22 Burst results for "Los Alamos National Labs"

"los alamos national labs" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:58 min | 11 months ago

"los alamos national labs" Discussed on Native America Calling

"That's also one eight hundred nine nine native. And i want to welcome back our guest. Dr mccabe chairwoman. Lee gatewood chris schuler and dr christianson. Welcome back to native america calling and right before the break Dr mckay was sharing some thoughts about the vaccination also prior vaccinations into chris. Something i wanted to ask you about your film you talk to people and talked about other diseases. And how vaccination efforts Were used in those other diseases to help. Treat and prevent those diseases share a little bit about what you found in your documentary. Sure thanks antonia What was really fascinating. We did three years of research before we even started. We started this in two thousand seventeen way before the pandemic and we were looking at that time at the low vaccination rates across the country Especially childhood vaccination rates that were sort of trending downwards And looking back as we do all the research for these documentaries and this one in particular You look at at the pushback vaccines that happened. Even with the polio vaccine with the smallpox vaccine throughout history there has been Misinformation that was spread just as it spread. Now maybe not in the same manner But people get this and latch onto it For all kinds of reasons and then coming coming here especially I was very very fortunate to meet dr mccabe And ron solomon. My good friend introduced me to her. I listen. I am a white privileged male. I understand that. And and i needed to spend at least three years researching and getting to know what were some of the issues around The antibac- movement frankly what we found And i was. I was a hopefully a good student Was that there is a as as Doctor kristensen mentioned and as as the chairwoman mentioned And his doctor mccabe taught me Historical trauma social determinants of health. That are different For native american people and alaskan natives health disparities that are different across the country. Not only for native americans but for african americans hispanic americans. Latin x folks And these disparities. Initially i thought why in the world if you have the information. Why wouldn't you take the vaccine for going to say. I couldn't understand it. Well i grew to understand it. And i get it at least a lot more than i did. And we tried to incorporate that into the film looking at the history when we started the film with women who says Dr betty corber from los alamos national labs who has one of the creators of the hiv vaccine..

Dr mccabe Lee gatewood chris schuler dr christianson Dr mckay dr mccabe ron solomon antonia Doctor kristensen smallpox polio chris america mccabe Dr betty corber los alamos national labs
"los alamos national labs" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"los alamos national labs" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Ridge national laboratory. Los alamos national lab and taiwan's national center for high performance computing. Or the first customers for that and nvidia announced a partnership with aws to integrate invidia. Gp's with amazon's arm based gravitons to processor to run android apps natively and stream games to mobile devices on the business workforce fronts invidia announced a new line of pro ampere cpu's for workstations the rtx. A five thousand and eight four thousand. Gpa for desktops and the a two thousand and eight. Four thousand gpu's for laptops there are also t twelve hundred and t six hundred gp's based on the multitasking oriented turing architecture and new eight ten and sixteen jeep us for data centers closer. Most of our homes though invidia is partnering with mediatek on a reference laptop platform for chromium lennox and nvidia. Sdk's mediatek will simplify. Its arm chips to work with nvidia. Gt us and obviously this could show up and chromebooks but also and game devices smart tvs and more. Yeah like. I said a lot of announcements there. I apologize on the one who edited alps. The the the the main line here though is that invidia is making a cpa. Not the first time. It's made cpu but it's making a cpu. For data centers that directly wants to get company big big companies to spend money when they're building supercomputers with nvidia That is invidia moving even farther away from just being a gpu company To being a full on chip company that provides high end chips to enterprise and that. That's a big deal Nvidia is really good at this stuff. And and so i would expect that you don't get The swish national competing center or the los alamos national laboratory to sign on. Unless you've really showed that that. You've gotta energy-efficient Cpu that can do what those enterprises need to do. In addition to that it's arm based right This this is another chink. In the wall against intel. Where arm can say we have. We have more supercomputers running on arm now because of invidia news. And i was like okay. What's going on i saw. Cnbc is reporting. The intel was stock was taking hit on the news which is not that surprising because intel does have a stronghold one today the centers and if in videos coming after it that's frightening to any investor in general because video can be quite aggressive. I mean when they come when it comes to power and efficiency. They're really good at it. When i think about something like the tegra one. This thing came out years ago. It's still powering. The nvidia shield. And it's still as fast as ever. It's still powering..

nvidia Nvidia android two thousand five thousand amazon eight taiwan Cnbc mediatek swish twelve hundred first time today Four thousand gpu sixteen los alamos national laboratory first customers invidia intel
"los alamos national labs" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"los alamos national labs" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Ridge national laboratory. Los alamos national lab and taiwan's national center for high performance computing. Or the first customers for that and nvidia announced a partnership with aws to integrate invidia. Gp's with amazon's arm based gravitons to processor to run android apps natively and stream games to mobile devices on the business workforce fronts invidia announced a new line of pro ampere cpu's for workstations the rtx. A five thousand and eight four thousand. Gpa for desktops and the a two thousand and eight. Four thousand gpu's for laptops there are also t twelve hundred and t six hundred gp's based on the multitasking oriented turing architecture and new eight ten and sixteen jeep us for data centers. Closer to most of our homes though invidia is partnering with mediatek on a reference laptop platform for chromium lennox and nvidia. Sdk's mediatek will simplify. Its arm chips to work with nvidia gt and obviously this could show up and chromebooks but also and game devices smart tvs and more. Yeah like i said a lot of announcements there. I apologize on the one who edited alps. The the the the main line here though is that invidia is making a cpa. Not the first time. It's made cpu but it's making a cpu. For data centers that directly wants to get company big big companies to spend money when they're building supercomputers with nvidia That is invidia moving even farther away from just being a gpu company To being a full on chip company that provides high end chips to enterprise and that. That's a big deal Nvidia is really good at this stuff. And and so i would expect that you don't get The swish national competing center or the los alamos national laboratory to sign on. Unless you've really showed that that. You've gotta energy-efficient Cpu that can do what those enterprises need to do. In addition to that it's arm based right This this is another chink. In the wall against intel. Where arm can say we have. We have more supercomputers running on arm now because of invidia news. And i was like okay. What's going on i saw. Cnbc is reporting. The intel was stock was taking hit on the news which is not that surprising because intel does have a stronghold one today the centers and if in videos coming after it that's frightening to any investor in general because nvidia can be quite aggressive..

Nvidia nvidia android amazon two thousand five thousand eight taiwan today Cnbc mediatek twelve hundred los alamos national laboratory first time Four thousand gpu sixteen first customers invidia lennox six hundred gp
"los alamos national labs" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"los alamos national labs" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Ridge national laboratory. Los alamos national lab and taiwan's national center for high performance computing. Or the first customers for that and nvidia announced a partnership with aws to integrate invidia. Gp's with amazon's arm based gravitons to processor to run android apps natively and stream games to mobile devices on the business workforce fronts invidia announced a new line of pro ampere cpu's for workstations the rtx. A five thousand and eight four thousand. Gpa for desktops and the a two thousand and eight. Four thousand gpu's for laptops there are also t twelve hundred and t six hundred gp's based on the multitasking oriented turing architecture and new eight ten and sixteen jeep us for data centers closer. Most of our homes though invidia is partnering with mediatek on a reference laptop platform for chromium lennox and nvidia. Sdk's mediatek will simplify. Its arm chips to work with nvidia gt and obviously this could show up and chromebooks but also and game devices smart tvs and more. Yeah like i said a lot of announcements there. I apologize on the one who edited alps. The the the main line here though is that invidia is making a cpa. Not the first time. It's made cpu but it's making a cpu. For data centers that directly wants to get company big big companies to spend money when they're building supercomputers with nvidia That is invidia moving even farther away from just being a gpu company To being a full on chip company that provides high end chips to enterprise and that. That's a big deal Nvidia is really good at this stuff. And and so i would expect that you don't get The swish national competing center or the los alamos national laboratory to sign on. Unless you've really showed that that you've got energy efficient Cpu that can do what those enterprises need to do. In addition to that it's arm based right This this is another chink. In the wall against intel. Where arm can say we have. We have more supercomputers running on arm now because of invidia news..

nvidia Nvidia android amazon two thousand five thousand eight taiwan mediatek twelve hundred los alamos national laboratory first time Four thousand gpu first customers sixteen invidia lennox six hundred gp center four thousand
NASA’s Perseverance rover lands on Mars

Morning Edition

03:34 min | 1 year ago

NASA’s Perseverance rover lands on Mars

"Good morning, Scientists from Planet Earth will land another mission on Mars today. NASA calls the rover perseverance. NPR's science correspondent Joe Palka has been following this one. Good morning, Joe. Morning, Noel, Can we talk about the logistics of this? They have to get a hurtling projectile toe land safely on Mars. How is this done? Yeah. What's the big trick? It's going 12,000 MPH, and they have two landed it two MPH. No problem. Well, what happens is they're overs packed up into something called the Aero Shell, which hits the top of the atmosphere on Mars and Atmosphere slows the craft down and it's friction heats up. That's why there's a heat shield, but that does slow it down quite a bit. But then there's a giant. Parachute that slows it down further and then finally, there's something called the Sky Crane, which is a jet pack that flies over the landing site to the landing site, then lowers the rover down on a tether and then cuts the cord and flies away. But the interesting thing is, this is the same landing system that the last rover used called curiosity. But it's been made more up to date by the fact that it's got this smart landing system so that you can actually look for Ah, good place to land. If it doesn't like the first place it picks the confide to the next one. What is modern is all the computers and navigation systems are on this new rover. The design of the rocket engines on the sky Crane is actually 50 years old. Believe it or not, those engines all trace their way back to the Viking Landers. That's Joe Cassidy, He's executive director for space at Arrow Jet Rocket die in the company that makes the rocket engine. The Viking missions landed on Mars in the mid seventies, and Cassidy says the rocket designed depended on a special valve that made it possible to vary the Rockets thrust. Funny part is back in the seventies, We had a supplier that actually developed that forest with J. P L came back to us in the latter part of the first decade of the 21st century and said, We want you to do that again. That supplier was no longer in business. But luckily they were able to find an alternate supplier who would make the valve for them. Very luckily, what is perseverance looking for on Mars? Well, it's landing in a place called Jez zero Crater, which was they think a lake bed 3.5 or Lake 3.5 billion years ago, And the idea is there might might might have been microbes in the lake. So there'll be cameras on the rover that will study the appearance of rocks looking for things like stromatolites, which are structures left behind by mats of bacteria. They're also instruments on the rover that will measure the chemical and mineral composition of the rocks at the landing site, and Nina Lanza is a geologist at Los Alamos National Lab and the scientists on one of those instruments called super Camp. See, this is the kind of thing that a geologist needs right. We need both chemistry. What's in Iraq and mineralogy how it's arranged. So knowing those things tells a lot about the conditions under which the rock form then whether or not those conditions were conducive to life. I asked this excitedly. Could we be getting news soon, saying that there was life on Mars? Well, it's one of those news stories where people get very excited, but they will also say I'm from Missouri proof show me so that's actually the idea of this. They may see things that look like there might have been life there. But they say to confirm that they have to bring the rocks back to Earth. And in fact, that's what this mission is going to do. It's going to collect samples that a future mission will return to Earth. Okay. NPR Mars correspondent Joe Palka.

Joe Palka Joe Cassidy Arrow Jet Rocket NPR Noel Nasa JOE Cassidy Nina Lanza Los Alamos National Lab Rockets Iraq Missouri Npr Mars
"los alamos national labs" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"los alamos national labs" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Cyber attack by Russia poses a grave threat to national security, according to the government Cyber security Agency. Evidence of the Hack has been detected at the Department of Energy, which maintains the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. Operates the Los Alamos National Lab in New Mexico. It's unclear what if any, damage has been done to Catherine Herridge says. Utah center Mitt Romney compares it to Russian bombers flying through U. S airspace undetected setting not to have the White House aggressively speaking out. And protest Ng and taking a punitive action is really pretty quite extraordinary. Romney spoke to Sirius XM President Trump has had no response. President elect Biden promises cyber defense will be a top priority. The Feds break up a drug ring operating on college campuses in North Carolina. Nearly two dozen people are facing criminal charges stemming from an investigation of drug trafficking at UNC Chapel Hill, Duke University and Appalachian State University reporter Jim Crow. Sula says the drugs, mostly Coke and pot, were funneled from a supplier in L. A through Frats on campus that Ellie suspect pleads guilty to federal narcotics charges and get six years in prison pandemic drives nearly eight million Americans into poverty and just six months the U. S. Poverty rate jumps to 11.7% in November, the biggest one year increase in the 60 years that the government's kept track government benefits early on helped keep families afloat. But once those ran out, families could not hold out. Official poverty lines. 26 K for a family of four Uber will give you a lift to get vaccinated. Ridesharing service says it will offer 10 million free or discounted rides for people who want to get the shot over, says it will supply transportation to and from their destination as well as rides for their second. Joe reporter Diane King Hall says the start date has not yet been announced. Uber's asked the Atlanta based CDC for early access to the vaccine for its drivers. Cruise takes a break from filming Mission Impossible seven after conflicts on set Yeah..

Mitt Romney government Cyber security Agen President reporter Los Alamos National Lab Catherine Herridge Department of Energy Russia Sirius Diane King Hall Ng New Mexico UNC Chapel Hill Utah CDC Sula Biden
Study reports mutant coronavirus that may be more contagious

KOGO's Evening News

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

Study reports mutant coronavirus that may be more contagious

"A research team at the Los Alamos national lab says the coronavirus that first turned up in Wuhan China is not the same one we're dealing with in the United States that's according to their study that found the virus has mutated into a new strain that's more contagious the lead authors as the virus mutated to several versions before the one we're dealing with became the dominant form in March scientists are hoping the virus will go dormant in the summer before a second wave in the fall otherwise they say it could keep mutating in the vaccine is being

Wuhan China United States Los Alamos
"los alamos national labs" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"los alamos national labs" Discussed on WTOP

"And to ensure mission success for more information go to fourteen at federal dot com that's fourteen at federal dot com WTOP at six thirty six in the word of caution about the corona virus that virus has mutated and appears to be more contagious now a new study by researchers at the Los Alamos national lab shows a new strain of the virus has become dominant worldwide if it doesn't subside in the summer like seasonal flu does it could mutate further and potentially limit the effectiveness of vaccines being developed the research has not been peer reviewed but scientists say they released the because the subject matter so urgent among the many businesses that have suffered under the pandemic or comic book stores some of temporarily closed others are trying to find some ways to continue connecting with the customers Fantom comics in dupont circle says it's been tough since the distributor stop shipping new books in March it's been a scary time but Camille Richardson store manager at phantom comics see some signs of hope you know it is looking like hopefully mid to late may it might be time to be shipping box again in the past few weeks Fantom comics has found new ways to connect with its customers online like a trivia night and that lasted for four hours and was only supposed to be like an hour and a half Richardson is looking ahead to when she can reopen the dupont circle comic book store and she sees the store growing its newly established online presence we're finding that some things might even work out better virtually even maybe after one or open ticket only on WTOP news next gift cards provide a lifeline for local.

WTOP Fantom comics dupont circle phantom comics Los Alamos Camille Richardson
Shedding Light on the Moon

Innovation Now

01:20 min | 2 years ago

Shedding Light on the Moon

"The moon power generation from sunlight can be very difficult. A lunar night is equivalent to fourteen days on earth. But a new NASA technology could shed some light on the problem. This is innovation now bringing you. Stories of revolutionary ideas emerging technologies and the people behind the concepts that shape the future when we send astronauts to the moon or for long stays. We're going to need a new class of power. Here's Dr Dionne Hernandez Lugo Project Manager for Asses Killa Power. Kill-power is a nuclear technology being developed here at NASA in collaboration with the Department of Energy Los Alamos National Lab and it's efficient system. We kill our gifts. You is that a higher power or higher energy to be able to power systems or instruments. You need at least ten kilowatt per astronaut. So if we're going to have astronauts living in space in the moon or Mars kill-power will give you that technology and the power needed in order for action. Us to be able to live in space. Experiments have demonstrated that the system is both stable and safe making killa power. A game changer. For long duration missions for innovation. Now I'm Jennifer.

Nasa Dr Dionne Hernandez Lugo Department Of Energy Los Alamo Project Manager
Power for the Moon

Innovation Now

01:20 min | 2 years ago

Power for the Moon

"On the moon power generation from sunlight can be very difficult. A lunar night is equivalent to fourteen days on earth but a new NASA technology could shed some light on the problem this is innovation now bringing you. Stories of revolutionary ideas emerging technologies analogies in the people behind the concepts that shape the future when we send astronauts to the moon or Mars for long stays. We're going to need a new class of power. Our here's Dr Dionne Hernandez Lugo Project Manager for asses Killa power. kill-power is a nuclear technology. Gee being developed here at NASA. In collaboration with the Department of Energy Los Alamos national lab and it's efficient system. We kill our gifts. You is that a higher power or higher energy to be able to power systems or instruments. You need at least ten kilowatt per astronaut. So if we're going to have astronauts living in space and the Moon or Mars kill-power will give you that technology and the power needed in order for action us to be able to live. In space. Experiments experiments have demonstrated that the system is both stable and safe making killa power. A Game Changer for long duration missions for innovation innovation. Now I'm Jennifer Paulie

Nasa Dr Dionne Hernandez Lugo Department Of Energy Los Alamo Jennifer Paulie GEE Project Manager
Kilopower: A Gateway to Abundant Power for Exploration

Innovation Now

00:55 sec | 2 years ago

Kilopower: A Gateway to Abundant Power for Exploration

"We send astronauts to the moon or lung stays. We're going to need a new class of power. Our here's Dr Dionne Hernandez Lugo Project Manager for Asses Killa Power. kill-power is a nuclear technology. Gee being developed here at NASA. In collaboration with the Department of Energy Los Alamos National Lab and it's efficient system. We kill our gifts. You is that a higher power or higher energy to be able to power systems or instruments. You need at least ten kilowatt per astronaut. So if we're going to have astronauts living in space and the Moon or Mars kill-power will give you that technology and the power needed in order for action us to be able to live. In space. Experiments experiments have demonstrated that the system is both stable and safe making killa power. A Game Changer for long duration missions

Dr Dionne Hernandez Lugo Department Of Energy Los Alamo GEE Project Manager Nasa Ten Kilowatt
"los alamos national labs" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:42 min | 3 years ago

"los alamos national labs" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Now, I don't want to imply that the shroud was made photographic -ly, because there was no silver, which would have been the light sensitive, material necessary photography. There was no silver anywhere on that cloth. And it's not a painting and it's not a painting. You know our team in seventy eight winter to answer the single question. How's the image formed, and we were unable to answer that we we're able to come back and tell you what? It's not it's not a painting. It's not a scorch and it's not a photograph. Those were that three kind of common suggestions for what might have formed the image. So we can tell you, it's not any of those, but we don't know of a mechanism that can create an image with those chemical and physical properties to this day, and in all the attempts in the last forty or so years to duplicate the shroud. Many by people using one of my photographs of the crowd is a basis for their work. No one has ever come close to matching all of the chemical and physical properties of the shrubs image several years ago, CNN documentary, basically called finding Jesus. They highlighted the shrub what were their conclusions very. Well, you know, I hate to say it, but I pretty much given up on television documentaries about the shroud. And George IV appeared in about twenty. I know. And, you know, I can only recommend to after all that. And, and so I, I was not very happy with that particular documentary because they dug out some very visual things that had long before been proven, erroneous, one of them being the theory of gentleman named nNcholas Allen, South African art historian, who claims that the shroud was made photographic Lii. And ironically, he said that they used silver, and then they removed all the silver, and fixed the image using the demand urine, so effectively Nicklaus. Allan said they created the shroud of urine. I guess at any rate. The frustration is there's only one property of the shroud image. That is similar to a photograph and that's the lights dark reversal that we've already mentioned. But every other aspect of that image is unlike any other photograph that I've ever seen and I've seen quite a few in my almost fifty year career. Probably most unique property damage the, the property of the image that hooked me when they asked me to join the team that the property that automatically sort of prompted me to actually join that team is the fact that there's spatial or depth information or topographic information often referred to as three d information in coded into the lights and darks of the shrouds image. And that's something that no one has been able to duplicate, and there's no simple solution to how an image might form. Very how did you get involved in this project? Well, you know, as a professional photographer, I had a photographic studio in Santa Barbara California at the time and I had been contracted by one of the local technical companies, they were a contractor Los Alamos National labs and they contacted me as photographic insulting for a seven month project. And of course, it was Los Alamos obviously had something to do with time bombs, and I can't really say much. More about it. But for seven months, we did that project. And I worked with a gentleman named Don van who was an imaging scientist working for that subcontractor company a few weeks after we finished that project. He called me again. You know, when you're self employed and the phone rings. You're hoping it's the next project, but he called me again. And I thought how another project with done. And instead, he said berry, what do you know about this shroud of Turin, and I kind of laughed and I said, but Dom Jewish and Don laughed and said, so my remember he's one of the other Jewish guys on our team. And he was the one who was there when they took an image of the shroud. A photograph of Shrout put it into an instrument called the VP, eight Emma, generalize, her which took the lights in the dark of the image, stretched them into three vertical space on a green screen monitor proportionate to each other. And when they did that with a normal photo, you get a jumble of shapes that make no sense at all when you do it with the shroud image, you get the natural. Relief of a human form, and it was that property that encoding of depth information into the image that actually prompted the formation of the shroud doctor in research project, when they saw that, that was the first time that a scientific instrument visualized that property, so that was sort of the milestone of the moment, and that was the catalyst for our team to be formed. And although initially, I was hesitant to participate. It was that image property more than anything else.

Don van Los Alamos National labs Allan CNN Los Alamos George IV nNcholas Allen Nicklaus self employed Shrout Emma VP Turin Santa Barbara California scientist Dom Jewish berry seven months seven month
"los alamos national labs" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

05:34 min | 3 years ago

"los alamos national labs" Discussed on WTVN

"So there's now a third period viewed article challenges, the radiocarbon dating in the peer reviewed literature is the image like a negative photographic negative. The, the lights and darks of the image on the shroud are the reverse of what we look at, you know, we're used to seeing light highlights yard shadows, and the image on the shroud is, in fact, the inverse of that now being an old school analog photographer, I spent many, many years in the dark room. And when I first looked at the actual shroud. I immediately see what was on that cloth had the appearance of a photo negative to me. Now, I don't want to imply that the shroud was made photographic -ly, because there was no silver, which would have been the light sensitive, material necessary photography. There was no silver found anywhere on that cloth and it's not a painting and it's not a painting, you know, our team in seventy eight winter to enter the single question, how's the image formed, and we were unable to answer that we were able to come back and tell you what it's not it's not a painting. It's not a scorch and it's not a photograph. Those were the three kind of common suggestions for what might. Oh, formed the image? So we can tell you, it's not any of those, but we don't know of a mechanism that can create an image with those chemical and physical properties to this day, and in all the attempts in the last forty or so years to duplicate the shroud. Many by people using one of my photographs of the crowd is a basis for their work. No one has ever come close to matching all of the chemical and physical properties of the shrouds image several years ago CNN documentary, basically called finding Jesus. They highlighted the shroud. What were their conclusions very? Well, you know, I hate to say it, but I pretty much given up on television documentaries about the shroud and jive appeared in about twentieth. I know and you know, I, I can only recommend to after all that. And, and so I, I was not very happy with that particular documentary because they dug out some very visual things that had long before been proven Iran. Onea's one of them being the theory of gentleman named nNcholas Allen, South African art historian, who claims that the shroud was made photographic Lii. And ironically, he said that they used silver and then they removed all over and fixed the image using the, the man's urine. So. Nncholas Allen said they created the shroud of urine. I guess at any rate. The frustration is, is there is only one property of the shrouds image. That is similar to a photograph. That's the lights dark reversal that we've already mentioned. But every other aspect of that image is unlike any other photograph that I've ever seen, and I've seen quite a few in my almost fifty year career probably the most unique property, the image, the, the property of the image that hooked me when they asked me to join the team that the property that sort of prompted me to actually join that team is the fact that their spatial or depth information or topographic information often referred to as three d information in coded into the lights and darks of the shrouds image. And that's something that no one has been able to locate. And there's no simple solution to how an image might form that way. Mary, how did you get involved in this project? Well, you know as a professional photographer, I had a photographic studio in Santa bar. California at the time and I had been contacted by one of the local technical companies, they were a contractor Los Alamos National labs and they contacted me as a photographic consultant for a seven month project. And of course, it was Los Alamos, obviously, had something to do with the timing bombs, and I can't really say much more about it. But for seven months, we did that project. And I worked with a gentleman named Don van who was an imaging scientist, working that subcontractor company a few weeks after we finish that project. He called me again. You know, in your self employed in the phone rings. You're hoping it's the next project. They called me again. And I thought how another project with done. And instead, he said, Barry, what do you know about the shroud of Turin? And I kind of laughed and I said, but Dom Jewish and Don laughed and said, so my remember he's one of the other Jewish guys on our team. And he was. Was the one who was there when they took an image of the shroud. A photograph of trout, put it into an instrument called the VP imaging Nizer, which took the lights in the docks of the image, stretched them into three vertical space on a green screen monitor proportionate to each other. And when they did that with the normal photo, you get a jumble of shapes that make no sense at all when you do it with the shroud image, you get the natural relief of a human form, and it was that property that encoding of depth information into the image that actually prompted the formation of shrouded durin research project, when they saw that, that was the first time that a scientific instrument visualized that property, so that was sort of the milestone of the moment, and that was the catalyst for our team to be formed. And although it nationally, I was hesitant to participate. It was that image property more than anything.

nNcholas Allen Don van VP imaging Nizer CNN Los Alamos Los Alamos National labs Iran California Onea self employed Turin Santa bar Mary Dom Jewish Barry scientist consultant seven months seven month
"los alamos national labs" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

05:23 min | 3 years ago

"los alamos national labs" Discussed on KTRH

"It is the lights and darks of the image on the shroud are the reverse of what we look at. You know, we're used to seeing light highlights shadows, and the image on the shroud is, in fact, the inverse of that now being an old school analog photographer, I spent many, many years in the dark room. And when I first looked at the actual shroud. I immediately see what was on that cloth had the appearance of a photo negative to me. Now, I don't want to imply that the shroud was made photographic -ly, because there was no silver, which would have been the light sensitive, material necessary photography. There was no silver found anywhere on that claw, and it's not a painting and it's not a painting. You know, our team in seventy eight winter to answer the single question, how's the image formed, and we were able to answer that we're able to come back and tell you what it's not it's not a painting. It's not a scorch and it's not a photograph. Those were the three kind of common suggestions for what might have. Formed the image, so we can tell you, it's not any of those, but we don't know of a mechanism that can create an image with those chemical and physical properties to this day and all the attempts in the last forty or so years to duplicate the shroud. Many by people using one of my photographs of the crowd is a basis for their work. No one is ever come close to matching all of the chemical and physical properties of the shrouds image several years ago CNN documentary basically called finding Jesus. They highlighted the shroud. What were their conclusions very? Well, you know, I hate to say it, but I pretty much given up on television documentaries about the shrouding George IV appeared in about twenty I know. And, you know, I, I can only recommend to after all that. And, and so I, I was not very happy with that particular documentary because they dug out some very visual things that had long before been proven, erroneous, one of them being that theory of gentleman named nNcholas Allen, South African art historian, who claims that the shroud was made photographic Lii. And ironically, he said that they used silver, and then they removed all the silver, and fixed the image using the demand urine. So. Nncholas Allen said they created the shroud of urine. I guess at any rate. The frustration is there is only one property of the shroud image. That is similar to a photograph and that's the lights dark reversal that we've already mentioned. But every other aspect of that image is unlike any other photograph that I've ever seen, and I've seen quite a few in my almost fifty year career probably the most unique property damage the, the property of the image that hooked me when they asked me to join the team that the property that helped him ably sort of prompted me to actually join that team is the fact that there's spatial or depth information or topographic information often referred to as three d information in coded into the lights and darks of the shrouds image. And that's something that no one has been able to duplicate, and there's no simple solution to how an image might form that way. Very how did you get involved in this project where professional photographer? I had a photographic studio in Santa Barbar. California at the time and I had been contacted by one of the local technical companies, they were contractor, Los Alamos National labs, and they contacted me as photographic insulting for a seven month project. And of course, it was Los Alamos, obviously, had something to do with the Tomich bombs, and I can't really say much more about it. But for seven months, we did that project. And I worked with a gentleman named Don van who was an imaging scientist working for that subcontractor company a few weeks after we finished that project. He called me again. You know, when you're self employed in the phone rings. You're hoping it's the next project. They called me again. And I thought how another project with done. And instead, he said, Barry, what do you know about the shroud of Turin? And I kind of laughed and I said, but, but Donna of Jewish and Don laughed and said, so, my remember, he's one of the other Jewish guys on our team. And he was. Was the one who was there when they took an image of the shroud. A photograph shroud, put it into an instrument called a VP imaging analyzer, which took the lights in the dark of the image, stretched into three D vertical space on a green screen monitor proportionate to each other. And when they did that with the normal, you get a jumble of shapes that make no sense at all when you do it with the shroud image. You get the natural relief of a human form, and it was that property that encoding of depth information into the image that actually prompted the formation of shrouded in research project, when they saw that, that was the first time that a scientific instrument visualized that property, so that was sort of the milestone of the moment, and that was the catalyst for our team to be formed. And although it Nishel hesitant to participate. It was that image property more than anything else.

nNcholas Allen Don van California Barry CNN Los Alamos George IV VP Los Alamos National labs Nishel Santa Barbar self employed Turin scientist Donna seven months seven month fifty year
"los alamos national labs" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

06:15 min | 3 years ago

"los alamos national labs" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"And Dr Michael tight lift the British Museum took a permanent chair at Oxford that didn't look so good. Well, anyway, twenty seventeen using the freedom of information act, the British Museum, ultimately released the raw data and new paper came out just a few weeks ago will be featuring it in our next update on trout dot com on June third or maybe fourth and that paper further supports the questionable content of the single sample chosen for dating. So there's now a third peer reviewed article challenges, the radiocarbon dating in the period, literature, very is the image like a negative a photographic negative. It is the, the lights and darks of the image on the shroud are the reverse of what we look at, you know, we're used to seeing light highlights shadows and the image on the shroud is, in fact, the inverse of that now being a an old school analog photographer, I spent many, many years in the dark room. And when I first looked at the act. Actual shroud. I immediately see what was on that cloth had the appearance of a photo negative to me. Now, I don't want to imply that the shroud was made photographic -ly, because there was no silver, which would have been the light sensitive, material necessary photography. There was no silver found anywhere on that cloth and it's not a painting and it's not a painting. You know, our team in seventy eight went to answer the single question how the image formed, and we run able to answer that we, we were able to come back and tell you what. It's not it's not a painting. It's not a scorch and it's not a photograph. Those were that three kind of common suggestions for what might have formed the image. So we can tell you, it's not any of those, but we don't know of a mechanism that can create an image with those chemical and physical properties to this day, and in all the attempts in the last forty or so years to duplicate the shroud. Many by people using one of my photographs of the crowd, as a basis for their work. No one. Has ever come close to matching all of the chemical and physical properties of the shrouds image several years ago CNN documentary basically called finding Jesus, and they highlighted the shroud. What were their conclusions very well? You know, I hate to say it, but I've pretty much given up on television documentaries about the shroud. And George IV appeared in about twenty I know and, you know, I, I can only recommend to after all that. And, and so I, I was not very happy with that particular documentary because they dug out some very visual things that had long before been proven, erroneous, one of them being that theory of gentleman named nNcholas Allen, South African art historian, who claims that the shroud was made photographic Lii. And ironically, he said that they used silver, and then they removed all the silver and fixed the image using the, the man's urine. So. Nncholas Allen said they created the shroud of urine. I guess at any rate. The frustration is there is only one property of the shrouds image. That is similar to a photograph and that's the lights and dark reversal that we've already mentioned. But every other aspect of that image is unlike any other photograph that I've ever seen, and I've seen quite a few in my almost fifty year career probably the most unique property, the image, the, the property of the image that hooked me when they asked me to join the team that the property that ultimately sort of prompted me to actually join that team is the fact that there's spatial or depth information or topographic information often referred to as three d information encoded into the lights and darks of the shrouds image. And that's something that no one has been able to duplicate, and there's no simple solution to how an image might form that way. Very how did you get involved in this project? Well, you know, as a professional photographer, I had a photographic studio in Santa Barbara. Ibra California at the time, and I had been contacted by one of the local technical companies, they were a contractor, Los Alamos National labs, and they contacted me as a photographic consultant, for seven month project, and of course, it was Los Alamos, obviously, had something to do with the timing bombs, and I can't really say much more about it. But for seven months, we did that project. And I worked with a gentleman named Don van who was an imaging scientist working for that subcontractor company a few weeks after we finished that project. He called me again. You know, when you're self employed in the phone rings. You're hoping it's the next project. They called me again. And I thought how another project with done. And instead, he said, Barry, what do you know about the shroud of Turin? And I kind of laughed and I said, but Dom Jewish and Don laughed and said, so my remember he's one of the other Jewish guys on our team. And he. Was the one who was there when they took an image of the shroud. A photograph shroud, put it into an instrument called the VP imaging analyzer, which took the lights in the dark of the image and stretched them into three vertical space on a green screen monitor proportionate to each other. And when they did that with the normal photo, you get a jumble of shapes that make no sense at all when you do it with the shroud image, you get the natural relief of a human form, and it was that property that encoding of depth information into the image that actually prompted the formation of the shroud odor, in research project, when they saw that, that was the first time that a scientific instrument visualized that property, so that was sort of the milestone of the moment, and that was the catalyst for our team to be formed. And although it initially, I was hesitant to participate. It was that image property more than anything else that prompted me to say yes to joining. The team. Although I have to admit even though I know there's million or.

British Museum nNcholas Allen Don van Dr Michael CNN Oxford George IV VP Los Alamos National labs California self employed Santa Barbara Turin Los Alamos Dom Jewish Barry scientist
"los alamos national labs" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"los alamos national labs" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"And ironically, he said that they used silver, and then they removed all the Schober and fixed the image using the, the man's urine. So effectively nNcholas Allan said they created the shroud of urine. I guess at any rate, the frustration is, is there is only one property of the shroud. Jim EJ that is similar to a photograph and that's the light and dark reversal that we've already mentioned. But every other aspect of that image is unlike any other photograph that I've ever seen. I've seen quite a few in my almost fifty year career probably most unique property damage the, the property of the image hooked me when they asked me to join the team that the property that sort of prompted me to actually join that team is the fact that their spatial or depth information or topographic information often referred to as three d information in coded into the lights and darks of the shrouds image. And that's something that no one has been able to duplicate, and there's no simple solution to how an image might form that way. Very how did you get involved in this project? Well, you know, as a professional photographer, I had a photographic studio in Santa Barbara California at the time and I had been contacted by one of the local technical companies, they were a contractor Los Alamos National labs, and they contacted me as a photographic insult for a seven month project and. Of course, it was Los Alamos, obviously, had something to do with the time bombs, and I can't really say, much more about it. But for seven months, we did that project. And I worked with a gentleman named Don van who was an imaging scientist working for that subcontractor company a few weeks after we finished that project. He called me again. You know, when you're self-employed and the phone rings you're hoping it's the next project. They called me again. And I thought how another project done and instead he said, Barry, what do you know, about the shroud of Turin? And I kind of laughed and I said, but, but dominant Jewish and Don laughed and said, so, my remember, he's one of the other Jewish guys on our team. And he was the one who was there when they took an image of the shroud. A photograph of trout, put it into an instrument called the VP janali Zor, which took the lights in the docks of the image, stretched them into three vertical space on a green screen monitor proportionate to each. Each other. And when they did that with the normal photo, you get a jumble of shapes that make no sense at all when you do it with the shroud image. You get the natural relief of a human form, and it was that property that encoding of depth information into the image that actually prompted the formation of the shroud of durin research project, when they saw that, that was the first time that a scientific instrument visualized that property, so that was sort of the milestone of the moment, and that was the catalyst for our team to be formed. And although initially, I was hesitant to participate. It was that image property more than anything else that prompted me to say yes to.

Don van Jim EJ Barry Los Alamos National labs nNcholas Allan Los Alamos Santa Barbara California Turin janali Zor VP scientist seven months seven month fifty year
"los alamos national labs" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

06:13 min | 3 years ago

"los alamos national labs" Discussed on 710 WOR

"And Dr Michael tight lift the British Museum and took a permanent chair at Oxford that didn't look so good. Well, anyway, into seventeen using the freedom of information act, the British Museum, ultimately released the raw data and new paper came out just a few weeks ago will be featuring it in our next update on trout dot com on June third or maybe the fourth and that paper further supports the questionable content of the single sample chosen for dating. So there's now a third peer reviewed article challenges the radiocarbon dating in the period. Literature berry is the image like a negative photographic negative. It is the, the lights and darks of the image on the shroud are the reverse of what we look at, you know, we're used to seeing light highlights yard shadows, and the image on the shroud is, in fact, the inverse of that now being an old school analog photographer, I spent many, many years in the dark room. And when I first looked at the actual shroud. I immediately see what was on that cloth had the appearance of a photo negative to me. Now, I don't want to imply that the shroud was made photographic -ly, because there was no silver, which would have been the light sensitive material necessary of dog Affi, there was no silver found anywhere on that cloth, and it's not a painting and it's not a painting, you know, our team in seventy eight went there to answer the single question, how's the image formed, and we were unable to answer that we're able to come back and tell you what it's not it's not a painting. It's not a scorch and it's not a photograph. Those were the three kind of common suggestions for what might. Oh, formed the image? So we can tell you, it's not any of those, but we don't know of a mechanism that can create an image with those chemical and physical properties to this day and all the attempts in the last forty or so years to duplicate the shroud. Many by people using one of my photographs of the crowd is a basis for their work. No one has ever come close to matching all of the chemical and physical properties of the shrouds image several years ago CNN documentary, basically called finding Jesus. They highlighted the shroud. What were their conclusions very? Well, you know, I hate to say it, but I pretty much given up on television documentaries about the shroud. And George IV appeared in about twenty I know. And, you know, I, I can only recommend to after all that. And, and so I, I was not very happy with that particular documentary because they dug out some very visual things that had long before been proven, erroneous, one of them being that theory of gentleman named nNcholas Allen, South African art historian, who claims that the shroud was made photographic Lii. And ironically, he said that they used silver, and then they removed all the silver and fixed the image using the, the man's urine. So effectively nNcholas Allen said they created the shroud of urine. I guess at any rate, the frustration is, is there is only one property of the shrouds image. That is similar to a photograph and that's the lights dark reversal that we've already mentioned. But every other aspect of that image is unlike any other photograph that I've ever seen. I've seen quite a few in my almost fifty year career probably the most unique property, the image, the, the property of the image that hooked me when they asked me to join the team that the property that ultimately sort of prompted me to actually join that team is the fact that their spatial or depth information or topographic information often referred to as three d information in coded into the lights and darks of the shrouds image. And that's something that no one has been able to duplicate, and there's no simple solution to how an image might form that way. Mary, how did you get involved in this project? Well, you know, as a professional photographer, I had a photographic studio in Santa Barbara California at the time and I had been contacted by one of the local technical companies, they were a contractor Los Alamos National labs, and they contacted me as a photographic consultant for a seven month project and. Of course, it was Los Alamos obviously had something to do with time bombs, and I can't really say much more about it. But for seven months, we did that project. And I worked with a gentleman named Don van who was an imaging scientist working for that subcontractor company a few weeks after we finished that project. He called me again. You know in yourself employed in the phone rings. You're hoping it's the next project. He called me again. And I thought how another project done. And instead, he said, Barry, what do you know about the shroud of Turin? And I kind of laughed and I said, but Dom Jewish and Don laughed and said, so my remember he's one of the other Jewish guys on our team. And he was the one who was there when they took an image of the shroud. A photograph trout, put it into an instrument called the VP Emma janali Zor, which took the lights in the dark of the image and stretched them into three vertical space on a green screen monitor proportionate to each. Each other. And when they did that with the normal photo, you get a jumble of shapes that make no sense at all when you do it with the shroud image, you get the natural relief of a human form, and it was that property that encoding of depth information into the image that actually prompted the formation of the shroud after research project, when they saw that, that was the first time that a scientific instrument visualized that property, so that was sort of the milestone of the moment, and that was the catalyst for our team to be formed. And although initially, I was hesitant to participate. It was that image property more than anything else that prompted me to say yes, to joining the team, although.

nNcholas Allen British Museum Don van Dr Michael CNN Los Alamos Emma janali Zor Oxford George IV Los Alamos National labs VP Turin Mary Santa Barbara California Dom Jewish Barry scientist
"los alamos national labs" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

04:38 min | 3 years ago

"los alamos national labs" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"That we were able to come back and tell you what. It's not it's not a painting, not a scorch and it's not a photograph. Those were the three kind of common suggestions for what might. Oh, formed the image? So we can tell you, it's not any of those, but we don't know of a mechanism that can create an image with those chemical and physical properties to this day and all the attempts in the last forty or so years, duplicate, the shroud. Many by people using one of my photographs of the crowd is a basis for their work. No one has ever come close to matching all of the chemical and physical properties of the shrouds image several years ago. CNN documentary, they simply called finding Jesus. They highlighted the shroud. What were their conclusions very well, you know, I hate to say it, but I've pretty much given up on television documentaries about the shroud. And George IV appeared in about twentieth. I know. And, you know, I, I can only recommend to after all that. And, and so I, I was not very happy with that particular documentary because they dug out some very visual things that had long before been proven Iran. Onea's one of them being that theory of gentleman named nNcholas Allen, South African art historian, who claims that the shroud was made photographic Lii. And ironically, he said that they used silver, and then they removed all the silver and fixed the image using the, the man's urine so effectively Nicklaus. Allen said they created the shroud of urine. I guess at any rate. The frustration is there is only one property of the shrouds image. That is similar to a photograph and that's the lights and dark reversal that we've already mentioned. But every other aspect of that image is unlike any other photograph that I've ever seen, and I've seen quite a few in my almost fifty year career probably the most unique property damage the, the property of the image that hooked me when they asked me to join the team that the property that ultimately sort of prompted me to actually join that team is the fact that their spatial or depth information or topographic information often referred to as three d information in coded into the lights and darks of the shrouds image. And that's something that no one has been able to duplicate, and there's no simple solution to how an image might form that way. Very how did you get involved in this project? Well, you know, as a professional photographer, I had a photographic studio in Santa Barbara. California at the time and I had been contacted by one of the local technical companies, they were a contractor Los Alamos National labs and they contacted me as a photographic insult for a seven month project. And of course, it was Los Alamos, obviously, had something to do with the timing bombs, and I can't really say much more about it. But for seven months, we did that project. And I worked with a gentleman named Don van who was an imaging scientist, working for that subcontractor company few weeks after we finished that project. He called me again. You know, when you're self employed and the phone rings. You're hoping it's the next project. They called me again. And I thought how another project with done. And instead, he said, Barry, what do you know about the shroud of Turin? And I kind of laughed and I said, but Dom Jewish and Don laughed and said, so my remember he's one of the other Jewish guys on our team. And he was. The one who was there when they took an image of the shroud. A photograph is trout, put it into an instrument called VPA imaging analyzer, which took the lights in the dark of the image and stretched them into three vertical space on a green screen monitor proportionate to each other. And when they did that with a normal photo, you get a jumble of shapes that make no sense at all when you do it with the shroud image. You get the natural relief of a human form, and it was that property that encoding of depth information into the image that actually prompted the formation of the shroud, durin research project, when they saw that, that was the first time that a scientific instrument visualized that property, so that was sort of the milestone of the moment, and that was the catalyst for our team to be formed. And although at Nisqually, I was hesitant to participate. It was that image property more than anything else that prompted me to say yes to joining. The team, although I.

Don van nNcholas Allen CNN Los Alamos National labs Los Alamos George IV Iran California Nicklaus Santa Barbara Onea self employed Turin Barry Dom Jewish scientist seven months seven month fifty year
"los alamos national labs" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

06:12 min | 3 years ago

"los alamos national labs" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"And Dr Michael tight lift the British Museum took permanent chair at Oxford that didn't look so good. Well, anyway, twenty seventeen using the freedom of information act, the British Museum, ultimately released the raw data and a new paper came out just a few weeks ago will be featuring it in our next update on trout dot com on June third or maybe fourth and that paper further supports the questionable content of the single sample chosen for dating. So there's now a third peer reviewed article challenges, the radiocarbon dating in the peer reviewed literature is the image like a negative photographic negative. It is the, the lights and darks of the image on the shroud are the reverse of what we look at, you know, we're used to seeing light highlights shadows and the image on the shroud is, in fact, the inverse of that now being an old school analog photographer, I spent many, many years in the dark room. And when I first looked at the. Actual shroud. I immediately see what was on that cloth had the appearance of a photo negative to me. Now, I don't want to imply that the shroud was made photographic -ly, because there was no silver, which would have been the light sensitive, material necessary photography. There was no silver found anywhere on that cloth and it's not a painting and it's not a painting. You know our team in seventy eight winter to answer the single question. How's the image formed, and we were unable to answer that we were able to come back and tell you what? It's not it's not a painting. It's not a scorch and it's not a photograph. Those were the three kind of common suggestions for what might have formed the image. So we can tell you, it's not any of those, but we don't know of a mechanism that can create an image with those chemical and physical properties to this day, and in all the attempts in the last forty or so years to duplicate the shroud. Many by people using one of my photographs of the crowd is a basis for their work. No. No one is ever come close to matching all of the chemical and physical properties of the shrouds image several years ago. CNN documentary, they simply called finding Jesus, and they highlighted the shroud. What were their conclusions very well? You know, I hate to say it, but I've pretty much given up on television documentaries about the shroud. And George IV appeared in about twenty I know and, you know, I, I can only recommend to after all that. And, and so I, I was not very happy with that particular documentary because they dug out some very visual things that had long before been proven, erroneous, one of them being the theory of a gentleman named nNcholas Allen, South African art historian, who claims that the shroud was made photographic Lii. And ironically, he said that they used silver, and then they removed all the silver and fixed the image using the, the man's urine. So. Nncholas Allen said they created the shroud of urine. I guess at any rate. The frustration is there is only one property of the shrouds image. That is similar to a photograph and that's the lights and dark reversal that we've already mentioned. But every other aspect of that image is unlike any other photograph that I've ever seen, and I've seen quite a few in my almost fifty year career probably the most unique property, the image, the, the property of the image that hooked me when they asked me to join the team that the property that ultimately sort of prompted me to actually join that team is the fact that there's spatial or depth information or topographic information often referred to as three d information in coded into the lights and darks of the shrouds image. And that's something that no one has been able to duplicate, and there's no simple solution to how an image might form that way. Very how did you get involved in this project? Well, you know, as a professional photographer, I had a photographic studio in Santa Barbara. California at the time and I had been contacted by one of the local technical companies, they were a contractor Los Alamos National labs, and they contacted me as a photographic consultant for seven month project, and of course, it was Los Alamos, so obviously, had something to do with the timing bombs, and I can't really say much more about it. But for seven months, we did that project. And I worked with a gentleman named Don van who was an imaging scientist working for that subcontractor company a few weeks after we finished that project. He called me again. You know, when you're self employed and the phone rings. You're hoping it's the next project. They called me again. And I thought how another project with done. And instead, he said, Barry, what do you know about the shroud of Turin? And I kind of laughed and I said, but Dom Jewish and Don laughed and said, so my remember he's one of the other Jewish guys on our team. And he was. The one who was there when they took an image of the shroud. A photograph of trout, put it into an instrument called the VP magenta laser which took the lights in the dark of the image and stretched them into three vertical space on a green screen monitor proportionate to each other. And when they did that with a normal photo, you get a jumble of shapes that make no sense at all when you do it with the shroud image. You get the natural relief of a human form, and it was that property that encoding of depth information into the image that actually prompted the formation of the shroud odor, in research project, when they saw that, that was the first time that a scientific instrument visualized that property, so that was sort of the milestone of the moment, and that was the catalyst for our team to be formed. And although it initially, I was hesitant to participate. It was that image property more than anything else that prompted me to say yes to joining. The team,.

nNcholas Allen British Museum Don van CNN Dr Michael Oxford Los Alamos National labs George IV VP California self employed Santa Barbara Turin Los Alamos Dom Jewish Barry scientist
"los alamos national labs" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

04:41 min | 3 years ago

"los alamos national labs" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"You know, our team in seventy eight winter to answer the single question, how's the image formed, and we were unable to answer that we, we were able to come back and tell you what it's not it's not a painting. It's not a scorch and it's not a photograph. Those were that three kind of common suggestions for what might have formed the image. So we can tell you, it's not any of those, but we don't know of a mechanism that can create an image with those chemical and physical properties to this day and all the attempts in the last forty or so years to duplicate the shroud. Many by people using one of my photographs of the crowd is a basis for their work. No one. Has ever come close to matching all of the chemical and physical properties of the shrouds image several years ago CNN documentary basically called finding Jesus. They highlighted the shroud. What were their conclusions? Well, you know, I hate to say it, but I've pretty much given up on television documentaries about the shroud. And George IV appeared in about twenty I know and, you know, I, I can only recommend to after all that. And, and so I, I was not very happy with that particular documentary because they dug out some very visual things that had long before been proven eroneous, one of them being the theory of gentleman named nNcholas Allen, South African art historian, who claims that the shroud was made photographic Lii. And ironically, he said that they used silver, and then they removed all the silver and fixed the image using the, the man's urine. So effectively nNcholas Allan said they created the shroud of urine. I guess at any rate. The frustration is, is there's only one property of the shroud image. That is similar to a photograph and that's the lights and dark reversal that we've already mentioned. But every other aspect of that image is unlike any other photograph that I've ever seen, and I've seen quite a few in my almost fifty year career probably most unique property, the image, the, the property of the image that hooked me when they asked me to join the team that the property that ultimately sort of prompted me to actually join that team is the fact that there's spatial or depth information or topographic information often referred to as three d information in coded into the lights and darks of the shrouds image. And that's something that no one has been able to duplicate, and there's no simple solution to how an image might form way. Very how did you get involved in this project? Well, you know, as a professional photographer, I had a photographic studio in Santa Barbar. California at the time and I been contacted by one of the local technical companies, they were a contractor Los Alamos National labs and they contacted me as a photographic insulting for a seven month project. And of course, it was Los Alamos, obviously, had something to do with the timing bombs, and I can't really say much more about it. But for seven months, we did that project. And I worked with a gentleman named Don van who was an imaging scientist working for that subcontractor company a few weeks after we finish that project. He called me again. You know, when you're self-employed and the phone rings you're hoping it's the next project. They called me again. And I thought I had another project done. And instead, he said, Barry, what do you know about the shroud of Curren? And I kind of laughed and I said, but Dom Jewish and Don laughed and said, so my remember he's one of the other Jewish guys on our team. And he was. Was the one who was there when they took an image of the shroud. A photograph of trout, put it into an instrument called the VP generalize her which took the lights in the dark of the image stretched him into three vertical space on a green screen monitor proportionate to each other. And when they did that with the normal photo, you get a jumble of shapes that make no sense at all when you do it with the shroud image, you get the natural relief of a human form, and it was that property that encoding of depth information into the image that actually prompted the formation of the doctor in research project when they saw that, that was the first time that a scientific instrument visualized that property, so that was sort of the milestone of the moment, and that was the catalyst for our team to be formed. And although initially, I was hesitant to participate. It was that image property more than anything.

Don van CNN Los Alamos nNcholas Allan Los Alamos National labs nNcholas Allen George IV California VP Santa Barbar Barry Curren Dom Jewish scientist seven months seven month fifty year
"los alamos national labs" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"los alamos national labs" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"To the convention center that day and buses a free, of course, buses all right across the street. You can write the the city bus. So access to censor. Also, any businesses looking for exposure, nonprofits, who are nonprofits. Right. We got to technology section. I'm looking at putting together the seminar series, which I'll talk about as we get closer to the event. But basically if a business is hiring. This is your biggest opportunity to get face to face with job seekers of all ages. Los Alamos National labs will be there. They, of course of many positions open Santa Fe chamber dot com is a banner right on the homepage to sign up for the business expo jobs there Thursday, April the eighteenth. You got it. I would come by. But we'll be doing that show that day at United world college up in Montezuma. No kidding. Okay. And then the next day at the the soon to be open Castenada hotel. In Las Vegas show on the road. Taking my show take my act on the road, man. I like that. All right. What else is going on? Well, we've got a networking event next week, which is business after hours. We will be the food depot on March. The twenty eighth at the Thursday starts at five thirty then the next breakfast is business over breakfast, April fifth at Kingston residents and one of the things I was going to mention oh, the leadership Santa Fe graduate should that. They will graduate may seventh Santa Fe country club. Congratulations to those folks. One more session to go. And then it's their graduation companies. The time goes by so fast. And then how soon before you started taking applications for the next one the application processes already open at closes in September. But get in early. If you're interested in this is only once a year. Right. Kind of kick. It all off in what August-September something like that September October September end of September the first session, but that'd be an orientation before that so apply. Now, you got it you want to get in it as well worth dot org. All right, Simon Brackley Santa Fe chamber of commerce. He's heading out now to play some golf. I'm gonna listen to Senator worth and you have a talk about the session..

Santa Fe Santa Fe country club Simon Brackley Los Alamos National Las Vegas Castenada hotel Senator Montezuma Kingston United world
"los alamos national labs" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"los alamos national labs" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"In an attack on smollet that he reported as a racist incident told police the actor paid them to stage that ambush and now CBS's dean Reynolds tells us a letter. That was sent to the set of the show empire. Allegedly cooked up by the actor Diraz told detectives they conspired with small let in a fake attack January twenty ninth CBS Chicago station. W B B M reports the brothers now also claim small that was behind the threatening letters sent to him a week before the alleged assault on Tuesday smell. Let's brother and sister posted Instagram messages. Appearing to criticize media coverage of the case when police have requested another interview with Jesse smollet reportedly another videotape that shows a singer R Kelly and relations with an underage girl. Michael Albany handed over a second tape last week. He now says he's working to hand over a third alleged sex tape to police Kelly Hispanic used of sexual misconduct involving minors multiple times over the past two decades. He's been sued by women who claim they were with Kelly when they were under h the Boston licensing board could decide this week if they should take action against the nightclub on the waterfront after a manager at that club allegedly allowed a man accused of sexually assaulting a server. To remain at the club to have more drinks universal hub reports at the time of the attack. The manager did not call police or kick anyone out that manager was eventually fired testimony yesterday before the licensing board included a detective from the Boston police who says the suspect remains an identified in the October incident at the grand on northern avenue. Very lucky and very thankful. Cross country skier after he was rescued on a lake in Sudbury amended fallen through the ice yesterday afternoon on Willis lake but was able to hold onto some bushes to keep himself above water until fire crews could get him out. Matt who didn't want to be identified tells WBZ TV he is thankful for the firefighters who came to his aid is very dangerous situation to follow the water underwater could've died of hypothermia. And I really appreciate it. Coming out saved my life madman was taken to the hospital for evaluation, but we'll be okay. A rare specimen of wire. Gold from Harvard University's mineral museum has gotten the once over from the Los Alamos National lab in New Mexico. Scientists helped me to unravel some of the mystery behind the goal that was found more than one hundred thirty years ago at a mining Colorado known as the Rams horn, they'd previously Bendel scientific studies published on the internal nature of the specimen now using neutrons from a particle accelerator. Scientists have determined is actually a mix of gold and silver composed of only a few single crystals. The wire gold will be the centerpiece of an exhibit.

R Kelly Kelly Hispanic Boston dean Reynolds Diraz Michael Albany CBS Willis lake Matt Jesse smollet Bendel Chicago assault Sudbury Harvard University Colorado Rams mineral museum Los Alamos National