighty-seven Ralph, it was a year the sold lots of historical retro movies like wish you were here hope and glory but also the wonderful cult classic with Nalen I which is one of my favorites is. What I nearly went, but I like to highlight some hidden gems and this week I've done exactly that it's GonNa cost Gary, Oldman Alfred Molina and Vanessa Redgrave and it is prick up your is it sounds like the worst sex act ever. Since he should do on the old sex you. Know th e biographical film revolves around the complex codependent relationship between young upcoming playwrights Joe. And Ken Halliwell who starts out says one of Olsen's rivals and quickly becomes his lover during the years at Rod at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts now I nearly went the. Never mentioned it fourteen or fifteen times. Now the movie masterfully delivers the oppressive and suffocating nature of their forbidden relationship because it happens in the nineteen sixties London where homosexuality was still very much on the cover on illegal of course, on the one room apartment, the Bali contains relationship. Now, it's like watching a play because of the feverish. And the cost is small. The acting is superb. Now, the screenplay was written by National Treasure Alan Bennett by Stephen Frizz you also directed for laundry a couple of years previously, but went onto rights dangerous liaisons the Griffis High Fidelity, the Queen, Philomena it's an historical piece of expose the intensity of a dysfunctional relationship against the backdrop of nineteen sixty swinging London changing attitudes towards sex and specifically homosexuality on explores themes of jealousy growing apart from relationships ultimately ending in tragedy really is a power to force of acting and story and his a clip. I nothing at all. Time won't ten. Nineteen Sixty Four He said next time got my friend is quite bolden these days Jones friends if it's professional Saddam cages men immense and they could still put you in prison for it. He's probably a police. Say Wonderful. Second Grey is a smash hit. I. The. Title was mine actually I gave him on his titles. Titles you can go to that. Only. I love. Prick up your ears it's a great film. So check it out. Good good. Pick their Mr Ashton and lastly are man Eddie Pence who? In all honesty in my opinion doesn't have a great track record on segments. It out apart, every people were defending what it was last week at the end of the great outdoors got great outdoor. Good pick this week however from John Landis and a few other director. Joe Dante Carl Gottlieb and Peter Horton and Robert KYC's it's a film called. Well, you tell him Eddie Amazon Women on the Moon yes. In the in the John R- of the Kentucky Fried movie that sort of thing Yes. It's a sketch. Yes. Film were twenty one different sketches with a ton of big name. Stars much get stars in a film like this because they only need them for a couple days. Shoot a little sketch and then you stitch it all together and you got yourself your felt just nonsense and insanity. It is loosely based around the concept of watching television. If you were flipping around vision late at night, you would run across like an old science fiction movie that title refers to Amazon Women on the moon. That's one of the sketches in this there's a bunch of different genres that they poke fun at from commercials to I mean, Joe Pantoliano in there is a guy who sells rugs head. But their literal rugs not to pay are actually rug. David Alan Grier is in a documentary about poor black guys who were born with soul. There was a sherlock Holmes one with the is it was it a Jack Rivers Roy it was the dinosaur. Yeah. I. Can't remember. This is so funny. Ed. Begley junior the son of the invisible man in a great sequence that I won't say anything more about. So it doesn't spoil it for you. Whole funny and one of my favorite segments in this film is an old time. A sort of it's supposed to look like it's from the nineteen thirties cautionary film about venereal disease it's done the same style of you've. Ever seen reefer madness, it's done the stout a warn young people off from having sex because of all the bad things that can happen is Stars Carrie Fisher and Paul Bartell, and just the the stylized way they perform it. The way it's shot is just a beautiful piece of work. It's called reckless youth. Here's a little scene from that from Amazon Women on the Moon Mary I've been going over your tests. How did a nice girl like you come to contract a social disease? Then my worst fears are confirmed. Shave. You are unclean. There's always hope you are unclean and then he goes on to warn about the dangers of masturbation and just goes on and on and on. Very entertaining. So Amazon Women on the Moon from nineteen eighty seven. If you're looking for something just goofy and I mean think about too much. You're fan of airplane and those kind of parody films I. Think you'll like this film Steve Ashton again a great pick the life of Joe Orton from prick up your ears, and if you're looking for action adventure and the shoot 'em up extreme prejudice from Walter Hill starring Nick Nolte. Those who are picks this week Stein to close up the video vault door. and. That's it for this week. Kids thanks so much for hanging out with us. We really appreciate it. If you're in the states and you're celebrating Labor Day, I hope you have fun long weekend do something for yourself, and for the people that you love find a way to have a little bit of. The retail of it, but be safe for you folks abroad in the UK and Australia and other places around the world list is shown. It's probably just a regular weekend for you but I want you to have some fun as well. I'll be off working on that movie, but we'll come back and do a brand new show for on. Wednesday meanwhile keep an eye out for those greatest hits shows and know how much I'll be thinking of you while I'm gone. So take care of yourselves until we talk again, stay the fuck at home you wash your hands real good they. Good in the hood and please always remember the swell given how by L. almost forgot congratulations to the Philadelphia. Flyers for extending their season one more game pushing the islanders to game seven. Thanks so much boys. It's a lot of fun. Let's do it. Let's take this. It'll make history history. It's. How it's going to happen os going to happen. Oh, for sure it's GonNa Happen. Got The whole show. Through, game seven. Game Seven. All right kids that said for the show. Thanks so much. We'll talk to you Wednesday until then please know this love you mean it by.

Powell Ralph Garman Yoho Eddie Bob Bob Eddie pence UK director James Bond Robert Dudley Josh Rouse Steve Ashton US Walter Hill Steve Ashton Steve Daniel Craig Steve he Mike Ralph Report Richard Nixon Nick Nolte Mr Eighty
Mitchell Froom is Chairman of the (Mixing) Board

The Frame

25:36 min | 2 years ago

Mitchell Froom is Chairman of the (Mixing) Board

"From the Mon broadcast center at KPCC. This is the frame. I'm Steven Cuevas filling in for John horn on today's show weekend. One of the Coachella festival delivered plenty of onstage by romance. What about the music, and then my visit to Mitchell rooms recording studio, he's produced records for nearly forty years with artists such as Randy Newman and Bonnie Raitt near reflects on how the industry has changed. If you get a really great track. But there was a bad part in it. And I remember the someone Elvis Costello would say odd. Just put a tambourine over to be fine and a program that provides mentors from Hollywood for teen girls aspiring to writing careers all that coming up on the frame. Coachella festival just wrapped up its first of two weekends with headline performances from Arianna ground-ape, childish, Gambino tame Impala while more and more pop music continues to creep into a festival originally created the spotlight. Indie rock Coachella is also casting a wider net when it comes to booking artists from around the globe black pink became the first Cape girl group to play Coachella and LA times. Pop music critic, Michael wood says let the performers like loss do Gunness that wanna and Rosa Leah where some of the biggest crowd pleasers of the festival, but he says his overall Coachella experience left a bit to be desired. Coachella has really turned into a festival that seems optimized for YouTube so many times when I was watching shows this weekend. I got the sense that what they were thinking about was who was watching it home now that manifest and a lot of different ways. Childish Gambino, for instance, put on a performance that was musically. Not great. But had some incredible camera work. He had a camera like guys with steady cams gonna following them around into the crowd composing these amazing beautiful shots that than they put on the big screens could shell up. But you're standing on the field looking up these screens, and you're sort of wondering why did I come to the desert to look at a big screen that I could watch at home. Well, this has been a dilemma not only at Coachella, but it large concerts everywhere. But in this case, how was that moment and similar moments. Where an artist is trying to create a viral moment. How was that typically received by the audience? Yeah, I think you nailed it. It's not about being in the moment or trying to give a performance that really connects with the people in front of you. It's about what can we do to? Make this thing. Gained some traction online. Now, that's not necessarily the worst thing in the world. Weezer brought out chilly from TLC and tears for fears to do to the songs they cover on their -til album. And that was kind of funny. I mean that was a funny way to look at an old rock guitar band that otherwise had no business at modern Coachella. So you know, kinda got a kick out of that. But other times it felt desperate. I mean, Casey must graves who I love at some point in her show for some unknown reason she brought out this old Instagram celebrity this woman who I'm not personally familiar with. But it had nothing to do with anything. It was clearly just a moment to get people tweeting retweeting Instagram. Ing men of sense. I didn't understand it. Well, could shall I think can still be a great opportunity to discover a band. You know, you've never heard of or a performer. You may be never saw. Live before what were some if any standouts for you in in that regard. It's true. It's true. You know, I I sort of bag on the big marquee things and whether or not they're going good direction. But there are always other good things happening at Coachella this year. I really enjoyed sofi who is a an electronic producer. She had this performance that was felt like such a interesting critique of the sort of EDM experience. She was basically just standing completely still find her laptop or whatever while these huge distorted sledgehammer beats for playing, and she was totally resisting the classic sort of like getting the crowd pumped up thing. And then like right after her dip blow played in the big dance Sahara tent, which is exactly that sort of like, a are you with me type thing? So that that was a funny sort of contrast that I enjoyed Billy Bush was also definitely an interesting thing to see this is a young L A native singer whose gotten a lot of attention in the media and the past few weeks big dig hit record. And so I was interested at Coachella sort of see is this thing for real is this kind of a media narrative that here's the America's news popstar. Or is this someone who is truly connecting with an audience, and I'm here. To tell you. She's truly connecting with an audience. Just can't get enough guys. Just always. She was pretty late. I don't know if there's technical problem or whatever. But you nobody's really laid it could shell because they've got this livestream. So she was about thirty to forty minutes late and people stood there waited they wanted to see Billy that bad that that that was okay. And once you came on stage, you could just feel the excitement in the crowd now going into weekend to there are people who will be going for the first time who were not there for weekend. One any words of advice for them. My advice is just try to have an experience that is in the moment. I mean so much of the festival seems like it's it's being directed offsite. But one of the beautiful things about good shelhah when it's beautiful is that you've got a hundred thousand people gathered because they really loved music or maybe they like music and they love Instagram, and they're trying to have a good time. And when it works it works. Michael wood is pop music critic for the LA times, Michael thanks so much. Thanks, man. Good to here. And one news updates from Hollywood this weekend the contract between the writers guild of America and the association of talent agencies expired, the writers want agencies to sign a code of conduct that relates to fees that agents make from packaging production deals with no agreements in place writers are being encouraged to fire their agents, the frames John horn gives us a little insight on what all this might mean. I don't think it's going to have any immediate impact on production in any realm. I mean, a lot of these shows are already Sast, and according to the writers guild, if you have fired your agent, you can bring in a manager or lawyer to negotiate your deal, the writers guild believes that the college and say that's a violation of law. And they're gonna hire a law firm to fight that a lot of writers. I've talked to say that they don't really need their agents to get work. Anyway, you can find your own stuff on social media that you can get a recommendation from a friend. So the revenue that could be lost. We'll be to the talent. Agents and the writers themselves say that they may be getting a ten percent rate. I mean up on the frame, a visit producer Mitchell frames home studio where he recorded many top artists, including Randy Newman. Mitchell fromm has been the go-to producer collaborator for a host of legendary artists. Randy Newman, Elvis Costello, Bonnie Raitt and Los Lobos to name a few but fruits early days were actually in the spotlight as a keyboardist and songwriter in the San Francisco Bay area in the nineteen seventies. But from prefers the studio when that these days is also jammed with his collection of vintage keyboards and synthesizers including the Celeste used on mister Rogers neighborhood to create the sound of trolley. I don't know how exactly they do it. But. Stream. Freen still writes and records his own music to releases though are rare but earlier this month, he put out two distinctly different albums one called ether featuring a rotating cast of vocalists and monkey tree. A more experimental electronic based collection created with his studio partner, David voucher for our interview from and I settled in behind his mixing console or he had just wrapped up recording sessions for Rufus Wainwright's forthcoming album, while we've just finished last week, which was an epic undertaking. We spent almost a year and a half. Wow. Epic in terms of what exactly everything? His singing his writing his vocal arrangements and working with him was just a pleasure because he's open minded and at the same time had a tremendous amount of ideas. So in a situation like that. I just look for where I feel I can be helpful. It's trying to make sure that an overabundance of ideas work really well together. So got it. And it was interesting is is that it wouldn't work. Well for anyone but him, isn't that interesting? Yeah. Well, that's it's the same with Randy Newman. His arrangements are incredible. But those same arrangements wouldn't work really well for different artists because it's just part of who he is in. What is so? Well, you're also, of course, very skilled musician in wondering like early on in this career of yours like at what point did it. Seem that production was really going to be the direction you went to as opposed to being in a fulltime ban. A realized that I thought I had more going on musically and more understanding than a lot of people that were hiring me. So I started seeing all well as possible. I could do it. I never dreamed. I could do it. I was in all of the George Martin's of the world and just through weird set of circumstances. I started a I got to produce my first band, and then it just happened. My first solo record was basically a reworked soundtrack to an art porn movie called cafe flesh. And slash records. Yeah. Agreed. They want LA LA punk late. And then the second band, I work with with crowded house. So then that started all the sudden, I guess I was a record producer. But but you've also continued to put out music not very often. Jerry sold them to new collections out. Now, why do you only put something out every you know decade? I do it when I feel I have to usually like, for example, the I have an EP in a long form record, which are both totally different. But the long form record is all analog synthesizers and chamberlain's. Yeah. And I'd written this piece of music, and I thought well, why didn't I just try to orchestrate it because I work every day. I'm music on something. So I just whenever I had time. I just went to it. And I got really excited about doing it. It was extremely difficult. But maybe that's what made me excited about it. What was difficult about it? A lot is done one note at a time. It just took a lot of time five seconds a day or something is the most I could ever get. So in this in ether. I really got away from any kind of beat it out time except on a few songs where someone was playing guitar. There's no click tracks or anything that was holding it. So I wanted to just feel really open more conducted than sort of grew feeling which also made it much more difficult. Did you have the songs in your head? If you will. And then there was a matter of trying to get the right execution or mostly I would ride out the tunes. Okay. Harmony then I would go in and try to orchestrate that it was just a lot of experimenting. For me that kind of project. It really helps me in my job. Because I now have a million ideas of things when I'm dealing with a song. I say I've got all these techniques I've developed so for example, there's one song on Rufus Wainwright's record. That is all his him at the piano, and then it's all since and I use a little drum machine. So I got to bring that to his music in a different way. Right. Some of the knowledge you were getting with the experimentation. Yeah. So I gave the confident and he heard it, and he's and he had just written. This new song that was kind of funny. And he said, well, why don't you just and we were sort of out of money? He's won just do any of those things try that and see how that goes you have to given the lunge every of your career, you constantly have to be up to speed with different technologies can do with instruments and just ideas for people. Yeah. You know? And and so it's we hopefully with each artist. You can understand them on a deep level and help develop music that sounds unique to them. And that's not easy. You can't just say, oh, I've got this one way that I work. And now, there's our we're going to do the bass and drums and guitars, and then you'll be fine because it worked on this other guys record. No, not at all. Everyone's so different. We're here in the studio with producer Mitchell fromm, and he's got to new records out when it's called ether. And the other is called monkey tree. We hear a number of different vocalists on ether including Pete, Molly Nari, and it had Edmonson and this veteran Russian rock singer. Sousse, little sold. He found me through Richard Thompson. Oh, and he's he's in this legendary Russian band called aquarium. He said they they used to just play in tiny apartments. And then all the sudden with the fall of communism also news playing stadiums. And but yes, really famous with on his own. His name is Boris GRA bench. Takoff right. I think he goes by b g now. Qisas much of a stars anybody I've ever worked with in my life. I love this guy in this case. He this piece that's on. Here was one section of a three part piece of music. He had on one of the records. We did. And I just asked them. Hey, could I just take your vocal and your guitar and just create a completely different thing? I see we'll tell me what what Boris thought of the finished product. He said it was fine. What are some of the things that have really changed, technology wise? Recording wise in the studio. I mean how much different of a place is the studio today. It's a guess it's just a different time. And the and what's gone that makes me the saddest is the amount that I learned being in on sessions from different people listening. He just amount I learned from Jim Kelton or Pete Thomas or David Hidalgo. It was much more of a kind of community where you could really learn and now people are facing just themself at home. It's just different. I can't really explain it. Then and some scenes, I know some people are working in a way where they have like a community, and they can do stuff together. It feels different to me, it feels more isolated and here a lot of things. On the radio. And it just sounds like one guy at home just kinda like putting it together. Like, you know, you've worked on this. A little too much beat beat the life out of it. Or it doesn't have that. I know what you mean and electric city or whatever you want to say, whatever that X factor, whatever they call it that you would have with with a with a band, and if you get a really great track, but there was a bad part in it. You know, I remember like someone Elvis Costello would say, oh, just put a tambourine over to be fine. You know, like just that. But that kind of thinking. Yeah. Not like, okay. We'll let me get in here, and I'm going to fix this. And then and then I'm gonna copy it, and then it's going to appear like this every single time. And you know, those things are flattening elements and people are so used everything being perfectly in time and perfectly in tune. If you start to completely tuna vocal. So it's perfectly in tune. You're gonna lose a lot. So what what's coming around the pike. Do you think? I mean, I don't know there. Everything that that's the thing. Now is someone said there's something that chameleon recordings coming out every year. What I'd like is it all bets are off like in the eighties. When I started producing those now six rivers on the snare drum. There was all these things that would happen that were part of the sound of the day. And then there was like when after Nevada came out everything had to be like below middle c just had to be deep and low anything above that sounded corny. But now, you can do anything. That's a producer Mitchell from his new records are ether and monkey tree and Mitchell, thanks for letting us come into your studio and bother you for a little while. Oh, my pleasure. Thank you. Coming up on the frame a program that provides mentors from Hollywood for teen girls aspiring to write for a living. There's a mentoring program in Hollywood called right girl. That's right with a w that pairs actors and writers with teen girls. At a recent star studded events if you prominent actors brought some of the teen stories to life KPCC's arts education reporter, Carla heavier takes us there. There's a space off vine street called the Linwood Dunn theater. It's very Hollywood there. These giant like bigger than life sized Oscar statuettes that flank hallways lined with behind the scenes photos of Hollywood hits in one of those hallways. I mean eighteen year old Sam from east LA. I'm right girl. I've been right grow for six seasons. Sam is referring to a free L A based program called right girl. That's w our IT. It's for expiring writers like her ages thirteen to eighteen who are looking for guidance from women writers who volunteered to share their expertise. Write girl pairs hundreds of teen girls with professionals for workshops and one on one mentoring. The teen girls are out of vulnerable stage in their life. So right girl asked us. Not to use their full names every month. Right girl offers sessions focused on different aspects of writing and Sam is here in this glamorous space owned by the academy of Motion Picture Arts and sciences because at the last workshop in character in dialogue, the right girls wrote scripts and now the organization has arranged for actors to take those stories from the page to the stage and SAM's hoping her script gets chosen. That's very exciting fingers crossed. I get something in there. This event helps the organization raise enough money to help the teams, and it's also a chance for them to see their work interpreted by professionals and not just any professionals, but a star studded cast this time actors like Keiko again ah from Gilmore girls Kirby. Hello Baptiste, Wayne Brady and Seth Rogan are bringing the girls writing to life. The actors perform fourteen of the scripts including SAM's. Here's how teased reading a monologue Sam row seriously. How easy does he think this is stab stabber you dead? No, see my job takes precision. I have to track. The jagged down find hide out and grow through this whole process or like this scene written by seventeen year old Rachel where Keiko again plays a student who's excited. She got into her dream college until she notices something on her acceptance letter, my dedication to athleticism and commitment to water polo. We. Water polo. I don't even know how to swim. A panel of female screenwriters give feedback on the scripts like on that last one producer screenwriter Josiane mcgibbon known for runaway bride and desperate. Housewives has this to say one thing. That's so hard to do that. You did is really take us on such a journey. The shows hosted by actor and New York Times bestseller, Lauren Graham, this is her first year as a right girl mentor herself being creative being playful having fun. Finding your voice I I wish I'd had that at a younger age be cut up after the show, and she told me she mentors is right girl because she believes it's important for teen girls in particular to find their voice that can only be positive for the creative world for the political world for the world. Let's talk about that. I second the creative world in TV women writers represented just twenty five percent of the writers on broadcast network shows. According to a twenty eighteen study from the center for the study of women in television and film at San Diego State. Eight in film. The stats are even more dismal women writers represented just fifteen percent of all writers on last year's top one hundred films. It's something Victoria who comes to rate girl from the valley says she thinks about I caught up with her by the red carpet after the show, we have too many of the same stories was, you know, not to invalidate anyone's experiences, but new stories need to be told. She's just fourteen years old. And this is her first year with right girl, her script got chosen to I heard like the names, Alex, Diane, which are the characters and story, and I like freaked out and I turned to hurt. I was like oh my God. Mom like. Listen as like reading out and everything in her seeing the characters are getting ready for a party when Alex played by Rogan has something to get off his chest. I know you don't get it. And you've lived your whole life. Not, you know, having a target your shirt to make sure your stomach wasn't bulging out, and we've never had to wear massive hoodies to hide your hideous body, and you can walk into a mall and not feel the changing room stalls closing in on you taunting you for not fitting in a suit. And I'm glad you don't. And I hope you never do because it's soul-crushing, and I love you, and I wouldn't ever want you to experience something like that. Seth delivered the lines a little bit differently than what I had imagined. But I actually found it to be a lot more like moving the way that it was. So like honest during the panel discussion writer, actor and director Lauren Miller Rogin had this to say about Victoria's work. The bravery that a writer can have inputting some of those really raw emotions in a scene can be so rewarding to the people who are enjoying your material victorious has she was thrilled to get this kind of feedback on her first real script. Oh my goodness. Like, if you're telling me that this is good like, maybe I can actually like make something out of this. That is kind of the point says, right girls, founder and executive director. Karen taylor. They have a lot of potential if you work with them when they're young before they get that idea that it's on a table or they get doors closed on them. She says that's one of the reasons why they host this event with the academy in their building. You just get this feeling like you're part of this whole lineage of film writers. I'm not at school. I'm not at a community center. I'm right here in Hollywood with Hollywood writers that are going to help me do this next month the girls take on creative nonfiction by writing memoir. The audio of the performances is courtesy of the kademi of Motion Picture Arts and sciences, the frame, I'm Carla heavier. Speaking of writing the Pulitzer prize for drama was awarded today the Jackie siblings dreary for her play. Fairview price for music was given to composer Ellen Reid for prism which had its world premiere last fall here in LA and a posthumous special citation was awarded to Aretha Franklin. That's all for today. I'm Steven Cuevas. Thanks for listening. John is back here tomorrow.

producer Hollywood Mitchell fromm writer Randy Newman Elvis Costello John horn LA times writers guild Rufus Wainwright Billy Bush Michael wood Steven Cuevas Sam Motion Picture Arts and scienc founder and executive director Bonnie Raitt Seth Rogan Boris GRA
T Bone Burnett: Perfection Is Second-Rate

Broken Record

56:49 min | 2 years ago

T Bone Burnett: Perfection Is Second-Rate

"I thought this is it man, Los Angeles. Quincy says, you know, I'd rather live in Los Angeles than heaven. That's T-Bone Burnett in conversation with my broken record partner. Rick rubin. We took a hilarious picture of Rick and T-Bone after they tape. This interview Ricksen a t shirt and shorts naturally T-Bone towers over him dressed impeccably in a white shirt and a black suit like some old school blues player, I think of T-Bone as Rick's spiritual. Godfather, he's a generation older in his early seventies. But he's had the same kind of extrordinary behind the scenes influence on the music. We all listen to T-Bone is probably most famous for helping launch the careers of artists. Like, Los Lobos, Counting Crows and Gillian Welch also for producing albums by brandy Carlisle Elton, John and the masterfully executed raising sand collaboration between Alison Krauss and Robert plant. Oh, he also produced and performed on my favorite Elvis Costello record of all time king of America. Then there's this film and TV credits. Are insane. He partnered with the Coen brothers as music supervisor on the big lebowski. He worked on O'Brien Where Art Thou. Walk the line crazy heart to detective to list goes on is a new record out called the invisible. Light acoustic space available wherever you get your music is the first in a series of records T-Bone will be putting out this year. And incredible outpouring of songs coming out of a play. He's providing the music for I only met him once years and years ago. What was the most star studded dinner party? I've ever attended was in LA. I got invited by accident and was wall-to-wall movie stars and T-Bone Burnett and the only person I wanted to listen to was T-Bone Burnett. You're about to understand how I felt I'm Malcolm God. Well, this is broken record. And I'm heartbroken. I didn't get to join in on this conversation. Here in conversation at Shangri LA studios in Malibu. Rick Rubin and T-Bone Burnett. Are you always writing songs now, you know, I took a job about three years ago? I I Marshall Brickman do, you know, Marshall Brickman incredible character. He was where the original focus in New York City. I didn't know that I really know him as a as a as a writer well in in the fifties. He was one of the cats in Washington square park, and he played on Judy Collins records, he played he was a session musician. He played all the played banjo and fiddle and Qatar mandolin guitar player on dueling banjos for deliverance. And by the time he was twenty three. He was the head writer on the Johnny Carson tonight show. And then he admitted the dick Cavite show, and then he wrote those movies with Woody Allen, she would know any all and Manhattan. And then he wrote jersey boys, which is a. Amazing. You know? So he's he's transitioned into theater and he called me up. And he said do you want to write a musical about the people who played ROY Rogers and Dale Evans, and do you remember them at all? So ROY Rogers was for my generation the biggest star in the world, you know, all through the fifties television show, and it was a an interesting idea. He's in the country music hall of fame because he's a great. He was fantastic singer. But I always thought he was ROY Rogers and how I saw Dale Evans was Dale Evans, but they were to actors. I didn't know that. Nobody knows that. So this is a story about the people who played them. And so they were like the Monkees here a little bit. Yeah. Except she wrote happy trails. She was a great song writer, and he was a great singer. But they were cast. Yeah. Into those parts. Yeah. And the whole character was a made up cab. Yeah. The healthcare. Unbelievable. How abroad Assad to play for you? Do. You wanna play me the song? Everybody wants to know the truth. But nobody wants to hear is. Everybody has to face the end, but nobody wants to get near. Everybody wants peace. But nobody wants to surrender. Every one lives in the past. But nobody seems to remember. There is nothing as long as Nova is everything burns it grows cold. Everybody wants to live forever. But nobody wants to get. Oh. Everybody wants to be forgiven, but nobody wants to confess. Everyone longs to hold onto moment. The no one can ever possess. Everyone wants to be free. But no one can pay the prize. Everyone wants to be. When no one has asked for advice. There is nothing as long as new does everything burns it grows code. Everybody wants to live forever. But nobody wants to get. Nobody knows the end of the story. We must wait for it to unfold. Everyone lives facing momento Mori, but nobody wants to get. Nobody wants to get. Nice. Where will that fall into the story? I think it's early on when he's. I think he's maybe auditioning for a radio show or something. He sings that song. But yeah, I think it's in the first act great. Yeah. Really good. Thank you have to right. Are you the point now where you you know, sort of where the songs fit, and is there ever a calling to like say, okay. In the end of the second act. We need to add a song miss spot. And this is what it needs to accomplish in the story, the up, in fact, I just wrote we did a twenty they colored a twenty nine our reading, which is you get all the actors up on their feet, and they read the parts, and you saw it you do it without costumes or that sets. But you get the you get the gist of it, the tempo of and I realized after the last one that there I didn't have a beginning song for ROY. And I didn't have an ending song for Dale. So what back in I did that. I wrote a road. Good song. Call out of nowhere for ROY to start off with. So you meet him and strength. And then Dale needed of saw a song at the end of a heavy duty number at the end. So yeah. And I'm sure we're going to we're going to open it in an Atlanta. And twenty twenty in the fall of twenty twenty and I'm sure once we get into the process of really getting it up and getting in front of audiences. They'll be a lot more changes to come. Yeah. Beautiful. I love the the peace and surrender lines. Really good. Right. Good. Yeah. Thank you. And I love the tagline the hook line is great. Yeah. Everybody wants to live forever. But nobody wants to get good. So. But when I accepted this commission in to to write these songs musical, and I'd done a lot of work with Sam Sheppard he and identify out of things for plays. And but of musicals different because every line has to be intentional. You know, you can't write just a cool salary. Yeah. It's narrative yet is narrative and planet became it was sobered me up quite a bit. And I started read I read Sondheim's books, and I started studying Frank lesser who I think was the greatest all the the Broadway composers and learner in low and of these cats, and it became clear that I was going to have to dancer get off the floor. So I started waking up every morning at four in the morning for about a year solid and riding when it was quiet. And then when I got through writing the twenty songs for the musical, I couldn't stop writing. So I. I have written. Now, I don't know how we've recorded about two hours of music. They were gonna start putting out April twelve is the process of writing a song for a musical different than writing asong, otherwise. Yeah. It is because. Yeah. Because it does have to move the story along, but, but but you start with music, I or do you start with the lyric us starting with the lyrics because it's as you say it's part of the book, it's part of the narrative. So you'd read it like a poem, basically. Yeah. Would you have a melody in your head? Yeah. Yeah. You know, melody is really just coda fide inflection. So you're as your storytelling, no matter what. And so the every sentence has a certain melody to it, and I was so I was doing that. I was writing, but I would have a sense of melody as it was going down. And then you know, I wrote. Putting out we're starting to put out records putting out three double records in the next year. This year, I'm gonna kinda work hip hop because I see these cats they just put stuff out constantly. So we've recorded a a lot of these tunes that have come afterward. Yes. A stopped. I really stopped producing other people for the most part, although interesting, I just made a record with Sarah Barilla's, that's really beautiful to you that she's a beautiful singer. And she's also gone through the experience of writing a play. She wrote a musical of waitress, and it raised the stakes for her to her writing has become much more resident deeper higher. It's interesting to hear her growth through the process house a collaboration with her different than her the records. We we did it more live, which is what I mostly do. That's the thing. I like most of the thing. I love about making records is when people are playing and singing all at one. Time and you get they get finished. And you say, yeah, that's great. You know, it's such a great feeling. It's such a there's something about people playing together that. No amount of getting it. Right. Yeah. Counters the energy of the interaction. That's really playing. Yeah. Perfection is a second rate idea shore and the computer is able to put out perfect music all day long. But it's not nearly as interesting as those Johnny cash records debate with him just sitting in a room with some people turn him onto a song and turning though, then turn the whole world onto the song the same way. So that's that's the process. I liked the most. And I think the band was great. She you know, is the same essentially same band that was on raising Sanjay Bill rose played drums Dennis crouch played string bass. Oh played guitar. I love that Hubble so much at raising Sanae in love, isn't that a beautiful beautiful. Yeah. It really took me by surprise. I don't know. I I wasn't expecting to be so beautiful and just blew my mind. You know, both that both of them have. Mystical beautiful voices. Yes. And and it was interesting to hear him softened up yet. But on paper, it wasn't necessarily must-listen Fe. And then hearing it was mind blowing also didn't I didn't know most of those songs. So that so I didn't know that they weren't original song. Yeah. So they were original for most people. Yes. Yeah. But it's got some of that same Butte. Sarah's record has some of that say that one come together, Robert Nells, this really, I think Bill Flanagan uniform, don't you Flanagan was doing that show crossroads. And I think he wanted to do a crossroads with with Robert and Allison and it ended up being a record. And then we did a crossroads later. But I think they met from that idea Flanagan pitch in them on doing it they met, and they did a they did a tribute to lead Bill yourself or some. Buddy up in up in Cleveland. I think and they enjoyed it. And then they called me up and said you wanna wanna make a record? And I sent him those two gene Clark songs. Those the first two things I sent through the morning through the night. And Polly, which I thought had those that chain had that dark mystical vibe that they both have. Syncing now to to hear Robert sing low and soft like that and go back and listen to Led Zeppelin beautiful showed another side and felt like a side that just the timing of. It was right for him. You know, what the to hear him sound like that was a revelation. Yeah. Wave sound like a grown, man. Yeah. Made sense. When before I mean, he he says himself in his early Led Zeppelin records e sound like a ca strato or something, you know, he was singing. So I, and I imagined that when he sings like that now it's more like he's imitating the old him, whereas raising sand sounds like more believable now. Yeah. I don't I really don't think he could sing those songs. He couldn't sing him in the rain. She used to sing a man, you know, same with Elton Elton's voices dropped could active IRS like that. And he's got this beautiful day resonant baritone now, and you're listening to some of the records. He says like he's. On helium or something after after getting used to his voice now and loving it and go and back in here. Not that they are. Absolutely classic and great food savers. Was there any reason you didn't do a second one with a follow up to raise? And I think we may go good. I think we may do one of these days love, maybe we should to gray. We should do it together. Let's do it's such a beautiful album. Yeah. I I would love to do do one. Again, we we went in and recorded some songs and having been through all the success. So to speak is the stake seem different when we went on the in the second time, and it didn't feel I don't think any of us felt the same kind of freedom that we'd say, isn't it interesting? How the stakes changed the whole process. Yeah. Yes. But but I think now it's been long enough. So we probably will go in and just play, you know? That'd be great. If you have ideas songs, I hadn't thought about it that much. I mean, they're just they're just been rumblings about about it. So we'll see we'll see where it goes. Have you done any other collaborations like that where it's been to artists who don't normally work together? I don't think I have have you done that. I see remember I've done I've done quite a few. You know, the rolling thunder revue, which was yes this studio was part of that whole time. Yes. That was a beautiful experiment, and it was a masterclass in art and show business. I mean, there was every Allen Ginsberg and an Waldman where they Sam Sheppard. Was there their incredible musicians? Joni Mitchell's there John by us. And how he Wyeth and David Mansfield one great musician after the mic Ronson from NPR Macron was part of it. Yeah. People from all different parts of the world, different disciplines different places, but everybody came together and collaborated, and it was a it was a tremendous learning experience that I've replicated or tried to replicate several times with like the ROY orbison black and white night show and incredible. That was a beautiful evening and. I saw at the other day. I was watching Leonard Cohen was in the audience. I'd forgotten that I think that idea of like Aerosmith and run DMC. Did you have anything to do with that supposed to? Yeah. I forgot it's hard. It's hard to think hard to think about project. Yeah. I know exactly. Just sort of it's hard to even look back at all shore. And I rarely yeah. Me too. But but that was certainly one of those that changed everything, and it'd be boys chain them doing. I'm down yet. Did you ever hear that? Oh, yeah. Never came out. It never came out. And never did. No. We couldn't get permission. It was supposed to be on that first album. I since two ill might have been the last thing we recorded for it. We couldn't get permission. It never came out. But I think it's on like YouTube or somewhere I heard it Steve Rabovsky politic. When just when. Yes in our guy. Yeah. And it was I'm really d. Fully be fully fully deal. That's right. So funny. So funny, man, they were cutting up. Yeah. I did that I did the guitar solo in the organ solo neither instruments that I really play. And it's really shows. When we come back T-Bone, premiers another brand new song for us. But first we pay the bills. In an election voted to the person who wants to make the world better. Right. 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And the impact they stand to have. Visit swell investing dot com slash broken record to start investing in the future. You want to do today for a fifty dollar bonus. When you open it account swell. Invest in progress. We're back and T-Bone has another new song to play for his called out of nowhere. Another number from the ROY Rogers and Dale Evans musical his writing for this is the song. I realized I needed a song to introduce ROY. I guess I didn't really have a powerful number two to introduce him. And as I said, the the guy who played him Leonard sly was a was a soulful beautiful cat. He wasn't at all. Like the swashbuckler. Buckling cowboy you know. He was he was different. And so I wanted to write something from inside him not not about him. Yes. But for something that that he was feeling about his life and Hillary came from. So the Sasanka out of nowhere. There is no into this road. We travel no conclusion is for. Once you just find thing. But it keeps you moving. That that can be one his words. Fi. Is no place to run between. No grievous. No Specht FRA. Can stop the wind from blow in? Can stop the river flow. Can stop the world from turn. Ken, stop the sun from burn. Gone a quit swin you expecting. If you want me to stay few dome. Of. To say. No. No. Happen. There is no into this road. We travel. No conclusion is for gun. Once you find thing. Keeps you. It keeps you. Back to that idea. You were talking about about the way art happens. Yeah. Right. Once you defined thing. You lose it yet. It's really hard. It's really hard. That's right. Yeah. So I mean, it's it's I think in retrospect after the moment of inspiration where the thing that wants to be revealed as revealed, and we know we like it, then we can maybe try to figure out why we like it. And then it's okay. Yeah. I think the other way around is very difficult. I don't know if it even happens. I think artists too. I think all really artists do is going down a road. And we we Mark things we say at this day. I was at this place. And I saw this thing and it was beautiful. Yes. And I'm gonna Mark this. So maybe you don't miss it. When you're going by. That's I think that's the real the real journey of an artist. I can remember seeing French impressionist paintings of trees in the French countryside and thinking it's very strange decision that that the artist is making, you know, putting all these different blotch is a color to make the tree. It's it's very poetic and beautiful. But it's you know, what wild imagination and then went to France the trees. Oh, that's what they action. I know note. I mean, it's like it's like the the lyrics of songs hit us in this sort of poetic magic. Away. When often if we hear the story of them, they turn out to be very ordinary descriptions of what really happened on its I guess, maybe it's the information that's left out that makes them seem so magical. Yeah. I think that's right. I do think. That's that's an interesting observation. I do. That's right in this song that you just saying the hook has a repetition of a phrase. The first only played did not have that. Right. Isn't it? Interesting that when writing words that certain words can be repeated often, and it feels really good and other words, repeat them, and it feels like you can never repeat them. Right. Some things become a chant. Yeah. And they've fallen really naturally, it's the melody of the thought its ability of the of the of the expression, maybe the phrasing as well. The the way they work with Mickley. So interesting you pretty good at this. It's very interesting never thought of that at all meter thinking of it right now. Really? Yes. It's part of the conversation. What's coming out from listening the solace? Excellent. How does that work? How do we do that? I've noticed the difficulty in it. But I've never thought about why. But that one this one here, I don't know. That's just something that became very important to me that idea and it was important in context. It was important for ROY Rogers because he for him everything just happened out of nowhere. Yes. Right. So important for him to embrace that idea. And but then it happened. I mean, the raising San record happened out of nowhere, right? Just think how does dad. Is the best things do. Yeah. That's right. They really do. They're not they're not they're not conceived or exactly they're just they're helped into existent love into a and b intention behind them is beautiful intention, but the intention didn't control it happening more like maybe the loud it allowed to be revealed that he got maybe just got Roland in the first place. And also in the first song if we were making record together if I was producing it. I would have suggested repeating the tag at the end of the first piece I'll do that. Well, we'll depends though because in the context of it, and I was civic about if we're making record together. It would be the purpose of the song would be different than the way. It would be applied. That's like, I don't know thinking about it. Like now str- the structure in play might be different than. Normal song structure wants to accomplish a different purpose. And we won't know until we get it up and were planted presentable one hundred percent, the I think the idea of making art like you were saying earlier about on the raising Santa mistakes got high, and then it changed because there was an expectation. I like to say I have said it before to artists that I've worked with his would we're making these things audience comes last. That's what I I agree. I agree. I don't believe you can do it for the audience know because I don't think we're I know that if we can make something that we like there's a better chance that someone else's gonna like it. And if we make what we that. We don't like, but we think someone else's gonna like that's impossible. That's that's one of the problems with, you know, working in television is there's a there are a lot of people that think they know what the audience wants. And they're always trying to get you. To do the thing the audience wants televisions of big collaborative medium. And you know, I I love to collaborate. And I love to collaborate with large groups, but it is it's a process of it's not a process of of starting with the audience and then working backward. Not at all about if you wanna make something good, right? And what audiences like is something? Good absolu-, you'll real real obligation or responsibility to the artist is to make thing you really love hundred percent. That's the if you do that this. There's a really good chance. They'll really love as well. Hopefully, so at least your best chance. Yeah, elise. You've got h aunts. And I feel like an as a record producer often feel like a proxy for the audience to say, right? Same. I'm not really musician. So all all I am is of of glorified fan. You know, really what I am while your listener. Yeah. That's it. Yeah. I listen. I try to understand I can tune into what pulls me into something. And what pushes me away, and I just really trust. Whatever that is. Right. Yeah. You never know. Why? You've learned to trust your instincts, that's valuable that's valuable thin. Most people don't that's one of the things. One of the things artists. Tested to how to do. Trust is instinct, all the best art is second nature. It's made by second nature. It's not made consciously in that way. That's why say artists artists role is the the goal of artists to create conscience not consciousness. You know? It's the create is secrete. The thing where you feel the the thing where you've for you empathize. Where you say. Yeah. That's right. That's true. That's beautiful. You don't do that. That's not a conscious decision. It's a it's an internal instinctive instinctual decision. Something that I I noticed relatively early in the working with different artists that that was interesting was one of the band. I worked with is called slayer heavy metal band, very. One of the inventors of black metal or like, very very aggressive metal. And and the lyrics were really dark and heavy and to some people they would look at that as negative content, and then I would go to a concert, and I would seen arena for of kids who were very much like the guys in slayer. Who were so filled with joy listening to this music. It was speaking directly to them. It completely was nourishing them, right? Combat would not have reached them just made them angry. Yeah. So it's like it's almost like beyond what the actual content is. It's more like how does what whatever the art is resonate with other people, and I personally don't like to see harm movies. I don't like see violence at all Haarer violence or anything. I almost never go to the movies of and maybe documentaries. But for some people that experience a feeling the thrill, they really got really moves a may like it. But again, I I don't know that there's a there's not a right and wrong, and there's not a positive and a negative in it. It's more like. It really is what entertains people and whatever stuff happened in their life that led them to a place where this darker things speaks to them in their case. It's it's healing to hear it. They don't they feel less alone. Right. Yeah. That's right. That's you know, the of called my new the new stuff, I'm working on with Keefe j of called the invisible light. And I feel that that's a because of that very thing you're talking about because the the what had say the words very dark the world. It's talking about is very dark. But if you listened to it, there's a great deal of light, invisible light. Yes, right beautiful. But you have to find your way into it. If you just if you just take it all at face value, or if you try to approach pedantically, you'll just say, well, this is this is a dark dark world. Well, it is dark world. But there's also, you know. Through though, there's all of that. There's the ocean in the trees the sky. It's all. It's all like like, I said earlier, I think it's all just a reflection of what's going on. You know? It's right. There's there's a there's tremendous beauty in the world, and is really bad stuff goes harder. And and all of that warrants being reflected back. It's interesting. I was been going around recently in most of the music, I'm hearing and supermarkets and department stores those things just going around life. Most of that. I'm hearing from the nineteen sixties, and I've curious about that because the nineteen sixties maybe the last time there was this sort of exuberance about art like whole foods the other day and the reporting good love, and I wanna hold your hand in this. And it was a it lightened the feeling and the and the place, and there really hasn't been that particular aspect of music since the nineteen sixties that I can think. No. And it's also it's also a time beyond what the lyrical content was when the industry was still small and the stakes were low. Yeah. I remind the people making that music probably were making it for themselves for the friends or for, you know, the high school dance, they weren't making it to sell out arenas because nobody had done that Raina play the everything it seems that anything. When it starts. It's small and has been awful intention and integrity in it. And then when it gets big and a lot of people are involved that just dissipates just in any any organization. This is one of the reasons I love as a producer. I love making records with I records with artists because you're dealing with an artist who's been working under complete autonomy. Yes. For a number of years, and he doesn't have experts telling him what the audience wants, for instance. So I've had very several very successful. I records with artists that are tremendous fun. And I still love today because because of that they're not they're unselfconsciously. No, baggage right. Yeah. I I've I've worked with both artists for the first time many artists in many successful artists, as you know, existing artists in it's definitely true. That with a new artist there's a freedom of how is this going to work whereas with the with the establish artists? There's all often a lot of bad habits to have to unlearn. Yeah. Yeah. Just playing in front of twenty or thirty thousand people will create something that had something to your brain. Well, it makes you it may it can make you be too broad. Yeah. And in studio the studio is like as a film, you know, like you you get right in on a person, you're close right by them. You know, they're singing in your ear in an large concert. You know, it's like a theater it's got lately you're projecting out into the last row. Yes. So it's very different. It's very different discipline and playing for large crowds, and what having Degen them up night after night could really give you some bad habits on the other hand working. With seasoned artists can be absolutely the best because there's little 'cause they're just good salute. I was gonna say when you mentioned the work that I did the, Johnny. And a lot of a lot of specially in the beginning when we started working together it was getting him to perform the songs less. Yep. Yes. Sell the songs just to tell it just tell me Friday night Sam sitting right here next to you. And we were sitting on the couch. Just sing me. The just tell me the story of the song. You don't have to perform it. And and there's recordings tape was role diamond. He would always himself. Get off stage cash get off stay. Yeah. He was a character would linka what a loss tremendous laws. That was. Yeah. Beautiful me. It was amazing. Yeah. I think he would have been anything. He would have done would have been good. Yeah. Because it was him. It wasn't wasn't that. He was the best musician or the best singer. It was he showed through what he made he chose that. But anything he would chose would've been great. You know, Sam Sheppard an hour doing play up in New York tooth of crime. And he called me up to to write music for it. And I was at a time in my life. When I couldn't I didn't know what music was anymore. I couldn't tell why one note should be here in another note should shouldn't be there. You know, every note was the same notes were even notes out. I was letting I was letting go of the idea of pitch and Tirlian just working purely off tone. I was at sea. And I said, and we were sitting in a theater somewhere. And I said to say, you know, I don't even know what music is anymore, man. And he said when you do it. That's what it is. And that was that was the most freeing thing anybody ever said to me in my life. And and and that's what I think that's the thing. We can help artists get to that point. I want to help other artists with with that same that same vote of confidence that same lack of questioning we'll be back with more of Rick's conversation with T-Bone after this. I'm just in Richmond producer broken record. The other day. I sat down with host. Rick Rubin to talk to him about how he could use Lincoln to hire people. How does hiring work on urine in the past? When I've had to hire people usually been more through word of mouth, asking friends looking for conditions, and it's honestly, not a easy process. One of the hardest things to do, but it's time consuming. Right. Absolutely. And you never you never really know. It's. The idea that there's a pool of talent out there available and that we can connect to that seems like something I would like to use it sounded make a higher for your small business natural. You wanna find the best person for the job odds are that person's linked only. Lynton jobs makes it easy to match with quality candidates who make the most sense for your role Lynton jobs. He's knowledgeable hard skills and soft skills to match you with the people who fit your role the best people come to Lincoln every day to learn an advance their careers. So Lincoln understand what they're interested in and looking for which means we knew us Lincoln to hire someone you're matches are based on so much more than a resume posted job today. A Lincoln dot com slash broken record and get fifty dollars off your first job post. That's Lincoln dot com slash broken record, terms and conditions apply. I don't know if you notice about me, but I have strong feelings about t shirts and underwear for the same reason, by the way that I have strong feelings about light switches people spend a gazillion dollars on the house of dreams. Building in extravagant features at the world will never see who when it comes to the light switch which naval touch multiple times everyday for the rest of their lives. They're like, let's just get the hideous way plastic ones. No do not hideous white plastic ones. Get the brass one. That makes a satisfying click. There is nothing in the entire house. Us more often same thing with t shirts and underwear. I mean, you wear them next to your skin fourteen hours a day every day of your life men's spend more time choosing neckties which they will never wear than they do on a word robe essential makes sense. Which is why I shop online with math. Well, the most comfortable underwear socks shirts. Undershirts. Hoodies and sweatpants and more you'll ever wear numerals anti microbial sober underwear which eliminates odors. They've got socks you can build a life around the best t shirts, but not some manic collection of hundred fifty t-shirts know who necks V necks tanks in white and gray and your size. And you know, how some clothing websites are so complicated that you practically need GPS to get around them. Not MAC Wellman elegant, simple clean. Wait. Wait. I'm gonna buy me. Samak Walden socks right now as I'm doing this some air nets with mesh better airflow and little anti odor magic and compression foot bed. Now, he's running. I'm done for twenty percent off your first order. Visit MAC Weldon dot com and enter promo code broken record, a checkup. We're back with more. Rick Rubin and T-Bone Burnett. What was your entry into music? I don't know any. I don't know. I mean, I've known you for so long. But that I I know you as T-Bone Burnett. I don't know how you became debone. Well, my my my first century into music was my parents had a great seventy eight collection, and I used to sit down and listen to all Louis Armstrong records and Ella Fitzgerald. The saw the great American songbook records zinn, Texas. Yeah. In Texas and Fort Worth. And and and I I was I was moved by the way. There was a song. That was a Cole porter song. I think called begin the begin you know, that tune in and listen to it not be immediately transported to some tropical island somewhere. And I was amazed at the way music could create place could create an atmosphere and environment. You could close your eyes, and I would no longer be in Fort Worth Texas, which was to me great relief. For it worth at the time at a very low ceiling in it felt like it felt like anything that was happening in the world was happening somewhere far away. And there was no way to get there. But music was a window or a door out and to into these other places into the world and was at that wasn't the music of Dave. Oh, no. That was all you were listening to older, even then it was old Museu. Yeah. It was all music, then it was what was the music of the day when he rea- well, it was like Elvis Presley, and and Ricky Nelson, I loved Ricky Nelson. Let personally I loved Ricky more than Elvis because he was on television. And he saying a great song every week. And I didn't I didn't really understand Elvis. See seem seem broad to me. Yeah. Whereas Ricky was cool and understated in. So I my my aesthetic sorta went that direction. I learned to appreciate Elvis, of course, much more later. Yes. When I when I got. When I got way into the special stuff, he did with Sam Phillips who was also wasn't saying Philipson greatest ration- to you. I mean, I feel like you know, he was a guy who like you didn't recognize race boundaries. He was a he was Sam Phillips was great civil rights leader. Actually, you know, he had the first all woman radio station W H, E R in Memphis, and he brought he brought hell and wolf into the studio when Helen of mine it scared the pants off of most white people at the time. He was a big strong black men in the south, and but he but Sam embraced him and embraced Ike Turner. And brought all these incredible musicians into the studio and opened up the the world to them and them to the world. You know, absolutely and admire that you've done very much the same thing. You just you've crossed those boundaries in just natch. Though, I have clicked dictation. I follow my taste that it's not there's no political underpinning snow. It's just the all we also had Sam. Yeah. You know to to start a started that way. Yeah. John M and before John Hammond. Incredible John Hammond was a uptown New York stablishment guy who went down to the village and found built Billie holiday, and you know. Music's always done that though music. The thing Tony Bennett, you know, has art school. And he says the great thing about art. And he's a good painter. He's very good painter says a great thing about art is either good or you're not good and done matter where you're from. Or what what your ethnic city is any of that? It's just good or not good. And it feels like the the. The relationships that I have with artists have had nothing to do with anything other than our love of music, and doesn't doesn't matter with from what the background is doesn't matter. But this not we're not talking about that. We're not about music, that's right and re on the same page or not. And that's all and that's good to like, whether we are not it's all ones. Exactly, I met trying to convince anybody of anything. Yeah. That's right, Willie Dixon. I worked got to work with Willie Dixon and one of the things. He would say is if that's the way you like it. I like it. Yeah. And I love that. Yeah. That's that's generous. That's a deep general. You know? Yeah. So and he was so so Elvis is on the radio and Ricky Nelson's on the radio. You're listening to seventy big band. Seventy eights stuff like that. What was your first music related gig? And your first instrument. Oh, well, you know, I was I one day I was at a friend's house, and there was A Gibson guitar much. Like this one win against a wall and hit the eastern. Like that. Oh, just just something about heading that one note was like a key that unlocked door that is that led me through my whole life. And once I started playing guitar when I was about twelve I started listening to Qatar players. That's when I you know, I learned how to play while would flour by the Carter family, which may Bill Carter is essentially the mother of rock and roll guitar, you know, every every rock and roll guitar player. I know learned to play while would flour. I or very soon thereafter. And so I started listening to the Carter family, and I started listening to Hank Williams and that stuff because it was on the radio. And there was a lot of interesting pop music. There was Peggy Lee was interesting at the time if she was really killer. Great. And then the Beatles happened to know, and that changed everything that that really did that change the world. I look at those. I look at those clips now the Beatles playing for audiences of young girls and the girls are screaming and some of them look like they're screaming at a horror movie, and I feel like there was that. There was that confluence of events of the Kennedy. It says the first Kennedy assassination and the Beatles. Coming out in the wake of that. That was was once again them metallica's. Yeah. It was it was them. Yeah. It was a Tharcisse them mythology ising this horror for us in an beautiful way. And and singing these joyful songs in the wake of this. Of the truck great tragedy. Tremendous and begin all unintentional. Yeah. Minute nether these like again looking back. We can see you just happened in. This was we can call it a reaction. But I don't think it was a intellectual Riyadh all know that happen. Nobody was connecting the two at the time. But I think in retrospect, it's hard not to connect yet. Right. It's fascinating. Right. So yes. So those those things I mean, sometimes we see around corners. I know you see around corners occasionally, and you think oh, I see where this fits in this works. I've had that app a couple of times. But most of the time I certainly didn't with raising sand. For instance. I didn't see around that corner. Just thought this is something to do was cool. Yeah. Yeah. These two sound good together. Absolut? Absolutely. But so did you did you join a band? Yeah. Then I at that point. I was already I was already in a little band, and we were playing mostly surf music at the time because I got electric guitar melody maker plan, flats flat wound strings on a melody maker. And there were all those great surf tunes that had they're all in the big, oh, I left out Jimmy Reed who Jimmy Reed for me was that's actually probably ground zero. That's after I learned may Bill Carter, I learned Jimmy Reed. And then that opened up a whole other world of our in be debar and be and and how old were you about this time, probably twelve or thirteen. You know, and the Beatles actually, one of the things I loved about the Beatles. Was they sounded like Jimmy Reed. They played the low strings on the guitar they played flat wound strings on the bottom of the Qatar like Jimmy Reed. And and he and he also it was also just the groove. You know, the pocket they played in a similar pocket to him. I feel like they must have listened to him. I certainly once I got into Jimmy Reed. I devoured everything. Everything. I learned every possible song and Chuck Berry as the that was the other get swing of the Beatles. Undeniably. Yeah. People don't really talk about it. Yeah. Yeah. The the songs are killer. But you know, and Ringo was you know, he played with sister Rosetta Tharp when he was the house drummer when he was the house drummer at the cavern club. He played with all the R and B X that would come through. So he got a real he he had he's probably just in eight with him. But he swung so hard. And I was watching Ron Howard's documentary of days a week felt the Beatles. And I realize oh the three geniuses up front were killing, but Ringo was supplant was Bali electricity was coming out of Ringo. He was blowing. Everybody's mind without us, even knowing. Yes, now looking back on it is after all these years of of listening to everything I can I can see at the time. I couldn't why I knew a love the way. I love the way he attacked his. Hi hat, for instance. Yeah. He just had going solid. It wasn't. It was. You know? So that's supplied a lot of electric city and excitement, but also just his just his put his whole self his, you know, he would hit the bass drums, Boone, you know, just like kill it. And the other cats were killing it too. But he was just he was the really electric part of it. I thought and but so yes, so when that happened, and then, you know, they're other guy before the Beales was buddy. Holly who they also wanted to be you know, we were playing also from Texas was there this feeling of definitely he was one of the cats that that made me feel like, oh, I can get out. I can get out from under this low ceiling as buddy Holly could do it. Yes. You know? It's it's possible. Yeah. That was T-Bone Burnett. Talking with my co host Rick Rubin at Shangrila in Malibu his new album invisible. Light Kucic space is out now and available wherever you get your music. You can also Bizet our website to find Spotify playlist for the album can also play list for some of our favorite T-Bone. Productions broken record is produced by Justin Richmond and Jason Gambrill with help from meal. Abell Jacob Smith. Julia Parton and Jacob iceberg special. Thanks to my co host, Rick Rubin, and Bruce headlamp are broken. Record. Theme music is by the great Kenny beats be sure to check out his new album with rapper Rico nasty. Also, be sure to check for next week's episode with Linda Perry, she talks with Bruce of being the first woman nominated for producer of the year at the Grammys and fifteen years that's next week. Bush can industries. I'm glad well.

T-Bone Burnett Rick rubin ROY Rogers Dale Evans producer Sam Sheppard Beatles New York City Los Angeles Bill Carter Marshall Brickman Elvis Costello writer Sarah Barilla Monkees Sam Malibu Woody Allen Jimmy Reed
American Anthem

Throughline

28:17 min | 2 years ago

American Anthem

"Hey amendments that i'm renting bluey in this is through live from npr so it's july fourth jimmy plant champion kind of playing opposite is i like to celebrate fourth of july but i don't like crowds so cinna fireworks fan i'm gonna try to watch the fireworks from far away from people saying yeah i definitely have a barbecue i'll probably girlfriend's house barbecue but rather watch it from far away that's my whole thing okay that's completely understandable obviously this holiday celebrate united states independence and one song that embodies the spirit of it is the star spangled banner it's of course the national anthem but they're also plenty of other unofficial anthems have resonated with different people for different reasons npr music has been collecting these american anthems over the past year these are songs on themes like patriotism war civil rights women's empowerment parliament in teenage rebellion would your american man it'd be putting me on the spot here 'em oh you know what my goto song when i wanna like get pumped up but it's also from one of my all time favorite movies remember the titans ain't no manhattan a time where no man that's a good british you know it's great is like the song you listen to when you don't feel well you feel down it instantly certainly makes you feel better a true american classic and today we're gonna share three stories from npr music's american anthem series that highlight the origins of songs that also became american classics at first the battle hymn of the republic my and i have seen the glory of the coming of or when johnny cash introduced this song on his tv show in nineteen sixty nine he made a mistake here's a song it was reportedly sung by both sides in the civil war the song does have roots in the civil war but it was written as a pro union entice slavery song here's npr's andrew limbaugh with the history of the easy on johnny cash for flooding the history of the battle hymn of the republic i had it wrong to i didn't even notice on had ties the civil war up until embarrassingly recently because i and maybe you if you grew up with similar more flavor of christianity only saying in a church little did i know the song was being used a root for college football teams go georgia and then anthem for labor union or evangelists billy graham who helped popularize hung among christian even took it to the russian army chorus in nineteen ninety two the march i mean it's just the right page and the march along if you're marching a picket line marching down the streets carrying signs that sparky rocker eight folk singer and civil war historian who performs a show of civil war music called blue and great in black and white with his wife rhonda sets you're heart to get your blood going in the chicken sleigh dragons dragons are relative though anita bryant used to sing the song at antigay gay rallies and it's also being used to justify racism on the flip side doctor martin luther king junior made his famous mountaintop speech the day before he was killed in nineteen sixty eight and it ends like i'm not i'm not how people release of patriotism is head of healthy come in the battle hymn that's professor brigitta johnson ethno musicologist at the university of south carolina who teachers in schools of music and african american studies after martin luther king junior died she says his home church ebeneezer baptist made a song about him and his truth of the civil rights movement johnson says this anthem is all about what you bring to it for example but when you see you're white nationalist kind of digging deep into their heavy patriotism messages they bring up things like the star spangled banner in the battle hymn end it becomes their battle cry just as easy as it becomes a battle cry for ebeneezer in atlanta and that flexibility he is by design quick history it's the middle of the civil union soldiers are sitting around the campfire enough singing songs and they're ribbing on this one guy one of the members of the singing the scottish immigrant name john brown not that john brown says harvard professor john stouffer we're not talking about the famous abolitionist just a regular soldier suffer is co author of the book the battle hymn of the republican biography song that marches on he says the soldiers were making up lyrics to the tune of an old say brothers lee meta so when they start making up songs to pass the time comrades needle him and say you can't be john brown john brown dad and then another soldier it out but his body wilder and the great john ron bottom line the move in the room so even though it's about their regular soldier ghost w abolition looms large judge end a song called john brown body is born become super popular among union soldiers for a few reasons it's easier to sing the melody simple the lyrics are easy to remember and most importantly it glorified the right to fight against slavery is a lot of time in a on a on a couple of years later he will do highly educated poet from new york what how comes to washington dc with prime minister to visit union troops as they do show confederate attacks but the union troops defendant impress how her minister pushes her to rewrite john brown's body rewrite it an elevated liz dated for a kind of educated audience john stouffer says julie word how is not interested in creating an anthem she wanted make capital eight art with metaphor and symbolism so she could join the ranks of the better known writers of her time symbolism lives in was seen by hawthorn melville the road that part of the way in which they were understood as great writers was their use of symbolism so how did many of the crowd source lyrics of john brown's body like let's hang jeff davis from me sour apple tree that crowd sourcing is what made the song so popular in the first place that administering melody of the original him regina johnson says african american united and picked up the melody as their app he also had this marching from arkansas being found by black soldiers will show jumping the gun get a gold star done withholding cottonwood done withholding corner colored yankees soldiers now sure you're born that folk singer sparky rutgers game twos versions of these songs we've been hearing he says that when he thinks the black union soldiers version of the song even in the south where in his words be boone's of the civil war are still fresh everyone sing along even though a lot of by reconstructive says news now i'm singing along with because we also saw some of their song banging rutgers has everyone also seeing heavy duty ward how version which eventually one getting published by be atlantic magazine in eighteen sixty two and becoming canonize and while it does transcend centuries and cultures spreadsheet of johnson is quick to point out that it is at the end of the day or so so the kumbaya moment will not be happening across the aisles because of this song because it's really about supporting whatever your perspective is own freedom of liberation having god is the person who's or dating were were doing in glory hallelujah about that with npr's andrew limbaugh with the history of the battle hymn of the republic coming up how nina simone created an anthem based on the joy of being black this message comes from npr sponsor nevada's state state museums the nevada state railroad museum in carson city is celebrating the one hundred fiftieth anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad with a new exhibit this spring the transcontinental railroad what a difference it made features artifacts including including the commissioners car v only intact railroad car remaining from the driving of the golden spike at promontory summit in eighteen sixty nine visit no doubt irwin fifty railroad dot com for more no matter what you've got planned you need a song of the summer this week on npr's pop culture happy hour we are rounding up experts from npr music we will play a ton of songs to lift your spirits and then you might even find your next favorite artist that's npr's pop culture happy hour listen subscribe by the nineteen sixties nina simone was well known as a singer songwriter and classically trained pianist in that decade she also became known as an activist here's npr's noel king hang with the story of how young gifted and black became an american anthem we're gonna start in nineteen sixty three with the murder of medgar evers evers was killed by a clansman shot in the back in his own driveway in mississippi then three months later in birmingham alabama for little girls were killed in a church bombing the reverend martin luther king junior gave the eulogy resides between the walls or they were discussing alert in response to the grief and outrage simone wrote a powerful song with unsparing lyrics and a provocative title mississippi goddamn alabama's got me so upset tennessee made me lose my body no fast forward to nineteen sixty eight and you got the scene for today's american anthem the black power movement was rising pride in being black in beautiful what's expressed by afros and fist raised in air nina simone captured this moment of joy in black identity so the the shift to be 'em similar wrote the song for children but it became an anthem for adults to to be young gifted and black with a dedication to nina simone friends the play right lorraine hands berry who wrote a raise in in the sun temporary was the first black woman to play performed on broadway gene simone bonded over civil rights and radical politics and then in january nineteen sixty five hands perry died of cancer at the age of thirty for a few months before she died hands perry had told a group of student essay winners you are young gifted and black those words stuck in nina simone pet here she is this will sound strange but not to people who are really hip she kept current attorney something and i remember getting a feeling feeling in my body and i said that's it to be young give to the black festival and sat down at the piano at that moment i made it but you know oh my we may simone wrote the music the words came from her bandleader wealth in irvine someone told him make it simple to quote make black children all over the world feel good about themselves forever young get didn't black caught on and other artists quickly recorded it including soul singer donny hathaway in nineteen seventy aretha franklin released her version in nineteen seventy two we invited to contemporary artists african american women from very different backgrounds to share their thoughts on this american anthem we show in vegas show and i'm a musician and apparent michelle india cello is a ten time grammy nominee she released the album a dedication to nina simone in two thousand twelve she says when she was growing up there was a real need for this song it's the first time i heard those words that about young black people you know being of color you did not feel that you were gifted and especially if you're black the first person to play the song for her was a white woman her middle school teacher in dc music wasn't so segregated i mean i love burt bacharach and i grew up listening to the carpenters but she also played me like bob marley so at least cater numb is this the beginning of my awareness of africa and it was somewhere in one of those classes or black history month where she's like we're gonna try to perform the song and acquire setting it's time passed so it became less popular my name is so me and i'm vocalist underwriter last year nina simone profile was raised again when she was inducted into the rock and roll hall of fame so me honored her in her own way in two thousand and eighteen she performs simone songs at lincoln center in new york city so me was born in illinois her parents were immigrants from one day and you gunda they encouraged her to take pride in her african heritage she didn't really need a song for that which made me wonder if she thinks this song is still necessary i think it is important just have these messages the tell young black people who they are or value when you look at the march for life but recently happened in washington and naomi weidler coming up there and feeling so she had to speak i am here today to acknowledge and represent african american girls historian don't make the front page of every national news that speaks to the need for black youth you know to be seen to be hurt its inner anthem i think is existing on a subconscious level in twenty twelve michelle in day give cello who has two sons invited the singer cody chestnut to perform young gifted and black on her album a dedication nina simone this is during the time of the whole trayvon martin incident and i was affected as a mother and so it just really for some reason i felt a should be voice with a strong male presence and that's why i chose each other where you're you're you're i hope only makes you question why did that song has to be written nina simone says she wants to this on to inspire black children to feel good about themselves forever maybe that's a lot to ask for one song but that message just as important as it was it's going to be young gifted and black first became an american anthem dealt with npr's noel king with the story of young gifted and black coming up how one song became an anthem of cultural pride and resistance for generations a mexican americans after this this message comes from npr sponsor cleveland clinic it's been two billion one hundred million heartbeats since cleveland clinic performed the world's first modern coronary bypass surgery which is just one of the reasons cleveland clinic has been ranked number one in heart care in the nation twenty four years according to u s news and world report but it doesn't stop there new cardiovascular innovations are always being developed and tested at cleveland clinic for more information or to get a second opinion visit cleveland clinic dot org slash heart care what a video games could help you and your child bond inlet important skills npr's life kit for parenting is taking on screen time one of the big things were working on right now is the concept of resiliency and not quitting when something is hard sometimes he lives in living rear end games are great with that checkout life kids new guidance screen time or subscribe to life kit all guys all of our episodes all in one place when the song la bomba hit number one in the united states states who is the first bending song ever do that npr she remarried soul mirage he looked at the history of this classic american song with afro mexican routes la bomba it was the first song in spanish hit number one in the united states but not this ritchie valens version no the year was nineteen eighty seven and the band took bomba's at the top of the charts was those global farrar series american anthem i'm gonna spend the next few minutes talking about why this spanish language song with roots in that group mexico is still and injuring american anthem will begin in the present or at least the not too distant unin unusually cold and overcast saturday in october last year counter protesters face down neo nazis and white supremacists this in shelbyville tennessee and the counter protesters brightest sound system but it was a nice one it was loud i i'm afraid we may have damaged their hearing chris erwin was one of the organizers he's a public defender in knoxville and says they used that sound system to drown out the speakers on the other side of the street with music there's this guy we call angry santa and angry santa's is a kkk guy unabashed we've seen him another rallies and he starts talking about rounding up all you degenerate horrors words and and it just occurred meals like let's try la bomba donna that a bomb the absolute best counter protests i have ever seen trevor noah side video of the rally online and talked about it on the daily show a white supremacist gets up to give a speech and he doesn't get punched someone just stopped playing lebombo dancing on her side and think about that the charlottesville they murdered that woman with the car they were violent came in clubs and fire and we had a thousand people show up african americans immigrants hispanics brave people and they're dancing singing laughing at them even one of the nazis kind of help a dumpster law look at it i got totally forget he's wearing a nazi helmets he's like yeah we'll supreme race but that is a supreme being come on dancing at a nazi rally with kkk members to a song that was multi cultural by its very nature and sound indeed an when you hit a song in something like that happens you know in a cellular level this is something that's right right now just as right is la bomba is where these times it's got eight long long history the story goes that seventeen year old mexican american kid from the san fernando valley name ritchie valens probably heard this version of labonte about growing up some binder that's what it was popularized as during the golden age of mexican cinema around the nineteen forties if there's any one song represents be america it is just one song lumber released by their wrote and directed the nineteen eighty seven film that bombed by about the life and death of ritchie valens but still doesn't know the exact meaning of the title of violence most famous song but he did lots of research for the film thinks it's a reference to something he calls bomba from africa which should be there was a sound and that landed on the shores of it could lose enslaved africans were brought a few hundred years ago today that cruise mexico and because cultural fusion has long been a means of survival african indigenous in spanish traditions were all mashed stop and out of that mash up a musical style is created called sewing heidel charles la bomba is a son had also been thrown alexander inundation ethno musicologist they use cla enemies vision himself listen to it when i'm muted and nothing says that rhythm is the beating heart on how much it's it's there it's like embedded in the strong itself to be yeah it is that afro caribbean connection that's been there for hundreds of years mixed in with a little bit of of the espanol in first nations ritchie valens took that style of folk music from latin america and turned it into an anthem for the united states of america his real name is richard balance what came of age when segregation was still legal imparts usa and kids were punished in school speaking spanish version of that i'm actually a b side but it became a surprise hit climbing to number twenty two on the charts in nineteen fifty nine louise by that says balance took that song to a whole new level it to a whole new audience because that audience with young at that time they were teenagers and they were hearing rock and roll they were hearing mexican folk music they were hearing about the role rock and roll a unique musical matchup that like someone had also also has roots in slavery and colonization astounded survival double now totally synonymous with e u s s and louise by the film that i wrote that song new audiences three decades later using a version by banned from east los angeles called the global in los lobos version of album but topped the charts by starting with rock and roll an ending what's going on my parents are big fan of los lobos i just remember hearing the los lobos version a lot in the car clear roads gay eagles is a member of a band from northeast ellie cold left got that and they've come to represent bomba's future taking the song in a new direction mixing son had roadshow with influences from hip hop culture i met up with the band their first practice face guy goes parents house in highland park where they played me their version has no matter that has not done better look at you look at what he's even now ritchie valens saying that to dance love on but you need a little grace denise carlos things this is the rebellious lead off because where she got us from east outlay i don't believe in borders i crush them carlo says son had also the style of music where the lyrics are always changing and courage is like free styling and hip hop so that bomba's is constantly evolving she in bandmate hector florida say their lyrics to the song song represent how they're feeling right now i will never be authentic to go i will never be authentic to this idea of americanism but i still belong and they still valid an article trust you got nothing what she does is still valid were not permitted crews were from right here we ellie kids and we speak spanish just as bad as we speak english you know like like that allowed us to there'd be proud of la bomba vs or that's just how they box me up in la bomba follows them everywhere on vacation even we arrows guy eagles says you're traveling in thailand with her husband who's also a member of the group and they were invited to a karaoke birthday party everyone there knew they were american end everyone one had to request doing elvis song and do lebombo and we're like okay let's do which one did you rock better oh love i'm sure i think without it i'm not gonna let bandmate hector floated florida says he loves that story because it's just one example of how people around the world think of spanish language song made famous by chicanos isn't all american anthem is specially right now you know like that's so dope to me this song survived slavery colonialism and you're damn sure just because trump because it listen listen up and we invite everybody to also make it your people in the night everybody claiming that we've gotten pr shreen murray summarizing the history of la bomba thanks again to our friends at npr music and if you wanna listen to more stories like this check out their american banks were listening happy fourth of july everybody out of that but then they ain't no man ain't no bad low you know reinvest okay

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