20 Episode results for "Los Angeles County"

L.A. County beaches reopen with restrictions

Audioburst Editors Picks Feed

00:23 sec | 7 months ago

L.A. County beaches reopen with restrictions

"In southern California beaches are once again open in Los Angeles County with restrictions. Here's L. A. Mayor Eric Our city. If you go to the beach you must wear face. Covering and maintain proper physical distancing from others activities such as swimming and jogging or allowed group sports including volleyball remain banned because of the pandemic.

Los Angeles County California L. A.
LA Health Official: 'Every Single' Person And Business Needs To Help Curb Virus Surge

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:42 min | 4 months ago

LA Health Official: 'Every Single' Person And Business Needs To Help Curb Virus Surge

"Let's get some lessons from a corona virus hotspot. California was considered an example of early action with the country's first statewide lockdown. But after easing restrictions California leads the country with the most corona virus cases nearly half a million. So let's zero in Los Angeles County Barbara Ferrer as director of the La County Department of Public Health and we asked if she understood what's driving the latest increase you know we're never sure with this virus I feel pretty confident saying that here in La County, there's a variety of strategies to sort of mitigate the greatest risk for transmission. You know having people inside who aren't wearing face coverings are with people who aren't in their household. We know that's a risky setting having people who are in fact gathering for the birthday parties that. They put off eating and drinking together high risk for transmission. Even if some of those activities are happening outdoors, I feel pretty confident that we understand also what's going on in workplaces, you can't have people crammed into workplaces would no physical barriers between them not able to wear face coverings and not expect that we're going to end up where we have here in our county, which is large outbreaks in the manufacturing industries. Those are things we can fix. Well, let's talk about that. Some may not know that La employs about as many manufacturing employees. Place in the country and you've had these major outbreaks at a garment maker at immune packing plant where the conditions there what you just described. Basically, no protective measures being taken I think the garment factory was a really good example of people not following our directors when we walked into the garment factory where we had over three hundred cases and unfortunately four people died, we found cardboard partitions withholding them so that the work could get passed easily from one station to the other. That's not the intent of having a physical barrier and cardboard does. Not, work as effectively as what we call, you know these impermeable often heavy plastic barriers. So you know we're clear in our directives, but manufacturers have to protect their workers at this unconscionable. It's not moral to have workers exposed because they're they're doing essential work. You think about garment jobs or meat-packing jobs these are tough jobs. They're often done by immigrants, and of course, we have heard all about the different disparities in different races. Different groups of people is that being driven by the kind of work that some people end up doing in La. Yeah I. Think it is being driven in part by that I. You know I would say if you look at WHO's hardest hit in La County. And I don't think we're unique you're gonNA find our Latin next Latino population is the hardest hit followed closely by blacks and African Americans Native Hawaiians Pacific Islanders I think it is driven by workplace exposures and then people go back to their homes with multi generational family members living. Together it's the perfect storm lot of spread and I also think if we ask People Tysoe late in quarantine support, we need a safety net. You can't really be choosing between them I going to be able to feed my family and pay my rent or am I going to be able to quarantine when I'm told I'm a close contact how devastating is it for working people that the schools are not going to open normal? It's mixed I. Think for Working People I think some working people really are worried about their children going back to school. You know here in La County, we obviously are seen our highest numbers of cases over the last few weeks than we've ever seen and I think there's legitimate worry amongst the staff and the teachers that would need to go back but we do have to have solutions for childcare and we need to make sure that those child care or extended day programs for school age children are run effectively and provide all of the safety precautions. Do you assume that the semester is gone that there'll be remote learning for the semester. I think it's up to all of us are state has set a threshold that you have to meet in order to be able to open your schools for in classroom learning we haven't met yet in La County we're in good company I think thirty four other counties here also haven't met that threshold. So we know what we need to do if we want to open up our schools again and it's going to require every single person and every single business to get back into the game to feel comfortable that they know what they need to do to slow the spread. Barbara Farrar is director of Los Angeles County's Department of Public Health. Thank you so much. Thanks a lot for calling us.

Los Angeles County director La County Department of Public La California Barbara Ferrer Los Angeles Barbara Farrar Department of Public Health
Fauci: U.S. does not have "total control" of coronavirus; One-on-one with Speaker Nancy Pelosi; Los Angeles county expected to keep stay-at-home order through July; Putin's close aide & spokesperson tests positive for virus;CDC Director: Nursing home dea

The Lead with Jake Tapper

40:30 min | 7 months ago

Fauci: U.S. does not have "total control" of coronavirus; One-on-one with Speaker Nancy Pelosi; Los Angeles county expected to keep stay-at-home order through July; Putin's close aide & spokesperson tests positive for virus;CDC Director: Nursing home dea

"This CNN breaking news. Welcome to the lead. I'm Jake Tapper. We begin today with some Breaking News Los Angeles County. Stay at home. Orders will with quote all certainty be extended for the next three months. That's three July. According to the Los Angeles County Public Health Director The Los Angeles Times just broke the story. It's an attempt to continue to slow the spread of Corona virus there and this all comes as the nation's top infectious disease expert dash Dr Anthony. Fauci issued a stark warning for the nation earlier. Today the United States does not Haffey says Corona virus under control. I think we're going in the right direction but the right direction does not mean we have by any means total control this outbreak. Dr Fazio also emphasizing. The consequences could be really serious. He said if states and cities open up before meeting the guidelines laid out by the White House task force which is precisely what appears to be happening in many states across. The Nation is a real risk that you will trigger an outbreak that you might not be able to control which in fact have productively will set you back not only leading to some suffering and death that could be avoided could even set you back on the road to try to get economic recovery. These warnings coming during a Senate Health Committee hearing earlier today. A hearing that in itself served as a testament to how much the trump administration does not yet have control of this pandemic all four administration officials testifying today testified remotely. Three of them are in some state of self quarantine because of exposure to a White House official at the White House who tested positive along with the committee chair. Republican Senator Lamar Alexander also in self-isolation because of possible exposure and of course the democratic ranking member. Patty Murray also appearing from home. Those two senators having a moment of bipartisan agreement. Today the testing so far in the US has not been nearly enough Republican. Senator Mitt Romney of Utah going so far. Today as to admonish the person in charge of getting testing up to speed Admiral Brett Jarara for his claims about testing as he stood next to president trump yesterday in the Rose Garden yesterday. You celebrated the we had done more tests and more tests per capita even than South Korea but you ignored the fact that they accomplished. There's at the beginning of the outbreak. While we treaded water during February and March I find are testing record. Nothing to celebrate whatsoever. Indeed is Romney pointed out. South Korea has lost two hundred fifty eight of its citizens to this virus. As of this moment the United States has lost at least eighty one thousand eight hundred and five all of the testimony today serving to contradict president. Trump's mission accomplished declaration just yesterday about testing. We have met the moment. And we have prevailed and CNN's Kaitlan Collins reports for us. Now Dr Ci also said today. The death toll is likely higher than the more than eighty one thousand. That's currently know about as the president pushes for the nation to reopen. One of his top health. Experts had a dire warning about doing so too soon. If you do an adequate response we will have the deleterious consequence of more infections and more debts. Dr Anthony Filed. She was one of four top health. Experts who testified virtually before a Senate committee today where he and others were pressed on whether the country is ready to reopen. It's important to emphasize. We're not out of the Wichita. That'll a we months but we are more prepared. More eighty thousand people in the United States have died from corona virus while the President has privately questioned whether that number is inflated. Doctor felt she said it's likely higher. Exactly what entire almost certainly is higher one day after trump claimed the? Us had prevailed on testing Democrats and one Republican on. The committee pushed back. This administration has had a record of giving US broken promises. That more testing supplies are coming and they don't I find are testing record. Nothing to celebrate whatsoever. Trump's testing coordinator said the administration hopes to have significantly ramped it up by September. We project our nation will capable of performing at least forty to fifty million tests per month. If needed at that time. Last week the president told reporters that the corona virus might go away without a vaccine. But DR founded testified. Today that that won't happen. That is just not going to happen. Because such a highly transmissible virus trump is often contradicted his own officials in public though all denied having a tense relationship with him. When asked today there is certainly not a confrontational relationship between me. And the president. We're there to give our best public device. And that's what we do have not had an occupational relationship with the president. We have a very productive working relationship with each other and also with the president and vice president at one point felt. She did clash with Senator Rand. Paul of the president's allies who recovered from corona virus earlier this year and as much as I respect you doctor fallacy. I don't think you're the end hall. I don't think you're the one person that gets to make a decision of a scientist a physician at a public health official. I give advice. According to the best scientific evidence at the White House. President trump remained behind closed doors today after one of his top. Aides tested positive vice president. Mike Pence who showed up to work in a mask will now distance himself from the president for the next few days and the vice president has made the choice to keep his Jay. Vaccines obviously also a big part of that hearing today Dr. Kelsey said he does not think one is going to be ready by the time we get to the school year but he's still hopeful that one can be produced in the next year or two but the question that still remains coming out of that hearing is whether or not that is going to be a vaccine. That's available for free to everyone. That was a question that multiple Democratic senators posed to these These health experts. That were there testifying on behalf of the administration. They said they would advocate for it but they said they could not be the one to make the decision or say for sure that this vaccine would be available to everyone free of charge Kenley Collins at the White House. Thank you so much joining me now to discuss the CNN's chief medical correspondent. Dr Sanjay Gupta. Sanjay see as always Dr found. She said today that the US does not have corona virus under control which seems factual and he warned that states and cities prematurely open up for business. There could be spikes that turn into new outbreaks and we are seeing some spikes in in meat plants in jail. How do you stop a new outbreak? Yeah I mean. He's been pretty consistent on this. Jake if you listen back to what he's been saying over the last couple of months. He has sort of warned that if the these gating criteria are not met your likely to see outbreaks the challenges whenever you reopen. You're to see some people who become infected that otherwise would not I think what Dr she really was emphasizing today in over the last few times he's spoken about this is at that point. You gotTa have testing in place. You've got to be able to fine. People who are newly infected and isolate them. Isolation is for people who have the virus quarantining for people who have been exposed to somebody and now need to quarantine themselves so they they they don't potentially spread the virus. It is that it is that that testing and that isolation and that tracing that that is so critical to preventing an outbreak. There will be new cases you want to prevent it from going into exponential growth. That's essentially what an outbreak is and can do it. If you have adequate testing you can do it even without a vaccine so that that's sort of the key. I think that he really was drilling down on in terms of reopening things. If you're GONNA do that Dr Fats. Y'All said today that it's more likely than not that the US will have a corona virus vaccine within a year or two but he also cautioned. There's no guarantee there will be a successful vaccine. How OPTIMISTIC SHOULD WE BE? Do you think it's about as optimistic as I've heard him on. Something I mean you know. There's there's I think people demand a certain amount of certainty from scientists and You know certainly someone like Dr Fao. She it's obviously hard to provide So I listened closely to how his tenor changes? I know he's He's speaking very closely to many of these vaccine manufacturers there several different platforms of vaccine that are being trialed. Meaning you know different types of vaccines that are being trialed. And there's lots of candidates out there so you know he is said A year Back in January said a year and he has sort of stuck to that. I mean you know. Things are moving really fast. Jake gotta say I've never seen vaccines move this quickly before. If one of them works if we start to see within the next. I'd say a couple of months jake You know by the end of June. Maybe if we see what are called these efficacy signals signals. That it's starting to work. It could be by early next year. Then it's a question of do. We have enough doses of the vaccine. How exactly is it going to be distributed all of that sort of stuff some of these vaccines require a really low temperatures? How do you? How do you Distribute things like that and refrigerators and all that sort of stuff. That's gotta be figured out. People should be figuring that out now but you know possibly early next year. Jake I want to get your reaction to an exchange between Republican Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky and Dr Ci about the risks of reopening schools. Take Alyssum Guard to going back to school. One thing that was left out of that. Discussion is mortality. I mean shouldn't we? At least be discussing what? The mortality of children is Mrs for Dr Foul. She as well you know. The mortality between zero and eighteen in the New York data approach zero. One size fits all that. We're GONNA have a national strategy. Nobody's going to go to. School is kind of ridiculous. I think we'd better be careful if we are not cavalier thinking that children are completely immune the deleterious effects so again you're right in the numbers at children in general do much much better than adults and the elderly particularly those with other line conditions. But I am very careful and hopefully humble and knowing that I don't know everything about this disease and that's why I'm very reserved in making brought predictions. Sounds a you and I know Dr Doughty Chee. And basically that's him saying the Rand Paul is being cavalier And he mentioned that some kids are experiencing a deadly symptoms similar to Kawasaki Disease. We've been talking about this for several weeks. Now there's still a lot we don't know about this virus and what it might do children. Yeah I mean that was. That was a doctor foul. She is at a strongest as polite as might be But yeah he's referring to the syndrome that we're clearly now seeing in this part of the world It's a Kawasaki Type Syndrome here. We're now calling. It pins for pediatric inflammatory. Multi Organ Syndrome pins is now the name for this It's an inflammatory syndrome associated with with Cova It's a brand new thing. I mean there will ultimately be textbooks written about stuff that we are discovering just over the last couple of Weeks Jake. I mean that's how fast medical science is moving right now but it's confusing as to why we're seeing this now. You know several months into this. This seems to be a post inflammatory. Sort of thing. Maybe kids who had had the corona virus at some point in the past and yet having inflammatory sort of flare up. Interestingly Kawasaki is typically more commonly seen in Asia in China and Japan and I've been talking to people over there some of my sources. They did not see the significant other Cossack over there so this appears to be something that's more predominant in this part of the world. We're not sure it could be some sort of genetic predisposition but this is what Dr Ci is talking about also Jake you know that even if it's true children thankfully are are not as likely to become very sick Or certainly die from this but they can still be carriers as well and that's got to go into the planning as we think about schools and and how to open those up as well. Dr Faustus said it would be a bridge too far to expect A vaccine or even a full treatment before students return to school in the fall. Should parents be expecting right now that they might have their kids at home at least through Christmas and the New Year? It's possible jake. I've been talking to a lot of folks in different school districts You know we heard from the Superintendent of La Unified School district Second-largest I believe school district in the country. I think right now. The plan is to open up schools. you know this fall They're they're starting to go through the what that's going to look like in terms of you know no cafeterias no assemblies gym class and things like that not happening really understanding how to maybe stagger start student times to try and space things out for the students You know obviously six feet apart all that sort of stuff but that is the planet could change as things go through the summer but I think right now most want to open up in the fall. All right Dr Sanjay Gupta as always thank you so much. Be Sure to listen to Sanjay's hot. Cast CORONA virus. Fact is fiction. It's on apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your podcast up next. Will there be more cash payments to Americans House Speaker? Nancy Pelosi will join us. Live as house. Democrats pushed for another stimulus bill plus atop CEO now predicting that a major airline will go out of business by September. What that might mean for you ahead. I'm referee Aubrey Edwards and Johnny Shivani. And the boss. Man Himself. Tony Kahn to eighty w unrestricted. When we heard the Florida Georgia shut down. Shut down to and we need to tape as much content include before that shutout listen to aws restricted powered by state farm for three wherever. You get your podcast in two thousand. Nineteen venture capitalists had another blockbuster year they invested more than one hundred and thirty six billion dollars in US based companies but now there's a corona virus pandemic and it has brought on economic calamity. So what's going to happen to all of that money? Invest it and all of those businesses. I'm poppy harlow in this week. Boss fouls I talked to venture capitalist arlan. Hamilton backstage capital. Arlen has had a remarkable journey from being homeless at times. Sleeping on the floor of the San Francisco airport to running a multi-million dollar venture fund clearly. She knows that thing or two about resilience her story on the latest episode of boss files. Wherever you gave your podcasts. All roads back to work in school go through tests what our country had done so far. Intesting is impressive but not nearly enough. We still need testing could be fast free and everywhere and we need the White House the layout detail national plan to make that happen. I I find are testing record. Nothing to celebrate whatsoever bipartisan frustration and outrage expressed on the Senate side of Capitol Hill today about the availability and capacity for widespread testing here in the United States. This comes after President. Trump declared yesterday that the. Us has prevailed on testing joining me. Now is the top Democrat in the House of Representatives House Speaker. Nancy Pelosi Madam Speaker. Thanks so much for joining us. I know you've unveiled a three trillion dollar relief bill that would include billions for testing. We're you satisfied by the administration's pledge this morning of forty to fifty million tests a month if necessary by September. Now you have too much than that and I think that they know that It has to at least double that maybe two and a half times that and the sooner we do it the better. It is a decision to open up the economy testing tracing treatment isolation if necessary and to do that we have to make a commitment to do as we do in our bill When you hear the Senate hearing today testing testing testing and as the distinguished democratic top Democrat on the committee Senator Murray set. You have to have a detailed plan. You have to have a definite plan on how to get this done. We've put that forth in our bill with the with everything that goes with them with the the ethic value that it's going to be there for everyone Not only the testing that tracing and the treatment but also whatever vaccine therapies are God sends us and science produces that they will be accessible for everyone in that country as well. So let's talk about This bill Your Republican counterpart counterpart Minority Leader Kevin. Mccarthy called it a liberal wishlist of a bunch of items that you wanted to have passed Even before the corona virus pandemic happened What's your response to that? I mean is this very specifically corona virus focused or other things in here that have nothing to do with it. He knows that that's what he said isn't so but putting that aside I can't be bothered about what others say what I am. What I'm proud of is what we are doing. And the fact is then all four. The bills had passed before. They've all been bipartisan. And we've all in our caucus have agreed that everything is corona virus centric and also in a timely way that relates to the virus. It's too deadly to our lives to our livelihood to our democracy for us to use it for any other purpose so when the money for state and local is to away the cost of the defray the cost of the outlays they've made for Corona virus and the revenue loss because of the corona virus testing testing with three pillars honor our heroes by supporting our state and local entities. So that they don't lose their jobs. The heroes don't lose their jobs opened up government testing tracing Treat CETERA and the third is putting money in the pockets of American people. All of it timed and centric to the corona virus. We would be an endless man running if we put our wishlist for the future and there that is not what the case is and sometimes I get a little heat for my own folks who say. Why can we do this in this bill? And that in the first. Because that's not with the bills about this. Bill is where this is and it's a big price but there's a big problem and as chairman of the Fed said think big because interest rates will never be lower. And so we are. They've used the interest rates to a give. Confidence that credit will be available because interest rates are low. We want those same interest rates and they use it to bolster the stock market. We want to use it to bolster the American people. I'm very proud of my chair. I want you to take a listen to what New York Democratic Governor Andrew. Cuomo had to say today about what he wants in the next stimulus bill. It has to be a smart piece of legislation this time. What does that mean? No handouts to. Greedy CORPORATIONS NO POLITICAL PORK. And no partisanship you. Sometimes there has to be a time in history when the federal government is willing to stop playing partisan politics so no partisanship and yet the house. Republicans sounds like they oppose this bill. The Senate Republicans oppose this bill. The White House. It doesn't sound like they're supporting this bill. That sounds partisan to me. Am I wrong? Well maybe Parson on their part. But it's not partisan on our part to meet the needs of American people but let me reiterate these we passed four bills. All of them parked. Bipartisan this is the fifth bill and much of the essence of this bill. The three pillars have a provenance in previous bills. We have had state and local in there. We had direct payments to people and unemployment insurance to people and we've had testing our first bill in March fourth testing testing testing our most recent bill. The past had twenty five billion dollars for testing so all of these spring in bigger way nonetheless. Because there's a bigger commitment to testing and to meeting the needs of localities so again. It's all been bipartisan. I hope that it will be. I think there's great bipartisan support. Throughout the country from governors and mayors about the state and local provisions that are in the legislation. Scientists all agree. We can't open unless we test. That's not even partisan that's that scientific and you've been heard The Chairman and the top Democrat on the committee. Say We haven't what we've done is not nearly adequate and then it can meeting the needs of people when Republicans say we need a pause as I keep saying. There's no pause in hunger and rent in your bills and no pause in the agony of not having a job because of this terrible situation so we feel very proud of the prioritizing curator of the issues that we have so that they meet the needs of the American people very directly and that is very defensible. Bill everything and it is for the purpose of getting opening up our government helping people in the meantime and feeding defeating this virus as we honor our heroes who working so hard risking their lives to save lives house speaker. It's house speaker. Nancy Pelosi thank you so much for your time. I'd say healthy. Good to see you as always and coming up virus work thank you. Hi will pass that onto him coming up new ways to control corona virus from one. St Considering requiring pictures of all visitors to La Looking to extend this day at home order for another three months. Stay with US work as we know it has changed. And as you've probably figured out when your home is also your office. All sorts of lines become blurred. Like how do you ask your boss more flexibility? You can look after your kids. How long should you let that slack? Message go on answer before following up. And how do we even begin to talk about work life balance? We're here for you. We've created a newsletter called work transformed to help us figure this all out together. Sign up to get work transformed into your inbox twice a week at CNN dot com slash work transformed that CNN dot com slash work transformed attention all passengers outsides minus one hundred nineteen point six degrees. Celsius them to the Academy Award winner. Jennifer Connelly you have to make sacrifices Tony Award winner. Tv digs train is our list forever. Snow piercer tune in May seventeen only on TNT explore the world of Snow Piercer. It Wilford Industry Dot Com Los Angeles County Will Los Angeles County will likely extended stay at home orders for another three months through July with more than ten million people L. A. County is the biggest county in the nation by population with more people than forty states. It comes as the governor announced more than one million corona virus tests have been conducted in California forty thousand in the past twenty four hours alone. Cnn's Nick Watt is in the Malibu area of Los Angeles County and Nick. This possible extension. On state homeowners. is really hitting a lot of people with surprise and shock. What do we know about the details? Well we are trying to figure it out right now jake but I've been getting text from people saying what is this. We go to stay home. Another three-month people are stunned. By this headline we are digging into the detail. What we know happened is that there was a supervisor's meeting here in La County and during a discussion about a moratorium on evictions. That public health director said that we are going to be extending our health officer orders another three months now. The county is beginning to reopen. So it could be that it's going to be three months until we see the very end or they could really be telling us to stay home for another three months. We are trying to get the details but what is very clear is that here in. La County. They are taking things. Slow activists in Florida bodybags on the steps of the Capitol Stores in Ohio today opening doors to a brave new world. We have cleaned everything. Everything is marked off. And everybody's safe through this weekend. Forty eight states. We'll have begun reopening Colorado South Carolina Georgia and Oklahoma were among the first and their new case are holding steady for now but it is still too early to tell the full impact of opening my concern is that we will start to see little spikes that might turn into outbreaks. New York State starts reopening Friday as we hear New York. City's terrible toll of nearly nine thousand dead through early. May might be even higher the CDC N- Assez another five thousand deaths are potentially related to the pandemic I very much aligned with Dr Pfau chief concern in the beginning of June. That will be the first chance we get to start to do something differently. But only if the indicators show us that just one reason why Broadway theaters will be closed through at least early September over in Hawaii. Every single new arrival might be photographed as officials scramble to enforce a fourteen day quarantine for visitors. Certainly having photos would be helpful new case camps inside Dakota climbing dramatically and after clashing with the governor over Cova checkpoints on tribal land the Oglala Sioux now. In a three day lockdown there will be absolutely no movement of anybody or anything throughout the reservation. Meanwhile Doctors Without Borders an international organisation has teams helping the Navajo nation as a new CNN. Poll finds fifty four percent of Americans think their government is doing a poor job preventing the spread a majority also think the worst is yet to come still some signs of normality on our horizon. Major League Baseball might restart spring training in June. According to The New York Times and an eighty two game season first pitch maybe July fourth and Disneyworld in Florida is now accepting reservations for July but some researchers fear a rerun of the nineteen eighteen Spanish flu pandemic spring summer lol and then the very large way this late summer or fall that could be much much larger than anything. New York had seen or many other places around the world. That's a concern to us. Nineteen eighteen holes as a model as it has so far so in. La County the stay home order may be extending for some time but tomorrow they are opening the beaches. But it's exercise only know lounging around in the sand. You GotTa Wear Mosque. Unless you're in the water and also they are not opening the beachside. Parking lots they do not want a crush of people here in Malibu and elsewhere this weekend Jake Arctic wanted Malibu. Thank you so much. One assisted living home. Owner has an idea as to how to slow the death toll in nursing homes and he's already implemented the plan. Is it working? Stay with us. More than half of all corona virus deaths in at least fourteen states are people living in assisted care facilities according to the Kaiser Foundation The C. Director today called Nursing Home deaths. One of the great tragedies joining me now is Tyson balanger. He's a former Marine infantry officer. Who served three tours in Iraq and he now runs shady oaks. It's an assisted living facility in Bristol. Connecticut thanks so much for joining us. Tyson you believe you have a solution to controlling the spread of Kobe. Nine hundred nursing homes. You Pay Your staff to live at your facility fulltime to lower the chances of the virus coming in. And how is it working jake opportunity? I wouldn't call it a solution. I caught a patch and I would call a necessary patch until we can reach a time of better testing better equipment and strong quarantines. The patch that we found was that an early March. We restricted our visitors. That help us reduce the number of people coming in from outside but we were still after forty. Eight staff members commuting in and out of our home. Each week we try to check white to medically screen people but we quickly felt discouraged with how uncomfortable that we'd be able to accurately decide who could be in and who couldn't especially with Ace Symptom Matic transmissions you know. Cova could transmit without any signs of ill health so we had to try something different and what we try to something that I call onsite caregiving so on twenty two march seventeenth staff members and I moved into our home into. Rv's it into the house. Next door would committed to living here for up to two months. Our goal at the time was bypassed the surge and reach time a better testing. And we've done that. We have had no case confirmed or suspected of covert in our home. None In a New York Times up at you suggested that all nursing homes in your state should consider paying staff to stay around the clock as you're doing but you did note. This could cost taxpayers in Connecticut. Fifty five million dollars over a six week period. Do you think that's a realistic proposal? Given THE EXPENSE. It depends on how much we care about our elderly. Care quite a deal care quite a bit over talking about World War Two veterans. We're talking about Korea War veterans and. I think it's just been deeply unfair. What's been happening in our senior homes. I'm not saying that everyone should do this. What I'm saying is that the state should provide this opportunity. We need to recognize this as a public good. And so yes the state should step in yes at least it should be experimenting with onsite caregiving as an option during the surge weeks. Especially now I agree and I the way that people talk about. The loss of the elderly makes me physically ill. Sometimes I wanted to ask you. A W buddies has corona virus in a nursing home nearby. And it's shaken me to the core. My heart is really really an of men over age. Eighty about seventy percent our veterans so when people talk about. Oh this old band died this old man it. These are the veterans that we cherish Memorial Day. We're not gonNA see them anymore if we don't take care of them and here in Connecticut if you do some estimates it comes out to almost as many as forty five percent of nursing home residents have had covert. That's that's wrong. We need to patch the situation until we can get to a better time of testing so we can get to a better time of equipment so we can get to a better time of Florentines and we're not there just yet before you go. I'm just curious as to what you made of New York. Governor Andrew Cuomo's conquerable controversial decision back. In March. He required all nursing homes to accept people even if they had tested positive for corona virus. It's a decision he reversed This week but I know a lot of people were angry thinking that he was basically forcing a bunch of vulnerable people to take in new patients that could infect them. What what what did you make? The view that I had from Connecticut was that it's coming to all nursing homes. It's coming to all assisted living so here in Connecticut. We're at a over. Seventy four percent of our homes have at least one resin with one thousand nine hundred nursing homes. I know that's the case in New Jersey that they went over ninety percent. So when we're talking about numbers like this I think the fundamental problem is as dramatic transmission going through the checkpoints and the fundamental solution at least in the short term is to bubble up and to to have onsite caregiving until we can reach the time a better testing better equipment and better florentines. Tyson Bolangir a hero in Iraq and a hero in Bristol. Thank you so much. Appreciate your time. Appreciate what you're doing for care seniors. Jake thank you very much more on the breaking news this hour more on the breaking news this hour about La county possibly extending the stay at home order through the month of July. I'm GonNa Talk to the Mayor of Los Angeles. That's next more now on that alarming prediction from Los Angeles County. The Public Health Director Director. They're saying today quote with all certainty Los Angeles County will keep it stay at home orders through July. Join me on the phone. Is Eric Garcetti? He's the mayor of the city of Los Angeles mayor. Garcetti for joining us. What was so alarming in? La County for the health director to make this kind of warning explain to us. What what the situation is there? I want to reassure people because I think there was a lot of panic. Suddenly when the headline said we're all GonNa stay exactly as we are three more months when that's not the case. I think quite simply. She's saying that we're not going to fully reopen Los Angeles and probably anywhere in America without any protection or any health orders in the next three months. I think we know that's going to be even longer than three months. And as I've said a million times we're not moving past cove at nineteen. We're learning to live with it. We're not going to go back to pre covert nineteen life anytime soon or jump forward to post covert nineteen time until there is a medicine or vaccine that allows that so we're still living in the age of covert nineteen. And you know that said. We don't have to freeze life or freeze our economy where it is but we will continue to need to have a health order about covering our faces physically distancing protecting our vulnerable population and following the numbers when it comes to what steps we take moving forward assessing those staying or retreating in some cases when this disease gets bad. Okay but she did seem to be saying that people were going to be staying at home still through July understand that we're not going back to one hundred percent normal for quite some time maybe not even until next year but are you saying that she's wrong that we're that Los Angeles County residents are not going to be staying home until July and I spoke to her a few minutes before because we listen. We've got a great health director and Dr Farrar here We've taken her advice and saved thousands if not tens of thousands of lives and I know most Americans want us to get it right. You look at polls across the country certainly here in Los Angeles. It's slow. Don't go fast and get it right. So we don't have to retreat. So she wanted to make sure that I communicated. And what she was. Communicating is that we still need to have a public health in order because there are some populations who will need to stay at home. People need to know whenever possible? It is safer to stay at home. So if you can telecommute CETERA. And there's no radical changes in the next week coming. But that doesn't mean three weeks from now six weeks from now two months from now we will continuously edit that order and make sure that we open up safely as much as we can and if it gets dangerous. I've always told people the hard truths we may need to step back at times as well. Governor Newsom said the California's done more than one million corona virus. Tasked with forty-one thousand. Done just yesterday. How many tests do you need to be doing for example four schools to reopen in September or October or August? I guess they opened earlier in California. How many do do you need to be doing a day for that to happen. I think we need to be an accounting of ten million people. The base is that's been recommended. Nationally is about fifteen thousand test. Today we're now at that in La County. I'm very proud. Where the first county that giving universal test anybody who wants them whether they have symptoms or not we have to figure out you know federal help for the city level to pay for that because we're burning through about a million dollars a day testing Some of that's reimbursable but it is absolutely critical. And thanks to your last guest. We have to test aggressively in our senior homes. Protect our veterans and our seniors and of course with people who are vulnerable like are people experiencing homelessness but for our schools. There's no question we're going to have to have for our young people not just testing once and you're good to go to school but at least weekly if not more frequently to make sure nobody infectious going to school. Even if they don't have symptoms that will reassure not only the students but of course their families and the teachers. If that's done I do think we can get in the fall back to some version of school even if it doesn't look exactly like we're used to all right. Los Angeles Mayor. Eric are said he best of luck with all of that. Thank you so much for your time and appreciate it Jake. Well current virus in the Kremlin the close member of Putin's inner circle now hospitalized. That's next in our world lead. A top aide of Russian President Vladimir Putin is now hospitalized with Corona virus as CNN's matthew chance reports Putin is now facing a crisis across his country and in his inner circle. Dmitri Piskunov sub. She'll when you use that. Putin spokesman has corona virus is gripping Russia to be Peskov. Maybe only the latest official there to test positive but he's the one closest to President Putin raises questions about the health of the Russian leader. Years Peskov was being the public. Math peaks strongman President. Putin rarely appears without him at home or abroad. There's a strong chance the two could have been in close contact to allay fears. Peskov has insisted there's been no impersonal dealings between the two. For over a month the Kremlin says Putin has been working remotely from his residence outside. Moscow clearly takes some meetings face to face like this one with the head of the Russian State Oil Company of Risks Country Reporting more than ten thousand new infections every growing signs of the strike this hospital in Petersburg at least fight corona virus patients killed in a blaze on their ward the weekend. Another died when a fire broke out in a Moscow hospital. Emergency workers say both incidents were caused by ventilators bursting into flames. Oh this is the Kremlin moves to lift restrictions on a national lockdown but the corona virus in Russia shows little sign of easing. Jackie seems to be getting even worse because the country now has more than two hundred. Thirty confirmed Corona Virus Infections. That's the second biggest in the world after the United States Matthew Chance. Thank you so much appreciate it our coverage on CNN continues. Now thanks for watching stay healthy.

United States Jake CNN Los Angeles County president White House New York Trump President Dr Ci Nancy Pelosi Dr Sanjay Gupta Los Angeles director official scientist President Putin Senate
Los Angeles County likely to remain under stay-at-home order through July; Fauci: United States death toll "Almost certainty higher" than 81,000+ reported; Coronavirus model touted by White House now projects 147,000 United States deaths by August 4th;

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

38:53 min | 7 months ago

Los Angeles County likely to remain under stay-at-home order through July; Fauci: United States death toll "Almost certainty higher" than 81,000+ reported; Coronavirus model touted by White House now projects 147,000 United States deaths by August 4th;

"This is CNN breaking news. Welcome to our viewers here in the United States and around the World Wolf Blitzer in the situation room. We're following breaking news. Residents of the nation's largest county are likely looking at months more at home the Los Angeles County Health Director. Just said she expects the state home order covering the counties ten million people to be extended through July also breaking right now the death toll from the corona virus pandemic now approaching eighty two thousand people with more than one point three million confirmed cases the US now accounts for more than one quarter of the world's four point two million cases and almost three hundred thousand people have died worldwide. Meanwhile a blunt warning from a top US health official that stands in stark contrast. What we're hearing from President Trump. Dr Raji telling senators that ignoring guidelines on reopening creates the real risk of what he calls an outbreak. That will that you will not be able to control direct quote. And he's urging more testing despite president trump's claim that the. Us has once again. I'm quoting him now. according the president prevailed when it comes to testing. Let's get some more and all the breaking news first of Los Angeles. Our national correspondent. Erica Hill is joining us. Erica ten million residents of Los Angeles County. They're probably looking months more at home. That's right that's what we've heard from the From the county public health director and what she said really coincided with what we heard from. Dr Anthony Fauci today. His concerns about moving too quickly about possibly triggering spike The Public Health director saying that her hope is always end by bend by using data they could lift restrictions slowly over the next three months today. Wolf she said very simply. There's no way an experiment in real time as experts urge caution. I think we're going in the right direction but the right direction does not by any means control of this outbreak retail stores opening their doors in Ohio. Today we are going to stick to a strict two to one. If we have an employee we can have to customers as more restaurants adapt we really felt. We needed one more week to let people stay at home and and not quite rush into it. Beaches in Los Angeles County set to reopen Wednesday for exercise only as the county's public health director warns other. Stay at home. Orders will likely be in place for the next three months. Broadway's iconic theaters won't be back before at least September sixth as the CDC reports that could be as many as five thousand additional deaths in hard hit New York City. The mayor warning any reopening is still weeks away in the beginning of June. That will be the first chance we get to start to do something differently. But only if the indicators show us that only if they show that we've reached the kind of consistent progress. We need that. Progress includes a steady decline in cases part of the White House's own guidance which no state appears to have met Alabama Texas and South Dakota among those seeing an uptick in Georgia. One of the earliest dates to reopen cases remain steady with nearly every state scheduled to be partially opened by the end of the week. Americans ARE NOT CONVINCED. Officials have the virus under control more than half say the government is doing a poor job preventing the spread according to a new CNN poll while fifty two percent believed the worst is still to come think. We're only literally in that very very early innings of this and was really concerning to me is. We're not planning for what could be. A large wave of cases is a real risk that you will trigger an outbreak. Do you may not be able to control. The union representing many workers at the nation's meat processing plants says ten thousand members have been infected or exposed to the virus at least thirty have died outbreaks and deaths at nursing homes and long term care facilities. Also a major source of concern Dr Anthony. Founding noting Tuesday the number of US debts maybe far higher than the eighty thousand plus reported and while September may feel like a lifetime away. There is pressure for answers about school. This fall Dr Voucher. Warning there is not a single solution and they're also won't be a vaccine in time. The idea of having treatments available or vaccine to facilitate the re entry students into the fall term would be something that would be a bit of a bridge too far meantime Disney now accepting July reservations for its theme parks as baseball prepares for a shortened season with fans cheering from hall. There wasn't pressure on officials. Stay at that hearing wolf before direction from the CDC her Chris Murphy of Connecticut actually pressing. Cdc Director Robert Redfield saying or. Are we going to get this guidance or not? My state is getting ready to reopen. I'd like to have the information and Dr Redfield basically making it clear It will likely not be there in time for Connecticut. At least which is one of the last states sent to Rio. Speak to the governor of Connecticut shortly Erica Hill. Thank you very much Let's go to the White House right now. Our CHIEF WHITE HOUSE CORRESPONDENT JIM. Acosta says On the scene for us as he always is Jim. Some really stark testimony. Today by Dr Ouchi and other top health officials that's right we'll president trump's rosy assessments of the corona virus pandemic were put under the microscope during that. Senate hearing top administration health expert. Dr Anthony Fauci warned senators not to reopen schools in the US too quickly and even one of the president's fellow Republicans Mitt Romney tore into Mr Trump's misleading statement that the US leading the world in testing. Thank you very much Mr Chairman testifying remotely a rare Senate hearing on the corona virus pandemic. Dr Anthony FAUCI warned the health crisis in the US could be worse than what's already known telling senators. The actual number of deaths may be higher than current estimates. I think you are correct at the number is likely higher. I I don't know exactly what percents higher but certainly higher vouching other administration. Health experts were grilled on some of president. Trump's questionable comments about the virus head of the hearing the president tweeted. Our testing is the best in the world by far. But that's not true. Some of the latest data shows the. Us still lags behind other countries in testing the administration has frequently compared the US to South Korea. Even though the two countries are far apart and deaths are glaring contrast noted by GOP. Senator Mitt Romney find our testing record. Nothing to celebrate whatsoever. The fact is their test. Numbers are going down down down down now because they don't have break we have going up. I'm in a clash over reopening schools Republican senator rand. Paul echoed complaints from trump supporters. That found she has been too cautious. Pfau chief fired right back. I don't think through the end hall. I don't think you're the one person against make a decision. I have never made myself out to be the end all and only voice in this. I'm a scientist. A physician at a public health official. I think we've got to. Be careful. If are not cavalier. In thinking that children completely immune the deleterious effects as the White House and some Republicans are clamoring for states to reopen vice president. Mike Pence was spotted outside the West Wing wearing a mask on like last week. Wore White House. Staffers can be seen in masks. To pence is keeping his distance from Mr Trump officials. Say as a precaution after the vice president's press secretary tested positive for the virus the vice president has made the choice to keep his distance for a few days and I would just note that that's his personal decision to make that as to how many days he does it. Poll finds a sizeable majority of Americans approve of the president's handling of the virus a measurable Spike over the last two months so the president is trying to distract the public from his record taking credit for the positive poll numbers for many governors tweeting. Remember this every governor who has sky high approval on their handling of the corona virus. And I'm happy for them all could in no way of gotten those numbers or had that success without me and the federal government's help the president is tossing out new bright shiny objects coining the term. Obama Gate suggest from President. Barack Obama somehow committed a crime. Even as Mr Trump won't say what it is or produce any evidence. What if the crime exactly what the crime is? The crime is very obvious to everybody you have to do is read the newspapers except yours. Senate Majority Leader Mitch. Mcconnell complained about Obama's criticism of the President President. Obama should've kept his mouth shut now. White House press secretary. Kelly mcenaney was not wearing a mask during her briefing with reporters earlier in the day. She says she took off her mask as she felt she was a safe distance away from reporters in the room. We should note though nearly all of the journalists. Were wearing masks during that briefing and ask for Senator Paul telling He is not the end. All be all on the pandemic. It should be noted. The press secretary frequently cited the doctor and his expertise during her briefing. We'll she should indeed because he is doctor. Fauci national treasure. We've said it many times and we continue to say that right. Thanks very much for that. Jim Acosta at the White House joining us now. The governor of Connecticut Ned. Lamont governor fact you so much for joining us the headline. We're having this hour. Some residents in Los Angeles will possibly remain under at least some form of stay at home order for the next three months. Your stay at home order in Connecticut expires. I understand next week on May twentieth. Are you considering governor? A partial extension of two or three months like they seem to be doing in Los Angeles at least now no. We followed a doctor couches guidelines very closely in terms of the downward trend in hospitalizations upward trend. In our testing making sure we're doing track and tracing in a very serious way we're gonNA have a very limited open on. May Twentieth and I think we can handle it and handle it responsibly. The Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy. You well Had some tough questions for the CDC director about the lack of specific guidelines on reopening from the CDC. In fact Senator Murphy called the Guidance. Given out so far in his words criminally vague from your perspective as governor does Connecticut. Have all the support and information you need from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Well Wolf? As soon as I heard there was some guidance that the White House said yanked back I really scoured the see how it could get a hold of that guidance so I could see what they had to say so we did get a hold of that guidance but more importantly I've got a business and scientific team that's put together guidance store by store business by business so then they know how they could open safely. The administration has released that guidance. Publicly yet it's available. It's been leaked obviously. Do you have any reason to believe that the White House is deliberately? Suppressing that guidance as Senator Murphy suggested I have no idea why they suppressed did it was stripped. It really took to the seriousness of Cova to Heart in major. You opened on a very serious way. And I don't know why the White House had wanted to scourge getting that information so just the bottom line on this point. You're you're satisfied with what you're hearing from the CDC guidance your look it was limited was not very specific at all when it came to businesses. We did that ourselves. It was quite specific when it came to religious services worship services that was sort of interesting discouraging singing because singing is away that you can project germs. So it was specific where they wanted to be specific doctor. She reiterated his warning that reopening too soon. We'll risk triggering outbreak. That states won't be able to control. What metrics will you monitor to make sure that that doesn't happen in Connecticut? We're going to have extensive. Testing number one and number two hospital utilization. Right now we have about forty percent of our beds empty so we have capacity to take a hint. But we're going to do that in a very careful way to make sure we always have the hospital capacity. We need to keep everybody safe. That rozier from the Department of Health and Human Services says he said today he believes the United States will have forty to fifty million tests per month by the fall. Are you confident that you'll have enough testing and contact tracing in place by the fall to reopen schools in Connecticut? I I am Wolf. We'RE GONNA test everybody going back to college especially those people in a residence hall. Were thinking about selective testing how you do a K. Through twelve as well. We're testing everybody going into the factory. Florida electric boat on a regular basis. So we're doing everything we can to keep people safe and see if we can cautiously get our economy moving again. Thanks so much. governor For joining us. I know these are really difficult. Life and death decisions you have to make. Were grateful for your joining us. Appreciate it very much. Thanks Wolf up next. That will have more in Dr Cheese Blunt warning in sharp contrast to claims president trump plus. We'll have more on the breaking news. Los Angeles County now expected to extend it stay at home order through July. I'm referee Aubrey at risk. Johnny Shibani and the boss man himself. Tony Kahn returns to eighty w unrestricted. When we heard the Florida Georgia shutdown we were shutting down to a we needed tape as much content as before that shutout listen. Aws restricted powered by state farm for free. Wherever you get your podcast. Top health officials including Dr Anthony Fauci gave rather blunt testimony today during a Senate committee hearing on the Corona virus pandemic. Let's get some more from our chief. Medical correspondent Dr Sanjay Gupta and our chief political analyst. Gloria Borger Sanjay Dr Chee conceded. Today that the US toll is almost certainly higher than the official tally right now. More than eighty one thousand Just how much higher could it be? Well you know if you look at this Study that came out of jail looking at Sort of end of Martin early April that study predicted that maybe death toll during that time prayed was twice as high wolf so Significantly higher. He was asked specifically by Senator Sanders. Could it be fifty percent higher and Dr Fao? She wouldn't put a number on it but he said definitely higher. I mean there's a lot of people who probably initially We're not tested Maybe were thought to have flu or some sort of other respiratory illness so did not count towards that serve tragic initial death toll and then you had a lot of people who who obviously were at home. We'll thin. They never made it to the hospital. They were told to stay home. Hospitals were pretty full as you remember initially especially in New York I think is the state that he was talking about specifically but probably all over the country. The death toll is higher than the official projections and some places higher than others. So what does that mean? Sanjay for how? We should respond to future outbreaks. Well I think the the lessons are the same. I thought that was sort of the most interesting thing you know. If you look at countries that you'd sort of hold up as models of success right now. They don't have a vaccine. They don't have a therapeutic. They don't have anything else that we don't have that any country Can't possibly You know get access to in some way. It's really a question of implementation and timing You know I think part of the issue that we've learned here is that you can't get behind the curve on this. You cannot get behind the curve at any step along the way because if you do it's very hard to catch up Even when we talk about testing it is true that we're testing a lot more but it's not just how many tests you have it's win. The tests were performed. It's not just stay at home orders going into place. It's win those stay at home. Orders actually went into effect. If you get behind it becomes very hard to catch up. And that's what we're seeing now so I think that's the biggest lesson learned really isn't a lesson learned. We knew that we just didn't. We just didn't act quickly enough interesting. Gloria the president boasted yesterday about the gains the United States the United States has made on Corona virus testing. Listen to this. We have a great testing capacity. Now it's getting even better. There's nobody close to us in the world and we certainly have done a great job on testing and testing is a big is a very big important function. By the way some people consider it more important than others to be honest with you but testing certainly is a very important function. And we have prevailed are so you heard him? Say we've prevailed when it comes to testing Gloria but top health experts say We're still not doing enough here in the United States. What's your analysis of that disconnect? Well if you listen to the hearing today it wasn't just the top health experts. It was also members of the committee including Republicans. The Chairman Lamar Alexander was talking about testing potentially for students who go back to college. Mitt Romney was talking about how we compare in a negative way to. What's been done in South Korea? I think Sanjay was just probably referencing. That and I think what you have is a president who right now wants to turn the page and is living in a very different world. He is talking about the light at the end of the tunnel. He is saying we're going to get back to normal. He is tweeting Two governors that they ought to liberate their states as senator. Chris Murphy pointed out today and what you have. The scientists saying is wait a minute what Tony found she was saying today is slow down. Look at our guidelines because in the end what you get. If you don't pay attention to these guidelines could be even worse than what you have now. You don't want to get to something that is totally out of control. He pointed out look. I don't run the economy He understands that everybody wants to get back to work but he was really Just saying to people wait a minute here and think about the consequences of what you're doing and the question. He didn't answer today because it wasn't asked it He said he gives the president his advice wolf but he didn't say whether the president takes it was important point as well. You know Dr Chee Sanjay also said it was a bridge too far. His words to assume we'll have a vaccine in time for colleges to reopened in the fall. But he did say that that should stop them from opening altogether colleges and universities reopened safely without a vaccine or an effective treatment. I think that it's going to depend on on where some of these colleges and universities are I mean safely is going to become a relative term. I mean I think no matter. What when you start to reopen things. There are going to be. There's going to be an increased number of people who become infected. I mean that's that we have a contagious virus out there as we've said all along that is the one constant in all this. I think if you're looking at communities where you don't have communities spread where it seems like you have adequate testing. You can quickly identify people who are carrying the virus and they can be isolated. I think you could open more safely. Obviously it's going to look very different Schools and universities this fall. No matter what Maybe STANDARD OF STAGGERED START TIMES. cafeterias assemblies. Things like that. You know any kind of gathering. Obviously those things are probably not going to happen for a while. I think it's GonNa be on a case by case basis although I've been talking to people including a Superintendent Valley United School district They say that their plan is to open the second largest school district in the country. So they're going through that planning right now. I think there's no question we're not gonNA have a vaccine by that point so all these plants have to be made with that in mind. Wolf J. We're just getting this in. This is breaking news. We're just learning that. The model often cited by the White House Corona virus tasks worth the University of Washington. Medical School model has just increased its projection of deaths as a result of corona virus by early. August by ten thousand now. They're projecting Sanjay that this it's really going to be one hundred. Forty seven thousand Americans dead by early August by August fourth right. Now what? Eighty one thousand eight hundred. Americans have died over the past few months. He just you just hate hearing these numbers Wolf. I mean and make gives me a pit in my stomach every time I see these models and see them going up and part of me thinks this is a direct reflection of of something that is that is happening right now is state. Start to open and people start to become more mobile We know I all I see. Sometimes I see that virus moving around from person to person and having a lot more hosts now to choose from. It's a sad state of affairs wolf and I think there's nothing worse in medicine than thinking about preventable deaths. People who could have been saved who who may not be as a result of this and I think it's tragic. I the models the models. I mean you know. They're they're often wrong but sometimes useful as this one. So we'll see where these numbers for land. Hopefully as a result of of hearing from you know doctor and the other doctor today people start to think about the impact of some of these decisions. Right now you know the glorious point early I kind of liken this to antibiotic therapy you. I think people know that. If you're gonNA take antibiotics you gotta take the whole course right. If you don't take the whole course. It could actually be worse than having started the treatment at all. And maybe that's a little bit metaphorical for what we're going through right now. The treatment has been working to some extent we've got to carry on with it. Otherwise we we back further than square one. We're shortly going to be speaking with the doctor who's in charge of that new projection. Get his analysis of why it could be one hundred forty seven thousand Americans dead from Corona virus by early August. Sanjay Standby Glorious. Dan By much more on all of this coming up including more on the breaking news. Some people in Los Angeles County likely will remain under stayed home orders four months. And we'll also get an update from South Dakota which has reported hundreds of new corona virus cases in the past few days alone in two thousand. Nineteen venture capitalists had another blockbuster year they invested more than one hundred six billion dollars in US based companies but now there's a corona virus pandemic and it has brought on economic calamity. So what's GonNa Happen to all of that money invested and all of those businesses? I'm poppy harlow in this week. I'm boss fouls I talked to venture capitalist or line. Hamilton backstage capital. Arlen has had a remarkable journey from being homeless at times sleeping on the floor of the San Francisco airport to running a million dollar venture fund. Clearly she knows a thing or two about resilience her story on the latest episode of Boss Files. Wherever you get your podcasts to following the breaking news right now very influential model now projects one hundred forty seven thousand American deaths by early August joining us now is Dr. Christopher Murray. He leads the team behind this model from the University of Washington Medical School. Thanks so much Dr Maria for joining us How did you get one hundred and forty seven thousand? That's ten thousand more deaths by August fourth than the earlier model. Yeah we're starting to see the effects of two things driving up the numbers. One is the consequence of the relaxing. Social distance saying people getting out in about having more contact. Were seeing you know the. Trans in case numbers in a number of states and big swings up in mobility and then some further states have relaxed social distancing like North Carolina in the last few days as well all of that unfortunately is combining to push. The number's higher as best. We can assess in in the data. That's out there. 'cause you've cited in the past what would you call explosive increases in mobility at least in some states for the rising death? Toll One another sixty thousand or so. Americans are going to die between now and August fourth according to your model if this trend continues for increased mobility and a lot of these states do you worry the death toll could even exceed your new estimate. We do we. We really worry that. Were on an unfortunate trajectory. When we started off making projections we had assumed that all the states regarding to sort of follow if you will the New Zealand model which is to keep social distancing in place until transmission gets to a really low level. And then you can open up a much more safely. We're not doing that. Were were speeding. Towards relaxing. Social distancing people are getting the message. They're getting out and I think we'll see the numbers go up in less. We see the benefits of people being cautious wearing masks and capacities test contact trace and is wait. Go up faster than we think they may well. Let's hope that happens. a doctor vouchers. You probably know Dr Murray. He said today that the official death filled out with more than eighty thousand here in the United States. Almost certainly his words almost certainly underestimates the true number of deaths. This virus has caused. You agree with them I do. We've like many. We've been looking very carefully both in this country. Any other countries at this notion of excess deaths that is you look at all the increase in deaths compared to normal for a given week in the year and in those analysis we see many more deaths both here in the US and abroad than the officially reported. Koga deaths. I think once I was GonNa say does your does your model doctor. Murray excuse me for interrupting account for deaths that may be missed by by official tallies. Not Really. We're we've we capture what the states are saying so some states like New York are reporting on both the confirmed deaths as well as presumptive debts but even then the total death count once we have more time to look back at excess mortality is probably going to turn out to be larger and I think when we look back a few months from now we're going to understand the consequences have been even greater than what we've been saying. So I just want to be precise Doc Dr Mariya projection. Now one hundred forty seven thousand Americans die from Corona virus by August fourth. But that's not the end of it. What happens after August? Fourth projecting how many more Americans will dive the rest of the month of August and into September and October? We are building up to be able to do that. many people are asking us. When is it going to be safe to open schools What what happens in September so we are certainly planning to start making those longer term projections. The challenge there is. We've got understand two things to be able to do that in a reasonable basis. What is the true effective temperature in season? And the next few weeks may tell US war and in the Second. One is the sort of almost Intangible which is how will people behave in terms of social interaction wearing masks And what will the states do in terms of mandates as the summer rolls on and those are going to be as as important dictating the trajectory in the full as any other of the of the drivers that we know about this corona virus can spread so quickly exactly two months ago on March twelfth. There were thirty eight deaths in the United States now. More than eighty thousand confirmed deaths in the United States is Doctor Murray. Thanks so much for joining us. We'll stay in close touch with you. All right thanks. We'll coming up update from South Dakota which has reported hundreds of new corona virus cases in just the past few days attention all passengers. The temperature outside is minus one hundred nineteen point six degrees Celsius them winner. Jennifer Connelly you have to make sacrifices and Tony Award winner. Defeat digs train is ours for snoop piercer tune in May seventeenth only on. Tnt explore the world of Snoop Piercer at WILFORD INDUSTRY DOT com. South Dakota which is not under a stay at home order has become a new corona virus hotspot. Hundreds of new cases have just been reported over the past few days joining us now. The Mayor Sioux Falls Palton. Hakin mayor. Thank you so much for joining us. I know you've got a lot going on over there out of every state in the country right now. South Dakota recorded the steepest week over week jump in new cases. Your city of Sioux falls is already Easing restrictions. You heard from Dr Fauci earlier today warning against the potentially triggering new outbreaks. If you move too quickly. How do you respond to that? Yeah well thanks for having me Wolf. You know the the increase that we saw this past week in the number of new cases in South Dakota specifically in the Sioux falls area was largely due to the The standup testing site that we put in place last week with the state with the CDC and the CDC actually called it the biggest standup testing operation. They've seen today where we ran. Four thousand task on the matter of three or four days all of which were tied to a meat packing plant. That's been a real hot spot press in our city so we knew we were going to see some increases based on that testing People are calling for more testing. They WANNA see increase in testing. When you see an increase in testing you can expect to see an increase in your numbers. And that's what we saw last week. You know as a result of those four thousand tests that we if South Dakota though does remain a national hot spot and you see a continued growth in new cases in your city of Sioux Falls. Are you prepare it to maybe rethink your stay at home order and order a stay at home order you know Wolf were? I think we're the only state in the country that either at a city or state level has not had a stay at home or shelter in place order at one point in this outbreak I explored that brought it to my city council. There wasn't an appetite to do that here. We have however Without that freed up a lot of healthcare capacity you know the goal all along with the response of this is to make sure that there is adequate healthcare capacity to meet the demand that will see from Kobe cases. And we have that in South Dakota. We have a healthcare systems that have said. Hey we're GONNA be okay based on the curve seeing however that being said if things flare up and we get to a point where we don't have that capacity then we have to look at. Okay what do we have to adjust again to try and flatten the curb? Even more. You know? We're an inpatient state where an inpatient country. You're seeing it all over the country. People people don't like this. They don't like to have to stay at home. They don't like these stay at home. Orders We Wanna get back to normal a lot of time at the detriment of of keeping other safe so balancing this act of opening the economy and public health is just. It's really an untenable act for mayors to try and try and do right now as I keep saying. Mayor these are life and death decisions for the folks in your city life and death decisions for the folks in your state you see how quickly something like this corona virus can explode and I just pointed out there were thirty eight deaths. Thirty eight confirmed deaths here. In the United States two months ago on March twelfth today may twelfth there. What more than eighty one thousand confirmed us. You see how that can that can explode. And it's the source. I assume have great worry to you. Yeah of course I mean the number one thing that keeps me up at night on this whole responses. Are we doing enough to keep people safe? And THAT MEANS PROTECTING THEM FROM TORONTO. Virus that also means protecting people from The mental health ramifications the unemployment ramifications of the small business closure ramifications So you have the public health pandemic and then you have the answer. Larry pandemic that results you know from the economy and the other things that are happening so I'd heard of last week. Small business owner in our city took his own life. Just didn't see the other side of this and so You wonder wonderkid. We do too much that we caused that. And those are weighty thing staff to think about a when. You're making a decision a lot of times. We talk about one seemingly. Good decision can have three or four spinoff decisions that you never anticipated. These are really really critically important. Life and death decisions mayor. Good luck to you. Good luck to everybody in your great state and you're wonderful city of Sioux falls. Appreciate your joining us. Thank you all coming up a closer look at the corona virus headlines from around the world. Wuhan trying to take a drastic step after corona virus outbreak and the spokesman for the Russian President Vladimir Putin the actually comes down with the corona virus in the hospital. Cnn is not following very important corona virus headlines from around the world authorities in Wuhan China where the virus I turned up just ordered everyone in the city to be tested because of a new outbreak. Cnn's Ivan Watson is monitoring the situation from Hong Kong Ivan Wolf. The Chinese authorities have reacted with serious alarm to a relatively small outbreak of corona virus. Over the weekend in that original corona virus epicenter city of Wuhan only six new confirmed cases. It appears to be community transmission. But there's been an emergency notice. Issued to city officials calling for a quote ten day battle. We don't win. This will begin but they plan to try to test within ten million residents of that city for the corona virus. Now Wuhan is the first place in the world where the corona virus was identified back in December. It led to a massive outbreak that killed thousands of people clearly. Don't want to take the risk of another explosion like that happening again. They're both Ivan Watson reporting. Thank you south. Korea is rushing to track down people who visited a soul nightclub distric that reopened then became a corona virus hotspot. Cns Paula hancocks in Seoul for us. Apollo give us an update on the contact tracing effort. That's underway wolf. More than ten thousand. People have already been tested in relation to the outbreak in Seoul's nightclub district more than one hundred of them have tested positive for the virus Seoul City earlier today and he told me that he's using the tools at his disposal to try and figure out exactly who was in that neighborhood over a two week period and test them. He said that he is looking at mobile phone records. They're looking at credit card usage records and peace cooperation. He also said this outbreak has taught him a lesson. The fact that we are not safe and enact break can happen at anytime anyplace both our Paula. Thank you Germany. Meanwhile just reported a very dramatic surge in corona virus cases more than nine hundred one day. Cns Fred Pike and is in Berlin for us. This appears to be a dramatic setback for Germany's plan to reopen. Either Wolf. Yeah the German government says it is very concerned about what could be a new acceleration of the novel Corona virus here in this country. Germany saw a spike in infections. Over twenty four hour period and the German Center for Disease Control says that the reproduction number for the novel. Corona virus was above one for three days in a row. Now they say that means that the virus could be expanding again rather than getting pushed back and they also say they're going to keep a very close eye on that situation. One of the hot spots here in. This country is Germany's meat-processing industry. There's at least three meat processing plants in various places in the country. That have seen a flurry of new infections. Wolf aren't Fred. Thank you Russia President Vladimir Putin's main spokesman has corona virus seen as matthew chances monitoring the situation in Russia from London Matthew. What's the latest we'll both the main spokesman for Russia's president has been hospitalized with Corona virus raising questions about the health of the country's leader Vladimir Putin the Kremlin says Putin has been working remotely but also had a few em- person meetings although a statement says his spokesman Dmitry Peskov has not seen his boss for over a month still underlines how pervasive the viruses become in Russia which is reporting more than ten thousand new infections every day and there were signs of the strain earlier at least five corona virus patients who killed in a blaze at a hospital ward in Petersburg at the weekend another was killed when a fire broke out in a Moscow hospital? Emergency workers say both incidents caused by faulty ventilators bursting into flames. Wolf Chats reporting. Thank you There's breaking news. We're following a grim new projection of one hundred and forty seven thousand corona virus deaths in the United States by early August we'll be.

United States president Dr Anthony Fauci CDC Wolf White House South Dakota official President Trump Senator Murphy Connecticut Los Angeles County Senate director senator South Korea White House Los Angeles Senator Mitt Romney
CBS 2 NEWS AM Update 09-13-20

CBS2 News Chicago

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

CBS 2 NEWS AM Update 09-13-20

"I'm Dana Kozlov here are the stories making news at this hour to Los Angeles County, Sheriff's deputies are in the hospital after being shot in an apparent ambush as they sat in their patrol. Car Police are still looking for that. Suspect a man opened fire in a shopping mall near South Bend Indiana killing another twenty two year old man police say it happened after an. Argument between the suspect and the victim three more people have died in the northern California wildfires bringing the death total there to twenty two and today's weather clouds finally moving out in the sunshine moving in for a pleasant day. The high expected to be around seventy six degrees. Join US ON CBS two four. CBS Chicago. com. For news updates around the clock I'm Dana Kozlov.

Dana Kozlov Car Police Los Angeles County South Bend Indiana CBS CBS California Chicago. seventy six degrees twenty two year
AP One Minute Headlines Nov 09 2018 15:00 (EST)

AP Radio News

01:00 min | 2 years ago

AP One Minute Headlines Nov 09 2018 15:00 (EST)

"California fires. I'm Ed Donahue, the AP news minute long ways from being out of the firefight. There are six major wildfires burning in California. Cal fire's Ken pill modest following the fires in the north right now. We are focus is on life safety. There are active rescues continuing to go on on all of these fires. And in particular, the campfire in Butte county, at least five bodies have been found in burned vehicles in northern California. Everyone in Malibu in southern California is being told to evacuate from a wildfire. There we have over three hundred Los Angeles County firefighters here, and as mentioned collectively that's going to grow as we continue to battle this fire, and as it is headed towards the Pacific Ocean. Alon forcement official says the gunman who killed twelve people at a southern California bar posted to social media during the attack the official told the AP, Ian, long had Facebook and Instagram accounts. And he posted about his mental state. And whether people would believe he was saying, I'm Ed Donahue.

California Ed Donahue AP Butte county Los Angeles County Ken pill Alon forcement Ian Malibu Pacific Ocean official Facebook Instagram
Tom Parsekian: Running for Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

1:33:09 hr | 10 months ago

Tom Parsekian: Running for Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge

"Hi Everyone Sophia. Bush here welcomed a work in progress where I talked to people who inspire me about how they got to where they are and where. They think they're still going whip smarties. We are releasing a special bonus episode today because there is a major election on Tuesday march. Third have you heard people talking about Super Tuesday? That's what's up and to my Los Angeles Friends. We need you all to vote. If you're not in la you should check to see what local elections are coming up for you because they really really matter and they matter especially when it comes to selecting our judges guys which brings me to today's special guest. Tom Par seekin. Who is running for? La Superior Court judge. He's bright. He's honest he has deep integrity and over thirty years of experience that would make such a valuable and much needed addition to our judicial system. We need people like him to be part of OUR GOVERNMENT. So take a listen. Find out how we got to know each other. Why he's such an amazing guy and then get out to the polls invokes every vote counts. Hi Tom Hello. I'm so excited that you're here today. I am thrilled to be here so for listeners at home Tom. Persecution is one of the dads in my friend group and also happens to be running for judge here in twenty twenty in Los Angeles County and you're one of my favorite people to have a holiday party with and also talk about the state of the union with and I'm just really excited that we get to unpack all of this stuff today. Really happy to be here so you and I first map because your daughter Lauren is one of my best friends and I remember the first time I came over for football Sunday at at your house. You and your wife Deb and you guys are just the most gracious hosts always and you know even as a pack of kids who are now adults. Some of whom have kids of their own. We love coming home to hang with. You guys are beautiful granddaughter. God's she's just the cutest stories of best in something that was really really special this summer. We might myself and Aaron. Your son-in-law and Lauren and our friend Michelle and Brian whole whole bunch of really lovely. Humans helped throw a sort of kickoff event for your campaign and it was so specialty. Here everyone telling stories about you know their relationship to you in their relationship to your family and all of this sort of really beautiful personal stuff and we got to talk about why judge ships are so important and what. We should really be aware of going into this election. Years about how the judges that are in these court systems around the country really help to determine the law not just for their city or their state but but really of how legal landscape looks at America and it was such a cool learning experience for me. And that's why I wanted you to come and talk to everyone. Who's listening to the podcast? I'm so happy to have a discussion about this particular subject. Because you're absolutely right. You know when people go into the election booth the one thing they are really foggy about is when they get to the slate of judicial candidates. They don't know who they are. They don't know what their background is. And the either. Don't vote at all or they might vote because somebody has an interesting looking name. Or what have you? I mean I've actually heard voters tell me that but the one thing they don't know really is what to do and we've tried to run a campaign to inform voters about judicial elections. Because you're absolutely right. They affect you know politicians WHO RUN FOR ELECTIVE OFFICE. They come and go. Some of them have term limits. They they have to by law others when they retire. Or what have you? But they come and go. Judges are on the bench forever whether or not there on the federal bench where they're pointed and then confirmed they're there for life but even in State Court. You have a judge on the Superior Court sitting for a term of six years but rarely if ever does a sitting incumbent judge ever get elected out of office. It just doesn't happen so they're really almost lifetime appointments as well and judges make decisions that affect. People's Day today lives and I tell people you know in Congress or in their state legislatures they pass laws and they affect people's lives but judges interpret the law. So when there's a dispute about something hey the final word is in the judiciary so if the House of Representatives is in a fight with the Senate or what have you about something or whether people are challenging a state pass law or a federal pass law at the end of the day they get the final word in the judiciary and really. That's what upholds the power in this stability in our government is that we have a place a final place out of the three co equal branches of government where you can go to get the final word and that word becomes the law because they're interpreting the law and they're telling you what the law is and so they decisions that they make are so profound. I call the Superior Court where it which is a trial court the Court of consequence because it's where people get decisions judgments that affect them so profoundly. It's so consequential you know so. It can affect their personal freedom so somebody's standing before you. There's a judge sitting on the bench one person and he or she is going to make a decision that could affect this person's very liberty or they could be making a decision that could affect their financial security and a profound way could be a a way that's almost desposited of their security financial security It could affect the reputation those kinds of decisions. It could affect their family relationships. All these things happened in a courtroom and it's not a panel of people. It's a trial judge that sitting in judgment and those Judges even when there's a jury there have tremendous effect on the jury by the decisions that they make during a trial proceeding. Because the jury's you know have trust in the judge and they can lead juries thinking a little bit of a way and so those decisions even with the jury are going to have a profound effect on the people standing before a judge in the courtroom. So what I tell. People is think about this when you go to vote in any given election. You're voting for somebody running for president eroding. Somebody running for governor or whatever it may be but a judge that person may affect you directly because the first time you ever have a brush up against the law or involved in any legal proceeding could be standing in a trial court. A some people may only get there for traffic court and never see a courtroom again but people end up in courtrooms and it's kind of scary for them because there's a lot on the line so you WanNa put people on the bench that have empathy and understanding and one of the things. I tell people when I speak is. There's a difference between empathy and sympathy. I mean sympathy is where you feel. Sorry for somebody. Empathy means you've been there. You feel you know what they're going through and I really think it's critically important. The judges have experience life experience. I think sometimes even at the federal benches well judges that are appointed or elected need to have some years under their belt. I always get concerned when I see somebody a little bit too young and ending up on the bench not because they may not have the intellectual capacity or the innate tools that they need but you do need to live life see people to experience even travel getting to see different cultures around the world. You need to be around a little bit. So that when you're sitting on the bench and you're making a determination about whether a witness is telling the truth or not and judges do that. They make determinations on whether a particular testimony is truthful. They do findings of fact. And they make determinations like that. You want that judge to be empathetic to be until intelligence. Certainly to have lived a little bit. They understand life experiences so that is something that makes me so curious. Because you've come to this place in your life where you realize that that adage if not us then who really rings true for you and I'm curious about the beginning you know how how we got here because you are an incredibly empathetic and incredibly intellectual person who does have so much experience under your belt but before we get into why. You're running I. I'm curious where did it all start can? Can you tell us where you grew up? Yeah I I grew up in New Jersey. I was the son of a wonderful man. My father who passed away twelve years ago he was such a beloved public servant. This was the highly decorated World War combat veteran. He was. He was the real deal. My Dad he at the age of twenty one and I think about that I have three children have a son who's twenty six and I think about somebody who's even five years younger than that in one thousand nine hundred forty two. He enlisted in the Army Air Corps because they didn't have an air force at the time it was part of the army and he became a pilot and navigator and Obama. Dear all wrapped in one. He trained you know all over this country before going overseas and then he was stationed in Okinawa and he remained there for two and a half years because he actually didn't come back until nineteen forty six because he was on the occupying force to keep the peace so he was in the war for a long time. He was a combat veteran his forward squadrons. These flights of of of fliers would go out on these dangerous missions. Where sometimes a third of them would not return and he was leading them because he was became an officer leading these forward squadrons in battle and bronze stars Multiple have all his records. He has an incredible career fighting for this country and came back From that I a different person In terms of you know when you give your life for the country like that and fight and see life and death you know over and over again for years. He came back and wanted to commit himself to public service. So I grew up in New Jersey in a household where I had a father who came from that background. He was born in Nineteen twenty one. He grew up during the depression and he was the child of refugees. My grandparents were from Armenia and they escaped the Armenian massacre of Nineteen fifteen to nineteen twenty the Ottoman Empire massacre which by the way incredibly. I'm running for judge in seat number one fifty one five zero and why that means a lot to me is call it. Kismet. Because I'm running and seat one fifty and the US Senate just passed resolution. One fifty recognizing the Armenian genocide a month ago. And this happened after I was placed into seat one fifty and I. It's just one of those things about whether you believe in numbers and how they affect things in life you know. That number was so impactful. I got a call. The next day from a sitting judge here in Los Angeles who was born in Armenia has an incredible background Getting herself to this country in her education and whatnot and she's a judge here in L. A. And she called me and she was emotional. Because I'm running and seat number one. Fifty and resolution one fifty just passed for the first time recognizing. The Armenian genocide occurred happened at all. And it's been a long fight for their media community to To get that recognition. And it's important. Yeah incredibly important to honor what communities have gone through and and it strikes me as so I mean moving really that your you know your father enlisted to fight against a genocide that was happening during World War Two to fight against what was being done to the Jews and that you come from this heritage of having escaped the genocide of your own people an incredibly Hitler and he wrote this down. It's not anecdotal when he tried to rationalize what he was going to do which was tried to exterminator race of people that being the Jewish culture at an raised at that time that a he said whoever remember the Armenian genocide. Yeah he actually wrote that. That's in history. So he used Air Menia massacre which was at one and a half million. Armenians were killed. They were marched out into the desert. Men and boys were separated from their mothers and daughters and they were summarily executed tortured. Murdered it if you read the history. It's it's it's very hard to even talk about my. My grandparents were from the cities of him and Dick Ron geared which are two cities which are now in eastern Turkey but at the time were western Armenia. There were particularly hard hit. I mean really just tremendous atrocities so Hitler looked back on that and said Oh that happened. Were you know? Now we're what twenty years later? Or what have you? And and he went about trying to exterminate You know a race based on that history so to have it not be recognized in this country that it even existed was something that the the Community Armenian community fought for and I will say. I'm really thrilled. That both the House in resolution two ninety six and then the Senate by unanimous consent which means there were no objections. And that's a by bipartisan. I think is fifty three forty seven right now. Republican that Senate passed unanimously resolution. One fifty to recognize Meena genocide. So my father yes he said you know is. The son of refugees joined grew up during the depression. So we're up during a time when there was hardship tremendous struggle. His father passed away when he was ten years old so his mother raised four boys. The eldest of which died on the kitchen table bleeding to death from tonsilectomy. This was at the time they did that. They gave you know the operations in the kitchen. Back in the nineteen late teens. I guess or early twenties. She lost her eldest son on the kitchen. Table never recovered from. I will honestly tell you that as I hear the you know the history of my family of something. She never quite got over and she had three more boys so she raised them my father being the youngest born nineteen twenty one and had to raise them as a seamstress in New York City. She was one of these. Sweatshop workers that you see in the old documentaries or or or hear about stories Women working who could only get protections eventually from the garment workers unions or trying like hell to organize and get rights for people. Were working for pennies an hour. That was my grandmother working to make enough money to raise. Three boys couldn't do it'd be so. Her eldest son had to work as well. You know to raise his brothers along with with my grandmother. So it's just an incredible history to think that my grandfather grew up our father. I'm sorry grew up during that time. During the depression the son of refugees who escaped a genocide and then said. I'm going to fight for this country at the age of twenty one risk my life for a country that at that time he all he saw. Was you know hardship in the depression and coming from a family who escaped you know this this heart horrific cars and probably motivated him to say he's in a better place and he's GonNa fight for this better place and did and so I think that's what shaped his worldview. Although I will say based on reading his letters voluminous letters which it is amazing that we actually have that. He wrote his mother from overseas during the war. And I have them. There are scores of them reading his letters to his mother. What I came to to realize about my father is this was who he was. As a person he innately was Just a person with tremendous empathy integrity and character. I know your good friend Lauren. My daughter knew my dad In her younger years and could tell you the feeling that she got about him as a human being and so. This is the kind of person that I grew up emulating in hoping to even approach that kind of person. I could never be him. But what a what a standard to set you know and so interesting and beautiful to me that his standard. He began so young but he came home to become a trial attorney. Eventually judge eventually state Senator in New Jersey and I wonder you know when you talk about knowing that you wanted to strive to be a man like your father in hindsight. Do you think about the the values. He passed down the lessons that he taught to you what what it was like to watch him consistently strive for deeper levels of public service. Yes I did because I watched him when he was giving speeches as a young boy and it was so moving because I would be watching people's faces in the audience and the kind of love that you could see from people when they saw him speak and I would listen to him as a young boy growing up and watching him out on the campaign trail depending on what he was doing. It was so inspiring to me because I end up from his discussions with one on. I would I learned that and I think this is what gives me the facility to do this because people say well. How can you be a judge? I mean don't you bring biases and prejudices that everybody has in everyday life to the bench? How can you wash that away and I tell people believe it or not I can? And it's it's hard to convince them because think about that. How do you do that but I think it was from growing up seeing that and learning that from my from my father he he? He was the kind of person that took everyone. And at face value at face value. In other words there was no prejudices preconceived notions whatsoever and I watched this year after year after year. Seeing him. Interact with people amazed how no matter. What the person's background. No matter where they came from what their preferences were their gender their financial position whatever it was he had such a big heart and such deep empathy for people and I could see when he interacted with them that he took everyone for who they were. There was no angle whatsoever. And that's what I saw and that's what I feel grew inside of me. You know through learning from him so These are the things that you know you know. You hope you know you can do Certainly in a courtroom. Do you have a favorite memory of your dad. Oh God there's so many members you know. I think it's funny. We were talking about watching him make speeches and whatnot. I think one of the memories that I have that was so impactful and I might have spoken about it last August when we did. The kickoff event was when my dad ran for governor back in the nineteen sixties he was endorsed by Robert Kennedy. And the way I was talking about him when he would make speeches and whatnot. You know Bobby Kennedy had this kind of effect on people and I think that's why they connected and why he endorsed dad and they they were kind of similar kindred spirits in that way and you know when my Dad. I'll never forget in June nineteen sixty eight. I was about ten years old and we were on the East Coast and we lost Kennedy here in Los Angeles. I think it was June sixth downtown. La At the embassador hotel. And I remember the next morning both my parents coming in my room and I was in bed. Woke me up to tell me that what had happened. I we lost Bobby Kennedy and it was like it was almost like a thickness in the air. You could feel it. It was I felt at that moment that there was it was like the world kinda paused on its axis in a sense that sounds trite may be but he really did there was there. Was this feeling that something major had changed at that moment that we were going to be set off into a different trajectory from that moment on things. We're going to change. And it felt a little unsettling at the time but my dad who in this was a tremendous moment you know for our family and the country in the world sitting down and talking to me about and I was only ten years old about what had just happened because this was a violent episode where we lost a beloved figure and talking to me about. How do you process that and move on to Young Child And you know his his strength at this moment of tremendous national Sadness and His grace and a sense at this time gave me a feeling that you can process these kinds of things and try to move on from them in a positive way Even when you have tragedies like this and because sometimes you can get really down and really feel despair which I think today in the country I see that as I go around on the campaign trail. I see a lot of despair and people kind of feel like they're losing hope or maybe they don't have hope and so. I think it's important like he kind of rallied. My little ten year old body at the time not to feel such despair somehow know that the world was not gonna end at that moment and so when I see that out there. When I'm just doing my thing here I try to bring that into the room. You know there are things that we can do that. You know that to not sit back and just let it go but to really try to make change for the positive and don't despair lose hope so I guess to answer your question. I was like to circle back to the question after a long answer but to answer the call of your question. It's that it's I guess it's that memory was so profound and how he handled it and it was a teaching moment for me that I can read to this day. That's so beautiful. And how special that you get to channel? One of your favorite memories of Your Dad when you're out doing your own work. What about your mom? What was she like? Oh Wow my mom. It was You know I raised four kids. I was the youngest of four three older sisters. She and my dad were married in nineteen fifty all the until the day. He died in two thousand eight long long marriage of fifty eight years until he passed away. She still alive today. She's going on ninety three years of age. She is an inspiration as she gets up in the morning and drives herself to the senior center to meet with her friends every morning at the age of ninety two going on ninety three and she went in to the Department of motor vehicles last year to take her written tests and got one hundred percent on this test at the age of ninety one going on ninety two it was such a who blew them away at the DMV so much that they came out from the back room where they do these tests to tell me that your mother got one hundred percent on a written test and they were so shocked by it. And so I told her I said. Well there's there's no question that you are fully here one hundred percent And you're with us so she's a woman of great strong fortitude. Her parents are an incredible story. Her father came to this country on a boat across the sea from Europe. Landed on Ellis Island Grandmother. Oh Yeah Yeah really okay. Well how cool is name his plaque on the wall on Ellis Island and he came through it would have been he came. He was born in Eighteen Ninety eight. He came over at the age of twelve so in nineteen ten. He came across the country at the age of twelve. He had one relative here to to be the contact. The idea was as many immigrants. Do in this country. Can he work and send money back to the old country to help his parents who were living in impoverished? At the time my grandfather worked basically as an indentured servant as a young child for a family on a farm for several years. Then we got of age. He worked in the coal mines and Wentz Western. Pennsylvania married my grandmother at a very young age. My grandmother was probably eighteen years old at the time when they got married and he worked in the coal mines in western Pennsylvania for several years until she felt she was going to lose him in the minds and convinced him to leave and go to New York City where he worked in heavy construction as an ironworker and he worked on the empire. State on the Chrysler building in and those buildings have my grandfather's hands in them and he worked in these iconex structures as an immigrant to this country and boy was he a proud immigrant home. My God Working in New York in these in these places at my my grandfather was a member of the original CIO before it was the AFL CIO was the congress of industrial organizations which is what that stands for and the Nineteen Thirties. I guess it was it became the AFL CIO if fake in nineteen fifty eight. They merged but it was a cio back in the nineteen thirties. And I can tell you that. I probably wouldn't be sitting here today if it wasn't for unions because between my father's side and my garment worker grandmother on one side working in sweatshops in New York and the M- the protections that they fought for to just get a wage that you could survive maybe and then my grandfather on the other side was a coal miner and then an iron worker in New York in fights that they wage back then to try to get a living wage. That's what they basically survived because of those fights I mean people today. You know you hear people talk about unions and sometimes they try to politicize them in denigrate them and use them as a political weapon. Forget about the politics. This is about survival. These were people coming together to try to see if you could survive in. They banded together to try to fight for them about what's fair and it's so interesting because if I may sidebars for a moment I've had people out on campaign trails ask me. Ym So passionate about healthcare and making sure that we have universal twelve Karen and we treat our citizens as well as we as they're treated in other countries that are on par with US economically. And I always remind people I say. How do you think I have healthcare? How many union the Screen Actors Guild? You that my union provides my healthcare and when I look at the other union workers on sets. You know people think Hollywood's fancy they forget that there's like four award shows a year but for the most part were on sets and it's a bunch of union guys on us and we're a bungee union kids and it's like I'm on sets with the construction workers union with transportation unions with the camera guys and everybody is only there and only protected because of these organizations and I feel like sometimes people and especially people who who. Maybe don't have the family history that you do. Forget that the only reason any of us has a shot even at a fair shake is because there were. There were organized because there were workers who had the courage to organize and fight for rights right. You know it's the concept. Collective bargaining is is is. How do it you're talking about? Is the screen actors guild or equity or what used to be after a SAG after that is an AFL CIO guilt and the you know actors and actresses who worked for some period of time. That maybe they don't work for a certain period of time you know. Most actors are in and out of work. And when they're if they didn't have the healthcare afforded to them by the AFL CIO SCREEN ACTORS. Guild say for instance. They would have healthcare. They wouldn't have basic healthcare. And that's that the only two where they got that is under the collective bargaining concept the idea that people. Because you can't do it alone because you're you're on an unequal bargaining position. Yeah you can't do it so you collect together with other people as a group so you have a little bit of power so you can equal. You could level out that table a little bit. You GotTa get a group of David's to fight the Goliath corporate and that's not a bad thing when people talk about that or they talk about concepts of you might have heard of the term interest group liberalism and the reason I bring. That up is because you know people talk about the the phrases conservative and liberal and whatnot. Sometimes they don't really know what it really means but I mean the terms like liberalism. Okay I mean the concept. There was way back people on their own couldn't fight for themselves because they didn't have the money or the power to do that. So in a capitalist society which is what our society is in everybody wants everyone to do well and exceed succeed as best as they can but there are also people who can't get a leg up and can't survive. So how do they do that? Well they the group together with others and that's what interest groups are. It's the only way they can do it. So they get together with others and they collect together and try to get a powerful voice as a group. That's really all it is. It's not a negative thing at all and a lot of people try to cast shade on that you know the concepts of people gathering as groups and fighting for their rights whether they're protesting whether they're you know in the streets protesting or whether their collective bargaining as a group or whatever it is it's very American you know something to be proud of. Every we in our country can do that and succeeded doing that. And fight for those things like getting an agreement where you have healthcare you know so these are you know I i. Don't you know as as a as running for judge? Is You know it's nonpartisan? You know I try to speak to all sides you know. Republicans and Democrats. Or what have you? I tried to tell them. Don't let yourselves be divided. You know you can have different opinions or whatnot but don't hate each other. You know because there are a lot of forces out there that try to divide you know in the country so You know don't don't look at the other side is the boogeyman or what have you. You know. Try to understand each side. Of course judges have to do that. When people come into the courtroom. And that's where that mixture of empathy and intellect comes in. I I is tied you. We were talking about your mom into into this stuff but I think it's so cool that you know. She grew up with a father who helped to build New York. What what was her kind of control in your family. What what do you feel like? You learned their mom while she was the matriarch on. My mom is solid very strong woman. I mean pets. Why she's still Sharpe's attack. Nora going right comes very good stock. I mean she's just really strong bright woman so when I see Matriarch. She raised four boys while she had a husband. My Dad who was you know a judge at one time who was a senator at one time state. Senator in New Jersey was the director of motor vehicles. So he was. He was serving the public which takes a lot of your time right so she had to raise four kids in a way that we all felt everything was going beautifully keeping things together and she did you know. I never felt at any time that there was a lack of contact with my dad or with my mom or anything like that and that was her. She was a very strong woman. I grew up as a feminist because I grew up with three older sisters. I had no brothers and I actually have two daughters and his son Soham just constantly surrounded by by women in fact even when we have cats and dogs they always seem to be female in my household so no matter what it is and people say. Are you a feminist? Is I guess I am because I grew up in a in a in a female household and my mom was a very strong figure and still is and so you know for me. I've always tried to encourage women to be involved in politics and whatnot and make their voice her. That's always been really important to me because I'm surrounded by beautiful bright intellectual women and and they seem to always do the right thing. You know the right thing to do so with my mom. She raised us In that kind of a household you know just you know everyone felt loved cared for you know that she was always there and and she also imparted that kind of empathy and understanding for people same concepts. Her and my dad knows really funny. People don't believe me when I told them this but it's true. My parents were married for fifty eight years and I tell people that I never saw them argue now when I tell people that they say oh well that that means. They argued behind closed doors. Or that's not possible. Or that's the I've had people tell me that's not healthy. That can't be right or what whatnot? But it's not that these two people sometimes to stars come together from the sky and there was some destiny there and whatever. The long term plan was for them to come together. It happened and that just in my life there was just tremendous love between them and it wasn't a fake kind of insincere love. I mean this is true I mean it was just always there and there was just no friction so they got along so well they saw is just on everything. They loved being together. They love traveling together. They loved each other's company so they love traveling with friends but they love traveling together alone as well because they loved each other's company so the House I grew up in was that kind of household. Some people say well Tom. That was unrealistic household. Grow Up and you couldn't possibly match that but been married for thirty five years and I feel the same way about my wife and I you know I just can happen and can be done But I think you know to answer your question. My mom set that kind of feeling in our house with our kids growing up and and was just a great home to to be in as cool. Do you think that from an early age? You had an inkling you wanted to follow in your dad's footsteps it's interesting. I had two pets. I had the path by academic path. you know through high school. I was doing well and I ended up studying undergraduate at Harvard University before being out of school for two years in between When I was on a soap opera in New York. So you're wondering no but it's true. I can tell you because I was doing plays in high school and that was I was doing well but then I was also in the arts and for some reason in this country never the Twain shall meet. I don't know what it is about our culture. You know you go to Europe. And the arts are so encouraged by the the government you know. They're encouraged France or whatever it is you know they they encourage the arts here. They do but not really. I mean it's like you know you have to have private foundations helped fund the arts and whatnot and there's kind of a concept of feeling. I think here now that we're talking about the arts. I'll just tell you you know it's kind of like well you're just going to. We're not going to regard you as an artist until you make it quote unquote you know. That's not so true elsewhere. Here you get that feeling so being in the arts which I was in high school and also doing Academically was too divergent paths. That it was not something it was something. I had to make a decision so I got into a really good college and there. I was studying up there but I was still doing. Plays and I was doing a play in Boston. And somebody saw me and one thing led to another and the next thing I know being signed by the William Morris Agency in New York and thought what do I do so I took a leave of absence to see where that would go and within a couple of months. I was on one life to live which is ABC soap. And at that time this was nineteen seventy nine so barbara's were really big. They were the Vegas they were the biggest and ABC was huge. And I think our show is like number three and I think there were twelve soaps at the time most were in New York and so we were shooting there in New York and I did that for for a couple of years and then because I promised my grandfather the one who worked in coal mines who said to me. Promise me that you'll go to college and finish and I promised that I would. I could not go back on that. So when my contract came up on one life to live I dropped everything and went back. I transferred to Columbia University. So we're GONNA be in your and that's where I finished my degree because my promise to my grandfather and so I did that I went to study at Oxford University on Scholarship. I had written an essay on Virginia. Woolf a little known book that she wrote called the waves I mean most people know to the lighthouse. Mrs Dalloway and all the things that you get on your syllabus in college but there's some more obscure writings of hers That are really brilliant. Virginia Woolf was the kind of the original stream of consciousness writer before William Faulkner in this country and took up the mantle of stream of consciousness writing. She wrote a book called the waves. Which is so brilliant. Because the way it is I I like to describe it this way. When you're reading it you don't know what you're reading it and that's what's meant to be so you're reading it in. It's a stream of words so you're now you're now in a film in a sense in your mind and you're riding along is visual through words and you don't know what's happening but something is affecting you as a reader and you're reading about someone whose feelings are reading about their feelings being warm and they're looking at some shimmering globe some orb of light but you don't know what it is yet and you can see it's kind of holding its position and it has a light reflecting in it and the person the person in the book whose relating this inner feeling to you as a reader is feeling this as well and over sudden a camera starts pulling back and I say camera because when you're reading this it's like this so the campus pulling back more and more and more farther away from this glimmering orb of light in. What are you finding out? What it is will wanNA finally comes back far enough. Is You're reading along the stream of consciousness. You realize that. It's a young child laying down in the grass staring at a drop. Abdou on a blade of grass and the feeling going through this young child's heart in the warmth of the sun staring at a drop of do on a blade of grass and to me that's brilliant literature and so anyway. I wrote an essay about this and I got picked to go study at Oxford. And I studied the Bloomsbury Group there you know Conrad and Lawrence and And James Joyce and Virginia Woolf well. My focus was was really Virginia because it just she she so brilliant and so anyway came back and from that and Went back into the business before came. A lawyer did some films. Tony Curtis who is legendary as you know and and some you know some great actors that my wife doing one of the one of the phones I did and Thirty five years later in three children later in a granddaughter later here we are and then went on to law school after leaving that business. So call now. Do you think. I wonder when I listened to you. Talk about that story. And and really when you tell stories in general you are such a storyteller and and when you discuss this Virginia Woolf Book and you talk about waves an and what it was like to realize it was the child. What I hear is the ability that you have put yourself in someone else's shoes you're in the story you're feeling the feelings realize who it is you see from their perspective. You talk about you know working with Tony Curtis or law school. The things you learn from your parents. There's so much about your life that is informed by looking at the world through other people's eyes and striking me in this moment as well as I know you. I'm realizing I'm learning something new that of course you're such a phenomenal person to have in our legal sphere. Because you truly take the time to look at what's happening through the eyes of the people experiencing it. Yeah I did. Thank you and I do feel that way sincerely. And when people say why. Why are you running for judge rather than something else you know whatever it may be? I say because it really is necessary. I really believe that when you make a decision that's going to affect people day-to-day that you have to have that empathy that that and that's why I said earlier on I really think it's important for people to have life experience years of of seeing so many different things before they're going to sit in a position to make a decision or if you're on the appellate court if you're writing an opinion which is where I could very well end up being and would like to someday because you're then writing the law as precedent yet others will follow and say this is the law that judge or justice for seeking wrote. He wrote this. So who's the person that's writing that the WHO's the person and even on the Supreme Court? When an opinion comes down no one person offers the opinion on the Supreme Court. Others concur or join in it but one person authors it and so who is that person you know who is the person who is saying this is who you can love or this is where you can travel to or this is. This is how you will be able to be. This is how you are to behave in society. They're dictating that. Who is the person who's handing down that decision boy? You want that to be somebody who really has that kind of empathy in deep feeling because when they're writing you want them to be writing for people generally for that through their heart. Yeah you know through their heart. You know because there are again. I've I've been practicing for my thirtieth year next year and I tell people you know when I talk about my experiences in the law. I said look there. You know a lot of people on the bench thousands and thousands and whatnot. I've been in and out of court both trial courts and appellate. I've done appeals as well and I say to people why what drove me to want to be a judge's at one of the things is that I felt I came out of the courtroom too many times shaking my head saying to this particular judge even read my papers. Read my papers. So so you've been in courtrooms where you're arguing a case and you realize judge on the bench doesn't even know what the case is pretty much the reason. I hate to say that is because I am running to become part of a group of people that I'm now saying something that's critical but you know what that has to be done because my I you know I want to be an active judge in a sense that I want to improve the judiciary whether it's by my own being an example and attracting people like minded to the bench that overtime will spread out and improve the general judiciary or how I write you know but yes that to answer your question yes I have come out of court saying to myself that it is clear to me that this particular jurist did not read. My papers did was not prepared to make a ruling yet ruled yet ruled so that's concerning because as again as I said earlier on these decisions can affect people's everyday lives. So you know you WANNA make sure if you're going to be a judge you're prepared you you you know you're going to give the you know. There are two sides to every case. Did you're going to give them their full do their full hearing so if you're going to be a public servant and you're taking the position of somebody who's going to render a decision you want to give him the respect that you're going to read all of their papers and all of their arguments. You're certainly not going to agree with everybody. Because you have to make a decision ultimately sure and your job is to apply the law to the facts has a judge. But you've got to give him that. Respect some curious when you talk about your your thirty years practicing law to get here. I wonder about a couple of things really that. Come to mind what? What was it like to argue in a courtroom for the first time and I WANNA know about complex litigation as your and I would love you to walk me and everyone listening through what that what that really means. I'm curious about what's been happening for the last thirty years. So so how did it all begin? Well it's funny because it really flowed from my background in the arts because when I said before they're two separate pads Well for me. They ended up becoming married and they came together. And it became a synergy or synthesis synthesis in some way because even though back in. I thought my God why do I have to be? Why do I have to choose to be only an artist or an academician you know? Why do I half? Why do they have to be mutually exclusive? And I found a way that they're not and that's what I'm that's where we are today because to answer your question my first time arguing in court. Well I came I was standing for. Most people are quivering. Because it's the first I've standing in a courtroom with us before a judge and you're arguing a what's called the motion. Which is a paper in your arguing your case for this particular ruling or whether you're in a trial which is if it's a bench trial that means the judges deciding alone or if it's a jury trial with a jury you're standing in front of a bunch of people. So how is this synthesis? How is this marriage happening for me? Well I am now in a sense performing in the courtroom but it's real. The script is not written in. Make believe it's it's real so I have to convince like an actor would have to convince an audience. I have to convince the judge or a jury. There's your audience of your position. And that's what actors do they learn their part. They live their part then presented in their performance and they have to convince ultimately the audience of the reality of the real kniss if you will of what their performances. That's what a lawyer. A good lawyer does in the courtroom there. Script is there is the facts and they write their opening statements in their closing statements which is their argument enclosing. It certainly the argument and that is a script that they're following their presenting it and perform it so my first time. I actually was very calm because I come from the arts and I'd come from a position of having to perform on stage in New York. I did a stage before as well and then now in a courtroom and so the senior attorneys. When I was a young attorney the senior attorneys would talk about. How is it that you went in there and won that argument? You just started here. What have you but I think it's really because I was able to marry those two things. I was able to be very comfortable and find the truth in what I was arguing. Yeah and present that and convince the audience which was a judge of that truth and so now from that first moment onto the next thirty years which led into the various kinds of litigation. I did which did ultimately lead to most of it being complex litigation. And I'll explain what that is. All that work I I then was able to to grow marrying those two concepts that the ideas of the arts and academia bringing them together in the law because the laws in art. It's an art and apply that art you know in a courtroom or or an an appellate court where you're arguing an appeal from a trial court decision which I've done in state as well as in federal court in Washington DC. I had the honour of of arguing actually against Paul Clement the former Solicitor General who was the Solicitor General of the United States under George Bush. He argued all of the White House's arguments. If you will in front of the Supreme Court Anyway we had an appeal one on one against him and he gave me the highest compliment by walking across afterwards and shook my hand and said that was really brilliantly argued argument Mr Persecution and I was. This was years ago but I felt so honored to. Have somebody really give me that kind of a compliment but anyway so in my in my work complex litigation is in the law there are cases so you have you know regular cases that everybody knows about whether it's an injury or whether it's a medical whether it's a contract dispute but there's a thing called the complex panel and that's where cases go that are not just so simple it can be cases where there could be so many law firms involved because there's so many parties involved that they're naturally in this big big web of issues and it can also be issues that are multiple as well and so the courts sometimes determine to assign something to the complex panel and those judges are typically those that are in a position you know intellectually history experience wise in a good position to handle those kinds of cases so to be on the complex panel as a judge. You have to have that kind of background as a lawyer. You have to be somebody who has really good organizational skills to be able to take those cases which are kind of deep webs of issues and parties and be able to untangle them in a way and and litigation them in a way where everybody is getting their fair hearing and everybody gets their Fair Justice. If you will you know in my cases you know some some matters. Constitutional Law cases sometimes end up on the complex panel. I've done a lot of eminent domain and inverse condemnation which maybe is getting a little too technical but it's a fifth amendment case and in our Constitution there is one of the Articles Fifth Amendment. Actually says that the government cannot take your property without compensating. You they can't just grab it and take it and so whether they're gonNA put a railroad through you know your backyard or not if they're going to do that and claim that they're going to take it by eminent domain. They're going to have to compensate you for that. Or if the government or one of its agencies damages your property by mistake maybe their power lines blow up or their water main burst underground in ruins your home what we just had here with the wildfires and Johnny. Yes and that's actually going on right now. We have gasping omitted Portola hills. I think it has. There's you can have gas escaping you know and the the public entities which are these gas companies are kind of not government but then the but in a sense they are quasi-governmental when those things happen or a water district water pipe blows up. Or what have you you know your house slides down a hill because the ground is saturated those are called inverse condemnation cases into government. Didn't mean to take your property but what we're saying is that they actually did take by mistake. So an inverse condemnation that's also fifth amendment cases and those are cases that. I've become kind of a specialist. It's something I've done many times so I have a question and forgive my ignorance but when you hear people say I plead the fifth you. Can you can plead the fifth where whereas you deny so. He refused to incriminate yourself. How are those really different part of that amendment? Okay great so there's different articles or closets and they're completely separate. I was like cool. What does with your house? What does that have to do their house? Long Gone Yeah. So would would the water crisis in Flint Fall under the fifth amendment imminent domain if I if I was representing as as an attorney somebody. Let's say you live there in your children. Were poisoned if you will. You couldn't drink the water because the lead was leaking into it because the pipes which are being managed by the state or whatever absolutely that's what it is and that and and I'm glad to say that in California. We always do lead the way out here. We really do in terms of Legislation that you know whether you call it progressive or whatever you WANNA call it. It's legislation that is in. My view is the right legislation. That's protecting people you know we. We have statutes that are good in that area in that inverse condemnation for instance. Thank God that there are statutes that say if you have one of those kinds of cases like the flint case but it's here and you have to go to court because of that you get to recover your attorney's fees and all the costs of experts getting all the information about those pipes or whatnot. Where normally you don't get those. Most people can't afford to go to court. You say so so again. That sort of goes back to this idea of grouping to defend ourselves to fight for fair wages to to fight a city that might perhaps be poisoning your water because most of us are not as powerful as the people who are incredible. And that's where the courts come in and take that if you take those steps. The groups forming field. There's a need another words. People can't afford to go to court. Their kids are dying from lead poisoning. But they can't afford to hire a lawyer. They can't afford to hire expensive engineers to prove their case and save their lives. If you will get clean water whatever it may be well in California groups conform go to Sacramento and lobby the legislators to pass the laws that say okay now. If you go to court against the government who did this to you. Guess what you're going to get your attorney's fees you're gonNA get your expert fees you're gonNA get your appraisal fees and whenever they are so you can do this so what that leads to his attorneys taking the case and saying you have to pay me to worry about the cost. Because I know at the end we're going to be able to recover it and confident because we have a statute that says we can Garda. And that's that's where that's where this thing happens. That's what allows lawyers show up and do pro bono work for people in cases like this. Well they can do. The prone is a little different. So pro bono means. You're never gonNA brier pro Bono Volunteer. Yes contingency work so it's lawyers say you know what I'm GonNa. Ib League educated lawyer. I have thirty years of experience. I'm great at what I do. And you know what I'm GonNa win this case for you and the client says but I couldn't possibly afford to do this and they can say. Don't worry about it at the end. Yeah you're not GonNa have to pay me. I'M GONNA say there's a good case. God it there's a statute out there that says don't they're gonNA have to pay me separately. Not Don't worry and that's how these people get justice. That's really cool. So you've argued before the US district courts the California state an US courts of appeal your member of the bar of the US Supreme Court. What is it? What is it like you know as a person who's clearly so empathetic you? You've got all these accolades you've been in all these courtrooms is it. Is it an emotional as well as an intellectual experience for you when you are arguing on behalf of people and their rights? Es Singular word. Yes I can tell you that when I sat there in Washington. Dc in the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals? Which is across the street from the White House? Waiting for the justices. Come out. It was a three three member panel to come out and take the bench. And this is a beautiful ornate courtroom in you sit there and I was sitting there waiting and I was alone sitting at my table and this was not long after my father passed away and I was sitting there thinking. I wonder if my dad if he could see me sitting here right now. I got very emotional just sitting there. I really kind of welled up in a sense. I'm glad I was alone because you know. I didn't have a client there as as one doesn't in an appellate court you sit there as a lawyer as an appellate lawyer. You're pretty much alone and I sat there and it was an empty courtroom because I got there early and I was glad that I had that moment to feel that. But it wasn't emotional moment for me because I thought about him and his life and what he had done and that I followed him ultimately and thought about what he would be thinking to see me sitting there about to have an argument made to this high court and it was very moving and emotional for me. You know to do that as very proud of that of that moment and kind of motivated me into my oral argument when you think back on your career in the cases that you've argued are is there an example that stands out to you about the importance of justice and how it affects the everyday man or woman in America absolutely. It goes to those cases where I use the word inverse condemnation and I was explaining that the reason I go back to that case and I've done many of those is because we're presenting really people who could never afford to be represented first of all in these kinds of cases but these are everyday people of every kind. These are homeowners. People whose biggest investment in their life is their home. It is you know and sometimes. It's a very precarious thing. They're living month to month. Whether it's on social security I mean I'm representing people who may be in the early nineties. Who their home is their life security which has been damaged which is on the precipice of going down a hill. Because of what happened. They're gonNA lose everything or or a young couple who have two young children who are getting by month to month and the thing. That's a wonderful about these cases is I represent a large group. Typically so the group then representing is comes from all walks of life so whether it's the elderly living social security or with is the young couple with young children or anybody in between and it's so interesting to me because they're from all all all a politics are not part of it there from all of quadrants. If you will so I'll elderly. I'll have young. I'll have this party that party politics. Don't enter into it. They they can be all kinds of people because I spent so much time with them. They're so it's such an intimate representation. Because I go to their homes and I sit in their homes their damaged homes and I meet with them in their living rooms time and time again that I get to know them their families in their homes which is very intimate and very private and so get to know who they are you know an and navy accidentally. I get to know what they're thinking is maybe on issues of the world and I realize as I'm sitting there representing say a group of same representing a group of twenty homes. Say in a particular case so I have twenty homes and these all these kinds of people and get to know them all. I realize through that one case what our whole society is made up of all these different kinds of people were trying to get by day by day and they all have different thoughts in different dreams and and whatnot. But they're all trying to get some justice right and so they hand that case to me and I go in and fight for them so when I'm in the courtroom and putting them up on the witness stand. I'm so proud when I put up a ninety year old man who's testifying in front of a jury about his home being damaged because I have such confidence that the jury is going to rule in his favor in their favor because he's a real people who need their help as a jury and in the end of the day they did. It's so cool. It just makes me think about how you get to have these experiences over and over again that reinforce that really the whole point of all of this is for us to be together and to advocate for each other and and to help our neighbors whether we held them or not and I. I was really really see that in these cases so so what was it. When was the moment that with his thirty year career? And all your experience with people. What was the tipping point where you said? You know. I was going to retire. But now I'm going to run for judge because those are very disparate polities. So what did it and I will. That's a good question because as you know I could make I could make that turn and say okay. Let's wind it down and there are probably a lot of people wondering why did you do this? And their people express that to me so yes. There was a very bright line moment. It was the bread cavanaugh hearings. I was watching the bread cavenaugh hearings because it was somebody who was looking to become a supreme court justice very important to watch that and I am very interested of course as we've been talking in knowing who wants to be on the court that's going to determine what the law is in how we are going to live our lives so of course. I'm going to be very interested in that so I watched that hearing and what led up to it and what. I was so shocked about was more than anything else was the disrespect that I saw being displayed by the candidate who wanted to be on the Supreme Court Mr Cabin and I'm not even commenting. This is a-political. This is not even having to do with party. I'm talking about basic common core decency. Yes because he sat there attacking the people who were asking him questions. Which is their job to do to advise and consent to to find out to inquire of a person's character and background to determine whether they're going to confirm that this person should be have the honor of sitting as one nine of the nine justices on the Supreme Court who make the law in this country. That's their job as a panel of senators in this particular case and so I watch the back and forth and the gin taken what not and there was such disrespect. So what I meant by that is I saw. For Instance Amy. Klawitter was one of the people questioning him. I respect her and her background. She's quite as centrist. You know by the way And was asking a former prosecutor attorney general and whatnot and she was asking questions to inquire a you know of this particular candidate in a very even reasonable way but he started attacking her personally started talking about her father and alcoholism and whatnot and then he started talking about himself his enjoyment of beer and whatnot in this and I started and I was watching this and I said am I watching a confirmation hearing for someone to be on the Supreme Court or my watching some sort of you know I you know play. That show is being put on about something that happened. Some day I to me it was more it was that unreal to me you know and and it really affected me so. I continue to watch and I watched questions being asked as they do. Because when you have somebody vying to be Supreme Court they do background investigations and they all do everything that comes up. Is that fair game? So there was questioning about things he had done in his younger years and whatnot. Now my personal experiences I you know went to the kinds of schools in the northeast very similar to Mr Cavenaugh. So I know these people i. I've seen the behaviors. You know what the culture is I do. I do because I was there and so I I. I've witnessed around the same time that he was there or I'm actually older than him. But we're we're pretty close to contemporaries I when he spoke when when it was alleged. What had happened back then and the kind of conduct that was going on back then my response was of course. I know this and what I did was. I communicated with my colleagues and friends who I went to school with back then at these kinds of schools every single one of them said of course we all know that that is the kind of thinking the kind of behavior that went on back then and they didn't even question it so that for those people who know that world and and understood that to be the case then you move into the hearings and you say okay if that is the case. Let's see how this person handles the questions about what occurred back and whatnot and then you look at somebody's character. You look at their intellect because they're answering questions on the spot. I mean it's you know you're not going to go to a room and think about drafting an answer. You're going to answer on the spot. And that's what I was watching for and I was not at all impressed with the way he was responding. He started I don't know if he sincere about it but he started getting emotional and crying in but it was back to. I guess I'm reaching back to my studying Shakespeare at Columbia University but thou dost protest too much. You know when. Somebody's starts really protesting that way. You start to think you know is you know you know how sincere as truthful is it so there that was a battleground that confirmation hearing but my take away from it and I tell people this I don't have a problem with there being a battleground at a confirmation hearing from with that. Okay IF PEOPLE WANNA battle things out the democratic way can be messy sometimes as what Obama used to always say. Democracy is messy. He's right you know sometimes it can be messy and sometimes you know you have to go through those things to get to an end point so I have a problem with there being you know a kind of a somewhat argumentative hearing especially some trying to scream court but what I don't like is to witness what I consider to be. The lack of temperament lack of temperament. They you certainly want to see in any judge whether it's a trial court judge which is what I'm running for or a Supreme Court justice. You want someone who has the temperament of the even-handedness that they're going to impart justice equally and I didn't see that and so that to me was my bright line point when I when I witnessed that hearing I said Hi self. I have to do something about this because right now people are saying. Get off the bench. Get Him so to speak. Get off the bench. Get out get out of your seats and start to be the change you know. Starting you know. Stop doing whatever you're successful at. You know it's time to enter public life to try to make a change and people started to do that and you know. I saw people doing that but when I saw that hearing it pushed me off saying okay. I need to get involved in mine. Involvement at that moment was very clear it was. It has to be in the judiciary because it wasn't just the Cabanera herring but for the last few years. The judiciary's been attacked by politicians. I mean we've seen yeah. I mean they wouldn't let Merrick Garland take a seat Agana centrists. Yeah you had the Senate holding up. Yes hearing their weaponising our judicial system which meant to be a check on the Senate not meant to be an arm of the Senate judiciary is supposed to be an independent branch of our government that helps us to have. I think about it like a stool. You know. We're supposed to have these three branches that hold us up and when one branch becomes kind of hijacked by another we've lost let me say one step further. There are three co equal branches of government the judiciary being one of them of course the legislative branch of the executive branch but the judicial branch is sacrosanct. Because you have to have a place a sanctuary where the other two branches battling out as much as they want to between executive legislative. They have to have a place to go to have the key. Habits settled and it has to be respected as the final word. And in the last few years you've had a tax from one of the branches of government against the judiciary saying things like this judge can't rule because he comes from a Mexican background or this judge can't rule because he's in Obama judge or this girl can't judge because he's a Bush judge or whatever and you had the chief justice coming out and saying hey we don't have political judges are judges are judges. You know now having said that but we do now. Don't yeah right now I tell people we have to stop living in a five to four world and what I mean by that is and it happened today in the ninth circuit. We had unfortunately a ruling that I said before was seven to four while it happened to be seven. Judges were from one party for judges. Were from the other party in the Supreme Court. You'll have five judges for one party for judges from the other party in the year. Two thousand you had the presidency determined not by the electorate but by the Supreme Court because they made the determination five judges from one party and four judges from the other so this is the way I have to come down on. Being a nonjudicial candidate are nonpartisan candidate. We can't ever have rulings coming down strictly along hard ideological lines. That is not the way of America. That is not what we're about and that's what's been going on and it frightens me because you see things like Justice Kennedy stepping down for no reason to make room for a politically appointed judge when you see debts being paid off mysteriously for people who work in the judicial branch as they were with Brad Kavanagh and then suddenly he gets a seat. Justice Kennedy is out in again. Kennedy son is involved in every everything feels like. It's been polluted by politics and it's not meant to so. I wonder when you think about that because you're I know this about you because I know you one of your favorite words in English language integrity you you live it and you breathe it and you you encourage everyone around you when making decisions to make those decisions from their integrity and I am. I'm curious now that we see the integrity of the court of of the judiciary being compromised. How do you think I mean where? Do you think we are in terms of integrity. And how do you think we get back to more of it boy? That is such an important question because the answer to the question could quote. Save the Republican quote. I mean it's that important. When you mentioned Justice Kennedy. That's a fact that was reported that his son had some connection whereby when he or I should say Justice Kennedy through his son had some connection that it made it questionable when he suddenly retired. Because he wasn't ill why he did that at the time. So I don't even into may comment on. It's been reported so that means that something other than pure integrity pure justice pure fairness was play. And so are we all perfect people know but we are too far from perfect these days so we need closer back to that we need to strive to get back toward it so we don't have to set a bar that says we all must be pure and perfect but were way too far from it right now and so my feeling is that in. This is why I again with the cabinet hearings. I kind of left out of my seat and said okay. I'm going to do something about this. In the judiciary is because even though I'm running for Superior Court which is a trial court and people say Tom. That's that's the trial court. It's not the Supreme Court in but you can't run for the Supreme Court but But it's the first step in the reason of doing is because I'm not just going to sit on the bench and and just stop there. I want to be an active judge. And what I mean by that. Is I want to be able to represent the judiciary as being the person who is defending the judiciary in its purest. Sense in its truest form and taking that defense wherever it has to go whether it's in Sacramento in the state of California and and doing whatever I need to do to improve the laws so that we improve the judiciary whether it's through passing laws working with state legislators I've already had discussions with some and they've said I'd love to sponsor that bill and this is great thinking but the idea there is to maybe improve the loss of that those who end up on the bench are the kinds of people. You want the bench those with deep integrity those with the experience and the background at end up there so there are things that can be done to improve the judiciary to get better people on the bench. I really want to be that kind of person where people say. Jeez I've never seen a judge out there talking about the judiciary in and kind of inspiring us to as people to try to find ways to improve it and really carrying the torch of fairness. You know She is drawn. You know our our lady judgment. She's blindfolded holding the scales. They're meant to truly be unbiased and fair and I think getting back to that would be very exciting. And if you notice on lady justices not only deserve blindfolds but those scales art even their even and I you know I keep telling people that sometimes when I go out to talk to clubs and organizations and whatnot you know on this campaign trail and they said well how would you rule this where Howard you roll that way while the code of judicial ethics which applies to as well for for judge in. We're not allowed to make comment on things that are presently before the court in could come before the court understand it so what I tell. People is remember that Lady Justice is blind and she also is holding scales that are equal so that if it's true justice both parties come in and the judge should be absolutely equal. There should be no tipping of that scale either way and you have to have that facility judge. You have to have it so I would love to attract I would. I would love to win this campaign so I can begin to be come the change but I would love to attract people to the bench and I may if I win and become a judge I may go out there and start looking for those people who are like minded and encourage them to run to be judged because they're they're they're the good people you know. They're the kind of people you want to see their to commit to that kind of Khimik service to do it. So this episodes coming out right before your election term very excited about so you're in La and you are listening to this. Please go and vote Tom. Parsegian foresee one fifty but as we talked about earlier. A lot of people don't really know how to do this kind of local research. Maybe maybe don't pay much attention to the smaller elections. Do you have a message for any of those people who maybe weren't planning on showing up on March third you about the impact of these things. Well the impact is tremendous first of all everyone. I think I mentioned way earlier on about this sense of despair that sometimes people have a loss of hope or or whatnot and I tell people don't despair don't lose hope because the way that you feel better about it is to use the power of your vote that the voting power is the most important treasured protected. Power that you have you have to exercise. It don't think I have something else to do or it's too difficult to look into this. You've got to exercise your vote because it's the only way we can make this change so as far as the judges go. There are ways you can do that. I know there's not much time. Certainly him with love for you to come. Vote for me and see one fifty but there are also. You'll see other judges on the ballot. So how'd you find out about go to the websites of these people? See what they stand for. And it's very easy because if you just take their name and you can go online and find out. Who's running for judge? You can look at it and he sample ballot and you can put their name in a Google search. And you'll see let's say their name is Smith. I guarantee you. It'LL BE SMITH FOR JUDGE DOT COM. Or something you know and Google will get you there and you can find out who are these people or their backgrounds you know. What do they think? And by the way who were they supported by? I mean I'm so proud to be supported by so many great organizations around this county like stonewall Democratic Club is you know has endorsed me you know. I mean that's a particular group particular organization that represents a certain group of people who really have a needs for people to have empathy. And have you know? Understand People's trials and tribulations in day-to-day life you know or you know here in in l. a. m you endorsed by the Democratic Party well I also got a qualified rating from the La County Bar Association Weisan important. And why is that? Something should look into you know go to La County bar website and find out how people were rated by them. Why is an important because the way you get a rating is so hard? It's so deep you have to submit seventy five references of judges that you've worked with have been in court with of opposing counsel of co-counsel of clients that you represented maybe experts that you've used people that you've used or come in front of in your work as a lawyer. Not Seven seventy five and they follow up by serving every one of the seventy five people and they call them on the phone the interview them so it's a deep deep vetting process so one of the things that simple things that people can do is if you see a list of candidates for judge and you. WanNa find out go to the county Bar Association. See how they rated them as qualified or well-qualified or possibly not qualified. There are some candidates who get that rating. And and then you take that into account. Yeah in something I think is so amazing is that Los Angeles County is actually larger in population than forty two entire states in our region. So the judges here in La County need to be able to handle a lot. Yes La County. Superior Court is the largest and most complex trial court in the United States of America are county as you said is bigger than forty two whole states so being a judge in this court is critically important You want good people on the bench. And by the way California leads the way in terms of its law states. Follow our decisions so when we set precedent here in California? Yes precedent here in California but it's also followed by other states so yeah which is a big important county and can you kind of walk us through the role the role of a judge would yeah the role of a judge here in La County. What will what will that look like for you? Yeah so for me the way it works and I'm really proud by the way talking about endorsements this is kind of a proud when it's nonpolitical. I've been endorsed by the presiding judge. Kevin Brazil who is the chief runs the whole court system at so cool. I know and and the assistant presiding judge who's going to become the presiding judge because there's two year terms next January so I've gotten the endorsement of both chief and assistant chief and the reason I bring that up is because Kevin Brazil who's the president presiding judge is the first African American presiding judge in the history of Los Angeles County Spirit Court and he's a wonderful brilliant judge educated. Ucla law but he's more than that. He's my kind of guy he's he's one of those people that has that deep empathy for people. He's a real If you met him he just is a Just what one of the people you meet and you just know his character integrity and empathy. So he's he's endorsed. May and the reason I bring him up to answer your question there. The people who make the decision as to where you're put so if you win and you're now going to be a judge of the entire county you have the jurisdiction of this. Whole County of eleven million people and all these courtrooms. Where does the judge Chief Judge Here the presiding judge place you. Well they take a lot of things into account. Of course. It's going to be your years of experience. In how long have you been doing this fifteen years or thirty years? What is your background? You knows your background and complex litigation or some other kind or is your background as a prosecutor. You've been doing only prosecuting his district attorney. And that's your area so they take those things into account and hopefully as I crossed my fingers. They take into account where you physically live because how how easy is it. Nellie traffic to get to the courthouse. You're GONNA be so. Yeah the commute so for me. I cross my fingers and pray that I get assigned to the central which is downtown. What's called the mosque Stanley? Mosk courthouse. Because I could actually take subway from my house to court. As I've told people to be quote judge on the train to court I want to be able to take public transportation to court every day and I would be so thrilled to do that. You know and it's wonderful because most people in La don't even know that we have subways. But we do. And I take them whenever I can. So you know there he would assign to the courts and then my role would be as a trial. Judge making decisions You know whether it's in front of a jury myself alone which is a bench trial or a jury trial for whatever comes into court and I can tell you that they can assign you to do anything. It's up to the presiding judge. You can be doing criminal courts civil courts family courts. Yeah they can put you anywhere so you could be handling anything. And now that's true for judges around the country correct anyone who's running for a as a superior court trial court trial court okay. So when we're talking about these different judgeships and you know you mentioned where where to go and what to look at here in L. A. County but likewise anyone in any state or county should be able to look up. Who's running for judge in this next election and then you would just recommend that they go on Google their records and and look for who in their court system or has endorsed them. Those would be the nation's they should yes I think they should go to their local county that counties Bar Association Bar Association website. Okay right now. It's not you know there's so many counties in the United States right not every county may follow this system but they most should if it's not the county bar it could be the state bar. Okay they could have a similar and then check the state yes to see. If they've done a rating of those judges have have. They brought them in for a deep vetting process and then determined what they think about that particular candidate. That's one way to go then. The next way to go is to look on Google. Their name find out because everyone sets up a website. Find out what they're thinking is because they're going to have on that website. What their view of the world is how they view things. You're GonNa get a quick sense of what kind of person this is that wants to be on the bench making these critical decisions and then the third level is who's endorsing them who's backing them up. What kind of people are they supporting them? Because that's going to give you another sense. So that's my to voters across the country. Greedier Google person go to the local county bar or the state bar find that they've been rated find out what their rating is and then look at who's endorsing them and then look on their website to find out what kind of people these are. And please do that. Because these people are going to end up making decisions in this courtroom that you might end up standing in Yep and you want these people to be fair minded people who render and administer equal and fair justice to everybody no matter their circumstance or background and thank you. Those action items are so hopefully. I love being able to give listeners specifics. I think it's important to to your point. This could just take a little a couple of minutes on an afternoon. You could spend ten twenty thirty minutes if you got really fascinated about something. Somebody may have you know. Put up it. It's not gonNA take days but but a little bit will really go a long way here and and for anyone listening here in La County. Your website is per seeking for judge Dot Com really simple. We'll put it in our stories guys you'll be able to swipe up and get it on on the work in progress instagram which brings me My dear to my last question for you which I ask everyone. The podcast is called work in progress. And when you hear that phrase. I'm curious what comes to mind is a work in progress in your life right. Wow that is you just brought us full circle because that is what I am trying to we are. We are a work in progress for civil and work in progress. What that means to me is it's it's it's a teachable Phrase in a sense that we need to get to work to create progress from me in the court system. Yes we need to get to work to create progress Tom. No one has answered that question. That way that's what it is. I love that and that's what I really really want to do. And I you know I you know people sometimes say well. You're running for election and you'll say this or that. No NO NO NO I. I really mean this deepest deepest part of my heart and soul that we need to do that. And that's why I'm here and doing this. We're going to get to work to create that progress in the judiciary because it's so important in our country. I love that I'm just so inspired by you. Thank you so much. I can't wait to vote for you on Tuesday a good. So what's really important to know? The people are voting on Tuesday march. Third Twenty twenty. And you gotta get out there to vote on March thirty twenty twenty so on Tuesday. Make sure your exercise your power to vote indeed things. This show is executive produced by me. Sophia Bush and Sim Saarna. Our supervising producer is Alison Bresnik. Our associate producer is Caitlin Lee. This episode was edited by Matt Sasaki and Our music was written by Jack Garrett and produced by Mark Foster this show is brought to you by cloud ten and brilliant adamy powered by simple cast.

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Los Angeles Times 9/14/20

L.A. Times Morning Briefing

03:44 min | 2 months ago

Los Angeles Times 9/14/20

"It's Monday September fourteenth. I'm Mary. Lotto and here's your local news from the Los Angeles Times. Brought to you by consumer reports standing for truth fairness and what's right for consumers consumer reports has been on your side. Since nineteen thirty, six with information you can trust on home auto food, health, tech money, and more learn more at C. R. Dot Org slash consumer. Today will be hazy smoky and warm with a high in the low nineties and a low tonight of sixty four. Our Top story to Los Angeles County Sheriff's deputies are recovering after being shot. Saturday. In Compton, in what authorities authorities described as an ambush video released by the sheriff's Department shows a man walking up to the deputies parked patrol car pulling out a gun and firing several times. The assailant is then seen running from the scene sheriff Alex, Viva said the injured deputies are thirty, one year old woman and twenty four year old man. He also said that both were sworn into office just fourteen months ago. In other news president, trump will visit California today to meet with emergency officials about the wildfires that are ravaging the state. That's what the White House announced Saturday a spokesman also claimed that the president will be briefed at McClellan Park in Sacramento County meanwhile California Governor Gavin Newsom said Friday that he had talked on the phone with the president for nearly thirty minutes the day before they discussed the state's fires emergency declarations and federal wildfire aid. Additionally, the governor credited trump for being proactive in his efforts to provide assistance to the state and he took trump to task for federal policies that reduce environmental protections. In related news tree, killing, Beatles helped fuel the creek fire in northern, California and the blaze could be a sign of worse to come one hundred, fifty million trees died in the Sierra national forest because of bark beetles over the last decade and those dead trees are prime fuel for wildfires. In fact, in two thousand, eighteen scientists warned of future mass forced fires as intense as the Dresden Germany Tokyo firebombings in world. War. Two researchers also say the area needs prescribed fire to whittle away at all that fuel, but the National Forest Service. Hasn't had enough staff or funding. In Politics Governor Gavin newsom signed a bill intended to end discrimination against lgbtq people in sex crime convictions, Senate bill one, Forty five will amend the State Law that allows judges to decide whether an adult convicted of having vaginal sexual intercourse with a minor should register as a sex offender that is in cases in which the minor is fourteen or older, and the adult is not more than ten years older than the minor currently adults who are convicted of having oral or anal sex with a minor under those circumstances are automatically added to the states sex offender registry, but sp one, forty five will give judge's discretion to make that decision. And in sports, the clippers. Held three to one lead in the series led by nineteen in the third quarter but still lost game six of their NBA playoff series yesterday. The Denver Nuggets on the other hand overcame a double digit deficit for the second consecutive game to win one hundred eleven to ninety eight game seven is tomorrow. The winner will face the Lakers who advanced to Western Conference finals Saturday they eliminated the Houston Rockets in five games. For these stories and MORE VISIT LA TIMES DOT COM

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LA County Sheriffs Gangs Pt. 1: Little Devils & Lynwood Vikings

Secret Societies

44:41 min | Last week

LA County Sheriffs Gangs Pt. 1: Little Devils & Lynwood Vikings

"Something to note all of the groups covered on this show operate in secret the details included in this episode or based on extensive research but cannot ultimately be one hundred percent verified except by society members themselves this episode features discussions of racism violence police brutality and murder discretion is advised especially for listeners under thirteen on december. Ninth two thousand. Thirteen united states attorney andre barrett unsealed five criminal cases for federal indictments and one criminal complaint against members of the los angeles county sheriff's department. These eighteen officials had been indicted on allegations of rampant abuse and misconduct in la county. Jails these first five unsealed cases. Were only the tip of the iceberg. Baratz said our investigation also found that these incidents did not take place in a vacuum in fact they demonstrated behavior that had become institutionalized. Some members of the sheriff's department considered themselves to be above the law over the past few years. The topic of police brutality and corruption has become mainstream and divisive dominating news cycles and political campaigns. So much so that. It often feels like the dialogue isn't about policing tool rather it's a dog whistle for warring political parties. There are many factors that contribute to the animosity between communities of color and the officers who police them in the next five episodes will be shining light on one pervasive problem in the world's largest sheriff's department since one thousand nine hundred seventy one the los angeles county sheriff's department has played host to violent deputy run gangs operating out of l. Ast stations for decades the los angeles police department has been a lightning. Rod for public controversies and bad press. They're at the heart of calls for police reform. But all the while the l. a. s. d. has been quietly humming away in the background policing nearly five thousand square miles of unincorporated cities scattered around la county rather than protecting the residents of these areas. The sheriff's department created their own gangs to terrorize the communities. They serve it almost seems impossible. But they're a decade's worth of documentation and every time one gang is exposed. Another seems to take his place. I'm alistair murden. Usually i host kingpins where we cover the rise and fall of underworld figures in organized crime. And i'm vanessa richardson. I host secret societies another spotify original from podcast exploring mysterious organizations from around the world for the next five weeks are two shows are teaming up to bring you the story about deadly gangs that are also secret societies and operate out of the los angeles county sheriff's department since nineteen seventy-one the l. a. s. t. has been plagued by gang activity within its own ranks as is the case with every story. We bring you. This activity has been investigated corroborated and in certain cases prosecuted however we should note that since these groups operates in secret. Some details are difficult to verify by exploring the history of politics in los angeles. We can better understand the city's current landscape today we're starting with the murky origins of the l. a. Ast's first deputy gang the little devils first appearing in the early nineteen s. They set the precedent for a revolving door of white supremacist. Gangs within the lsd. Many of which still exist today we have. Oh that's an more coming up. Stay with us. Bloomberg dot com global news coverage helps you see the opportunity ahead as the leading authority and global business bloomberg dot com reveals new wave of looking at the most urgent issues facing our world like the role of climate and social justice solutions for emerging global economies shifts in technology and more every story bloomberg dot com tells will expand your horizons inspire your purpose and power your success however you define it invent your possibility at bloomberg dot com. This episode is brought to you by the new mini countryman. there's nothing many about the new mini countryman. It's a spacious four door that can fit up to five people with a trunk. Big enough for cargo to discover more at many usa dot com. If the thought of the holidays coming up makes you tired for your bed. Then listen up casper's black. Friday sale has a thirty percent off of everything. You need to make your place of rest. A place of dreams. Supportive mattress ends soon. Pillow soft sheets cozy room melons and all up the lankans but don't fall asleep yet. Casper's black friday sale is on now. Go to casper dot com to shop now. Terms and conditions apply in the nineteen sixties and seventies. La looked oddly similar to what it is today. Four lane boulevards lined with boxy concrete buildings and towering palm trees. The downtown area was spotted with greasy spoons and hole in the wall bars. The now institutions but culturally the energy was different author. David kukoc described the seventies as the last decade in which los angeles bore some resemblance to the frontier town at had once been the sixties ushered in a wave of social change and hedonism that was rooted in defiance against the government against convention and against law and order especially after the manson murders in nineteen. Sixty-nine there was an air of lawlessness in. La that some found alarming but many others found alluring and exciting. There's an evergreen nostalgia for the caffeine free good vibes. Attitude of late nineteen sixties. La but this free love culture was largely a white experience on the outskirts of hollywood. Black and latino communities lived markedly. different lives simmering. Beneath the veneer of the sixties was a hotbed of socio political. Unrest that was nearing a breaking point on the other side of the one. Oh one sat east los angeles a sprawling mexican american borio with a proud history. The neighborhood managed to thrive for nearly a hundred years. Despite gentrification slowly encroaching on its borders but by the late sixties things had changed east. La was a low income neighborhood with underfunded schools and among the highest dropout rates in the country forty four percent in nineteen sixty eight. This was especially important because at the time college was one of the only ways to avoid being drafted to vietnam for the eighteen year olds growing up in east. La it wasn't a question of if you were going overseas. But when and tragically latino men sent to vietnam largely returned in bodybags they were killed at a rate that was highly disproportionate to their white counterparts. It seemed like they were being used as cannon fodder and east. La sent more than their fair share of sons to die. Many of the barrios residents felt little control over their future. A feeling that only intensified after a sucker punch piece of legislation in nineteen sixty one. Three thousand homes in east la with displaced. So that the. I five. And i ten freeways could be built in the middle of what was once a vibrant neighborhood. This was confirmation of a larger problem. Most los angelenos were unaware of or unconcerned with the problems facing the barrio outside of east. La media coverage made the neighborhood looked like a dangerous rundown gangster paradise many elderly residents of east la. Remember what it was like in those days policing by the los angeles county sheriff's department was brutal. Excessive force was common and the void of opportunity made it impossible to escape the confines of poverty. There was no support for the local schools. No action from local politicians and eventually the teenagers of east. La got tired of waiting on march fifth nineteen sixty eight. Hundreds of mexican american students staged a walkout at their rundown schools protesting against racist teachers apathy among school administrators and a lack of college preparatory training a week later the protests had ballooned to about twenty two thousand students that was when the los angeles county sheriff's department got involved. But why the sheriffs and not the lapd across lake county. There are dozens of small unincorporated cities like west hollywood and content that aunt within lapd's jurisdiction instead of forming their own police force. These small cities signed a general law enforcement contract with the l. a. s. t. currently forty two cities and one hundred forty one unincorporated communities have contracts with the lsd making it the largest sheriff's department in the world at the time of the wool counts the department employed about seven thousand deputies and because of the nature of their contracts la operates like a typical police department. This is why when angelenos talk about the police. They often referencing both the l. Ast and the lapd which carry out similar functions in different parts of town and like the lapd deputies have a reputation for showing up to peaceful protests overdressed when they pulled up to. The student led demonstration in march nineteen sixty eight. They arrived in riot gear. The deputies ordered the stunned students back to class but the kids of east l. a. Were tired of being intimidated and pushed around. Several students started launching bottles of soda at the deputies. Then all hell broke. Loose deputies went off to the students with batons arresting several. The clash was brief but brutal although it did little to stop the walkout the protests went on for several more days with each one broken up by the a. st surprisingly the protests worked on the tenth day an emergency school council meeting gave voice to many of the students demands most of which senator around better education the meeting spurred fundamental change in the east. La school system however it also served as a tipping point for racial tensions in the neighborhood. The walkouts in many ways catalyzed chicano movement an expression of cultural pride and civil justice in east. La activist cesar chavez was already mobilizing the mexican american community through his work with the agricultural workers organizing committee or a w. o. c. but the walkouts brought young chicanos into the fold and as the movement grew the communities policing grew more brutal street. Gangs had always been a problem in east los angeles dating back to nineteen thirty five. But as the chicano movement grew the sheriff's department became less discriminate in arresting what they thought were gang members. Anyone could be beaten and arrested if they looked at a deputy wrong. This kind of aggressive policing came to a head in nineteen seventy at the national chicano moratorium march on the morning of august. Twenty ninth between twenty and thirty thousand demonstrators collected in the guntalk. Now the ruben f salazar park in east la peacefully protesting the vietnam war unprompted the l. Ast descended showering the crowd with tear gas. They beat protestors with batons before arresting them. A building was set on fire over one hundred fifty peaceful protesters were arrested and four were left dead when pressed about their motives. The lsd provided. No reasonable explanation instead. They called the protesters communists. For the record they want to many citizens across los angeles. The laguna park riot belt senseless a culmination of the excessive force and mass arrests that had become commonplace in east. La after the riot the crackdown on the chicano movement grew so intense that the movement fizzled out. It may sound like the elliott st was acting overtly racist and there was reason for that by the time of the laguna park. Riots a group of deputies within the east. La sheriff's station had formed a secret society called the little devils. The members were easily recognisable by the red devils tattooed on their left cavs it was a white supremacist brotherhood. Operating out of the station they saw themselves as an island of law and order in a sea of violence and squalor and the people they were paid to protect became enemy number. One coming up. We'll dive into the evolution of deputy gangs in the la sd high listeners. I'm thrilled to tell you about the new spotify original from podcast that i think you'll really enjoy. It's called a love story every tuesday. All love story celebrates the ups downs and pivotal moments. That turn complete strangers into perfect pairs. Each episode offers an intimate glimpse inside a real life romance with couples the highlights and hardships that define their love. Whether it's a chance encounter a form of friendship or even a former enemy. Our love story proves that love can begin and blossom in the most unexpected ways. Ready to him more. Follow our love story. Free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. What's if you discovered your life with something. It's not sir. Alex rider ordinary sane extraordinary spot. Reluctant hero imdb. Btv's original series. Alex rider is an action spy thriller. Although in a british teenager recruited by my six based on the novels. by anthony horowitz. Alexy's mission begins off the. He learned his uncle's death was cover. Up and alexy's brian secret spot training. Alex will put his skills to the to find out why he's uncle was killed and fitz into a much larger global conspiracy stream alex rider now exclusively on imdb tv streaming service offering premium movies and tv shows for free no subscription required available on amazon fire tv or anywhere. Prime video is available. Imdb tv wise entertaining. Oh is free now back to the story by nineteen seventy-one members of the east. La sheriff's station had formed what they considered a secret society. The little devils they were identified by the small red devil tattooed on each of the members left. Carves their find. Stories of the little devils are scattered. But there's no question about the gangs existence. This activity has been written about extensively by the l. a. times and in a report from loyola law school. The little devils are considered the first deputy in the los angeles county sheriff's department. They've been recognized as gangs by county judges and the media because the deputies involved acted like members of any street gang. They had gang signs initiation ceremonies hazing rituals and an official logo around the time the gang was formed. The station adopted the ford apache seal. The logos thought to have been created by members of the little devils and remains the official seal of the entire station fort. Apache was in nineteen forty. Eight western movie about an isolated. Us army post. In apache territory. Henry fonda stars as a racist commander obsessed with subduing the local natives. The kamanda is intentionally portrayed as ignorant and incompetent and by the end of the film. His disastrous crusade against the apache tribe leaves him and most of his men dead but members of the little devils apparently missed the subtext and saw the film as an instruction manual for how to treat their local community according to residents of east. La their attitudes seemed to be that any arrest was a good arrest because it got a young gang banger of the street. It didn't matter whether that person was responsible for the given crime or whether they were actually a gang banger. In the first place as one resident puts it the motto. Seen to be arrested. Whoever you can and figure it out later. Lsd management didn't learn the little devils existence until nineteen seventy-three while investigating misconduct by two deputies. Who happen to be members. The la county sheriff. At the time peter j pitches launched extensive investigation into the deputy gang. The captain in charge r d campbell ultimately found that forty. Seven deputies at the station were involved. However there's no record of whether there was any disciplinary action taken against them sheriff pitches was known for taking a hard stance on inter of his discipline but he also worked hard to keep any talk imitation of misconduct from seeing the light of day he even refused to comply with subpoenas for information which eventually landed him in front of the california supreme court to this day. These deputies personnel files are confidential. Making it nearly impossible to identify who was involved in a little devils and what kind of discipline. They might have received but someone at the east. La sheriff's station seemed to take the problem seriously enough that the little devils died off by the nineteen eighties but the spirit of their gang assisted in fact. This lone ranger mentality seemed to take root across the entire department. By the time the little devil cease to exist. A new deputy gang had sprung up across town in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven. A sheriff's station opened in lynnwood a city in la county just nine miles south of east la and almost immediately a deputy. Gang began to form by nineteen eighty. They were calling themselves. The lynnwood vikings. They seem to have identified themselves with ankle. Tattoos of vikings blonde haired. Blue eyed marauders from the north. Like the little devils before them. The vikings police a low income neighborhood of color stations in these areas were tersely referred to as ghetto stations in testimony from a former member of the group and like the little devils. The vikings police aggressively. It quickly became clear to the residents of lynnwood that the vikings were not. They're protected as they were an invading force to build cloud and camaraderie. The vikings presented themselves as an elite group inviting only the most talented and committed deputies to join their ranks. That isn't to say the best deputies loyalty was valued over l. a. s. d. policy. Many of the gangs members were linked to officer involved shootings. Excessive force unconstitutional searches. Perjury and general misconduct. If a viking shot someone they earned the right to tattoo. The numbers nine nine eight on their ankles. The code for an officer involved shooting taking a civilian life was reportedly considered a celebrated rites of passage. Vikings were also known to use gang specific slang tag buildings with their graffiti and throw hand signals and l. For lynnwood the actions were no different from the street gangs. They were policing but because they technically enforce the law. The vikings seem to feel above it. At least that was the attitude around the station when twenty eight year old. Paul tanaka was transferred there in nineteen eighty-seven even though he was japanese-american tanaka was soon considered one of the boys and he became one of the few people of color initiated into the vikings few months later to knocker with learn what it meant to be protected by that brotherhood in march nineteen eighty eight. He and four of the deputies found themselves in a fifteen mile car chase from compton to long beach. They were hot on the trail of one year. Old hong pio lee who fled police after running a stop sign. Even though the deputies chase lee down the freeway he never exceeded fifty five miles per hour. Given that it was two thirty in the morning it wasn't the most dangerous conscious on record but you would never guess that from the way. The deputies responded the chase ended in industrial area of long beach. Lease car screeched to a halt as three. Lsd cars pulled up behind him. Tanaka and the other four deputies jumped out of their cars guns drawn along beach. Pd patrol car pulled up behind them to offer. Assistance and a sheriff's helicopter circled overhead. Deputy joan chapman approached lease com. Instructing him to get out with his hands raised instead lee through the car in reverse. According to reports filed by all five deputies lease spelled backwards chapman had to jump out of the way to avoid being hit tanaka and his colleagues fired their weapons unloading fifteen rounds into the car. Eight of the bullets hit lee killing him after reviewing the deputies reports l. ast homicide investigators and the district attorney's office cleared tanaka and his compatriots of any wrongdoing. However there was a problem there were several contradictions between the deputy stories and the reports filed by the to long beach. Police officers who had been on the scene that night one office has said that he never saw the tried to back his car into any of the deputies instead lee had slowly put his co. in verse and only began driving away after the shooting began after the shooting. The officer said he turned to his partner and said we just observed the sheriff's execute. Somebody there was more about the incident that didn't make sense. When lease car was recovered. It was crashed into a fence. A hundred and twenty feet from where. The shooting allegedly took place and there was a bruising on lee's face as though he being beaten the inconsistencies and rage the korean american community within linwood and across los angeles li's family sued the l. s. d. for over five million dollars. They called the killing an execution brutal and unnecessary. They alleged that the sheriff's investigation was sloppy at best but more than likely a cover up. Evidence showed that the sheriff's investigators did not follow protocol when questioning the officers. In fact all five deputies were left alone together in the same room for ten hours lease family alleged that this gave them plenty of time to coordinate their testimonies and make sure the story was at its height in nineteen ninety. The lease settled with the lsd for nine hundred ninety nine thousand nine hundred ninety nine dollars a considerable sum but far below the five point seven million dollars they'd asked for apparently the la county sheriff at the time showman block was enraged by the settlement. No because a man was dead because of how much it costs the department and the bad press it ruled meanwhile none of the deputies involved were held accountable in fact not only did. They remain on duty but they moved upward. Paul tanaka was promoted to lieutenant a year. Later as lieutenant tanaka became the vikings greatest champion reportedly protecting the deputy gang from other supervisors within the department. Even as many of his fellow members were named in a massive lawsuit that accused the department of racially motivated hate crimes in one thousand nine hundred ninety over seventy five residents of lynnwood filed a class action lawsuit against the l. s. d. alleging that the department was aware of the vikings racially motivated violence against the community and tolerated the behavior. The suit claimed that viking members had shot killed beat racially profiled and illegally searched black and latino next people solely to terrorize the community. The lawsuit brought media attention to the lynnwood. Vikings for the first time an investigation found that not only had the vikings terrorize the community. They had also terrorized any supervisor who tried to bring them under control. One accounts claimed to the vikings shot a dog and tied up in his commanders car. Another at human feces on a supervisor's car engine within the station itself. Investigators found a map of lynnwood in the shape of africa racist cartoons of black men and a clumsily made plane ticket to africa hanging on the wall. All of this evidence was brought to court and the vikings had little way to defend themselves during the court proceedings report on sheriff block. If his deputies and the vikings were any different from street gangs block defended them saying the facts that a group of people with a particular assignment banks together in a sort of brotherhood could be a very positive thing. But the district court disagreed in his ruling us district judge terry j hatter wrote many of the incidents which brought about this motion involved a group of lynnwood area deputies who are members of a neo nazi white. Supremacist gang. the vikings which exists with the knowledge of departmental policy makers the l. a. s. t. eventually paid out seven point five million dollars to the people of lynnwood and will ordered suspend one point five million dollars on mandatory training. Or because the sheriff's department is funded by tax payers. It might be more accurate to say that the people of l. a. county pay down nine million dollars while the deputies themselves walked away relatively free despite the multi-million dollar settlement and public scrutiny the l. a. s. d. did nothing to curb the vikings influence if anything they thrived a year later in nineteen ninety. Two county judge. James colts published a separate report on the excessive use of force by the l. a. s. d. The report concluded that some deputies appeared to have engaged in behavior that is brutal and intolerable and is typically associated with street gangs but despite the overwhelming evidence. Sheriff block refused to investigate or even admit the deputy gangs were real. However when deputy mike osborne cain to lynnwood as a trainee in nineteen ninety four. It was clear to him that the vikings ruled the station. Osborne referred to the vikings as a caste system. Those at the top. Where white and male the veterans on the force they were known for routinely using racist and sexist slurs. They were also the ones you needed to impress. If you wanted your career to go places of course that also meant being initiated into the vikings yourself and once you were in osborne told the la times you were expected to be one of the boise's you bought into the code of silence. The protected every member of the gang. You didn't report illegal. Activity carried out by fellow. Deputy you saw nothing even. If you were a dividing you were expected to follow their rules. Osbourne's wife fellow deputy aurora motto. Broke that code of silence in nineteen ninety-six. After witnessing her training officer of viking fabricate evidence against black and latino civilians she also saw him destroy evidence and falsified police reports a federal offence jones was arraigned in march nineteen ninety-six on felony charges than the identity of his whistle blower got around the station fast. That same month someone shot at osborne may autos home in the dead of night while their children were asleep in that bedrooms though. She can't prove it may otto is convinced. The shooter was a member of the vikings. But neither she nor osborne knew who to turn to after all they were the police coming up. We'll look at the repercussions of the vikings unchecked criminal behavior. This episode is brought to you by the makers of clorox disinfecting products these days. When you're on the go it's important to leave the outside outside. Trust clorox disinfecting wipes to help. Keep your home clean and safer from the phones. We never leave behind two other high touch surfaces. Like door handles and light. Switches clark's disinfecting. Wipes kill ninety nine point nine percent of viruses and bacteria including covid nineteen virus when used as directed on hard nonporous surfaces. So you can feel confident that you are helping to keep your home clean and disinfected when it counts. Trust clorox learn more at clorox dot com pseudomonas salmonella and influenza virus type a to kill sars covy to on hard nonporous surfaces us directed if the thought of the holidays coming up makes you tired for your bed. Then listening casper's black. Friday sale as up to thirty percent off of everything need to make any place of rest. A place of dreams weighted blankets for the so low sleepers dark bands for your furry soulmate bed frame made with premium felton womb for the sophisticates in your life and of course supportive mattresses that align your spine so you wake up in a better mood and the night before but don't use on this casper's black friday sale is on now for a limited time. Give the gift of better sleep and go to casper dot com to shop now terms and conditions apply now back to the story. The lynnwood vikings were first brought to light in nineteen ninety as part of a class. Action lawsuit filed against the l. Ast it was clear to the us district judge overseeing the complaints that the deputy gang operating the lynwood sheriff's station was not a social clique as sheriff block had called it. but a gang of neo-nazis. They terrorize the community and were more concerned with putting people away then. Doing good police work an attitude that has put many innocent people behind bars on friday. January eighteenth nineteen ninety-one forty one year old. Donald sarpi stepped onto the front steps of his home in lynwood california his teenage son and a few friends. We're talking loudly in the front yard. And sarpi asked them to quiet down and come inside as he walked outside. A car crept down the street as it past. Someone leaned out the passenger side window and fired a single bullet into stop his chest. The three people in the car yelled gang slogans before peeling out. Donald soppy died in the hospital later that evening. The case was investigated by detective. Craig a member of the vikings sarpi son and his four friends were questioned about what they had seen but their initial statements were all over the map. The teenagers couldn't agree on the color of the car that drove by calling it ten bauge orange even black. They also weren't sure of how many people were in the car. Two maybe three. They were certain that the shooter had been mexican and male but that was about it the only teen who could id. The shooter was scott turner though the way he arrived at his conclusion is suspect. According to china detective each had shown him a binder full of fotos called a photographic lineup. Turn was asked to. id the shooter and claims. He was coached the entire time when he pointed at a picture. Dietsch would say things like no. He's in jail already. It couldn't be him when they arrived at a picture of sixteen year. Old francisco correo who turn a recognized from around the neighborhood. Dietsch agreed it could be him and stopped the exercise typically the detective working the case which show the photographic lineup to all five witnesses. The say night without giving them the chance to speak with one another that's to ensure they aren't able to accidentally persuade one another's memories instead dietsch waited months to show the lineup to the other witnesses by then the young men knew who turn had picked and fell in line with his story. Francisco was arrested soon. After even though there was no physical evidence linking him to the crime during korea's trial the five teenage witnesses all testified and all delivered inconsistent stories in addition to miss remembering the make model and color of the car they also seemed unsure that korea was even the man who pulled the trigger. The case was declared a mistrial after the jury deadlocked five to seven with the majority voting for acquittal but the district attorney move to try correo again about six months later and this time around the witnesses had this story straight. They identified correo as the shooter confidently. They knew the color of the car and the jury had no idea that this was second trial nor did they know about the inconsistencies. In the first trial correal himself maintained that on the night of the shooting. He was at home with his dad. Who corroborated the story. He claimed he got home from school. May dinner then did some homework while he and his dad watch tv. The prosecution alleged that nobody does their homework on a friday night. So correo must be lying. The prosecution also informed the jurors that legally if someone is believed to be lying in one part of their testimony. They're allowed to disregard the entire testimony as false incredibly. This is what happened and so the jury was left with nothing but five compelling eyewitness accounts that pointed to correo as the shooter. They found him guilty. On the morning of korea's sentencing a man approached correo lawyer courtroom. He introduced himself as oscar rodriguez. He claimed to have been involved in the shooting and new career was innocent. The moment the hearing began correal's lawyer alerted the judge and asked him to allow rodriguez to speak. But for whatever reason the judge refused and went ahead with the proceedings korea was sentenced to two consecutive life terms francisco. Correo would spend nearly twenty years in prison before the innocence project took on his case in two thousand nine. They say that as they began reinvestigating the case. The elliott also got involved by that point. The lynwood sheriff's station had been closed for years and the vikings had died out by the turn of the century but detected each still worked for the department as did many of the men who were once part of the vikings gang. The sheriff's department claim to be reinvestigating career ios case but representatives from the innocence project believed. They were only interested in covering up any wrongdoing. Meanwhile all five of the witnesses who initially idead correo admitted that they had been coached by detective dietsch and the prosecuting attorney daniel. Soppy son even wrote a letter in support of correo. Admitting that he did not clearly see the face of his father's killer careers. Petition was heard in march. Two thousand eleven during his closing argument the attorney for the l. a. s. d. said that he did not believe the department had committed misconduct but his final comment was the most shocking. He said that as an officer of the court he had an ethical and legal responsibility to ask the judge to grant francisco careers petition l. Asd's own lawyer believed that korea should go free later in two thousand eleven correo filed a civil rights lawsuit against each and the los angeles county. sheriff's department. He was awarded ten point one million dollars more than five hundred thousand dollars for every year he had spent in jail. currently detective. dietsch is off the grid. There's little information on where he is or whether he's on payroll but as far as we can tell he hasn't been formally discharged from the sheriff's department and just as one. Viking member was another was promoted that same year whole to nocco was appointed undersheriff second income on to la county's new sheriff lee baca overnight. A viking had become the second most powerful person in the world's largest sheriff's department and as was the case at lynnwood. His tenure was rife with controversy in two thousand twelve. A blue ribbon commission would accuse tanaka his boss and a few colleagues of allowing their deputies to beat and humiliate inmates at county. Jails cover up. Deputy misconduct and allow deputy gangs to run on checked. It seemed as though the abusive toxic culture he learned at lynnwood followed him for the rest of his career. It brings to mind an old cliche. You can change the law but you can't change the people. The little devils may have disbanded by nineteen eighty but the violent mentality that formed. The gang didn't dissipate overnight. The vikings are also gone. The lynwood sheriff's station closed in nineteen ninety-four but every time one gang is disbanded. Another seems to take its place the current sheriff of la county. Alex vienna waiver cut his teeth at the east. La station in two thousand sixteen. He recommissioned the ford to patchy logo. That had i been installed by the little devils. The community has complained that the seal is racist and demeaning but this is evidently done little to change. Vienna waves mind. The logo still stands. And as we'll discover the little devils and the vikings set a precedent for future deputy gangs each increasingly violent. The next group to take this mantle was stationed in lenox. A neighborhood south of would they were aptly named the grim reapers. Thanks for listening. Join us next week as we continue our deep dive into the deputy gangs at the l. Ast we'll also unpack the history of sheriff culture to understand the outlaw mentality that allow these gangs to evolve. You can find more episodes of kingpins secret societies and all other spotify originals from podcast for free on spotify kingpins and secret societies as spotify originals from podcast executive produce include maxine ron cutler sound designed by russell nash with production assistance by ron shapiro collie madden and travis clark. This episode was written by aaron land. With fact checking by haley. Milliken and research by julian borrow brad klein and brian. Peteris this episode styles vanessa. Richardson and our standard. And don't forget to check out our love story. The newest spotify original from podcast every tuesday discover the many pathways to love as told by the actual couples who found them. Listen to our love story. Free on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.

los angeles county sheriff's d vikings la county lynnwood La laguna park los angeles thirty percent five million dollars andre barrett Baratz lapd five thousand square miles alistair murden vanessa richardson la Paul tanaka vietnam David kukoc Alex rider
Los Angeles Times 11/2/20

L.A. Times Morning Briefing

03:04 min | Last month

Los Angeles Times 11/2/20

"It's monday november second. I'm mary regalado. And here's your local news from the los angeles times brought to you by the so fly. Daily podcast reaching financial independence starts with having the right information every weekday morning. S-o-f-i keeps you up to date with important business. News stock market happenings and how they affect your financial life search for so-fi s. o. f. I wherever you get your podcasts. Today will be mostly sunny and very warm with a high around eighty three degrees low tonight of fifty eight our top story los angeles county public health officials reported one thousand five hundred ninety new cases of the coronavirus yesterday and four related deaths. Officials said there were also seven hundred. Ninety nine confirmed coronavirus patients in county hospitals on friday with twenty percent in intensive care though hospitalizations have increased slightly. They remain far below the peak of the outbreak in july. Still many southern california communities are reporting increases in the number of cases recorded each day a concerning trend that has some officials worried that transmission of the virus could be on the rise. The united states on thursday broke the single day record for the highest number of corona virus cases. Then did so again. Friday in crime news actress. Laurie lachlan began serving her two months sentence on friday for her role in the college. Admissions bribery scandal. According to the us attorney's office in boston the full house star was being processed at the federal lockup in dublin california lachlan will be screened and tested for covid nineteen and placed in quarantine for fourteen days back in august. She was sentenced to two months while her fashion designer husband. Mossy malaysia newly got five months for paying half a million dollars in bribes to get their two daughters into usc as rowing recruits in other news rodeo drive the luxury retail mecca in beverly hills will be closed to cars and pedestrian traffic on election day and the day after the move came as city hall encouraged some businesses to board up their high end stores. Beverly hills police chief dominic gravity said his department would go on full alert and that businesses might choose to close down or limit operations city. Shopping areas have become places of protests. Since the death of george floyd man at the hands of minneapolis police and sports. Both of la's nfl teams lost yesterday. The rams were hurt by early turnovers in a twenty eight to seventeen defeat against the miami. Dolphins quarterback jared goff also threw two interceptions and fumbled twice all in the first half. The chargers on the other hand jumped out to a twenty one point lead against the denver broncos but they collapsed in the fourth quarter. They lost thirty one to thirty. When the broncos scored on the final drive of the game for these stories and more visit. La times dot com.

mary regalado eighty three degrees Laurie lachlan La times los angeles county twenty percent two months southern california lachlan dominic gravity fourteen days us george floyd dublin five months boston rowing million dollars usc mecca
The CRUSADE Channel Newscast For September 9th 2020

CRUSADE Channel Previews

08:39 min | 3 months ago

The CRUSADE Channel Newscast For September 9th 2020

"Hey folks it's my church producer, the Shakespeare Radio Film Festival announcing that we're offering the entire festival including Joseph Pierce his commentaries purchased nineteen dollars, ninety five cents. That's a fifty percent discount. This exclusive download will include over sixteen hours a festival content to reserve your Shakespeare Radio Film Festival download at an incredible fifty percent off go to crusade channel Dot com forward slash Atlit. Crusade Channel News. News you can trust. Because the truth can be trusted. Traveler Crusade Channel News Desk. Peers Stacey Co it good morning crusaders welcome to Wednesday September nine, twenty, twenty I'm Stacey Cohan reporting from the Crusade Channel News desk at the Coen ranch in Winkelmann Arizona. This report is brought to you by founding father films publishing, featuring rare essential works like humility of heart and life Washington put back into print and edited by Mike Church available exclusively at my church DOT com slash books. Here's what to listen for this hour. What happens if Joe Biden loses the left is preparing in Georgia the Democrats were double dipping when it comes to voting in Los Angeles County, they are the first aban trick or treating the leftist coalition is. Explicitly making preparations to deal with the situation where the November election ends without a clear outcome or with Joe Biden. Win The Donald Trump refuses to recognize according to the daily beast the leftist group convened by the relatively secret fight back table bt T. reportedly discussed their plans in secret during a zoom virtual meeting referring to the meeting the daily beast reported over the course of two hours. Participants broach the question of what the progressive political ecosystem can actually do in a series of election scenarios they began charting out what it would take to stand up to a multi-state communications arm to fight disinformation a training program for nonviolent civil disobedience. And the underpinnings of what one official described as mass public unrest unnamed aid to the Biden campaign told the daily beast. It's aware of the concerns expressed by many of these leftist groups that are actively planning for all contingencies and Scenarios Democrats are baselessly promoting the notion that president trump will refuse to leave office if he loses calling on their supporters to prepare to mobilise just in case that happens pharmaceutical company, Astra Zeneca. Will be putting an experimental krona virus vaccine steady on hold in America after a participant in the united. Kingdom. Faced in apparent serious adverse reaction according to a report the Anglo. Swedish company Standard Review Process Triggered A. Pause to vaccination to allow review of safety data and Astra Zeneca spokesperson said the pause is a routine action which has to happen whenever there's potentially unexplained illness in one of the trials while it's investigated, ensuring that we maintain the integrity of the trials a suspected serious adverse reaction includes symptoms that require legislation life threatening illness and even death meanwhile, nine biopharmaceutical company signed an unusual pledge to uphold high ethical standards suggesting they won't seek premature government approval for Covid nineteen vaccines are seen in the day he dedicated himself by special vowed of the service of the black slaves a work that was to last for thirty three years quoted the day. And God will hope you, Saint. Joan, of ARC, you're listening to Crusade Channel News. Hi I'm Barbara Dooley, and I'm excited to share some great news for my friends at bulldog. Kia you can buy new Kia online and have it delivered straight to your home right now twenty twenty Kia soul L. Lexus are only fifteen thousand nine, hundred dollars at bulldog key in Athens. That's right. You can get a brand new. Kia Soul elway for less than. Sixteen thousand dollars this includes two thousand dollars, customer cash and a dealer discount, one, thousand, four, hundred and fifteen dollars get your new Kia soul today at bulldog. Kia Wow. What a great deal in with their free pound delivery service you can have your new Kias delivered straight to your driveway. So do what all other smart car shoppers do and get your new KIA from bulldog Kia only Atlanta highway in Athens or at bulldog KIA DOT COM must've? Two thousand twenty x number K. Two, zero, hundred one. Thousand two hundred fifty dollars. In. Texas tag into your items not included to deal for details will say, yeah, at bulldogs. Are saying they the day is Saint Peter. Claver he was born at Purdue Catalonia. Spain in fifteen eighty of impoverished parents that were descended from ancient and distinguished families. He studied at the Jesuit College of Barcelona and entered the Jesuit. Novitiate at Tarragona in sixteen o two and then took his final vows on August Eighth Sixteen Oh four while studying philosophy it may Orca the young religious was influenced by Saint Alphonsus Rodriguez to go to the indies and save millions of perishing souls. Well, in sixteen ten, he landed in Columbia. That's the principal slave market of the new world. Worth thousand slaves were landed every. Month after his ordination in sixteen sixteen, he dedicated himself by special vowed of the service of the Negro slaves a work that lasted for thirty three years boarding the slave ships. As they entered the harbor, he would hurry to the revolting inferno of the hold holden offer whatever to the poor he could do refreshments or whatever he had. He would care for the sick and dying instruct the slaves through Negro catechists before administering the sacraments through his efforts. Three hundred thousand souls entered the church. He encouraged them to live as Christians and he prevailed on their masters to treat them humanely he died in sixteen fifty. Dallas police chief you Rene Hall announced her resignation Tuesday the latest in a string of police chief stepping down amid growing calls for police reform hall. Didn't cite a reason for leaving in her resignation letter. The announcement came shortly after inconsistencies were found in the departments after action report detailing the first few nights of protests after the death of George Floyd. She did hint that she will continue her career in law enforcement she'll be staying on his chief through November Tenth Dallas. Mayor. Eric. Johnson said he wasn't surprised by her pending departure. Her departure is the latest in a series of police chief resignations in major cities across the country Seattle police chief Carmen best recently left the force over efforts by city leaders to slash the police budget and Rochester New York police chief Lebron Single Terry on Tuesday said he's leaving the department at the end of the month following criticism over his handling of the death of Daniel prude. The Georgia Secretary of State said Tuesday at thousand voters cast ballots twice in the states June primary fifty, eight percent of them were cast. For Democrats in Georgia voter has to request a specific party ballot in the primary election. While the investigation is still ongoing initial results show that of the partisan balance it issue approximately fifty eight percent word democratic ballots spokesman for Georgia. Secretary of State Brad Raffin Sperber said Robbins burgers office announced voting twice is a felony. Those accused will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. Well it is happening trick or treating is going to be cancelled in La County. This Halloween due to the risk of spreading of the corona virus according to some new guidance from the local health department door to door trick or treating is not allowed because it could be very difficult to maintain proper social distancing on porches and it front doors especially in neighborhoods that are popular with trick or treaters. The Los Angeles County Department of Health said in a news release trunk or treating events where children trick or treat from cars also. Not Allowed the county's public health department is encouraging alternative ways to celebrate Halloween this year including online parties car parades that comply with public health orders and individuals must remain in their vehicles during these through events I dunno everybody's wearing a mask for Halloween. What's the problem semi your news tips to news at Crusade Channel Dot com stay tuned to the crusade channel would live breaking news updates all day the best live talk radio anywhere up next the Mike Church show continues I'm Stacey Cohan for the crusade channel seeking news and finding truth.

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California Wildfires Update

Environment: NPR

03:54 min | 1 year ago

California Wildfires Update

"Get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make WIFI simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply this message comes from NPR sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races other things are fast like Xfinity X. by three of our member station K. p._C._c.. Thanks so much thank you directions absolutely California has networks of mutual cooperating fire agencies and we'll find when they come back I mean they can watch their homes burn on TV. I've talked to multiple people like that but it's still extremely concerning anytime we have an evacuation like this eighteen thousand acres were told fifty thousand people in Canyons near Los Angeles have evacuated because of another fire Sharon McNary as a reporter for member station wildfires are sweeping today across large parts of California just north of San Francisco the Kincaid fire in Sonoma's county has engulfed more than six unusual for late October and it was very windy add those together with the excess of fuel that's grown up after our big rains last year and in northern Los Angeles County the one on the east grew very very fast and it threatened a lot of homes we understand there may be some homes already the valley now the West has calmed down somewhat but overnight we did have sustained winds of about twenty miles an hour gusts up to thirty so the attention family dry we've had multiple days of what they call red flag conditions that's when it's very dry it's hot it was ninety five degrees yesterday you know which is nice eighty burned up there and the one on the west end of the valley threatened a historic black resort built up in the twenties it threatened the West regularly they're part of life yes no that's not the case we expect fires We kind of know which areas have not burned in unequipped they have asked where they were seven hundred fifty eight fire engines short of what they felt they needed to protect structures and of course thousands of homes burned in that fire so when we what's a combination that combined with homes built into all of these canyons can create a very dangerous situation for for homeowners is a tricky one unkind people are often very prepared for fires but it's always a shock to the homeowners to have to pick up and leave and stay away from their homes not knowing what we have multiple big fires in California it is deeply concerning Sharon or you're getting to the point

California Sharon McNary Los Angeles County Los Angeles NPR reporter Sonoma San Francisco Kincaid eighteen thousand acres ninety five degrees
MYSTERIOUS DEATH OF: Mitrice Richardson

Crime Junkie

40:14 min | 7 months ago

MYSTERIOUS DEATH OF: Mitrice Richardson

"This episode is brought to you by simplisafe. Go to simplisafe dot com slash crime junkie to build your system today high crime junkies. I'm your host Ashley Flowers and I'm Brett and since May is mental health awareness month. I want to tell you a story about a young woman whose deteriorating Mental Health Plato Tragic Role in her untimely death. This is the story of my trees. Richardson home for as long as her family could remember twenty four year old trees. Richardson had been absolutely fascinated by the human mind. She's really smart really kind and super curious to learn everything there is to know about what makes people tick and so no one in. Her family is surprised when she decides to get her. Undergrad degree in child psychology. They're also incredibly proud because my trees is the first person in her family to go to college. Schoolwork family steady relationship with her long term girlfriend. Tessa keep me trees pretty busy in Los Angeles which is the same city that she grew up during her undergrad. My trees is living with her great-grandma mildred in a part of Los Angeles called Watts while she goes to school now to make some extra money during this time also works part time as a go go dancer. Lgbtq bar in Long beach she continues. This even after Undergrad. She's pretty sure that she wants to go to Grad School. So Washy looks at program. She keeps dancing and also starts doing some part time administrative assistant work so from her background. It's pretty easy to tell that she's a hard worker and her family doesn't know her as someone to get in trouble. So on the night of September sixteenth. Two thousand nine when Milton gets a call from an expensive restaurant down in Malibu saying that my trees can't pay her eighty nine dollar bill. She's just totally stunned. Mildred tries to pay the bill over the phone with her credit card hoping that she can basically just clear this up and my trees can get home and she can figure out what's going on but according to the disappeared episode about this case called lost in the dark. The owner at the restaurant won't accept mildred card because she's not there in person to sign the receipt at a loss for what to do. Mildred calls my trees. His Mom Latif Lateef knows that might trace has just. She's been a little bit off lately. I mean she'd been kind of down. Kind of depressed and Latinos and Tessa mattresses girlfriend and even some other people have kind of been noticing that she's just been off. I mean you can see it. Even in her text messages. They've getting stranger and stranger lately and Latif has been worried about her daughter's mental state but she doesn't have a reason yet to think that it could be any real danger and she's never done anything like this before just leaving a restaurant without paying. This is all new so as soon as she gets off the phone with mildred. Latif calls the restaurant to try and figure out what the heck happened except it's too late because the owner tells lateef that he already called nine one one to let the authorities handle the situation. He tells her the Los Angeles County Sheriff's department just took betrays away in custody for not paying her bill. He says they should be in route right now to their small. Lost Hill Station out in Malibu Canyon and they told him that they would be taking her car as well to an impound lot nearby the restaurant. Her stomach is rolling with anxiety and Latif calls the lost hills station next and she's able to breathe a sigh of relief when they tell her. Yes my tree. She's on her way with officers. Who arrested her she's safe. Everything's fine though. Latinos learns that might treat. Let police searched her car and when they did they found a little bit of marijuana. I mean like less than an ounce although she's understandably shaken up by all of this Latinos weighs her options carefully. She's got a young daughter with her at home and the sheriff station out in Malibu is over an hour away from where she lives in east l. a. going there tonight would be extremely difficult so ultimately. Latif decides that might trees will be safe at the Lost Hill station until the next morning when she can drive over there to pick her up and sort this whole mess out but early the next morning when Latif calls the sheriff's Department to check on her oldest daughter and to let them know that she's on her way she gets some terrifying news. My trees isn't at the Lost Hill station. Wait then where is she? That's exactly what Latif is demanding to know. She's super distraught. Because the sheriff's said my trees would be safe and looked after during the night but instead of keeping her Alexander Nazaran reported for Newsweek that the sheriff tells the teas that might trees was released from custody at twelve thirty eight. Am The sheriff's didn't keep her at the station like they said they would instead. They let her literally walk out of the station on foot into the dark and no one has seen or heard from her. Since did they at least give her like her cars. She's not completely unfit nope. And it's not just that might trees walked out of the station without her wallet without her Cell Phone and over ten miles away from her Honda. Civic and on top of that not only. They not have her car there waiting for her. None of the officers at the station even offered her a ride back to the impound lot to pick it up now the jailer. The Lost Hill Station tells a horrified Latinos that will you know? We offered to let my tree stay until morning. But she declined to wait in a cell and didn't WanNa wait in the lobby either and Latinos. Just totally appalled that her daughter was allowed to walk away like that but more than that. She's terrified and she knows deepen her got the. They need to find her daughter as soon as possible. All the public transportation in the area was shut down for the night when she was released and this was back in the days before. Uber and lift again plus. She didn't even have her cell phone to call a cab if she wanted to aunt if she could have gotten a cab. She didn't even have her money. That's how this whole mess started so really. She could be anywhere along this long stretch of rocky southern California highway trying to put aside rising panic. Latif ask about filing a missing persons report. This whole situation just feels so wrong because while she knows my trees has been going through a bit of a rough patch. It seemed like the normal stress of graduating from college and trying to like plan the next phase of your life. Yeah I mean. No one's twenty s especially early twenties are easy but you mentioned that she had been slightly depressed before this does she have any sort of like history of mental illness or something that could explain such a strong change in her behavior will not according to her girlfriend Tessa. She talked to the advocate magazine. Back in two thousand nine and she said that might trees didn't have any kind of diagnosis and she hasn't been prescribed any kind of medications and Tessa statement echoes with the La County. Sheriff's department tells the teas when she tries to file a missing persons report that first morning. They say listen. We didn't have any cause to hold her until the morning because she had no criminal record she passed her field sobriety tests and she wasn't exhibiting any kind of weird behaviors. That made them think that she could be a danger to herself or to someone else and they said you know even the marijuana and her car was enough for them to hold her because it was such a small amount basically all she got was a citation for court appearance before being sent on her way so overcome with worry. Latif tries to reason with the La County sheriff's to get a missing persons report filed right away but they don't think that it's been long enough to justify filing report and they send tease away. Devastated now call it a mother's instinct call whatever you want but she knows diagnosed with a mental illness or not. My Theresa's behavior is in right. That's not her baby and she has to find her right away after a panic day of waiting hoping and praying. Latif gets some shocking news from the sheriff's Department Crime Junkie is brought to you by capital. One where you can open a savings account in about five minutes and earn five times the national average. Just imagine five times more savings towards that overdue home addition. Maybe even an addition on that edition. This is banking reimagined. What's in your Wallet Capital One? Na member FDIC around six o'clock that night law enforcement officials tell the teas that they think in the very early morning hours that same day just after Latif was trying to file that missing person. Report was told no that? Mma trees might have been cited or at least someone who matched. Her description was cited. And this really blows my mind because yeah law enforcement tells the teas. Hey we think we may have a sighting of. You're missing daughter. But that's citing happened like twelve hours before super early in the morning and we just now think that you should know about it so they waited that long to tell this panic mother like hey we might have seen your kid earlier yes. So here's what happened. According to Mike Kesslers article in Los Angeles magazine the La County Department tells the teas. Hey we got this call early in the morning of September seventeenth a few hours after we let my trees go about a prowler. That was in Montenegro about six miles away from here. The caller says that there was an African American woman who fit my therese's description hanging out in his backyard now. The caller told the dispatcher. That she didn't seem dangerous or anything. And that when he opened a window to ask her if she was okay. She said that she was fine. Just resting when he went to get a better view of her from a different window she was just gone so a police cruiser swung by the neighborhood for a glance but they didn't find this woman either so there was no way to confirm her identity on the spot. All of this makes Latifah's heart drop. The landscape out in Montenegro is really rough and mountainous and if that really was her daughter than my trees out there by herself were anything could happen to her she could have fallen down in a canyon. She could have been abducted in her vulnerable state. Basically pick a worse case scenario here and it could have happened. They just don't know anything at all. Now keep in mind. This call came into the station hours before the sheriff thought it might be a good idea to let. Latif know about it and even worse. They didn't even issue any kind of be on the lookout bulletin for six hours. Not until past noon that six hours of wasted search time? Latif her ex Michael and the family are livid that the La County sheriff's department doesn't seem to have any real sense of urgency about finding their loved one like why aren't they taking this more seriously especially with trees acting so out of character. There's no way it should have taken them so long to tell her family what was happening and to give them an update but unfortunately that's just kind of how it goes for the first couple of days. Finally two days later the Los Angeles Police Department takes over from the county sheriff's and they head out Monte to do a search why does the? Lapd suddenly take over the case so since my trees is a resident of the city of Los Angeles. It seems that the sheriff's department kind of hands over the case to the city and I'm not sure what the rules are between city and county jurisdiction. But that's just what I read that they did anyway so the LAPD get out there with search dogs who confirm what Lati- he's already knew in her heart. That strange woman cited in Montenegro in the backyard. From someone's home was trees. Richardson the search dogs. Pick up her scent exactly where the nine one caller indicated but here's the weird thing according to La Magazine. Instead of starting at the loss hill station and trying to follow my choices sent to see if it takes them the full six mile distance between the station and the backyard of this guy's house who called the police bay just kind of start the search in the backyard and don't track her full movements even though the police say that she left on foot. So there's no telling how she even got there and once the sent goes cold it's just gone now. In addition to my therese's sent the canine searchers and their handlers also find a set of footprints. The prince start off at like a normal walking pace but then they change into a run as if she got spooked by something. When the searchers are out in Montenegro Lati- keeps the pressure on the La County Sheriff's department. She wants to know every single detail about the night may trees disappeared starting all the way back at the restaurant while there's no telling what exactly drew my trees to this particular place. It's an upscale. Restaurant called Joffrey Latifah. Learns that her daughter's behavior was off from the minute that she handed her car over to the Valet. Auto Straddles website reported in two thousand ten. That might trees told the Valet that she'd come there to avenge Michael Jackson's death and then once she got inside to actually sit down and order meal she basically by joined up with his group of strangers at a nearby table and they were nice they let her sit with them but her train of thought just kind of stayed super disjointed and she kept talking about nonsensical things like her being from Mars by the time. She tried to leave without paying her bill. Even the wait staff had noticed. My trees didn't seem to be of any kind of sound mind in here. I'm GONNA play you the nine one one call from offerings and I want you to tell me what you think. Well I bet there. Okay hi I'm calling from Jaffrey's restaurant nowadays We have a guest here who is refusing to pay her bill and we think she may she sounds really. British Navy on drugs or something We're wondering if somebody just come by picker up to four zero zero Pacific Coast highway issue a white black Asian Hispanic leave Young black dolls. Pinal twenty okay what you? She's wearing a black t-shirt and I think Libyan issue with anybody else. Yeah it's pretty clear that the wait staff is noticing erratic behavior. It's kind of odd that the police officers who showed up didn't right. Yeah I mean to me. It's it's super obvious that something was wrong that night. I mean the staff see at the people at the restaurant and yet the sheriff's department keeps telling Latif wasn't we had no reason whatsoever to keep her until the next morning or think we needed to do any kind of psychiatric Holt but Latif doesn't buy any of that for a second so she requests everything that she can get her hands on like the incident. Report the call logs from the Lost Hill Station and she make sure to ask for any video footage that the station might have of my trees in custody. There's just one issue law enforcement officials don't want to hand over any of the Information. Latifah's asking for and they're pretty cagey about exactly what information they even have to begin with and obviously Latif is beyond frustrated by that. She's feeling stonewalled. Like police aren't taking her daughter's case seriously enough and like maybe they haven't even taken it seriously from the very beginning keep in mind. Malibu is a very rich very white and very celebrity. Heavy part of California and treat isn't any of those things. She is a young working class. Black woman from a rough part of La and you know that Lost Hill Sheriff station. That's actually where Mel Gibson was taken back in like two thousand six after he got arrested for Dui and went on his like Super Antisemitic rant. And yet what I find. Super Interesting is the sheriffs after that took him back to his car when he was released and so the family wants to know. Why didn't you at least offer the same courtesy to my trees? You sent her away on foot. You could've at least driven heard. Her car made sure that she was safe. Was able to get her hands on the tapes that she had asked for like to me. That would clear everything. So that's the other thing the La County. Sheriff says we don't have any tapes. Excuse me I know. My traces family is as stunned as we are like. Because I mean hello. This is law enforcement. Like if anyplace has surveillance it's gotta be then so while they don't really buy this explanation. I mean what else can you do? They don't have any kind of power over them now. Right about this time wallet. Piece gets even more desperate to see the footage and learn the truth about her daughter's condition she gets information about what the LAPD pulled out of her daughter's car the impound lot all the way over by Joffrey Restaurant Carla Hall Road La Times back in two thousand ten that police find my therese's Honda. Civic is jammed full of clothes and makeup. I mean almost like she was living out of her car plus get this may traces cell phone and wallet were in her car this entire time with her debit card and she had enough money in her account to cover the restaurant bill easily. Somehow the sheriff's department must have just missed these vital items or didn't look for them the night that she was arrested and another thing that they find that is super important. At least to me are her journals now. Some of them are nice bound. Books others are these like spiral notebooks and these more than anything that they found so far. Really START TO ILLUSTRATE. Tila teas and the rest of the family. That might trees was in serious crisis because as soon as they crack. Open the pages. They get a glimpse into an inner world that they didn't even know existed while the exact contents of my therese's journals haven't been released publicly her dad. Michael describe them to the. Oc Register as just kind of anxious and disjointed writing. She was questioning her sexuality. As a lesbian fixating on a woman who wasn't her long term girlfriend rambling about her career prospects and her family basically a lot of like stream of consciousness type stuff and all hours of the day and night and interestingly he said that her handwriting alternated between very neat and thoughtful and then just like awful scribbles and sometimes the style would change like right in the middle of a sentence even though Latif is shaken up by my choices journal she continues searching unwilling and unable to give up. The time keeps passing by new years of two thousand ten almost four months later. There's still been no sign of my trees or what might have happened to her. The La County sheriff's Office conducts a huge search and rescue operation on January ninth with hundreds of volunteers. All over Malibu Canyon but it doesn't turn up. Any sign of my trees with is devastated but still tries not to fall into total despair and she keeps pushing the sheriff's department for that footage. Show me my baby show me. My daughter finally law enforcement agrees to show them the tapes now all of a sudden magically there are tapes but before they actually show them the footage. Something strange happens. That rocks the entire investigation. This episode was made possible by Stitch. Fix You guys. If I had a dollar for every time Britain were out on tour and someone asked us where we got our genes or are shirt or that black distressed denim jacket that Brit lives in. Everyone loves. I wouldn't have to podcast anymore. The answer is stitch fix. It's always stitch fix. I may be able to make podcast with the best of them but when it comes to styling myself I get stuck in a Rut. But I'm obsessed with almost every piece that my stylists sends me like the pair of just black brand jeans that I've literally worn holes into this is the best way to branch out with no strings attached. Because you just pay twenty dollars styling fee per box and you can go through all the close. Your personal styles sends you if you like anything you only pay for what you want to keep an eye on that twenty dollars. Styling gets credited towards your purchase. Then just send back anything. You don't want they won't charge you for those and you can get boxes as frequently or as infrequently as you want. It's totally tailored to you. In every way get started today at stitch fix dot com slash crime junkie. And you'll get twenty five percent off when you keep everything in your fix that's stitch fix dot com slash crime junkie for twenty five percent off when you keep everything in your stitch fix dot com slash junkie in February two thousand ten about three weeks after the big surge in Los Angeles County. Might Traces Dad. Michael Swears that he saw his daughter in Las Vegas. Wait what yeah. He says he's one hundred percent sure that it was her. He's convinced he saw her in downtown. Las Vegas walking the streets away from the Strip in an area known for sex work and while obviously this is where you want to see your daughter. It kindles Michael's hope that even if my trees somehow became a human trafficking victim or fell into this life in whatever way it at least means that she's alive and there's a chance that they'll finally be able to bring her home but Latinos doesn't believe it. I mean she is sure in her gut that might trees is still somewhere in the Malibu Canyon area and police don't believe in take Michael citing seriously either but he doesn't care and he actually ended up staying in Las Vegas to search on his own determined to find his daughter. Now there's a lot going on at once in this investigation so while Michael is searching in Las Vegas the. Lapd is still sorting through all of my trees communications rape before she went missing the already have the journals that they found in her car but they expand outwards in their search and they actually looking at her texts and her social media posts. Like I mean we all know. Social media isn't real life but I think when you interact with someone on a day-to-day basis and you see how they are on facebook or Myspace base or whatever you do get a sense of. What's normal for them to pose how it's normal for them to talk? Yeah totally like especially. If it's someone you're close to you can kind of get a feeling of how they're doing based on their status updates or maybe lack of status updates and stuff and you can see if someone's feeling or being a little bit off exactly and that is what her most recent social media posts all kind of show they get more and more rambling and incoherent. I mean they're time stamped at all hours of the day and night. Newsweek reported her last facebook. Post mentioned quote signs everywhere and in another one. It sounds like she wasn't even really sleeping like here. But how have you read it okay? So this post says I just WANNA sleep. Ll but you know me and my crazy ideas. Let's see where they take me so it sounds like she's just letting her mind go. You know yeah and I mean obviously. We can't do any like armchair diagnosing again. She was never officially diagnosed with anything. But between this. The claims from joffrey about avenging Michael Jackson and being for Mars and the pages and pages of rambling journals might trees. Doesn't sound okay to me and the LAPD starting to see the same thing they think might trees may have been having some kind of manic episode in an onset of bipolar disorder. Now this is not super comforting for my Theresa's family though because they think law enforcement should have seen that from the very beginning like it's great that you're onboard now but where were you. I mean the day showed up at your station and it makes them even more determined to get a clear picture of just how Mitra was behaving in the sheriff's custody they are relentless and finally after months of begging arguing pressuring and demanding might trees family and some trusted friends are finally allowed to see the security tapes from the Lost Hill. Sheriff Station again. This is months after they said. Yeah you can. It still took a ton of pressuring to actually get them what they see on those tapes shocks and appalls them according to Latif on that disappeared. Episode this is what they see there on. The grainy footage is my trees pushing and pulling on the bars in the holding cage. Like she's trying to force them open clearly upset about her circumstances. It's hard for her family to keep watching. But for my traces sake they keep going and they're just as my trees is being released. Another door opens and a deputy goes out of his deputy male but they can't see where he's going or if he ever spoke to my trees even though they're going in the same direction as best. I could find this footage hasn't ever been released to the Public. So it's not something that. I can show you where we can put on our blog posts for our listeners. So did they ever find out who this? Deputy is anybody. No and y the delay in releasing this footage doesn't like there's much even on there. I mean that's exactly what I want to know too. Because according to that disappeared episode the officers at the Lost Hill station I try some really shady explanations to her family about like why they didn't hand them over. I mean they start saying like oh well you didn't ask for the tape showing what happened inside the station. We thought you wanted the stuff that happened outside. Akron traces or lease so. That's why we didn't give them to you. Which will K- yeah like you? If truly what if that's what they asked you wouldn't be like. Hey we don't have anything outside but but by the way let's show you what's in here like it. It doesn't pass the sniff test for me. Yeah now the family is even more upset. By the fact that the sheriff's Department refuses to identify the deputy on the video. And it's at that point that whatever little bit of goodwill remain between my. Theresa's loved ones and Law. Enforcement totally disintegrates. Instead of working together the two sides stand as enemies and even as time goes on and mattresses case grinds to a halt that relationship stays just as tents. Latif remains tormented by questions while the La sheriffs and their spokespeople are adamant that they did everything by the book and had no cause to hold her for mental evaluation. And they say they were right to let go free. But here's something super interesting that I found remember that nine one one call from Jaffrey's where the hostess nervous about how mattresses acting. Yeah well. She's not the only one Mike Hustler reported for. La Magazine back in two thousand eleven. That the deputy who arrested my trees was actually concerned about her behavior to and that's part of why he took her into custody to make sure that she stayed safe. He even put all of it in an email that Mike got a hold up. I can't have you read the whole thing right because even the way back machines linked to the email is dead but snippets were released in the article. I mean honestly. They're pretty damning. The deputy says that he felt might trees was acting unusual and he was super uneasy about letting her go which was it. I don't know about Uber but to me that seems like a big jump from the department saying hey we were totally confident. She was fine and now this arresting officer saying no. She's clearly not fine. I'm taking her into custody so she stays safe. Yeah so between this revelation. The video footage the cold investigation and still no answers about what happened to her daughter. Lati- has hit her limit. And in June of two thousand ten she actually sues Los Angeles County and the sheriff's department for six separate claims including negligence and wrongful death and as expected the department categorically denies each claim. While the case waits to go to trial. Something totally unexpected happens out in Las Vegas. My cheese is cited again this time by a former high school classmate who claims that he saw her in the casino of the Real Hotel while he was gambling early one morning. He says that she looked nervous and kind of ran off when he called her name now. Unlike her father Michael supposed sighting. This one is taken seriously by the LAPD. And they descend on Las Vegas in late July to work with the Las Vegas police in a joint search for my trees now. This might sound like good news but for Latinos though. None of this is comforting. She isn't any more convinced that my trees ever made it out of Malibu Canyon and was so many hard to search areas in difficult terrain. She truly believes that by searching in Las Vegas. Investigators are moving further and further away from the truth and she's about to find out. Just how right that? Belief is. This episode was made possible by Madison. Reed you deserve gorgeous. Professional hair color delivered to your door. Starting at just twenty two dollars for decades women have had two options for colouring. Their hair outdated at home color or the time and expense of a traditional salon and legit right now salons aren't even option. I was talking to my friend care the other day just about how things have since we've all had to stay at home. And she was saying that the one thing she misses the most is getting her hair done because now all of her grazer showing and I was like girl us Madison Reed so she went on took the online quiz to get her perfect color match and within a couple of days her entire kit. Color Shampoo conditioner treatment. All came right her door. She said she was able to apply herself. No drips no mess. No overpowering chemical smell and the color came out amazing and the conditioner left her hair. Feeling healthy and silky smooth so staying at home does not mean. Your Hair. Game has to suffer. Find your perfect shade at Madison. Dash Reed Dot Com crime junkie listeners. Get ten percent off plus free shipping on their first color kit with Code Crime Junkie Ten. That's Code Crime Junkie. Ten at Madison Dash Reed Dot Com on August ninth two thousand ten a group of Park Rangers investigating the site of an old marijuana growing operation in Dark Canyon. Find a human skull and a woman's partly mummified naked body. Some clothes are found about six hundred feet away. And the right leg is a couple of yards uphill from the body with the FEMUR removed. It takes four days but eventually Latif gets confirmation of what she's known all along. The body belongs to her daughter. My trees the discovery rips open every single argument my trees loved ones ever had the Los Angeles law enforcement. Dark Canyon is a super remote area about eight miles from the loss till sheriff's station and less than two miles away from where my trees was last seen in Monte Nido and for almost a year. Latif has been absolutely adamant that my trees had never left the area and here at last is undeniable proof that she was right. I mean obviously. I'm sure that there is always a glimmer of hope in her. Mom's heart that she was still alive. But the Scott to be just so heartbreaking to know not only is she gone but you were right about where she was and they just weren't listening to you. I mean that's got to be so frustrating definitely. Did finding her give anymore answers as to how she died. Well here's where things get even weirder. We've seen in this whole story a kind of running theme that the sheriff's Department didn't handle trees and her circumstances as well as they should have. I mean I think we can all agree about that. Will that doesn't stop now. Even after her bodies found. And here's one of the reasons. I say that we know my trees. His body was found by Park Rangers. I according to an article from Julie Bennett in L. A. The Rangers call the SHERIFFS. Who Come right down. Now there's penal codes that say the sheriffs are supposed to call the coroner right away to tell them. Hey we have human remains. That isn't just procedure. It's an actual law. You don't wait you call. But it seems they waited for almost ninety minutes and then to make it even shadier the La County sheriff's department went ahead and airlifted the body out of Dark Canyon without permission from the corner. They disturbed their own crime scene. And you bet that that's another code violation when Latif learns this. I mean she's absolutely sick to her stomach. I mean she's beyond livid when she learns how my body was handled any closer she gets from finally knowing like yes. My truce's gone. We know where she is is immediately cancelled out by rage about how her remains were treated and by how quickly law enforcement declares her death to be quote undetermined really. They don't even consider the possibility that might trees was murdered and her body was hidden in Dark Canyon and I totally get where she's coming from like. I'm a MOM would be incredibly outraged. At how the police handled this but to play the devil's advocate a bit. We know that my was in a mental health crisis. And she's in this supermo area. That's hard to hike to even if you enjoy hiking and are good at it. Unlike me. Couldn't she just succumb the elements and wild animals could have disturbed the scene. Guess I just seeing how that would complicate things totally again. You can put all of the shady stuff that was done by the sheriff's department aside and that's still an option but the thing about that is animal. Behaviour in relation to dead bodies has been pretty extensively studied. So officers would know what to look for to be able to definitively say like okay yes coyote or whatever type of scavenger like ripped her bra off and disturb the body but the thing is about how she was found is might trees. Her clothes were neatly taken off in ways. That animals couldn't do like a scavenger animal. Can't UNHOOK A bra. And unbuckle a belt right like it couldn't have UNZIP my jeans right and they don't have opposable thumbs to be able to do those things. But that is how my trees is closed were found plus what? I also found that I thought was fascinating from. La Magazine is that animals who snatched body part tend to take them downhill. But if you remember the one piece of mattresses body that was found a way from her was her leg and her leg was found up hill and it didn't have any kind of tooth marks or anything to suggest that an animal took it there. So how does a leg of hers get to another place above her which is opposite from animal activity and there's no sign of animal activity on those bones and that leads to a bigger question if an animal didn't take the lake uphill? There's another much more sinister possibility that someone a human took it there and left it there yet the La County Sheriff Says No no crime just a tragic death. They then put forward a theory that might trees had some kind of allergic reaction to poison oak so severe that it caused anticlimactic shock leading to her death. How could you even begin to tell that from her remains? It said that she was mummified. Or partly mummified. I don't know if they found something specific that led them to that theory but everything I registered. It was the theory that they've been putting forward but even this theory doesn't explain why she was naked. It also doesn't explain why matrix his clothes were never sent to the crime lab for testing. Or why the leaves and dirt at the scene weren't tested for blood or why her remains weren't even examined for evidence of trauma or sexual assault. I mean it's honestly like I get if you have the Syria and I get if the evidence backs it up but you have to close the doors. You have to at least try I don't know how anyone can comfortably say. My trees wasn't murdered when there were so little done by law enforcement to rule that out as a possibility. If that wasn't it I get it but we have to rule it out. Yeah I have no idea why you wouldn't like none of the reasons I can come up with any sense. I agree and I mean so. Does my trees family. They are convinced that the La County sheriff's are hiding something and they continue their fight for answers for years in two thousand eleven latief's calls an independent forensic expert who agrees with her assessment. That the sheriff's made some really big mistakes on how they handled. My trees remains that same year. Two Thousand Eleven Latif and Michael Get a settlement in their wrongful death suit for about nine hundred thousand dollars which is split between them now. In Thousand Sixteen the California Attorney General's office actually conducts a criminal investigation into how mattresses case was handled but ultimately they declined to press any charges. Even though again like there are some very clear laws broken even even how her remains were handled officially might treat. Richardson's cause of death is still listed as undetermined and the case is still open. Whatever happened to my trees that night? It's very clear to all who knew her that some form of mental illness was at play. It might not have been what caused her death but it is. What led her to that restaurant on that night in September. Two thousand nine. And you know it's often around my trees. His Age when signs of Mental Illness. Start to manifest. And sometimes it's hard to recognize what's happening in someone that you love. But it's important to know the signs between expected and unexpected behaviors and it's important to remember that one in five adults experience mental health issues each year. It's so much more common than you think. And unfortunately for those in marginalized communities like Matrix who was both a black woman and a lesbian. It can be even harder to get the right help. The National Alliance on mental illness is working to end the stigma for marginalized communities. And they're providing a number of resources to all people dealing with mental illness. If you WANNA learn more about breaking the stigma around mental illness and to find out what you can do to help please visit the National Alliance on Mental Health at. Www dot n. a. m. i. Dot work again. If you want more information on the National Alliance on mental health you can visit them. Www dot n. a. m. i. Dot. Org We will also linked to that on our website along with pictures from the case and all of our source material. You can find that at crime junkie. Podcast DOT COM. I'm used to follow us on. Instagram at Junkie podcast. We'll be back next week with a brand new episode Crime Junkie is an audio chuck production. So what do you think? Chuck D approve.

Latif Lateef Los Angeles County Michael Jackson Los Angeles Police Department Lost Hill station Malibu Canyon officer sheriff's Department Las Vegas Los Angeles Richardson Los Angeles County Sheriff California Sheriff Station marijuana La Magazine Theresa Tessa Malibu
Los Angeles Times 6/30/20

L.A. Times Morning Briefing

03:40 min | 5 months ago

Los Angeles Times 6/30/20

"It's Tuesday June thirtieth I'm kyle, Sour. Hoffer, and here's your local news from the Los Angeles, Times. Brought to you by the S-o-f-i daily Podcast, reaching financial independence starts with having the right information every weekday morning, so fi keeps you up to date with important business news, stock, market happenings, and how they affect your financial life. Get your money, right and search for Sophie S. O.. F. I wherever you get your podcast. Today will be mostly sunny, but cool with a high of seventy seven and a low tonight of sixty one. Our top story. Los Angeles County, Whoa, close beaches, Friday and Ben Firework displays in anticipation of the Fourth of July holiday. Health officials said yesterday that the move is necessary in light of an alarming spike in corona virus cases especially as cases in La County surged past one hundred thousand county public health director. Barbara Berra, said the alarming spike in cases is not just the result of increased testing. The surge is proof that community transmission has definitively increased with the rate of those testing positive. Nearing nine percent officials are also warning that now. One in one hundred forty residents are likely unknowingly infected with the virus. In More Virus News Riverside County intensive. Care Unit beds nearly hit capacity Sunday with ninety nine percent occupied, however local health authorities said the numbers are misleading. Some hospitals have temporarily transitioned extra beds for intensive care use, and the challenge may instead be finding enough staff to run those additional ICU beds, meanwhile, Riverside remains on the states watchlist for counties that fall outside of acceptable health metrics Congressman Role Ruiz called on the county to reinstate safety measures including in order to wear masks in public. In court news the Golden State killer pleaded guilty to more than a dozen murders and a long list of other crimes, yesterday and Sacramento Joseph, James. Diangelo junior's crimes ran from at least nineteen, seventy, three to nineteen eighty-six, involving attacks on some one hundred six children, men and women, overall fifty women were raped, and thirteen people were killed, and during the hearing about two hundred people attended, some victim silently cried. Others faced him as he pleaded guilty. The Angelo will be sentenced to prison for the rest of his life. In Education News. About twenty percent of Elliott parents, and they are not ready to send their children back to campus this fall that's according to survey results released yesterday by the La Unified School district, another twenty percents and their onshore, and more than one third of employees said they're against returning for now superintendent, Austin Buehner said that no decision has been made yet. He also said in person. Classes would require extensive testing and contact tracing implemented by state and local health authorities. Many other school systems including San. Diego unified have announced that campuses will be reopened in some fashion. And finally La City Controller Ron Gal moved yesterday to have the city stopping councilman Jose We ours salary galloper. Instead it would be unacceptable for the council to continue receiving taxpayer funds while facing a felony charge in a federal corruption case, Gal Perrin in a memo also said was ours last day, receiving a city salary was June twenty third same day he was charged with racketeering. He's accused of receiving one point five million dollars in bribes and other improper financial benefits all while earning nearly two hundred and fourteen thousand dollars per year was ours. Attorney did not immediately respond to a request for comment on GALP action. For these stories and more visit, L. A. Times dot. com.

Riverside County Los Angeles County Gal Perrin La Unified School district Hoffer Los Angeles kyle Austin Buehner La City Sophie S. O Barbara Berra Angelo Ben Firework Diangelo Riverside Sacramento Joseph racketeering
NPR News: 09-13-2020 3PM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 2 months ago

NPR News: 09-13-2020 3PM ET

"Live from NPR news I'm Barbara Klein officials in Oregon or reporting a decrease in the number of active fires cruiser. Now, battling thirty four blazes in the state fourteen hundred square miles are scorched. Oregon's Democratic Senator Jeff Merkley tells ABC's this week. Many communities are devastated. Septic Guidroz six, hundred miles up and down the state I never escape the smoke We have thousands of people who have lost their homes officials say air quality will remain poor across the state at least through the rest of the day. California police are searching for a man who shot to Los Angeles County, Sheriff's at point blank range last night while they sat in their patrol car in Compton, they're in critical condition. In the meantime NPR's David Folkenflik tells us a public radio reporter covering a news conference on the shooting. Last night has been charged with obstruction of justice. Video footage shows five Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputies Forcibly Subduing Josie Wong of southern California public radio, they pushed her to the ground hard. Her bosses faces badly bruised long covered a press conference at the hospital where deputies were being treated and a small provocative protests that sprung up outside she tracked deputies arrest of one of the protesters. The department says ignored warnings and did not have ID reporters present say she shouted she was a reporter Meghan. Garvey is executive editor for southern California public radio. Is that. You know it's a it's a critical role of the media. To Report on. Matters of public interest including protests, including police conduct, and that was exactly what Josie was doing the incident followed local protests over police shootings of civilians, David Folkenflik. NPR News. The Attorney General of Texas is appealing a decision about mail in ballots in Houston Texas public radio's Jerry. Clayton has details, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton Republican says he's appealing a ruling that would allow mail in ballots to be sent to all registered voters in Harris County which includes Houston. Paxton argues the plan would violate Texas election law and the state's constitution. He filed the motion with the Fourteenth Court of Appeals in Houston, Harris, county clerk, Chris Hollins who briefly worked in the Obama Administration plans to send the mail in ballot applications to two point four, million voters in the Houston area. A state judge on Friday ruled the county could proceed with mailing the applications I'm Jerry Clayton San Antonio. Former New York. City mayor, and Democratic presidential hopeful Michael. Bloomberg is making good on his promise to help Joe Biden win the presidency in November he's committing at least one hundred million dollars to Biden's campaign in the crucial battleground state of Florida. This is NPR. The. Governors of Latin. America's premier development funding. Bank have elected president trump's candidate to lead the institution as Carrie Kahn reports. It's the first time since the bank's founding more than six decades ago that it'll be led by someone not from Latin America Marissa Claver Carone forty-five-year-old cuban-american lawyer from Miami will become the president of the Inter-american Development Bank beginning next month for going the banks long tradition president trump nominated clever caroni currently his top advisor on. Latin America and known for hard line policies toward Cuba. Venezuela. The nomination angered prominent leaders in Latin America who called for a postponement of the vote others tried to organize a boycott of the election in the end clever Cardoni one more than sixty percent of the vote his promise to strengthen the bank which funds twelve billion dollars in projects annually and will be critical to Latin America's economic recovery from the Coronavirus Pandemic Carrie Kahn NPR news is city. In, Belarus tens of thousands of protesters flooded the center of the capital Minsk again today as anger rises over last month's election, which they say was rigged, they continue to demand. President Alexander Lukashenko resign police have reportedly detained some two hundred fifty people today. Russians are casting ballots in local elections. Today, the vote is seen as a test of support for President Vladimir Putin's United Russia party. I'm Barbara Klein NPR news.

NPR Josie Wong California Houston Inter-american Development Ban Los Angeles County Texas Harris County Barbara Klein NPR News David Folkenflik Jerry Clayton San Antonio Ken Paxton Republican Latin America President Vladimir Putin President Alexander Lukashenko Oregon Senator Jeff Merkley reporter president
LA County Sheriffs Gangs Pt. 1: Little Devils & Lynwood Vikings

Kingpins

45:10 min | Last week

LA County Sheriffs Gangs Pt. 1: Little Devils & Lynwood Vikings

"Something to note all of the groups covered on this show operate in secret the details included in this episode or based on extensive research but cannot ultimately be one hundred percent verified except by society members themselves this episode features discussions of racism violence police brutality and murder discretion is advised especially for listeners under thirteen on december. Ninth two thousand. Thirteen united states attorney andre barrett field five criminal cases for federal indictments and one criminal complaint against members of the los angeles county sheriff's department. These eighteen officials had been indicted on allegations of rampant abuse and misconduct in la county. Jails these first five unsealed cases. Were only the tip of the iceberg. Baratz said our investigation also found that these incidents did not take place in a vacuum in fact they demonstrated behavior that had become institutionalized. Some members of the sheriff's department considered themselves to be above the law over the past few years. The topic of police brutality and corruption has become mainstream and divisive dominating news cycles and political campaigns. So much so that. It often feels like the dialogue isn't about police in a tool rather it's a dog whistle for warring political parties. There are many factors that contribute to the animosity between communities of color and the officers who police them in the next five episodes will be shining a light on one pervasive problem in the world's largest sheriff's department since one thousand nine hundred seventy one the los angeles county sheriff's department has played host to violent deputy run gangs operating out of l. Ast stations for decades the los angeles police department has been a lightning. Rod for public controversies and bad press. They're at the heart of calls for police reform. But all the while the l. a. s. d. has been quietly humming away in the background policing nearly five thousand square miles of unincorporated cities scattered around la county rather than protecting the residents of these areas. The sheriff's department created their own gangs to terrorize the communities. They serve it almost seems impossible. But they're a decade's worth of documentation and every time one gang is exposed. Another seems to take his place. I'm alistair murden. Usually i host kingpins where we cover the rise and fall of figures in organized crime. And i'm vanessa richardson. I host secret societies another spotify original from podcast exploring mysterious organizations from around the world for the next five weeks are two shows are teaming up to bring you the story about deadly gangs that are also secret societies and operate out of the los angeles county sheriff's department since nineteen seventy-one the l. a. s. t. has been plagued by gang activity within its own ranks as is the case with every story. We bring you. This activity has been investigated corroborated and in certain cases prosecuted however we should note that since these groups operates in secret. Some details are difficult to verify by exploring the history of policing in los angeles. We can better understand the city's current landscape today we're starting with the murky origins of the l. a. Ast's first deputy gang the little devils first appearing in the early nineteen seventy s. They set the precedent for a revolving door of white supremacist. Gangs within the lsd. Many of which still exist today we have. Oh that's an more coming up. Stay with us. Bloomberg dot com global news coverage helps you see the opportunity ahead as the leading authority and global business bloomberg dot com reveals new ways of looking at the most urgent issues facing our world like the role of climate and social justice solutions for emerging global economies shifts in technology and more every story bloomberg dot com tells will expand your horizons inspire your purpose and power your success however you define it invent your possibility at bloomberg dot com. This episode is brought to you by the new mini countryman. there's nothing many about the new mini countryman. It's a spacious four door that can fit up to five with a trunk. Big enough for cargo to discover more at many usa dot com. If the thought of the holidays coming up makes you tired for your bed. Then listen up casper's black. Friday sale has a thirty percent off of everything. You need to make your place of rest. A place of dreams supportive mattress soon. Pillow soft sheets cozy room milnes and all up the lankans but don't fall asleep yet. Casper's black friday sale is on now. Go to casper dot com to shop now. Terms and conditions apply in the nineteen sixties and seventies. La looked oddly similar to what it is today. Four lane boulevards lined with boxy concrete buildings and towering palm trees. The downtown area was spotted with greasy spoons and hole in the wall bars. The now institutions but culturally the energy was different author. David kukoc described the seventies as the last decade in which los angeles bore some resemblance to the frontier town at had once been the sixties ushered in a wave of social change and hedonism that was rooted in defiance against the government against convention and against law and order especially after the manson murders in nineteen. Sixty-nine there was an air of lawlessness in. La that some found alarming but many others found alluring and exciting. There's an evergreen nostalgia for the caffeine free good vibes. Attitude of late nineteen sixties. La but this free love culture was largely a white experience on the outskirts of hollywood. Black and latino communities lived markedly. different lives simmering. Beneath the veneer of the sixties was a hotbed of socio political. Unrest that was nearing a breaking point on the other side of the one. Oh one sat east los angeles a sprawling mexican american barrio with a proud history. The neighborhood managed to thrive for nearly a hundred years. Despite gentrification slowly encroaching on its borders but by the late sixties things had changed east. La was a low income neighborhood with underfunded schools and among the highest dropout rates in the country forty four percent in nineteen sixty eight. This was especially important because at the time college was one of the only ways to avoid being drafted to vietnam for the eighteen year olds growing up in east. La it wasn't a question of if you were going overseas. But when and tragically latino men sent to vietnam largely returned in bodybags they were killed at a rate that was highly disproportionate to their white counterparts. It seemed like they were being used as cannon fodder and east. La sent more than their fair share of sons to die. Many of the barrios residents felt little control over their future. A feeling that only intensified after a sucker punch piece of legislation in nineteen sixty one. Three thousand homes in east la with displaced. So that the. I five. And i ten freeways could be built in the middle of what was once a vibrant neighborhood. This was confirmation of a larger problem. Most los angelenos were unaware of or unconcerned with the problems facing the barrio outside of east. La media coverage made the neighborhood looked like a dangerous rundown gangster paradise many elderly residents of east la. Remember what it was like in those days policing by the los angeles county sheriff's department was brutal. Excessive force was common and the void of opportunity made it impossible to escape the confines of poverty. There was no support for the local schools. No action from local politicians and eventually the teenagers of east. La got tired of waiting on march fifth nineteen sixty eight. Hundreds of mexican american students staged a walkout at their rundown schools protesting against racist teachers apathy among school administrators and a lack of college preparatory training a week later the protests had ballooned to about twenty two thousand students that was when the los angeles county sheriff's department got involved but why the sheriff's and not the lapd across lake county. There are dozens of small unincorporated cities like west hollywood and content that aunt within lapd's jurisdiction instead of forming their own police force. These small cities signed a general law enforcement contract with the l. a. s. t. currently forty two cities and one hundred forty one unincorporated communities have contracts with the lsd making it the largest sheriff's department in the world at the time of the wool counts the department employed about seven thousand deputies and because of the nature of their contracts la operates like a typical police department. This is why when angelenos talk about the police. They often referencing both the l. Ast and the lapd which carry out similar functions in different parts of town and like the lapd deputies have a reputation for showing up to peaceful protests overdressed when they pulled up to. The student led demonstration in march nineteen sixty eight. They arrived in riot gear. The deputies ordered the stunned students back to class but the kids of east l. a. Were tired of being intimidated and pushed around. Several students started launching bottles of soda at the deputies. Then all hell broke. Loose deputies went off to the students with batons arresting several. The clash was brief but brutal although it did little to stop the walkout the protests went on for several more days with each one broken up by the a. st surprisingly the protests worked on the tenth day an emergency school council meeting gave voice to many of the students demands most of which senator around better education the meeting spurred fundamental change in the east. La school system however it also served as a tipping point for racial tensions in the neighborhood. The walkouts in many ways catalyzed chicano movement an expression of cultural pride and civil justice in east. La activist cesar chavez was already mobilizing the mexican american community through his work with the agricultural workers organizing committee or a w. o. c. but the walkouts brought young chicanos into the fold and as the movement grew the communities policing grew more brutal street. Gangs had always been a problem in east los angeles dating back to nineteen thirty five. But as the chicano movement grew the sheriff's department became less discriminate in arresting what they thought were gang members. Anyone could be beaten and arrested if they looked at a deputy wrong. This kind of aggressive policing came to a head in nineteen seventy at the national chicano moratorium march on the morning of august. Twenty ninth between twenty and thirty thousand demonstrators collected in the guntalk. Now the ruben f salazar park in east la peacefully protesting the vietnam war unprompted. The st descended showering the crowd with tear gas. They beat protestors with batons before arresting them. A building was set on fire over one hundred fifty peaceful protesters were arrested and four were left dead when pressed about their motives. The lsd provided. No reasonable explanation instead. They called the protesters communists. For the record they want to many citizens across los angeles. The laguna park riot belt senseless a culmination of the excessive force and mass arrests that had become commonplace in east. La after the riot the crackdown on the chicano movement grew so intense that the movement fizzled out. It may sound like the elliott st was acting overtly racist and there was reason for that by the time of the laguna park. Riots a group of deputies within the east. La sheriff's station had formed a secret society called the little devils. The members were easily recognisable by the red devils tattooed on their left cavs it was a white supremacist brotherhood. Operating out of the station they saw themselves as an island of law and order in a sea of violence and squalor and the people they were paid to protect became enemy number. One coming up. We'll dive into the evolution of deputy gangs in the la sd high listeners. I'm thrilled to tell you about the new spotify original from podcast that i think you'll really enjoy. It's called a love story every tuesday. All love story celebrates the ups downs and pivotal moments. That turn complete strangers into perfect pairs. Each episode offers an intimate glimpse inside a real life romance with couples the highlights and hardships that define their love. Whether it's a chance encounter a form of friendship or even a former enemy. Our love story proves that love can begin and blossom in the most unexpected ways. Ready to him more. Follow our love story. Free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. This episode of kingpins is brought to you by simply safe. Everybody wants to feel safe in their home. The best way to get that sense of security is with simplisafe. It was designed to be easy to use so protecting your whole home. Twenty four seven has never been simpler. You can order online with the click of a button. Once it arrives just opened. The box placed the sensors and plug it in now. Your home is protected around. The clock is amazing. That within thirty minutes of opening the box. I could have complete and running home. Security system going complete with a camera. Entry sensors a motion sensor and even yard stakes now. I just need to get a yard. But seriously i'm happy that i. I didn't have to wait around for technician. I didn't have to do any drilling or need tools of any kind. I can see why. Us news and world report named simply safe the best overall home security of twenty twenty head to simplisafe dot com slash kingpins and get a free hd camera that simplisafe dot com slash kingpins to make sure they know that our show sent you now back to the story by nineteen seventy-one members of the east la. Sheriff station had formed what they considered a secret society. The little devils they were identified by the small red devil tattooed on the members. Left carves their fide. Stories of the little devils are scattered. But there's no question about the gangs existence. This activity has been written about extensively by the la times and in a report from loyal law school. The little devils considered the first deputy gang in the los angeles county sheriff's department. They've been recognized as gangs by county judges and the media because the deputies involved acted like members of any street gang they had signs initiation ceremonies hazing rituals and an official logo around the time the gang was formed. The station adopted the ford apache seal. The logos thought to have been created by members of the little devils and remains official seal of the entire station fort. Apache was in hundred forty. Eight western movie about an isolated army post in apache territory. Henry fonda stars as a racist commander obsessed with subduing the local natives. The commander is intentionally portrayed as ignorant and incompetent and by the end of the film. His disastrous crusade against the apache tribe leaves him and most of his men dead but members of the little devils apparently missed the subtext and saw the film as an instruction manual for how to treat their local community according to residents of east. La then attitude seem to be that any arrest was a good arrest because it got a young gang banger off the street. It didn't matter whether that person was responsible for the given crime or whether they were actually a gang banger. In the first place as one resident put the motto. Seen to be arrest whoever you can and figure it out later. L. s. d. management didn't learn the the little devils existence until nineteen seventy-three while investigating misconduct by two deputies who happen to be members the la county sheriff at the time. Peter j pitches launched an extensive investigation into the deputy gang. The captain in charge r d campbell ultimately found that forty. Seven deputies at the station were involved. However there's no record of whether there was any disciplinary action taken against them sheriff pitches was known for taking a hard stance on inter of his discipline but he also worked hard to keep any talk him into the misconduct from seeing the light of day he even refused to comply with subpoenas for information which eventually landed him in front of the california supreme court to this day. These deputies personnel files are confidential making nearly impossible to identify who was involved in the little devils and what kind of discipline they might have received but someone at the east. La sheriff's station seemed to take the problem seriously enough that the little devils died off by the nineteen eighties but the spirit of their gang assisted in fact this lone ranger mentality seemed to take routes across the entire department by the time the little devils cease to exist. A new deputy gang had sprung up across town in nineteen seventy seven. A sheriff's station opened in lynnwood a city in l. a. county just nine miles south of east. La and almost immediately. A deputy. Gang began to form by nineteen eighty. They were calling themselves. The lynnwood via they seem to have identified themselves with ankle tattoos. Vikings blonde head. Blue-eyed marauders from the north like little devils before them. The vikings police to low income neighborhood of color stations in these areas were tersely referred to as ghetto stations in testimony from a former member of the group. And like the little devils. The vikings police aggressively a quickly became clear to the residents of lynnwood that the vikings were not their protectors. they were an invading force to build cloud and camaraderie. The vikings presented themselves as an elite group inviting only the most talented and committed deputies to join their ranks. That isn't to say the best deputies loyalty was valued over l. a. s. d. policy. Many of the gangs members were linked to officer involved shootings. Excessive force unconstitutional searches. Perjury and general misconduct. If a viking shot someone they earned the right to tattoo. The numbers nine nine eight on their ankles. The code for an officer involved shooting taking civilian life was reportedly considered a celebrated rites of passage. Vikings were also known to us gang specific slang tag buildings with their graffiti and throw hand signals and l. for linwood the actions were no different from the street gangs. They were policing but because they technically enforce the law. The vikings seemed to feel above it. At least that was the attitude around the station when twenty eight year old. Paul tanaka was transferred. There in hundred eighty seven. Even though he was japanese. American tanaka was soon considered one of the boys and he became one of the few people of color initiated into the vikings. A few months later tanaka would learn what it meant to be protected by that brotherhood in march nineteen eighty-eight. He and four of the deputies found themselves in a fifteen mile. Koch as from compton to long beach they were hot on the trail of twenty one year. Old hong peo- lee who fled police after running a stop sign. Even though the deputies chase lee down the freeway he never exceeded fifty five miles per hour. Given that it was two thirty in the morning it wasn't the most dangerous conscious on record but you would never guess that from the way. The deputies responded did chase ended in industrial area of long beach lease car screech to a halt as three. Lsd cars pulled up behind him. Tanaka and the other four deputies jumped out of their cars guns drawn along beach. Pd patrol car pulled up behind them to offer. Assistance and a sheriff's helicopter circled overhead. Deputy john chapman approached lease com. Instructing him to get out with his hands raised instead lee through the car in reverse. According to reports filed by all five deputies lease sped backwards chapman had jumped out of the way to avoid being hit tanaka and his colleagues fired their weapons unloading fifteen rounds into the car. Eight of the bullets hit lee killing him after reviewing the deputies reports l. ast homicide investigators and the district attorney's office cleared tanaka and his compatriots of any wrongdoing. However there was a problem there was several contradictions between the deputy stories and the reports filed by the to long beach. Police officers who had been on the scene that night one of us has said that he never saw lee tried to back his car into any of the deputies instead lee had slowly put his car in reverse and began driving away after the shooting began after the shooting. The officer said he turned to his partner and said we just observed the sheriff's execute. Somebody there was more about the incident that didn't make sense. When lease call was recovered. It was crashed into a fence. A hundred and twenty feet from where. The shooting allegedly took place and there was a bruising on lee's face as though he being beaten the inconsistencies and rage the korean american community within linwood and cross los angeles li's family sued the l. a. s. d. for over five million dollars. They called the killing an execution brutal and unnecessary. They alleged that the sheriff's investigation was sloppy at best but more than likely a cover up. Evidence showed that the sheriff's investigators did not follow protocol. The offices in fact all five deputies were left alone together in the same room for ten hours lease family alleged that this gave them plenty of time to that testimonies and make sure the story was at its height. In nineteen ninety. The lease settled with the l. a. s. d. for nine hundred ninety nine thousand nine hundred ninety nine dollars a considerable sum but far below the five point seven million dollars they'd asked for apparently the la county sheriff at the time showman block was enraged by the settlement. Not because a man was dead but because of how much it costs the department and the bad press it ruled meanwhile none of the deputies involved were held accountable in fact not only did. They remain on duty but they moved upward. Paul tanaka was promoted to lieutenant a year. Later as lieutenant tanaka became the vikings greatest champion reportedly protecting the deputy gang from supervises within the department even as many of his fellow members were named in a massive lawsuit. One that accused the department of racially motivated hate crimes in nineteen ninety over seventy five residents of lynnwood filed a class action lawsuit against the l. a. s. d. alleging that the department was aware of the vikings racially motivated violence against the community and tolerated the behavior. The suit claimed that viking members had shot killed beat racially profiled and researched black and latino people solita terrorize the community. The lawsuit brought media attention to the lynnwood. Vikings for the first time an found that not only had the vikings terrorize the community. They had also terrorized any supervisor who tried to bring them under control. One accounts claimed that a viking shot a dog and tied it beneath his commanders car. Another smeared human feces on a supervisor's car engine within the station itself. Investigators found a map of lynnwood in the shape of africa racist cartoons of black men and a clumsily made plane ticket to africa hanging on the wall. All of this evidence was brought to court and the vikings had little way to defend themselves during the core proceedings. A reporter are sheriff block. If his deputies and the vikings were any different from street gangs block defended them saying the facts that group of people with a particular assignments together in a sort of brotherhood could be very positive thing but the district court disagreed in his ruling. Us district judge terry j hatter wrote many of the incidents which brought about this motion involved group of lynnwood area deputies who are members of a neo nazi white supremacist gang. The vikings which exists with the knowledge of departmental policy makers the la st eventually paid out seven point. Five million dollars to the people of lynnwood and we'll order to spend another one point five million dollars on mandatory training or because the sheriff's department is funded by taxpayers. It might be more accurate to say that the people of l. a. county pay down nine million dollars while the deputies themselves walked away relatively free despite the multi-million dollar settlement and public scrutiny the s. did nothing to curb the vikings influence if anything they thrived a year later in nineteen ninety two. La county judge. James colts published a separate report on the excessive use of force by the l. s. d. The report concluded that some deputies appeared to have engaged in behavior that is brutal and intolerable and is typically associated with street gangs but despite the overwhelming evidence sheriff block refused to investigate or even admit the deputy gangs were real however when deputy mike osborne came to lynnwood as a trainee in nineteen ninety-four. It was clear to him that the vikings ruled the station. Osborne referred to the vikings as a caste system. Those at the top were white and male the veterans on the force. They were known. For routinely using racist and sexist slurs they were also the ones you needed to impress if you wanted your career to go places. Of course that also meant being initiated into the vikings yourself and once you are in osborne told the la times. You were expected to be one of the boys you bought into the code of silence. The protected every member of the gang. You didn't report illegal activity carried out by a fellow. Deputy you saw nothing even. If you were a dividing you were expected to follow their rules. Osbourne's wife fellow deputy aurora. Jato broke that code of silence in nineteen ninety-six. After witnessing her training officer of viking fabricate evidence against black and latino civilians she also saw him destroy evidence and falsified police reports a federal offence. Jones was arraigned in march nineteen ninety-six on felony charges and the identity of his whistle blower got around the station. Foss that same month. Someone shot at osborne and mayo's home in the dead of night while the children were asleep in that bedrooms though. She can't prove it may otto is convinced. The shooter was a member of the vikings. But neither she nor osborne knew who to turn to. After all day word the police coming up. We'll look at the repercussions of the vikings unchecked criminal behavior. This episode is brought to you by britannia experienced britannia. A world filled with romance treachery political intrigue magic follow the invasion of britain in forty three. Ad one rival kings queens tribes and god's to put their differences aside to avoid their demise at the hands of the roman empire while the romans stop at nothing to conquer these mythical lands now. The only hope for britannia is a young girl. she's grown says. Follow the chosen. As she pursues her destiny to save her people and defeat the empire oncoming for you. Watch all new episodes of britannia sundays at nine. Eight central or on demand anytime only on epochs get the channel or the app. Whether you're managing a business starting your own or even working on a podcast like me. Keeping everything organized and cliff the people you work with is a must well. The folks over at monday dot com couldn't agree more and they're helping teams do just that no matter where they are monday. Dot com is an online teamwork platform for collaborates who wants to plan track and manage all of their daily work or in one place. It's easy to set up and use and is beautifully designed to manage any team organization or process online monday tacoma nabil's teams to move faster and meet their objectives by offering ready to go templates for a wide range of use cases with built in solutions for your industry. Workflow and the best part is monday. Dot com is completely customizable to fit your specific needs giving you a streamlined advantage to track the progress of work within the company and your clients build confidence within your team and reach every goal with these visit monday dot com to start your free two week trial now back to the story. The lynnwood vikings were first brought to light in nineteen ninety as part of a class action lawsuit filed against the st. It was clear to the. Us district judge overseeing the complaint that the deputy gang operating at the lynwood sheriff's station was not a social clique as sheriff block had called it. But a gang of neo-nazis. They terrorize the community and were more concerned with putting people away then. Doing good police work an attitude that has put many innocent people behind bars on friday. January eighteenth nineteen ninety-one forty one year old. Donald sarpi stepped onto the front steps of his home in lynwood california. His teenage son and a few friends were talking loudly in the front yard and sarpi asked them to quiet down and come inside as he walked outside. A car crept down the street as it past. Someone leaned out the passenger side window and fired a single bullet into sop his chest. The three people in the car yelled gang slogans before peeling out. Donald soppy died in the hospital later that evening. The case was investigated by detective. Craig dietsch a member of the vikings sarpi son and his four friends were questioned about what they had seen but their initial statements were all over the map. The teenagers couldn't agree on the color of the car that drove by calling it tan beige orange. Even black they also weren't sure of how many people were in the car. Two maybe three. They were certain that the shooter had been mexican and male but that was about it the only teen who could ide- the shooter was scott turner though the way he arrived at his conclusion is suspect. According to china detective had shown him a binder full of photos called a photographic lineup turned. It was asked to. Id the shooter and claims. He was coached the entire time when he pointed at a picture. Dietsch would say things like no. He's in jail already. It couldn't be him when they arrived at a picture of sixteen year old francisco correo who turner recognized from around the neighborhood agreed. It could be him and stopped. The exercise typically the detective working the case which show the photographic lineup to all five witnesses the same night without giving them the chance to speak with one another. That's to ensure they accidentally persuade one another's memories instead dietsch waited months to show the lineup to the other four witnesses by then the young men knew who turner had picked and fell in line with his story francisco. Correo was arrested soon. After even though there was no physical evidence linking him to the crime during korea's trial the five teenage witnesses all testified all delivered inconsistent stories in addition to miss remembering the make model and color of the car they also seemed unsure that korea was even the man who pulled the trigger. The case was declared a mistrial after the jury deadlocked five to seven with a majority voting for acquittal but the district attorney move to try correo again about six months later and this time around the witnesses had this story straight. They identified correo as the shooter confidently. They knew the color of the car. And the jury had no idea that this was korea's second trial nor did they know about the inconsistencies in the first trial correal himself maintained that on the night of the shooting. He was at home with his dad. Who corroborated the story. He claimed he got home from school. May dinner then did some homework while he and his dad watch. Tv the prosecution alleged that nobody does their homework on a friday night. So correo must be lying. The prosecution also informed the jurors that legally if someone is believed to be lying in one part of their testimony. They're allowed to disregard the entire testimony as false incredibly. This is what happened and so the jury was left with nothing but five compelling eyewitness accounts that pointed to correo as the shooter. They found him guilty on the morning of course sentencing. A man approached careers lawyer outside the courtroom. He introduced himself as oscar rodriguez. He claimed to have been involved in the shooting and new career was innocent. The moment the hearing began correal's lawyer alerted the judge and asked him to allow rodriguez to speak. But for whatever reason the judge refused and went ahead with the proceedings korea was sentenced to two consecutive life terms francisco career would spend nearly twenty years in prison before the innocence project took on his case in two thousand nine. They say that as they began reinvestigating the case the ast also got involved by that point. The lynnwood sheriff's station had been closed for years and the vikings had died out by the turn of the century but detective dietsch still worked for the department as did many of the men who were once part of the vikings gang. The sheriff's department claim to be reinvestigating careers case but representatives from the innocence project believed. They were only interested in covering up any wrongdoing. Meanwhile all five of the witnesses who initially idead correo admitted that they had been coached by detective. Each and the prosecuting attorney daniel. Soppy son even wrote a letter in support of correo admitting that he did not clearly see. The face of his father's killer korea's petition was heard in march two thousand eleven during his closing argument. The attorney for the l. a. d. said that he did not believe the department had committed misconduct but his final comment was the most shocking. He said that as an officer of the court he had an ethical and legal responsibility to ask the judge to grant francisco careers petition l. Asd's own lawyer believed that correo should go free later in two thousand eleven correo filed a civil rights lawsuit against each and the los angeles county. Sheriff's department. He was awarded ten point one million dollars more than five hundred thousand dollars for the year he had spent in jail. currently detective. dietsch is off the grid. There's little information on where he is or whether he's on payroll but as far as we can tell he hasn't been formally discharged from the sheriff's department and just as one. Viking member was outed another was promoted that same year whole to nocco was appointed undersheriff second-in-command to la county's new. Sheriff lee baca overnight. A viking had become the second most powerful person in the world's largest sheriff's department and as was the case at lynnwood. His tenure was rife with controversy in two thousand twelve. A blue ribbon commission would accused tanaka his boss and a few colleagues of allowing their deputies to beat and humiliate inmates county. Jails cover up. Deputy misconduct and allow deputy gangs to run on checked. It seemed as though the abusive toxic culture he learned at lynnwood followed him for the rest of his career. It brings to mind an old cliche. You can change the law but you can't change the people. The little devils may have disbanded by nineteen eighty but the violent mentality that formed. The gang didn't dissipate overnight. The vikings are also gone. The lynnwood sheriff's station closed in nineteen ninety four but every time. One gang is disbanded. Another seems to take its place the current sheriff of la county. Alex vienna waiver cut his teeth at the east. La station in two thousand sixteen. He recommissioned the four to patchy logo. That had i been installed by the little devils. The community has complained that the seal is racist and demeaning but this is evidently done little to change. Vienna wave as mind. The logo still stands. And as we'll discover the little devils and the vikings set a precedent for future deputy gangs each increasingly violent. The next group to take up this mantle was stationed in lenox. A neighborhood south of inglewood. They were aptly named the grim reapers. Thanks for listening. Join us next week as we continue on deep dive into the deputy gangs of the l. Ast we also unpacked the history of sheriff culture to understand the outlaw mentality that allowed these gangs to evolve. You can find more episodes of kingpins secret societies and all other spotify originals from podcast for free on spotify kingpins and secret societies as spotify originals from podcast executive producers include. Maxine ron cutler. Sound designed by russell nash with production assistance bhai wrong shapiro carly madden and travis clark. This episode was written by aaron land with fact checking by haley milton and research by julian. Zero brad klein and brian patriots. This episode stars vanessa. Richardson and alliston. Murden don't forget to check out our love story. The newest spotify original from podcast every tuesday discover the many pathways to love as told by the actual couples who found them. Listen to our love story. Free on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.

los angeles county sheriff's d vikings la county La lynnwood laguna park los angeles andre barrett Baratz lapd five thousand square miles alistair murden vanessa richardson lee Paul tanaka vietnam thirty percent David kukoc east la forty four percent
Nature Gardens At The Natural History Museum of LA County

Cultivating Place

56:50 min | 1 year ago

Nature Gardens At The Natural History Museum of LA County

"This is cultivating place conversations on natural history in the human impulse to garden from nor state public radio in northern California. I'm Jennifer jewel this week. We visit a remarkable public garden in California during California native plant week the nature gardens at the natural history. Museum of Los Angeles County are testament to just how much one garden can do where once a parking lot sat stay with us, the landscape architect and museum staff. Collaborated very deeply on the original planting a pallet for the entire garden. It was master planned and every plant that was chosen to be a part of this garden was chosen for a contribution that it would make to providing habitat. This is cultivating place. I'm Jennifer jewel in this hour fifth but not quite final. Listen for more information towards the end of this episode in our five part series on our gardens as habitat, and we gardeners as powerful land stewards and bio-diversity protectors. We visit a remarkable public garden in California. It's California native plant week the nature gardens at the natural history. Museum of Los Angeles County are testament to just how much one garden can do to turn back time and help restore habitat even in downtown LA where once a parking lot sat Barron an overheated. We're joined today by native plant expert, Carol Bornstein, director of the nature gardens and by Leila Higgins, senior manager of community science there. With hard data collected over the last seven years and huge hearts for this work. They bring us up to speed on what the nature gardens and the habitat they provide can offer to us all Carol and Leila. Join us today with the help of audio producer Joanna clay from the nature gardens. Welcome Carole and Leila. Hello. I I'd love to have you both start by restating your job title, and tell us what that actually means in your working life day today. Let's start with you, Carol. I'm the director of the nature gardens here at the museum. I also oversee the the museums live animal program. So I joke he like to tell people that I'm responsible for the living things here at the museum as opposed to all the the dead specimens that we have in in our collections. There's no typical day, really. But a fair amount of. Time will be spent out in the garden communicating with our head gardener and some of the other members of the garden team just addressing what's going on with the the plants in the in the collection itself. Interacting with many other staff with regard to how the the gardens are being used of for educational purposes carefully for some of the research work, just all sorts of different collaborations that revolve and spin off of what's happening out in the gardens. Yeah. What about you? Leila. Hi. So I'm the senior manager of community science which some people refer to as citizens science about a year ago. We changed the name not everyone is a citizen who we want to participate. I'm personally, not a citizen of the United States. And we also were approached by the community and asked to change the name. And so that that's the rationale there. But the. Definition is the same regardless of whether you call a community signs like we do or citizen science, and it's getting the general public involved in answering real research questions and are real research questions or what's going on with nature here in Los Angeles. And that's not just in the garden, but all over the LA southern California region. But now that we have the garden it's an amazing field research site for both are scientists work in research and collections. I have a degree in entomology, so insects are among jam. But I love I realized that I wasn't going to be a hard science researcher. I realized I needed to communicate science to people, and that's what gave me true joy and getting to help build this garden here at the museum. It's just so amazing coming into work and seeing kids around the pond like literally getting their feet wet following chasing a butterfly getting to see birds up-close or them crawling through the wormhole in. Dirty zone. It's it's something that gives me like tangles every day. It is a it is an incredible garden. Carol will you describe the scope of these gardens that were we are talking about an a little bit about their history that how big are they when were they I put in. Why were they put in? Well, so the guards are roughly three and a half acres, and they took the place of a couple of parking lots and some rather mundane landscaping fair amount of lawn and not not a whole lot else. And the idea came about during the process of doing some major renovation to the the museum itself earthquake retrofitting the old historic wing and some of the galleries throughout the museum. And I wasn't here at the time Leela can speak to this perhaps more detail. But the the idea was to take the museums work, it's research work, and it's. -cational programming outdoors on our own property and to use the space the outdoor space as part of our our mission based work so becoming a museum of nature and natural history. The museum staff they developed a team of of biologists and educators, and that's where Leila came in wearing both hats at the time and worked with meal and associates local landscape architecture firm to develop the concept for the gardens and to help to construct them. And the goals were were multiple. They wanted to build something that could be used as a field site for conducting research also for many educational program opportunities for nature play because so many people who live in Los Angeles. Don't have the opportunity to have some type of connection with the outdoors. They they don't get to the beach or they don't go to the mountains. Nhs their school yards may be more asphalt than anything else. And there was a very strong belief that we needed to provide some opportunities, whether it was a first touch for nature or giving people a chance to just move along that continuum and become better aware of more connected with nature that is around them and also to serve as a demonstration garden of what they might be able to do in their own space and last, but certainly not least to create habitat for wildlife in this urban setting Lindy one adds something to that. So I've been at the museum ten years. And when I first got here and heard about this project, and I was like, oh my gosh. How can I start working on that? I have a master's degree environmental education, which was paired with my entomology undergrad degree and was like this is going to be a really powerful space for many of the reasons Carol outlined, and as a person who grew up on a form in England and got to run around playing hall trees and pretending to be a badger and chasing butterflies down a country lane. I felt really really compelled to help make a space where people can have experiences like that here in Los Angeles safe natural outdoor spaces where parents could bring their kids and kind of the parents could sit down and relax and kids could get their hands dirty in compost and climb on a tree stump and chase butterflies. Maybe. Okay. Maybe they also. Oh can pretend to be badgers. But American badges note European badges? But I got to work on that literally had started in December of two thousand eight and then halfway through two thousand nine I got assigned to the nature gardens project working with the head of exhibits at the time, Karen wise and found myself as the most Judy person in the room with the president of the museum and head of our construction company listening to the pitches from all the different landscape firms that we're going to possibly wanted to work with us. And then we selected Mierlo layer at associates, and I was just like how my in this space and an in getting against the whole completion cycle and then hiring on Carol and the now having a full complement of garden staff and seeing kids and adults out in that space. It's kind of just like a magical thing, it is magical thing. And I wanna go back to Carol for just a second before we get into more of the science being. Done there, Carol as really one of the premier native plant experts in California, especially in public garden space, your whole career has been dedicated to to this kind of work will you describe for people the kind of range of plants both implant types, and maybe how many species you have. And just like, what would we mean when we say were planting for habitat, give us some tangible names and faces to that. Well, I I'll just start by saying that the the gardens are not an entirely, California native composition, there are exotic plants here. Although most of what people see when they come was part of the overall planting design, very very little of what remained prior to the groundbreaking is on the property, but there are some exotic species and those reflect part of the fabric of the. Urban landscape that exists throughout Los Angeles. And that was intentional to make it be accessible in a visual way. That people could relate to some of the plants that were already here that they do see around the city, but I'd say about two thirds are California native plants, and they range from local native species of plants that you might find along the natural reaches of the Los Angeles or the San Gabriel rivers. So right Perry in vegetation such as a Royal willow, the California sycamore oak woodland, primarily we would we have coast live oak. But we also have a few species of other native oaks on the property. Lots of Toyin, which is the official Strub official native plant of Los Angeles that absolutely thrives in this garden, several different kinds of CNN 'thus and man's anita's coffee berry and. Currents and gooseberries. So there's a quite an extensive array of Woody plants, but we also have a lot of native grasses Perennials. There's even an aquatic component. Because we have an unnatural Listrik pond that is populated entirely with California native plants and the Hollander meadow actually have to pollinator gardens one that is exclusively California natives a mosaic of grasses and annual and perennial wildflowers with a few shrubs for structure around structure, but we also have an a'mixed Hollander garden that is a more formal in presentation to appeal to people who might not like, you know, the the less tidy look that the the meadow a presents in addition to all of that there's also an edible garden that doesn't fact have some California native plants mixed in partly for their in secretary benefits. But. Also because some of our native plants definitely have an edible component to them. That's a kind of a general overview. Yeah. And there's roughly six hundred or so different species and cultivars in the garden, not including the edible plants and the annual wildflowers so for the snow barely size. There's a lot of plant diversity a lot of impact. When I was last there. I think the the Wildflower meadow mosaic area, you were referring to was just getting started. And with this great bloom year going on can you describe that a little bit for us shirt? Yes. It's in bloom. It's it's probably the most dynamic part of all of the nature gardens other than the changing annual beds in the edible garden because of the composition of the diversity of plants that are there, and the fact that it has. It has definitely evolved since we planted it. It was the the last section of the garden to be installed. The meadow originally had a lot more annual Wildflower component to it. And over time the bunch grasses have naturalized and taken up more of the real estate. So there are probably there's less of the ground plane of annuals, but there are more of some of the other plants that we landed such as the desert APR ikat and the Indian Mallow and the annual sunflower some things have just been super super happy in that location. And we have let a lot of things just evolved on their own trying to take a to some degree a bit of a hands off approach and let things find their place. But at the same time, we are we are still managing it just in that description alone where you have the, you know, really Connick. Canopy trees of the sycamore and the oaks there and all the way down to the to the native bunch grasses. There is this beautiful and wholly Representative plant communities there which would allow for a lot of year, round, observation and information collection. So I'm going to move to you Leela and have you talk a little bit about the different ways that you are incorporating both community science and hard science with all of that opportunity throughout the year. Again, we were very excited about this garden opening and even before it opened. We started surveying the space with our scientific staff. We had this group that we call the habitat team. And I was one of the lead content educators on that team. But also had. A science background. So was able to work with an across the science to education side of things, and we have been doing a lot of field research out in the space. So we have our Tamala gist out there putting up Malays trap. That's been up since the garden has opened animals trap for those of you don't know it's like almost like a tent, but for insects that fly through the environment, and they get caught on the piece of netting. That's there. And then they are tracked into flying up to try and get away they fly up woods. And then they get cold in this jar, which is filled with alcohol, and yes, they do parish. But we take killing things very seriously here. We're only doing it to to help our understanding of the planet and to hopefully, make the planet and our environment, especially here in Los Angeles better for humans and for wildlife. So we. Found hundreds and hundreds of insect species in the garden through that Malays trapping projects and our staff and volunteers sorting through those insects inside of our nature lab exhibit. So the public can come in throughout the week in the weekends and get to see volunteers and work study students from USA sorting through those insects, and we have a microscope setup. So they can see them up close and see some of these life forms that are flying around in also even their own backyards, but are something that are so small and so tiny the people don't get to see. So we've had three hundred and five species of insects observed in the nature gardens through this logical survey to split that up nine species of dragonflies, damsel flies which mostly relying on the pond because dragonflies and damsel flies lay their eggs inside of water. And so their babies live on the border of putting in that wall. A source really helps to increase the bottom versity in relation to the dragonflies. Dams of is we have fourteen species of butterflies in a found in the garden. Nineteen species of flower flies, also known as a hover flies they are pollinators forty five species of scuttle flies. So these are in the true fly group there also known as humpback flies because they have this very large hump behind their head an-and, sixteen species more than sixteen species of bees, and then thirty four species of beetles, which Beatles, my favorite order insects. So very excited to see so many of those in our age gardens, and then beyond the insects. We've had four species of reptiles amphibians found there was a turtle dumped in the pong. There was a American bullfrog dumped in the pond. So those are species that we've seen were not necessarily very excited about having them in in the space. They are again invasive species that have. Wrought havoc around the world. But then we have to species blizzards have shown up and there were not really lizards in the space before the gardens were built seventeen species of mammals, ten species of sales slugs and one hundred seven bird species are. Yeah, it's amazing are one of orange haired the museum Kimball Garrett he has lived in Los Angeles his whole life. He grew up playing in the Hollywood hills all birds around and he scored a job here at the museum and has been here over thirty years. And since the gardens opened he has been going out weekly and he's done two hundred seventy nine bird surveys. He seen twenty two thousand six hundred fifteen individual birds, which represents one hundred seven species I wanted to just add something about all these creatures. None of that wildlife was intentionally brought into the garden. There's only there's only one animal that we. Intentionally introduced in that was the Arroyo chub, which is a native fish that. We actually had to secure a permit in order to release it in the pond, and it has been so happy that the initial seating of maybe twenty five to fifty or so fish has now turned into many, hundreds if not thousands of fish, but everything else, you know, that we have been documenting has arrived on its own accord. Although as Leila did say a couple things apparently were deposited in the pond that we pre mmediately removed. Carol Bornstein is director and Leila Higgins, the senior manager of community science both at the nature gardens of the natural history. Museum of Los Angeles County in downtown LA, the three and a half acre garden was conceived and planted in what was mostly as volt parking lot. The natural history museum is LA's oldest museum building and the present day anchor of an emerging cultural educational and entertainment hub in exposition park. Natural history museum. Visitors are awed by extraordinary specimens and the stories behind them. In addition to sharing the history of the planet. The natural history museum also explores a more local transformation, the outdoor nature gardens and the nature lab. Look at how environment and people past and present interact in LA the unifying. Theme in these indoor and outdoor experiences is the interplay of nature and culture in Los Angeles and the world the gardens put living nature into the life and science of this historic natural history museum. We'll be right back after a break to hear more. Hey, I've had so many wonderful comments and notes about the impression this habitat series has made on all of you and me to how it's opened your thinking and inspired your own gardening at this time of year in particular. You'll hear more about this at the end of this episode. But I just couldn't help myself. I added one more episode to what was supposed to be a series of five. It was too hard to stop because in reality all gardens are about habitat right there have tat for us for our sanity for our wildlife, and our plants and well engaging in life, more, fully and richly on all levels. It's because of you donors out there that I was able to put my head around curing such a series and the forethought planning scheduling in communicating. This involves so thank you to each and every one of you who showed up as donors as well. As listeners we have a lot of new ideas here at cultivating place, and we need listener support to help us out. If you wanna be the gardener to our garden, please consider making a tax deductible donation by clicking on the link that says support in the upper right hand corner of any page Eckel debating place dot com, while most people give us a steaming donations of twenty dollars a month. Kenny size or one time gift goes a long way to make these important conversations possible. Thank you. Now. Back to our conversation with Carol Bornstein and Leila Higgins of the nature gardens at the natural history. Museum of Los Angeles County. This is cultivating place. I'm Jennifer jewel. Welcome back to our conversation with Carol Bornstein and Leila Higgins of the habitat intense nature gardens at the natural history. Museum of Los Angeles County in downtown LA. So that was one of my questions when when you referred to frog and the turtles being dumped, these are non native species that somebody came and just released without permission into the environment. The turtle happened during construction we did have a camera trap on the pond of time camera trapping is something else that way, we do in the garden to help to collect data and we saw some construction boots coming in the frame, and then the next day turtle was in the pond. So it was a rhetoric slider. It's on the top one hundred species list of invasive species that is on the red list way had somewhere live animal staff. Oversee the removal of total and rehoming wanna go back to all of these wonderful numbers of bugs, you were giving these three and a half acres of gardens went into a place that was basically just as fault. It was just paved over and more or less, and then these gardens come in you've been what I understood from what you said is you've been collecting this data on the insect and other life in the gardens for all of these years or a great many of them since the garden was planted. We're hearing all the time right now about how fresher are insect life is in the world. And it's decreasing numbers. We don't have data from before the garden was there. But in theory there clearly weren't, you know, damsel flies and dragonflies because there was not water. So are you seeing trends of upward and downward? Are you what are you seeing there? And what does it say to you? So the Malays trap that I was talking about is one of well, it was originally in the first ration- of this research product, which is called bio scan which stands for biodiversity science city nature just run by our Tamala staff here, and Dr Brian Brown are Tamala just he's a fly specialist, and so that Malays trip in our nature gardens was one of thirty that was all over the city of Los Angeles and through. Those traps they discovered forty three species of of these flies that are brand new to science not new Los Angeles. But brand new no scientists knew that they had existed on the planet until our researchers looked at them and identify them. Yes. So this is real science happening. And in two other flies that he looked at in that sample one had never before been found in Los Angeles. Edit only been known to exist in Europe, a third one also never before found in LA only known from the east and west coast of Africa three scientific discoveries one new species, and then to range expansions we found to date is they're working on publishing a lot of state. But so I don't want to preempt them on that. But what Carol Annan other people have been saying plant native plants plant native plants, and or climate appropriate plants, and you will increase by diversity in your space. I think for Gardner. There's maybe our greatest joy in life. E is this idea of making. Gardens that welcome all of these creatures even in a small space and being able to make that difference. Just feel so hugely helpful to me and hopeful to me, given what we are seeing worldwide in terms of declines of these creatures that we we rely on them for everything and we harm them at our own peril. So with that in mind, I wanna move back to Carol. And you know, we talk about habitat nor garden's very generally, but you can give us some really I think beautiful specifics, perhaps on ways that you have as a plant person thought about the habitat needs of these, you know, many different species and said, you know, maybe this is their larvae. Food. Maybe I'll plant this this is there, you know, this would be great nesting material for for hummingbirds. Maybe I'll plant this has there been a kind of intentional planning for the support of the different life stages of some of these creatures mean, I think the the most common when we hear about all the time. Of course is the milk Weeden and the monarch or you know, for us the pipe vine and the Aristo Kia with the pipeline swallowtail butterflies have had there been other examples like that that you can share with us wherein, you think that long term for what your plants and your final relationships are doing together while they the short answer is. Yes, that that was definitely intentional the team that of Leland. I mentioned of the landscape architect and museum staff. Collaborated very deeply on the original planting. Palette for the entire garden. It was master plan and every plant that was chosen to be a part of this garden was chosen for it. What a contribution that it would make to providing habitat also to be compatible with our Mediterranean climate here in Los Angeles, and to be to survive on fairly low water over its lifespan, not everything has worked for one reason or another because guards, of course, are grand experiments in and things don't number one live necessarily live forever. And we're constantly editing and changing trying to honor the original intentions, and when new plants are brought into the garden. They do need to pass muster with that same goal in mind to provide either a food source, whether it's through the flowers or the fruits or nesting material or shelter as far as specifics. Well, there's a plant from. Baja California Mexico. Culver Beena, Lila seena that. One of the things that people do like about that. And it has become very popular year in central and southern California is that blooms almost all year long has lovely purple flowers that happen to be fragrant adapted to our dry summer climate here. And it attracts a quite a diverse array of butterflies, so from skippers disqualify sales monarchs so that is one that is popular not only for its beauty. But also for its attractiveness to butterflies, the native sunflower, I mentioned that earlier I've been delighted by how happy it is in our garden. But also the fact that not only do native bees neck, visit the flowers when they're in bloom in late spring early summer, but as the seeds ripen, then it provides a wonderful food source for gold finches, they will just hang upside down and just feast away until they. You know, get disturbed by something and fly off and then of Chile return. So that's a plant that that that gives in multiple ways coast live oaks and oaks in general, you know, have a reputation of being fantastic habitat. Plants. There's documentation that oak trees provide some type of support to over five hundred different creatures of wildlife at some point during their life. Whether it's a food source or nesting or shelter. And so we definitely see an awful lot of activity among the many oak trees here in the garden Ciller of few very very few examples. I remember when I was there being really taken by the bat monitoring equipment that ill had down by think by the pond area. Well, I I know that we've documented I think it's five. Species now. And I think that the reason that we are seeing that kind of activity is because of the fact that all of these plants are providing some type of food source for insects in the the bats visiting to eat, the insects and Leela can probably fill in more detail about that. Yes. So the person who puts up the bat detector is Miguel Oriana he works in the community science office. He's also an urban cone of researcher an Mamool gist. So we've had a bat detector up for number of years in the garden. We have one two three four five species of bats that have been detected. We've got the big Brown bat red bat hoary bat pallid bat and Townsend big eared bat, one of the other things that the again, I keep mentioning the pond the pond is a great resource for bats, not what was people would think it's because of all insects that live in the aquatic environment. And then emerge. Urge as adults and these flying insects are then food source for bats. And you'll often see that's fine. Ovo waterways around Los Angeles at dusk. And it's a really beautiful sight to behold, and you're like, you might be eating any of the mosquitoes that a flying around right now and bats so that was one of the things like we have to have a pond, we have to have a pond, we have to have a pond known only going to add all of this diversity and habitat for these species that really rely on that quantum environment. But I've done a lot of ponding with children. And so taking kids out to the edge of the pond hitting them Annette giving them a even a simple tool like a plastic smoothen and a ice cube tray. They can then sample for the macro invertebrates in the pawn, and they get to find things like two strikers and Dragonfly. Larvae and dams affi- larvae, and we don't actually have very many mosquitoes upon which is an tastic all the Orioles job undoing their job eating eating them. Lots of other insects like may fly larvae we found some pita larvae living in the pond as well. Beyond the pawn. We also wanted to make sure that we added habitat value in addition to the plant, so we have be hotels, we put up out there. And I remember working with some of our exhibit team with some old pieces of wood Brian round or Tamala just had in his backyard, and we drilled hundreds of holes into them and put them out, and we're so excited when we saw Ie's moving in these a solitary bees, not the, you know, honeybees that live in these giant, colonial groups, so they're much less likely to Singley solitary bees, and they move in. And they lay their eggs inside of these holes and provision them with pollen sacs. And then the babies hatch out and get to eat Napolitan. There is inside there. So that's that's really fantastic things that get provisioned with spiders or actually wa-. So we have we have areas that we let go muddy and then wasps come and collect the mud from those little edges of the muddy puddles and make little Ness on the side of the building. We've also left lots of area is like bare sand because their ground nesting sand SPS in the ambiguous which have these beautiful green eyes. You know? That's not something that most gardeners may be no about, but yet if you want to have these beautiful wasps, and again, these are solitary wasps, so they're not gonna be out there trying to sting us. Humans like yellow jackets are and then added bonus for those mud Doha's. You know, if you have any phobia of spiders there they as part of their life cycle they need to vision their their their nest with those items for their babies too. In this fifth episode in our series focusing on the important role. We our gardens can play in supporting bio-diversity in this world. We're speaking with Carol Bornstein director and Leila Higgins senior manager of community. Science at the nature gardens of the natural history. Museum of Los Angeles County in downtown LA the gardens were designed and planted by Mia layer and associates a firm now known as studio M L A in two thousand thirteen in collaboration with science and education. Staff at the natural history museum specifically to re introduce native habitat, by way of water rocks. Trees other plants and soils for the native wildlife of Los Angeles to return, the resulting insect reptile, mammal and bird diversity. Making this oh Acis garden. Their home is reminder to us all of the power. We have to create habitat for all on our own patches of earth. We'll be right back after a break. Stay with us. Okay. So thinking out loud. Here you want to know what I'm loving, the very most about this conversation with Carole and Leela it's this. We're speaking so little about pollinators now that might sound like a funny thing to say, but if you've been listening to these conversations in this series, you might have picked up that my feelings are this when we talk about habitat and biodiversity loss. It's not about one subset of life animals, we humans, call pollinators. We don't need this issue reduced to a sound bite. We are fully capable of grasping both the nuance and the complexity of the damage we have done to these living systems and our capacity for helping to restore balance. And it's not about us doing this because it benefits us as humans that the loss of pollinators will severely impact our food. Ops. For instance, we care, and we can act based solely on the fact that it's the right thing to do the problem. We've created is not simple and the answer is not simple. But it starts simply with starting from where we are doing what we can to not only change our actions in decisions, but to increase our own understanding and wariness garden variety everyday actions from the ground up. It is about the monarchs in the hummingbirds and the honeybees, but as Carol and Leila demonstrate it's also about lizards, and spiders beetles and bats, it's about flies and sand wasps, we might be preconditioned to be scared of, but which are in fact gentle, and they had the most beautiful iridescent is and they have an important place in this. Well. Of life that we're one tiny part of we can do this. We you and me gardeners, we most especially can do this. Now back to our conversation with Carol Bornstein and Leila Higgins of the nature gardens at the natural history. Museum of Los Angeles County. This is cultivating place. I'm Jennifer jewel. Welcome back to our conversation with Carol Bornstein and Leila Higgins of the nature gardens at the natural history. Museum of Los Angeles County in downtown LA, you know, as home Gardner's in in you have both sort of reference the idea of the garden serving as demonstration for other people to see what they can do. And clearly not everybody's going to be able to put in a big pond or plant an enormous oak or even planned to small oak that's going to become an enormous oak. If you both of you had sort of one to three things that you would say to listeners as to what you would love to see them do in their gardens to move in this direction. What would those with those three things being let's start with you. Carol. Well, that's tough. I've thought about this a lot. I guess maybe the first thing I would suggest is to if you're using any kind of toxic chemicals in your garden to just stop doing that the statistics about the use of of herbicides pesticides in this country is a very alarming, and in my opinion. It's it's unnecessary. And we are managing this garden using organic practices, and we are not using toxic chemicals at all and we're not using synthetic fertilizers either. So I would encourage people to just abandon those practices because that is killing both beneficial as well as the occasional pests that might be visiting your garden and allow natural natural predators to help come and provide some kind of ecological balance in whatever size garden, you might have. So that I think that might be my first suggestion, certainly incorporating some Nick, California native plants into your garden, if you don't already, and if you're space is really really limited. I would concentrate on those that are as local as possible to your area. With the expectation that those would ideally be the best adapted to your site. That isn't always the case, but more likely than not they would they would hopefully be better adapted than something from tr- SU super far away as many of your listeners Nell, California's incredibly diverse state with over six thousand species of native plants and not all of those are going to grow well in your mediate area. So try to narrow your scope. Releasing chemicals using native plants, regardless of the size of your garden tried to incorporate different layers vegetation. So that you're providing habitat for as wide in array of of wildlife as possible. And by that, I mean plans that cover the ground in your kind of a blanket on the ground mid story as well as some type of canopy because different species occupy all of those different zones, and that not only adds to the visual interest of your garden. But it definitely will also nurture other forms of life to a appreciable extent. So I have to add one more, and that is some type of a water supply, even if it's just a tiny little dripping Byrd bath type of setup at that has everything needs water to some degree, and it doesn't have to be exuberant or expansive, but just a little bit. We'll go a long way to supporting life. What about you Leela? Okay. Get rid of your loans as much as you possibly can especially in southern California habitat value, basically zero I'm not saying don't have any loan. I totally see them as a great place for children and dogs to maybe play or laying down on for a picnic or taking a nap in on for all those things but as much as possible frequently drive by and you see people not using the loans for ninety nine percent of the time. So yet rid of his much loan as possibly feel it. You can outdoor cats are really destructive unloved cats. I love my friend's cats, but they kill so much wildlife. Lizards birds insects, even and I know that's really hard for some people here. But that you can have. You're happy. Indoor cat you could make an outdoor cat run. One of the women that I do a lot of work with a huge advocate football life. Here. Nelly. Susan gottlieb. She has a lovely nice big cat run outside. And so and she has hundreds and hundreds of hummingbirds visit her house, but that Cameron allows the cats to be outside the birds to be safe, and then Leslie, Carol mention the no pesticides. I'm going to get really specific one kind pesticide not dentist sides any rat poison the being put out they can be really destructive going up the food chain getting all the way even to in are amazing mountain line p twenty two he was suffering from mange had to be captured and administered medicine, and that's that's directly linked to rodenticides. And so that's something we're really trying to fight against here in Los Angeles right now. And getting that to be something that the. Adopted across the city, and hopefully Ross the county, and hopefully other cities counties will follow suit. Is there anything else you would like to add? And I wanna remind listeners that there's this amazing opportunity coming up the city nature challenge is gonna be able twenty seven th through the twenty nineth for survey shin period. Get your smartphones digital cameras out take pictures any plant or animal in any city. That's participating and that's a project that I helped to star in co-founded when someone from California academy sciences, and it's a competition between it was originally for years ago. L A versus San Francisco, which cine can find the most ager in the hundred forty cities around the world. Lots of cities in the western United States LA and San Francisco a long standing rivalry. Help us beat San Francisco. I just remembered one thing or new book while I'm one of the co-authors Carol was one of our scientific advisers. We have a whole we have twenty five field trips around LA, the nature gardens is one of them. So on vine, okay hero. Anything you would like to add in terms of the the plant in wildlife connection to the plants that I didn't mention it all that are really kind of should be at the top of the list for providing capital are the buckwheat s- the area games and Bacchus so buckwheat ZIM backer as have been huge stars in terms of the the insect diversity that they support how many different species of buck weeds. Do you have in the garden and our their lists of plant and plant species that you have in the garden up online under on the website. We don't have it online. I do. You have a plant database, and you know, we share it with people who express an interest in it. But it's not live. I can roughly say that we have probably seven or eight species of buckwheat in the garden. I'm really glad you mentioned both of those because they are such for one thing. Great season extenders, we are very close to our time. So I think I will move to is there is there anything else you would like to add maybe speaking personally to some moment of beauty or engagement in the garden that you could share with visitors about, you know, not just the wise. But not just the like you should. But the this is why it's so powerful to you personally. Well, I could say that for me the time that I spend not only in this garden, but my own garden brings me joy just by virtue of seeing the beauty that plants that are thriving provides and the support that they also provide the the dynamic between the plants and the wildlife is just a constant stores of. While inspiration, beauty and pleasure. It's it's part of the fabric of of our landscape in. I I don't know how I came to. Appreciate that. Exactly. I I've been gardening since I was a child, but I don't really think I paid that much attention to the wildlife. It was more the plants initially and over time I've come to appreciate the connection. Between all of these different living things, and how they how they change over time to me that is I think one of the most interesting aspects of being a gardener and the happy surprises when something does what you don't expect it to do, and that can be a wonderful thing in of itself, the problem solving aspect of being a gardener realizing that not everything is going to work the way you want that there are going to be failures. But they'll also be a lot of successes the willingness to you know, the willingness to fail and to to try something new, and it's always changing. That's what I love about. What I do that. It's it's unpredictable, and I really appreciate and value that very highly. What about you Leela? So for me, it's really going to see people in this space engaging as the manager of the community signs program like getting right before this interview. I went onto I natural. Which is the platform we use to help documents nature in this garden space, like how many species observations have been found documented by people who visit the museum and some of those people coming to our programs. Some of those people are kids in you know, some of our kind of like nature clubs, but some of them are just general visitors who maybe don't even get a personal interaction with. And so I looked that up. We had over two hundred seventy two people submitted three thousand seven hundred ninety seven observations which represents five hundred twenty eight species in that garden space up. And so seeing the power of that data set that has been collectively created by many most of those people are not scientists they're not they don't have undergraduate degree or master's or PHD in science, but they are out there and they care enough to take a photo and they care enough to submit. And so we get to see that data. And then get a better understanding of what is here in this garden space, and that's really powerful to me than having those personal interactions in the space will ink out, even if I'm just really rushed in Woking to meeting will through the space and see a group of schoolchildren kind of running joint smiles on that faces. And then when the they realize that they're allowed to kind of put their hands in the pond and failed at pond Volta and the teachers like, yeah, okay. Go ahead and just like this exuberant joy on those faces that feeds me feeds, my soul and shows the true power of the space. Thank you. Both very much for being guests on the program today. It has been a great pleasure to speak to you both and learn even more about those powerful gardens. Thank you, a pleasure to be a part of this series. Yes. Thank you. Carol Bornstein is a California native plant expert and the director of the nature gardens at the natural history. Museum of Los Angeles County. Leila Higgins is an entomologist educator and senior manager of community. Science at the natural history. Museum with hard data collected over the last seven years and huge hearts for this work. Carol and Leela are just two people in a large team working to increase support and learn from the nature gardens and the habitat they provide they provide that habitat to us all humans and other wildlife for more information on the nature gardens. Please see the museum's website at N H M dot org where you can follow the data collections and live cams that Carol and Leila were telling us about placed out in the gardens. You can also check out their new book co authored by Leila on which Carroll served. A science editor it's called wild LA exploring, the amazing nature in and around Los Angeles. As they say alligator lizards and free flying parakeets are just the beginning. While this was meant to be the fifth and final episode in our deep dive series into our gardens as important in sustaining habitats for the wildlife of our native areas, and we gardeners as important stewards of bio-diversity. I just couldn't help myself. I have extended the exploration to one more episode because it fits in so beautifully. You might know of the iron. Rush plants woman and garden designer Mary Reynolds from the movie dare to be wild of which her surprising gold medal winning garden design at the Chelsea flower show and her passion for nature in gardens is the focus or you might know her as the author of the garden awakening in either event, I think you will really enjoy hearing her garden life journey and her concept for gardens as arcs of hope for wildlife, the globe over join us next week for that cultivating places a listener supported co-production of nor state public radio for more information and many photos from the inspiring nature gardens in Los Angeles. See this week show notes under the podcast tab, Eckelt availing, place dot com. Our engine near skyscraper field. Original theme music is by Mark muse, accompanied by Joe craven, and Sam Bevan cultivating places distributed nationally by p r x public radio exchange until next week and joy, the cultivation of your place. I'm Jennifer jewel.

Los Angeles Leila Higgins Museum of Los Angeles County California Carol Carol Bornstein Jennifer jewel senior manager Leela director United States Natural history museum researcher museum of nature Carole Acis garden head gardener producer
Los Angeles Times 10/6/20

L.A. Times Morning Briefing

03:09 min | 2 months ago

Los Angeles Times 10/6/20

"It's Tuesday October sixth I'm Kyle Sour Hoffer and here's your local news from the Los Angeles Times presented by the Salvation Army in a year with fewer red kennels help rescue Christmas for the most vulnerable to give ask your smart speaker to make a donation to the Salvation Army or donate at Salvation Army USA DOT ORG. Today will be mostly sunny and very warm with a high around eighty nine degrees in a loaded on sixty three. Our top story despite some promising numbers, Los Angeles County is not expected to move into the next phase of relaxing corona virus restrictions this week, the county recently reported an adjusted rate of seven point, three cases per one hundred, thousand residents policing it within tier one that's here indicates that community transmission is still widespread California counties can't move out here one until the adjusted case rate drops to seven or less for two consecutive weeks. Meanwhile, local officials have staggered the reopening of some businesses and are keeping a close eye on numbers to ensure they don't lead to a surge of new cases, hospitalizations and deaths. In other news, the August complex fire in northern California has burned more than one million acres. It is the first wildfire in California history to have destroyed such a vast swath of land. The blaze began as a series of smaller lightning sparked fires and Mendocino national forest. But now the fire is only fifty four percent contained in the northwest area of the destruction is of grave concern because it's close to communities statewide four million acres have burned during this fire season, and at least thirty, one people have died in the fires. Tens of thousands of people have also been displaced as evacuation orders remain in effect in several counties. Meanwhile Governor Gavin newsom appointed Martin Jenkins to the California Supreme Court. Yesterday Jenkins could become the first openly gay justice on the court and only the third black man, a former prosecutor and judge he is currently newsome's judicial appointments. Secretary Jenkins viewed as generally less liberal than the four justices former governor, Jerry Brown appointed to the court. He would fill a vacancy on the court left by the recent retirement of Justice Ming W Chin an appointee of then Republican. Governor Pete Wilson Jin was the courts most conservative member. And finally, the southern California steelhead trout is teetering on the edge of extinction but biologists and engineers want to change that by improving part of the L. A. River Channel, they want to Ruffin the bottom with. And deepen the notch along Channel Center by at least two feet, boulders will also be anchored along the channel to create pools allowing the steelhead to rest overall population has plummeted to fewer than four hundred steelheads scattered across the coastal waters between San Luis Obispo and the Mexican border. The Endangered Species Act requires the government to take action to prevent extinction of the species which was listed as federally endangered in Nineteen ninety-seven Biologists and city officials hope to complete the project before L. Twenty Twenty eight. Summer, Olympics. For these stories and more visit LA TIMES DOT com.

California California Supreme Court Secretary Jenkins Salvation Army Los Angeles County L. Twenty Twenty Governor Pete Wilson Jin Los Angeles Times Governor Gavin newsom Kyle Sour Hoffer Salvation Army USA Jerry Brown L. A. River Channel San Luis Obispo Mendocino Channel Center prosecutor newsome
Los Angeles Times 10/27/20

L.A. Times Morning Briefing

03:07 min | Last month

Los Angeles Times 10/27/20

"It's Tuesday October twenty seventh. I'm Kyle Sour Hoffer, and here's your local news from the Los Angeles Times presented by the salvation. Army, in a year with fewer red kettles help rescue Christmas for the most vulnerable. Give ask your smart speaker to make a donation to the Salvation Army or donate at Salvation Army USA DOT ORG. Today will be nice with plenty of Sunshine, a high of seventy eight and a low tonight at six. Our Top story, The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors will consider emotion today seeking options for removing. Sheriff Alex via Nueva. Their proposal escalates the contentious relationship between the county's most powerful elected leaders but supervisor Mark Ridley Thomas told The Times that the sheriff is increasingly being viewed as a liability. If approved, the motion would erect county lawmakers to look into how to impeach Viana Waiver or take away some of the responsibilities. The lawyers also explore legislative changes that could make the position of sheriff an opponent role. Instead of an elected one, the motion seeks or report back in thirty days via. Nueva has previously pushback against criticism and said, he has no intention of stepping down. In Education. UC Berkeley is disavowing. It's Eugenics Research Fund School of Public Health Team Michael C. Lou disclosed the funds existence to faculty yesterday and bioethics professor. A Soggy K. Oba soggy raise concerns after receiving an email about the fun. The email claimed it supported research on policies that could affect the distribution of traits in the human race including those related to infertility prenatal screening abortion end gene modification the fund came from a family trust to the University of California Board of regents and nineteen seventy five for research under the banner of now revile ideology. No evidence has surfaced that Berkeley used the money for eugenics research. Instead, it funded a genetic counseling training program Lou said that does not absolve the university. In Business News California has led the country impermanent restaurant closure since March, in the wake of those losses, Michelin, guide will hold an event at eight to celebrate the California restaurant industry and raise money for food banks. The family meal we'll take place at four PM GUIDE UP MICHELIN DOT COM more than thirty Michelin starred chefs are scheduled to appear including Wolfgang Puck Gordon Ramsay an Nancy Silverton. The first California winners of a new sustainability awards category will also be introduced earlier this month the organization announced, it would not release. It's twenty twenty guide of California's best restaurants. And finally, the dodgers have a chance to win the world series for the first time since one, thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty, eight, tonight, they hold a three to two lead over the Tampa Bay rays and game six starts at five PM Rookie Pitcher Tony Gull and we'll start for la he pitched game two on two days rest and lasted only one and one third innings Blake's. Now we'll start for the race he has two wins and two losses in the postseason. For these stories and more visit LA TIMES DOT com.

Los Angeles Times California Nueva Michelin Michael C. Lou Salvation Army Berkeley Kyle Sour Hoffer Los Angeles County Board of Su Eugenics Research Fund School Army University of California Board dodgers Salvation Army USA Tony Gull Mark Ridley Thomas Blake Tampa Bay supervisor
Monitor Show 01:00 09-13-2020 01:00

Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

01:42 min | 2 months ago

Monitor Show 01:00 09-13-2020 01:00

"He. If you plan to go out to drink, be sure to make a plan to get home safe. If not make a plan anyway because while you're plants can change. Here's one thing that won't. If. You're caught drinking and driving, you'll face dwi that could cost you up to seventeen thousand dollars in fines and fees jail time, and you could lose your license. So while you're making your plans, make sure to plan a sober right before you go out. So you don't drink drive goes to jail plan while you can't sober rides dot org a message from textile. President trump is calling on his democratic opponent yet again, speaking at a rally in Mendon. Nevada Saturday night the president called Joe Biden pathetic human being festetics, Gel and pathetic human being to allow that to happen. Here's the problem. He doesn't even know it happened I don't I don't think. I think he has no idea but he's a pathetic human being to let that happen the president was discussing Joe Biden's latest commercial which brings up reports that he disparaged world. War. One. Veterans trump reportedly called Americans who died in the First World War losers and suckers according to the Atlantic The Los Angeles County Sheriff's deputies are in critical condition after a shooting incompetent and tweet the department said a male and female deputy were ambushed as they sat in their. Patrol car both sustained multiple gunshot wounds and are currently undergoing surgery. The shooting took place around seven o'clock Saturday at a Metro Blue Line station and train service has been disrupted. The suspect remains at large tropical storm sally is expected to strengthen as it turns in the Gulf of Mexico according to the National Hurricane Center maximum sustained winds are at forty miles per hour and the storm is moving to the West northwest at eight miles per hour sally is located.

Joe Biden president trump Metro Blue Line National Hurricane Center Mexico Mendon Nevada Atlantic The Los Angeles Count seventeen thousand dollars