25 Burst results for "Los Alamos National"

"los alamos national" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:32 min | 5 months ago

"los alamos national" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Thought I haven't done an episode about hydrogen and the proposed hydrogen economy for quite some time. It might be a good sign to revisit this topic and remind everyone what it's all about, because when it comes to conversations about Transitioning away from a dependence on fossil fuels. Hydrogen is frequently part of that conversation. Today, we're going to explore why that is and whether we can, in fact, produce enough of it responsibly in a green way to create a true hydrogen economy. Spoiler alert. That's just one component of a hydrogen economy. I'll talk a lot about that in this episode. First We got to just lay some groundwork. Right? Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe. It's what's stars are made out of. According to the Los Alamos National Laboratory. If you were together all the atoms in the universe, all the matter, So you got all the atoms in the universe, all in one room. Well, it would need to be a really big room. But more than 90% of all those atoms in that room would be hydrogen. So at first, you might think that means we're lousy with the stuff here on Earth. And we kind of are, But there's some other things about hydrogen that makes that hope plentiful thing a little more misleading when it comes to our day to day experience. So first pure hydrogen has a.

Earth Los Alamos National Laboratory Today one room more than 90% First one component first hydrogen
NASA’s Perseverance rover lands on Mars

Morning Edition

03:34 min | 1 year ago

NASA’s Perseverance rover lands on Mars

"Good morning, Scientists from Planet Earth will land another mission on Mars today. NASA calls the rover perseverance. NPR's science correspondent Joe Palka has been following this one. Good morning, Joe. Morning, Noel, Can we talk about the logistics of this? They have to get a hurtling projectile toe land safely on Mars. How is this done? Yeah. What's the big trick? It's going 12,000 MPH, and they have two landed it two MPH. No problem. Well, what happens is they're overs packed up into something called the Aero Shell, which hits the top of the atmosphere on Mars and Atmosphere slows the craft down and it's friction heats up. That's why there's a heat shield, but that does slow it down quite a bit. But then there's a giant. Parachute that slows it down further and then finally, there's something called the Sky Crane, which is a jet pack that flies over the landing site to the landing site, then lowers the rover down on a tether and then cuts the cord and flies away. But the interesting thing is, this is the same landing system that the last rover used called curiosity. But it's been made more up to date by the fact that it's got this smart landing system so that you can actually look for Ah, good place to land. If it doesn't like the first place it picks the confide to the next one. What is modern is all the computers and navigation systems are on this new rover. The design of the rocket engines on the sky Crane is actually 50 years old. Believe it or not, those engines all trace their way back to the Viking Landers. That's Joe Cassidy, He's executive director for space at Arrow Jet Rocket die in the company that makes the rocket engine. The Viking missions landed on Mars in the mid seventies, and Cassidy says the rocket designed depended on a special valve that made it possible to vary the Rockets thrust. Funny part is back in the seventies, We had a supplier that actually developed that forest with J. P L came back to us in the latter part of the first decade of the 21st century and said, We want you to do that again. That supplier was no longer in business. But luckily they were able to find an alternate supplier who would make the valve for them. Very luckily, what is perseverance looking for on Mars? Well, it's landing in a place called Jez zero Crater, which was they think a lake bed 3.5 or Lake 3.5 billion years ago, And the idea is there might might might have been microbes in the lake. So there'll be cameras on the rover that will study the appearance of rocks looking for things like stromatolites, which are structures left behind by mats of bacteria. They're also instruments on the rover that will measure the chemical and mineral composition of the rocks at the landing site, and Nina Lanza is a geologist at Los Alamos National Lab and the scientists on one of those instruments called super Camp. See, this is the kind of thing that a geologist needs right. We need both chemistry. What's in Iraq and mineralogy how it's arranged. So knowing those things tells a lot about the conditions under which the rock form then whether or not those conditions were conducive to life. I asked this excitedly. Could we be getting news soon, saying that there was life on Mars? Well, it's one of those news stories where people get very excited, but they will also say I'm from Missouri proof show me so that's actually the idea of this. They may see things that look like there might have been life there. But they say to confirm that they have to bring the rocks back to Earth. And in fact, that's what this mission is going to do. It's going to collect samples that a future mission will return to Earth. Okay. NPR Mars correspondent Joe Palka.

Joe Palka Joe Cassidy Arrow Jet Rocket NPR Noel Nasa JOE Cassidy Nina Lanza Los Alamos National Lab Rockets Iraq Missouri Npr Mars
"los alamos national" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"los alamos national" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Text up. I'm your host, Jonathan Strickland. I'm an executive producer. And I love all things Tech and on November 15th 2018. I ran across an article titled Quote. Can we produce enough green hydrogen to save the world and quote And I thought I haven't done an episode about hydrogen and the proposed hydrogen economy for quite some time. It might be a good sign to revisit this topic and remind everyone what it's all about. Because when it comes to conversations about transitioning away from a dependence on fossil fuels, hydrogen is frequently part of that conversation. Today, we're gonna explore why that is and whether we can in fact, produce enough of it responsibly than a greenway. Create a true hydrogen economy. Spoiler alert. That's just one component of a hydrogen economy. Don't talk a lot about that in this episode. First We gotta just lay some groundwork. Right? Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe. It's what stars are made out of. According to the Los Alamos National Laboratory. If you were together all the atoms in the universe, all the matter, So you got all the atoms in the universe, all in one room. Well, it would need to be a really big room. But more than 90% of all those atoms in that room would be hydrogen. So at first, you might think that means we're lousy with the stuff here on Earth. And we kind of are, But there's some other things about hydrogen that makes that whole plentiful thing a little more misleading when it comes to our day to day experience. So first pure hydrogen has a.

Jonathan Strickland Los Alamos National Laboratory executive producer
"los alamos national" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"los alamos national" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Get in touch with technologies with tech stuff from Howstuffworks Back home. Hey there and welcome to Tech stuff. I'm your host, Jonathan Strickland. I'm an executive producer. And I love all things Tech and on November 15th 2018. I ran across an article titled Quote. Can we produce enough green hydrogen to save the world end quote and I thought I haven't done an episode about hydrogen and the proposed hydrogen economy for quite some time. It might be a good sign to revisit this topic and remind everyone what it's all about, because when it comes to conversations about Transitioning away from a dependence on fossil fuels. Hydrogen is frequently part of that conversation. Today, we're gonna explore why that is and whether we can in fact produce enough of it responsibly than a green way to create a true hydrogen economy. Spoiler alert. That's just one component of a hydrogen economy. Don't talk a lot about that in this episode. First We gotta just lay some groundwork. Right? Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe. It's what stars are made out of. According to the Los Alamos National Laboratory. If you were to gather all the atoms in the universe, all the matter, So you got all the atoms in the universe, all in one room. Well, it would need to be a really big room. But more than 90% of all those atoms in that room would be hydrogen. So at first, you might think that means we're lousy with the stuff here on Earth, and we kind of are but There's some other things about hydrogen that makes that whole plentiful thing a little more misleading when it comes to our day to day experience. So first pure hydrogen has a.

Jonathan Strickland Los Alamos National Laboratory Howstuffworks executive producer
"los alamos national" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"los alamos national" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"To text up. I'm your host, Jonathan Strickland. I'm an executive producer in alot of all things Tech and on November 15th 2018. I ran across an article titled Quote. Can we produce enough green hydrogen to save the world end quote? And I thought I haven't done an episode about hydrogen and the proposed hydrogen economy for quite some time. It might be a good sign to revisit this topic and remind everyone what it's all about. Because when it comes to conversations about transitioning away from a dependence on fossil fuels, hydrogen is frequently part of that conversation. Today, we're gonna explore why that is and whether we can in fact produce enough of it responsibly than a green way to create a true hydrogen economy. Spoiler alert. That's just one component of a hydrogen economy. Don't talk a lot about that in this episode. First We gotta just lay some groundwork. Right? Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe. It's what stars are made out of. According to the Los Alamos National Laboratory. If you were to gather all the atoms in the universe, all the matter, So you got all the atoms in the universe, all in one room. Well, it would need to be a really big room. But more than 90% of all those atoms in that room would be hydrogen. So at first, you might think that means we're lousy with the stuff here on Earth, and we kind of are but There's some other things about hydrogen that makes that whole plentiful thing a little more misleading when it comes to our day to day experience. So first pure hydrogen has a.

Jonathan Strickland Los Alamos National Laboratory executive producer
"los alamos national" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"los alamos national" Discussed on WTOP

"Thing shortened your quarantine from 14 days to perhaps 10 days now Assistant Secretary for Health branch or are there on CNN said the CDC is hoping to shorten that quarantine and they're hoping that that would mean People would be encouraged to comply. The new recommendation would be for 7 to 10 days of quarantining and a negative test for covert 19. It's not clear when those recommendations could be issued over searchers air, saying that one mutation of the covert 19 virus at the beginning of the pandemic altered its genetic sequence to help the virus spread more easily from person to person, making the pandemic harder to stop. Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have been working with hamsters in human lung tissue on this one. Ah local runner has set a record for the fastest 10 Mile race ever run by a woman in the U. S era. D'Amato collapsed into her husband's arms after running the up dog 10 miler in record time in Anacostia Park. I can't believe it still feels a little surreal. The 36 year old mom who graduated from American University is now the U. S women's record holder for the 10 miler, breaking the old one by almost a full minute. Location. The race was undisclosed right up until the moment it kicked off to heap Spectators away due to covert 19 tomatoes next goal to qualify for the Tokyo Summer Olympics at the US trials next year for the five keine 10-K. I still have a shot to be a new Olympian. This next go around for for Tokyo 2021 now, so that's my goal. So let's go trying to make an Olympic team. Can Duffy w. T O p news We wish her the best. Up ahead here on w T o p a big bump up for conforming mortgage limits in the D. C area. I'm Jeff label. It's 9 24. Here's Greg Myers, vice president. U S. Federal Microsoft. Imagine being able to harness the power of the cloud at the tactical edge in connected, disconnected and denied environments with Microsoft. Azure Stack Edge suite of products you can a trusted as your hybrid cloud enables innovation anywhere, extending our hyper scale compute capabilities to even the most. Challenging edge locations. Ruggedized to meet military standards as your stack edge includes our tactical cloud appliance. That's roughly the size of.

Tokyo Microsoft Assistant Secretary for Health Los Alamos National Laboratory CNN CDC D'Amato Anacostia Park US Greg Myers American University vice president Olympics Jeff U. S
"los alamos national" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"los alamos national" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"From howstuffworks dot com. Hey there and welcome to Tech stuff. I'm your host, Jonathan Strickland. I'm an executive producer. And I love all things Tech and on November 15th 2018. I ran across an article titled Quote. Can we produce enough green hydrogen to save the world end quote? And I thought I haven't done an episode about hydrogen and the proposed hydrogen economy for quite some time. It might be a good sign to revisit this topic and remind everyone what it's all about. Because when it comes to conversations about transitioning away from a dependence on fossil fuels, hydrogen is frequently part of that conversation today, we're going to explore Why that isthe and whether we can, in fact produce enough of it responsibly than a green way to create a true hydrogen economy. Spoiler alert. That's just one component of a hydrogen economy. I'll talk a lot about that in this episode. First We gotta just lay some groundwork. Right? Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe. It's what stars are made out of, according to the Los Alamos National Laboratory. If you were together all the atoms in the universe, all the matter. So you got all the atoms in the universe, all in one room. Well, it would need to be a really big room. But more than 90% of all those atoms in that room would be hydrogen. So at first, you might think that means we're lousy with the stuff here on Earth, and we kind of are but There's some other things about hydrogen that makes that whole plentiful thing a little more misleading when it comes to our day to day experience. So first pure hydrogen has a.

Jonathan Strickland Los Alamos National Laboratory executive producer
"los alamos national" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"los alamos national" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Behind the tech and how it affects our lives and culture. Here's tech stuff. Get in touch with technology with tech stuff from how stuff works. Hey, there. Welcome to Tech stuff. I'm your host, Jonathan Strickland. I'm an executive producer. And I love all things Tech and on November 15th 2018. I ran across an article titled Quote. Can we produce enough green hydrogen to save the world end quote? And I thought I haven't done an episode about hydrogen and the proposed hydrogen economy for quite some time. It might be a good sign to revisit this topic and remind everyone what it's all about. Because when it comes to conversations about transitioning away from a dependence on fossil fuels, hydrogen is frequently part of that conversation. Today, we're going to explore why that isthe and whether we can, in fact, produce enough of it responsibly than a green way to create a true hydrogen economy. Spoiler alert. That's just one component of a hydrogen economy. Don't talk a lot about that in this episode. First We gotta just lay some groundwork. Right? Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe. It's what stars are made out of. According to the Los Alamos National Laboratory. If you were together all the atoms in the universe, all the matter, So you got all the atoms in the universe, all in one room. Well, it would need to be a really big room. But more than 90% of all those atoms in that room would be hydrogen. So at first, you might think that means we're lousy with the stuff here on Earth, and we kind of are but There's some other things about hydrogen that makes that whole plentiful thing a little more misleading when it comes to our day to day experience. So first pure hydrogen has a.

Jonathan Strickland Los Alamos National Laboratory executive producer
More states halt reopenings as COVID-19 cases surge

The Daily 202's Big Idea

10:24 min | 1 year ago

More states halt reopenings as COVID-19 cases surge

"When the first corona virus cases appeared in Chicago back in January they bore the same genetic signatures as a germ that emerged in China weeks before. But HIS EGON Oser an infectious disease specialist at northwestern examined the genetic structure of virus samples from local patients. He noticed something different. A change in the virus was appearing again and again this mutation associated with the outbreaks in Europe and new. York City eventually took over Chicago by May. It was found ninety five percent of all the genomes that he sequenced. At a glance, the mutation seem trivial about thirteen hundred amino acids, service building blocks for a protein on the surface of the virus in the mutant virus, the genetic instructions for just one of those amino acids number six fourteen switched in the new variant from a D. which is shorthand for. Asset to a G, which is short for Lycene. But the location of that mutation was significant because the switch occurred in the part of the genome that codes for the all important spike protein. The spike protein is the protruding structure that gives the corona virus. It's crown like profile, which also gives its name the crown virus, and allows it to enter human cells the way a burglar picks lock. And Its ubiquity at this point is undeniable of the approximately fifty thousand genomes of the virus that researchers worldwide have uploaded into a shared database about seventy percent carry the new mutation, which is officially designated as D, Six fourteen g, but known more familiarly to the scientists on the front lines of this fight by one letter. G. G. Hasn't just dominated the outbreak in Chicago. It has taken over the world and now scientists are racing to figure out what it means. And how to stop it to of Our Star Science Writers Sarah Kaplan Join. Reported at least four lab experiments suggest that this mutation makes the virus significantly more infectious, although none of that work has yet been pure reviewed, another unpublished study led by federal scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory asserts that patients with the g variant actually have more virus in their bodies, making them more likely to spread it to others. The mutation does not. Does Not appear to make people sicker, but a growing number of scientists worry that it is making the virus more contagious. The scramble to unravel this mutation mystery embodies the challenges of science during the coronavirus pandemic with millions of people infected in thousands dying every day around the world, researchers strike a high stakes balance between getting information out quickly. And making sure that is right. The burglary analogy is when I found very helpful, because it really helps conceptualize what this virus is doing to our bodies, Joel likes to say that the coronavirus can be thought of as an extremely destructive burglar, unable to live or reproduce on its own. It breaks into human cells in coops, biological machinery to make thousands of copies of itself that leaves a trail of damaged tissue and triggers an immune system response that for some people for many people can be fatal, the so-called side kind store. This replication process is messy, even though it has a proofreading mechanism for copying its own genome, the coronavirus frequently makes mistakes. Those are the mutations. The vast majority of mutations have no effect at all on the behavior of the virus. But? Few genetic mutations could be more significant than the ones that affect the spike protein. That is the viruses lock pick the most powerful tool against us. The protein attached to a receptor on respiratory cells, called as to which opens the cell and let's the virus slip inside. The more effective despite protein, the more easily the virus can break into the bodies of its hosts, even when the original variant of the virus emerged in Wuhan China. It was obvious that the spike protein was already quite effective. But, it could have been even better. The spike protein for the coronavirus has two parts that don't always hold together well when you look at it under a microscope in the version of the virus that rose in China the outer part, which the virus needs to attach to a human receptor, frequently broke off equipped with this faulty lock pick. The virus had a harder time invading Ho cells. Studying both variations of the gene, using a proxy virus, in a Petri dish of human cells heireann show a virologist at scripts. Research found that viruses with the g variant had more spike proteins in the outer parts of those proteins were less likely to break off. In that research. The virus was ten times more infectious with that mutation. The good news is this. The mutation does not seem to lead to worse outcomes for patients, nor does it alter the viruses response to antibodies from patients who had the D variant? Suggesting again? This is great news that vaccines being developed based on the original version of the virus will be effective against the war infectious European strain. Identifying, emerging mutations allows researchers to track their spread, knowing what genes affect how the virus transmits enables public health officials to tailor their efforts to contain it wants therapeutics vaccines are distributed on a large scale. Having a baseline understanding of the genome will help pinpoint when drug-resistance inevitably starts to evolve. None of this unfortunately is a magic bullet, but experts say that understanding how the virus works will help respond better. Still, it's a race against time. And Right now. The virus is winning. And, that's the big idea. Here are three other headlines that should be on your radar. This Tuesday number one. US deaths are approaching one, hundred, twenty, five thousand. We expect to pass that number today and the total number of confirmed cases, here's top two and a half million amid worsening outbreaks in Florida, Texas and Arizona that are straining hospital capacity to the Limit Jacksonville, the largest city in Florida and the host to the Republican National Convention in late. August announced that masks will now be mandatory in public and indoor locations. Vice President Pence plans to go ahead with plan travel this week to Florida and Arizona, even though cases are spiking, but Arizona Saul another record, high and hospitalizations days after trump visited the state for a raucous indoor rally where almost no one more mask. Florida's Rolling Seven Day. Average has risen by one hundred percent since week ago. Trump's former FDA commissioner Scott gottlieb warned last night. Night that the surging number of cases could result in nearly half our country infected with the virus by the end of the year and overall deaths are likely to return to more than one thousand per day. He predicts in fact, the number two at the CDC, told the Journal of the American Medical Association yesterday that the US. has quote way too much virus to be. Be Able to contain it anymore and shoe cat said that we're no longer in a position like New Zealand or Singapore. South Korea, where new case can be rapidly identified, and all the context traced and people are isolated or sick and people who are exposed or quarantined, and that's how you keep things under control. She said instead. We have way too much virus across the country. Country for that right now. She described herself as very discouraged and added. This is really the beginning I think there was a lot of wishful thinking around the country that hey, it's summer. Everything's GonNa be fine, but she added that she seemed quote a lot of worrisome factors over the last week or so and added quote. We are not even beginning to be over this. And, we're seeing that on the front lines. Los Angeles County health officials have issued a dire warning in the last twelve hours that conditions are rapidly deteriorating in the nation's most populous county as the virus spreads quickly, officials are warning that both public and private hospitals in the city of angels may soon be overwhelmed leading to triage. One factor that's alarming leaders in southern California. Is that corona virus patients are crossing the US Mexico border to seek medical care. Now, a lot of Americans seeking treatment. But the head of California's Emergency Medical Services Authority describes the stream of patients crossing the border back and forth as quote pouring gasoline on the fire. Arizona Governor Doug Ducey pushed back his plans to reopen public schools and has banned gatherings of more than fifty people. He also has closed down bars, nightclubs, movie, theaters and water parks. All of which he recently reopened as we discussed last week warning residents that we can no longer be under any illusion that the viruses going away on its own other hard hit states, including Tennessee and Georgia have put in place new stay at home. Orders extended them. There are so many unsettling stories just popping up across the country that it's hard to keep up more than two hundred people in West. Virginia were advised yesterday to quarantine after possibly being exposed to the virus will working out at a gym. New Jersey. Governor Phil Murphy says plans to allow indoor dining or are going to be postponed indefinitely while New York Governor Andrew, Cuomo says his administration is reconsidering whether indoor dining can restart safely. New York City next week, which was going to happen as part of its phase three now this is a big blow for restaurant owners in the tristate region who've been preparing to reopen by hiring staff that they'd laid off and restocking their inventory as they teeter on the precipice of bankruptcy, a lot of that food may now need to be thrown away and Broadway's main theaters all said yesterday that they're going to remain shuttered until at least January and probably longer.

Arizona Chicago Florida China United States California Europe Egon Oser Lycene New York City York City New Jersey Los Alamos National Laboratory Virginia Burglary Sarah Kaplan Doug Ducey Wuhan China New Zealand Los Angeles County
Study reports mutant coronavirus that may be more contagious

KOGO's Evening News

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Study reports mutant coronavirus that may be more contagious

"A research team at the Los Alamos national lab says the coronavirus that first turned up in Wuhan China is not the same one we're dealing with in the United States that's according to their study that found the virus has mutated into a new strain that's more contagious the lead authors as the virus mutated to several versions before the one we're dealing with became the dominant form in March scientists are hoping the virus will go dormant in the summer before a second wave in the fall otherwise they say it could keep mutating in the vaccine is being

Wuhan China United States Los Alamos
Mutant coronavirus strain more dominant worldwide, possibly more infectious

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Mutant coronavirus strain more dominant worldwide, possibly more infectious

"Scientists also warning of a new strain of the virus that might be even more contagious than covert nineteen this new strain of the coronavirus has become dominant worldwide and appears to be more contagious than the versions that spray and in the early days of the covert nineteen pandemic according to the new study led by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory the LA times see the researchers think that the new strain can spread faster and make people vulnerable to a second infection after the first scientists warned of the new study is noteworthy but said that its conclusions require further

Los Alamos National Laboratory La Times
"los alamos national" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"los alamos national" Discussed on KOMO

"The Los Alamos National Laboratory but says the new strain began spreading in Europe in early February and it spread around the globe by the end of March they warn if it doesn't subside in the summer like the fluid could mutate even more and not react to vaccines there's still a debate going on over whether the corona virus hat was manufactured in a lab or if it developed naturally A. B. C. news correspondent linsey Davis spoke with an expert about where it may have actually come from to help us try to make some sense of all this we like to bring in Tom Bossert president trump's former homeland security adviser and ABC news contributor thanks so much for joining us politics so they suggested there is a link between the virus and will haunt lab Dr Fauci seems to knock that down entirely and is said that the science indicates involved in nature who is right and what we know yeah well it is very important to be precise about this language because they could both be right they can also both be wrong at the same time and here's what I mean by that the the the virus itself has been studied by scientists including in the trump administration under the N. I. H. St Francis Collins the director of the NIH has come out and scientifically concluded with a report that they published almost a month ago but it wasn't made by man it wasn't a man made you know genomics kind of can you know conception of humans he was naturally yeah kind of you may be brewing so to speak for maybe even years if not months so the question is did it then transmits a human beings from the market or were they looking at this naturally occurring viruses in the lab and then either intentionally or through some accident release it from that lab so the question is not about origin of the virus that's not man made the question is about whether was released accidentally or whether it was you know a natural occurrence and that's the question being investigated now as we know this virus has already killed tens of thousands of Americans do you envision political or social fallout from suggesting that a Chinese lab is to blame I do that's exactly why it's so important to be careful with that language between the president and secretary of state and and doctors out she they're all saying something similar but to be very clear the fall out from a mistake or an accidental release will be you know somewhat significant but perhaps obviously not that level of war or conflict we've we've had this problem in our country where after nine eleven we had doctors in laboratories not properly caring for the anthrax that they were working on and studying and that could have been a bio laboratory security concerns certainly we can see a buyer laboratory safety concern in China and we want international agreements to improve those standards and those practices of that negligence and and mishaps don't happen but if it were intentionally intentionally released it's not intentionally created but intentionally released that would be tantamount to the largest bio warfare we've ever seen on the planet and so we have to be very careful to make sure we don't imply that unless there's pretty strong evidence you kind of just touched on this but I'm just curious to know if you think that we will ever definitively know the true origin of the virus and how important is that discovery yeah I think that there's a good chance that we'll know so it was both naturally occurring which it is and naturally transmitted let's say from the market down the street we may never be able to prove that there won't be a tie for mayor he said to speak that we can zero in on and talk to but it was released from the lab many alternative intentionally or otherwise we should be able to find evidence of that I believe that's what our intelligence community is looking at now you can talk to lab officials and maybe disgruntled doctors that worked at the lab they were observing their practices one of the first questions I'll have to ask is whether that lab was actually looking at and performing research on this virus so will determine that and then we'll determined through investigation and if there is some link to the lab will find over time that so Tom Bossert the former homeland security adviser for president trump come on it's time five twenty.

Los Alamos National Laboratory Europe
"los alamos national" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"los alamos national" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Strain of the corona virus scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory made the identification the strain appears to have become the dominant strain worldwide and has been present since a March it also appears to be more contagious than the versions that spread in the early days of the covert nineteen pandemic researchers say it appeared first in Europe and then migrated quickly to the U. S. east coast in addition to spreading faster it may make people vulnerable to a second infection after first bout with the disease according to new research being published today new models are predicting that national death toll from covered nineteen will rise sharply in the next few weeks a projection by the trump administration forecasts up to three thousand deaths per day by June first and university of Washington research teachers now project one hundred thirty four thousand U. S. deaths by August almost double the previous estimate from last week many health officials are concerned about a spike in cases S. thirty one states will ease business closures and stay at home orders former vice president Joe Biden says covert nineteen testing will be the Lynch pin to re opening the American economy testing record results treatment and only access to a vaccine for covert nineteen should be available to everyone and I mean everyone free of cost speaking at a virtual town hall yesterday the presumptive democratic presidential nominee said essential workers deserve easy access and rapid result testing for covert nineteen he also said the federal government should enforce rigorous employment standards to make sure front line workers get the testing they need as well as paid sick leave mir Lightfoot says Chicago is now past the grim market one thousand deaths from covert nineteen but she says the city has been able to bend the corona virus curve because people have been abiding by the stay at home order as for re opening the city I don't see a world in which we simply flip the light switch and say whatever you were doing in February go back to that now that's not gonna happen but we do have to make sure that we are we have a robust infrastructure in place to help support our people all across the city like this is the city will be laying out a plan for businesses soon for the fourth time Chicago chefs have swept the nominations for best chef in the James beard awards the six nominees up for best chef Great Lakes region honors our gene Kato of Momotaro Jason Hammel of Lula cafe Orioles Noah Sandoval a John shields and Karen Marie shields from a Smith plus Eric Williams from virtue and Bocas Lee Wallin the awards were supposed to be handed out last night but that award ceremony was cancelled due to the pandemic the winner will be announced September twenty fifth during an online ceremony no it's got nothing to WGN sports with Dave Benett well baseball made a comeback today in Korea the Korean baseball organization began its season and empty ballparks with pictures of fans placed in the stands base coaches not pyres were required to wear masks and no high fives could be a preview of what we'll be seeing if baseball resumes in the United States fives err fives that's what they were I guess that that that that'll work with we're just going to get used to it yeah I mean we're gonna have to get used to a lot of things I think of the list of priorities that's one that I think we can all be aware I know but when you watch people on TV shows or whatever now hugging and shaking hands with a TV show opens up on one of the talk shows and the host comes out and they give everybody in the stands a high five and they're all you know how to get in touch in a dance and it just looks so natural a month ago and now it looks like your start up what would you have you probably know people who you you would stick out your hand and they will give you the fist bump instead I know I was never a fist bump or Dave but now I think if I lease that well that would be probably too extreme probably want to go with the the elbow Bob for the Bowers we were talking about this morning the one that I think I'm going to try and kickoff is the foot top if you know I do I'll touch my right foot to your right tell we're just gonna kick each other's foot I have a little bursitis in my right toe so not sure I want that let's go back to sports already in progress the NFL has moved its five scheduled international games back to the U. S. and of the release of the schedule Thursday night football world paying tribute to don Shula the hall of fame coach of the colts and dolphins coach for thirty three seasons C. died yesterday at the age of ninety TV ratings for the latest episodes of the last dance down a bit for the.

Los Alamos National Laboratory
"los alamos national" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"los alamos national" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"The voice of Roger. Speaking to you through the Mars. Microphone Super Cam. And so we've completed that testing and we're ready to send this instrument off to Jet Propulsion Laboratory to get bolted onto the reverend. This launch will take place in late July of two thousand twenty. It then takes about nine months to get to Mars so we're heading for a landing on February eighteen. Twenty twenty one fits Roger. Wiens the Super Cam. Principal investigator with the Los Alamos National Laboratory and this is space time still the come believe in. Ufo's and alien abductions at falling because people more important things these days to worry about and later in the science report growing concerns that the covered nineteen virus can be spread simply through breathing and talking all that moss to the come on space time. Okay let's take a break from our show for word from our sponsor express. Vpn rated number one by Tick Raider may be wondering why you need a virtual private network. Well it's in the name. It's all about privacy. Do you really want big brother? Take companies hackers governments. And who knows who else. Knew Ping in on your mind activities now you might not have anything to hide but it's still really creepy and it could be dangerous for you and those you care about. Also how often do you run across a website and you want to get information from it but you find out that the GEO blocked?.

Twenty twenty Roger Jet Propulsion Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Principal investigator Wiens Ufo moss
"los alamos national" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"los alamos national" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Weeks everybody is assuming well once we get through this we're done I wouldn't be so quick to assume that over the last few days of Brooklyn admissions have declined slightly but the fight continues social distancing appears to be reducing the spread but just how contagious is the virus and is there a risk to re opening society too soon without a better understanding of how easily it can pass to each other people were Steven Portnoy put those questions to the White House response coordinator in light of new government research using data from Wuhan China researchers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory arrive to the conclusion that a single person with the virus can on average in fact about six others that's twice as many as scientists had previously assumed Dr Deborah Berke says it'll take much more study to determine coronaviruses true reproductive number the only way to do that at this point right now is to get the antibody tests out there Burke's believes many if not most of come down with the virus I haven't even gone to the doctor we're seeing the significant cases Steven Portnoy a CBS news the White House jobs numbers out today continue to paint the economy in a downward spiral nearly seventeen million Americans filed for unemployment between March fifteenth and April fourth CBS news business reporter Jason Brooks with claims numbers for the week ending just last Saturday a staggering number of Americans are filing for unemployment benefits as they lose their jobs during the corona virus outbreak the government says initial jobless claims top six point six million nearly matching the total from last week which was revised higher to six point nine.

Steven Portnoy coordinator Dr Deborah Berke Burke Jason Brooks Brooklyn White House Wuhan China Los Alamos National Laboratory CBS reporter
"los alamos national" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"los alamos national" Discussed on WTOP

"Hospitalized in New York grew by its smallest number in weeks everybody is assuming well once we get through this we're done I wouldn't be so quick to assume over the last few days in Brooklyn admissions have declined slightly but the fight continues social distancing appears to be reducing the spread but just how contagious is the virus and is there a risk to re opening society too soon without a better understanding of how easily it can pass to each other people or Steven Portnoy put those questions to the White House response coordinator in light of new government research using data from Wuhan China researchers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory arrive to the conclusion that a single person with the virus can on average in fact about six others that's twice as many as scientists had previously assumed Dr Deborah Berke says it'll take much more study to determine coronaviruses true reproductive number the only way to do that at this point right now is to get the antibody tests out there Burke's believes many if not most of come down with the virus haven't even gone to the doctor we're seeing the significant cases Steven Portnoy a CBS news the White House you jobs numbers out today continue to paint the economy in a downward spiral nearly seventeen million Americans filed for unemployment between March fifteenth and April fourth CBS news business reporter Jason Brooks with claims numbers for the week ending just last Saturday a staggering number of Americans are filing for unemployment benefits as they lose their jobs during the corona virus outbreak the government says initial jobless claims topped six point six million nearly matching the total from last week which was revised higher to six point nine.

New York coordinator Dr Deborah Berke Burke Steven Portnoy White House Jason Brooks Brooklyn Wuhan China Los Alamos National Laboratory CBS reporter
Shedding Light on the Moon

Innovation Now

01:20 min | 2 years ago

Shedding Light on the Moon

"The moon power generation from sunlight can be very difficult. A lunar night is equivalent to fourteen days on earth. But a new NASA technology could shed some light on the problem. This is innovation now bringing you. Stories of revolutionary ideas emerging technologies and the people behind the concepts that shape the future when we send astronauts to the moon or for long stays. We're going to need a new class of power. Here's Dr Dionne Hernandez Lugo Project Manager for Asses Killa Power. Kill-power is a nuclear technology being developed here at NASA in collaboration with the Department of Energy Los Alamos National Lab and it's efficient system. We kill our gifts. You is that a higher power or higher energy to be able to power systems or instruments. You need at least ten kilowatt per astronaut. So if we're going to have astronauts living in space in the moon or Mars kill-power will give you that technology and the power needed in order for action. Us to be able to live in space. Experiments have demonstrated that the system is both stable and safe making killa power. A game changer. For long duration missions for innovation. Now I'm Jennifer.

Nasa Dr Dionne Hernandez Lugo Department Of Energy Los Alamo Project Manager
"los alamos national" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"los alamos national" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Nine for tickets if you'd like to reserve them musicians correct me if I'm wrong Franz light to eat I would say so big time I'd like to get paid also it's also a good French benefit right paid are you eat more comes first yeah are you able to pay the musicians we pay them we pay them a living wage we pay better than the union does good yes that's we want top priority we we want to make sure that we treat them like professionals Hey guys we demand professional behavior yeah it is tough to ask people to work for free no we won't do it right now and then call professional musicians yeah well exactly and as a matter of fact if we aren't able to meet our obligations financially we don't do it so far we've been able to do that we've never been in doubt angry and basically the communities are supporting the work that we do that's where we get our dollars from all right if somebody was new to town coming to town and they just landed in town and and they play on a let's say the viola and they they want to group that they can play with occasionally they can talk to contact you through the website absolutely world with me always looking for instrumentalists always looking and vocalists and vocalist yes and by the way are vocalists audition for the box corral we usually have them come in and and set up an audition with us we usually get we draw our instrumentalists from that work histories that are already here the Santa Fe symphony the R. opera the New Mexico filler Monica and the Santa Fe opera exactly and sometimes there's an overlap among those workers stress very nice up front have you acquired anymore no you collect exotic batons are not been on a buying spree for your sake I I keep looking but I haven't come across any is cool since the last time I don't have it right more exotic and in your favor would for baton is the kind that doesn't split and the kind that directs all the proper notes in the in the right exactly I'm looking for a laser tipped one who yeah all right you can try to get one of those up at the gift shop at Los Alamos National Laboratory most likely Linda gives the front good to see what all the reforms have saved here all right we'll take a break we will come back I have no idea what we do we're gonna do so why you guys do something when you call in and talk about talk.

Los Alamos National Laboratory Linda Franz Mexico Santa Fe
Power for the Moon

Innovation Now

01:20 min | 2 years ago

Power for the Moon

"On the moon power generation from sunlight can be very difficult. A lunar night is equivalent to fourteen days on earth but a new NASA technology could shed some light on the problem this is innovation now bringing you. Stories of revolutionary ideas emerging technologies analogies in the people behind the concepts that shape the future when we send astronauts to the moon or Mars for long stays. We're going to need a new class of power. Our here's Dr Dionne Hernandez Lugo Project Manager for asses Killa power. kill-power is a nuclear technology. Gee being developed here at NASA. In collaboration with the Department of Energy Los Alamos national lab and it's efficient system. We kill our gifts. You is that a higher power or higher energy to be able to power systems or instruments. You need at least ten kilowatt per astronaut. So if we're going to have astronauts living in space and the Moon or Mars kill-power will give you that technology and the power needed in order for action us to be able to live. In space. Experiments experiments have demonstrated that the system is both stable and safe making killa power. A Game Changer for long duration missions for innovation innovation. Now I'm Jennifer Paulie

Nasa Dr Dionne Hernandez Lugo Department Of Energy Los Alamo Jennifer Paulie GEE Project Manager
Kilopower: A Gateway to Abundant Power for Exploration

Innovation Now

00:55 sec | 2 years ago

Kilopower: A Gateway to Abundant Power for Exploration

"We send astronauts to the moon or lung stays. We're going to need a new class of power. Our here's Dr Dionne Hernandez Lugo Project Manager for Asses Killa Power. kill-power is a nuclear technology. Gee being developed here at NASA. In collaboration with the Department of Energy Los Alamos National Lab and it's efficient system. We kill our gifts. You is that a higher power or higher energy to be able to power systems or instruments. You need at least ten kilowatt per astronaut. So if we're going to have astronauts living in space and the Moon or Mars kill-power will give you that technology and the power needed in order for action us to be able to live. In space. Experiments experiments have demonstrated that the system is both stable and safe making killa power. A Game Changer for long duration missions

Dr Dionne Hernandez Lugo Department Of Energy Los Alamo GEE Project Manager Nasa Ten Kilowatt
"los alamos national" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"los alamos national" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"To tech stuff. I'm your host Jonathan Strickland. I'm an executive producer and a low of all things tech, and on November fifteenth twenty eighteen I ran across an article titled quote can we produce enough green hydrogen to save the world and quote, and I thought I haven't done an episode about hydrogen and the proposed hydrogen economy for quite some time. It might be a good sign to revisit this topic and remind everyone, what it's all about because when it comes to conversations about transitioning away from a dependence on Basel fuels hydrogen is frequently part of that conversation today, we're going to explore why that is. And whether we can in fact produce enough of it responsibly than a Greenway to create a true, hydrogen economy. Spoiler alert. That's just one component of a hydrogen economy. Don't talk a lot about that in this episode I, we got to just lay some groundwork, right? Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe. It's what stars are made out of according to the Los Alamos National laboratory if you together all the atoms in the universe all the matters. So you got all the atoms in the universe all in one room. Well, it would need to be a really big room. But more than ninety percent of all those atoms in that room would be hydrogen. So at first, you might think that means we're lousy with the stuff here on earth. And we kind of are, but there's some other things about hydrogen that makes that whole plentiful thing, a little more misleading when it comes to our day to day experience. So I you're hydrogen has a boiling point of minus two.

Jonathan Strickland Los Alamos National executive producer ninety percent
"los alamos national" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"los alamos national" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"And ironically, he said that they used silver, and then they removed all the Schober and fixed the image using the, the man's urine. So effectively nNcholas Allan said they created the shroud of urine. I guess at any rate, the frustration is, is there is only one property of the shroud. Jim EJ that is similar to a photograph and that's the light and dark reversal that we've already mentioned. But every other aspect of that image is unlike any other photograph that I've ever seen. I've seen quite a few in my almost fifty year career probably most unique property damage the, the property of the image hooked me when they asked me to join the team that the property that sort of prompted me to actually join that team is the fact that their spatial or depth information or topographic information often referred to as three d information in coded into the lights and darks of the shrouds image. And that's something that no one has been able to duplicate, and there's no simple solution to how an image might form that way. Very how did you get involved in this project? Well, you know, as a professional photographer, I had a photographic studio in Santa Barbara California at the time and I had been contacted by one of the local technical companies, they were a contractor Los Alamos National labs, and they contacted me as a photographic insult for a seven month project and. Of course, it was Los Alamos, obviously, had something to do with the time bombs, and I can't really say, much more about it. But for seven months, we did that project. And I worked with a gentleman named Don van who was an imaging scientist working for that subcontractor company a few weeks after we finished that project. He called me again. You know, when you're self-employed and the phone rings you're hoping it's the next project. They called me again. And I thought how another project done and instead he said, Barry, what do you know, about the shroud of Turin? And I kind of laughed and I said, but, but dominant Jewish and Don laughed and said, so, my remember, he's one of the other Jewish guys on our team. And he was the one who was there when they took an image of the shroud. A photograph of trout, put it into an instrument called the VP janali Zor, which took the lights in the docks of the image, stretched them into three vertical space on a green screen monitor proportionate to each. Each other. And when they did that with the normal photo, you get a jumble of shapes that make no sense at all when you do it with the shroud image. You get the natural relief of a human form, and it was that property that encoding of depth information into the image that actually prompted the formation of the shroud of durin research project, when they saw that, that was the first time that a scientific instrument visualized that property, so that was sort of the milestone of the moment, and that was the catalyst for our team to be formed. And although initially, I was hesitant to participate. It was that image property more than anything else that prompted me to say yes to.

Don van Jim EJ Barry Los Alamos National labs nNcholas Allan Los Alamos Santa Barbara California Turin janali Zor VP scientist seven months seven month fifty year
"los alamos national" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"los alamos national" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"I guess at any rate. The frustration is there is only one property of the shrouds image. That is similar to a photograph and that's the lights and dark reversal that we've already mentioned. But every other aspect of that image is unlike any other photograph that I've ever seen, and I've seen quite a few in my almost fifty year career probably the most unique property, the image, the, the property of the image that hooked me when they asked me to join the team that the property that ultimately sort of prompted me to actually join that team is the fact that their spatial or depth information or topographic information often referred to as three d information encoded into the lights and darks of the shrouds image. And that's something that no one has been able to duplicate, and there's no simple solution to how an image might form that way. Mary, how did you get involved in this project? Well, you know, as a professional photographer, I had a photographic studio in Santa Barbara. Ibra California at the time, and I had been contacted by one of the local technical companies, they were a contractor, Los Alamos National labs, and they contacted me as a photographic consultant for a seven month project. And of course, it was Los Alamos. So obviously had something to do with the timing bombs, and I can't really say much more about it. But for seven months, we did that project. And I worked with a gentleman named Don van who was an imaging scientist working for that subcontractor company a few weeks after we finished that project. He called me again. You know, when you're self employed and the phone rings. You're hoping it's the next project. They called me again. And I thought, how another project with Don. And instead, he said, Barry, what do you know about the shroud of Turin? And I kind of laughed and I said, but Dom Jewish and Don laughed and said, so my remember he's one of the other Jewish guys on our team. And he. Was the one who was there when they took an image of the shroud. A photograph of trout, put it into an instrument called the VP imaging analyzer, which took the lights in the dark of the image and stretched them into three vertical space on a green screen monitor proportionate to each other. And when they did that with the normal photo, you get a jumble of shapes that make no sense at all when you do it with the shroud image. You get the natural relief of a human form, and it was that property that encoding of depth information into the image that actually prompted the formation of the shroud doctor in research project, when they saw that, that was the first time that a scientific instrument visualized that property, so that was sort of the milestone of the moment, and that was the catalyst for our team to be formed. And although it initially, I was hesitant to participate. It was that image property more than anything.

Don van Los Alamos National labs Los Alamos California Santa Barbara self employed Mary Turin Dom Jewish VP scientist consultant Barry seven months seven month fifty year
"los alamos national" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"los alamos national" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"To the convention center that day and buses a free, of course, buses all right across the street. You can write the the city bus. So access to censor. Also, any businesses looking for exposure, nonprofits, who are nonprofits. Right. We got to technology section. I'm looking at putting together the seminar series, which I'll talk about as we get closer to the event. But basically if a business is hiring. This is your biggest opportunity to get face to face with job seekers of all ages. Los Alamos National labs will be there. They, of course of many positions open Santa Fe chamber dot com is a banner right on the homepage to sign up for the business expo jobs there Thursday, April the eighteenth. You got it. I would come by. But we'll be doing that show that day at United world college up in Montezuma. No kidding. Okay. And then the next day at the the soon to be open Castenada hotel. In Las Vegas show on the road. Taking my show take my act on the road, man. I like that. All right. What else is going on? Well, we've got a networking event next week, which is business after hours. We will be the food depot on March. The twenty eighth at the Thursday starts at five thirty then the next breakfast is business over breakfast, April fifth at Kingston residents and one of the things I was going to mention oh, the leadership Santa Fe graduate should that. They will graduate may seventh Santa Fe country club. Congratulations to those folks. One more session to go. And then it's their graduation companies. The time goes by so fast. And then how soon before you started taking applications for the next one the application processes already open at closes in September. But get in early. If you're interested in this is only once a year. Right. Kind of kick. It all off in what August-September something like that September October September end of September the first session, but that'd be an orientation before that so apply. Now, you got it you want to get in it as well worth dot org. All right, Simon Brackley Santa Fe chamber of commerce. He's heading out now to play some golf. I'm gonna listen to Senator worth and you have a talk about the session..

Santa Fe Santa Fe country club Simon Brackley Los Alamos National Las Vegas Castenada hotel Senator Montezuma Kingston United world
Russia expels 60 U.S. diplomats, closes consulate in retaliation

Scott Stiegler

02:20 min | 4 years ago

Russia expels 60 U.S. diplomats, closes consulate in retaliation

"From your breaking news station i'm larry mullen break the us is responding to russia's decision to expel sixty americans from that country in response for the exact same move by the us earlier in the week correspondent phil black says russia doesn't believe they had any other choice the russian view is that this is the band minimum response it's a reasonable response to what you have done to us and justly but they've included a warning and that is that if other countries notably the united states do take further action against russia than russia will respond further as well employees of the city of santa fe or getting a reminder from new mayor alan webber he's telling them the city will continue to prohibit its employees from helping immigration and naturalization service investigators enforce immigration laws weber says no city resources will be used to identify or apprehend noncitizens solely on the basis of that person's immigration status the waste isolation pilot plant in south eastern new mexico resumed operations last year following a three year shutdown since then one hundred eighty shipments of radioactive waste of arrived at the facility they've come from los alamos national laboratory as well as installations in idaho texas tennessee in south carolina well you've no doubt noticed it a big jump in gas prices in new mexico triple eight mexico says the average statewide price went up ten cents in the past week to two fifty four a gallon albuquerque gas prices went up sixteen cents to two fifty one gallon daniel armbruster is with aaa new mexico most analysts anticipate that the prices are going to continue to rise when we reach mid april the price nationally will probably be two seventy right now it's at two sixty five aaa says on average motorist will now pay more than thirty five dollars to fill up a fourteen gallon tank sixty four degrees in albuquerque our next news update at six i'm larry molin franken ninety four point five fm and am seven seventy newsradio k k o b guns used for one purpose to kill other humans your lieutenant governor your governor candidate said that how do you react how do you respond this is jack from.

Russia Phil Black United States Santa Fe Alan Webber Mexico Los Alamos Idaho Tennessee South Carolina Albuquerque Larry Mullen Texas Larry Molin Franken Two Fifty One Gallon Thirty Five Dollars Sixty Four Degrees Fourteen Gallon