16 Burst results for "Lorrie Wilmot"

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

05:56 min | 7 months ago

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

"Search. From the journeys belonging to blackness digital media. Project. I'm India Lorrie Wilmot. And you're listening to the PODCAST. Talking journeys out belonging to blackness. Joining us today is Dr Kristen Smith Kristen. Is a black feminist anthropologists, social justice advocate, associate professor of anthropology, and African and African diaspora studies in the Director of the Center for Women's and gender studies at the University of Texas at Austin. She is the founder of Hashtag site black women, which is a social movement network podcast and blog than intended to acknowledge honor black women's long standing intellectual production, and motivate others to consciously incorporate incite lack women's scholarship into their works a practice that's often overlooked and undervalued. The author of the Book Afro Paradise Blackness Violence and performance in Brazil Kristen's writings and social justice advocacy focuses on anti-black state-sanctioned police violence throughout the Americas and particularly in Brazil. Specifically. She contends with gendered and Racialist Police violence and its impact on African descended women and communities, and of course, their efforts of resistance. Noted as an expert on black liberation and featured on programs such as NPR, you can find Kristen's essays and articles across various outlets including the American anthropologists the Huffington. Post. The American prospect. And the black scholar. Welcome. Kristen. Thank you so much for having me today. Act One call to. Adventure. I.

Dr Kristen Smith Kristen Lorrie Wilmot Brazil Center for Women founder associate professor of anthrop India NPR Austin Huffington University of Texas Americas Director
"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

"From the journeys belonging to Blackness Digital Media Project. I'm India Lorrie Wilmot and you're listening to the podcast talking journeys out belonging to blackness joining us. Today is Dr Courtney deserie. Morris Courtney is a visual conceptual artist writer will she'll anthropologists and assistant professor of and Women's studies at the University of California Berkeley at UC Berkeley. She teaches courses on critical race. Theory feminist theory Black Social Movements in the Americas women's social movements in Latin America and the Caribbean and is working on her forthcoming book. Defend this sunrise lack women's activism and the geography of race in Nicaragua as an artist Courtney works primarily in the fields of photography experimental video installation and performance. Art Work Examines the complexities of place. Ecology memory and the constant search for home in her art. Courtney is concerned with understanding the ways we inhabit place through migration ancestry and shared social memory. And also how places inhabit us. In fact this past winter she had a showing at the Shara equiano value gallery and I hope I said that correctly in Oakland California called. Adjust your eyes for this darkness. Welcome Courtney thank you so good to be here. I'm I'm so excited. And I am a huge huge fan of your work both your writings in your art tickly in the ways in which you use your scholarship and your art to intentionally highlight narratives that are often ignored or ones that disappear from our collective history of the space that I like be in even as a sociologist myself. So I appreciate that. Plus I enjoy the ways you place self self in various geospatial emotional spaces as both an outsider and an insider rates so this type of subjectively That we see that's in your art and the ways in which pay homage to the ancestors. It's a great platform. I'm really happy to be on the program and to have an opportunity to engage with your listeners. Act One call to adventure so as a creative as an artist writer professor there are paths Lee take processes we engage in. Did you become interested in doing the work? You do today. you know. I mean it's interesting to sort of reflect on that question and and kind of look back on your life and you often have the moment like the experience of looking at your life in thinking like wow. How did I get to this point? You know because when you're making choices you don't always you can't anticipate or predict the future you know and sort of wear your path is gonNA lead you in. Sometimes you start thinking that you're you know that you're going to do one thing and then you ended up taking some interesting. That didn't really plan on. And I think you know for me I mean. Part of it was that You know I grew up in a really creative household My mother's a self taught painter. I remember going up in like talking to her mother..

Dr Courtney deserie Morris Courtney Lorrie Wilmot writer University of California Berke Nicaragua UC Berkeley India Caribbean assistant professor Oakland California Americas Latin America Lee professor
"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

"Sir from the journeys belonging to Blackness Digital Media Project. I'm India Lorrie Wilmot and you're listening to the PODCAST TALKING. Journeys out belonging to blackness. Joining us today is chef and Master Chocolatier Michel Pool. Michael is the founder and CEO of hot chocolate artisan firehouse chocolates which is based in. Seattle. Washington Michael is an award winning chef with over thirty nine years of experience as a firehouse cook for the Seattle Fire Department. Where he was lieutenant he is a graduate of Likud on blue. Patty with Legrand's diploma in cuisine and pastry. Michael Specializes in French and Caribbean cuisines. French pastries and artisan chocolates. He has won awards including the Master Award for best chocolate tears and confectioners in America by the international chocolate salone and has placed gold silver and bronze for the luxury chocolate salon for his delicious chocolates and desserts. Chef Michael Pool has been featured on the nationally syndicated. Talk Show Rachel Ray as well as local newspapers and television stations on both coasts. Welcome I go. Thank you happy to be here. So listing your culinary accolades and I think it is worth mentioning to your businesses tagline quote uncompromising goodness in every bite. I love that right. Lets US know that you are in the serious business of food and that speaking to and connecting with people through your cuisine.

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

16:03 min | 1 year ago

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

"From the journeys of belonging to blackness digital media project. I'm India Lorrie Wilmot. And you're listening to the PODCAST TALKING. Journeys out belonging to blackness. Joining us today is Dr Catherine Sophia Bell. Catherine is associate professor of philosophy at Penn State with research and teaching interests in African American Afrikaner Philosophy African American Studies African Diaspora studies lack feminist philosophy and critical philosophy of race. She's an author. Co Founding Editor of the Journal Critical Philosophy of race a certified Yoga instructor in founding director in owner of La Belle. Be Coaching which Offers Executive Academic coaching workshops and retreats for administrators faculty and Graduate Students. Catherine also offers services specifically under happily unmarried and erotic empowerment that provide individual and Week Group. Coaching workshops and retreats designed to support the social emotional and physical wellbeing of her clients. Thank you for having me Katherine. Let me tell you. I just love the way. You're able to demonstrate for so many folks out there. How one in academic can be multifaceted in dynamic right. Don't sit at a desk. Let's read in on this thing right and then also to how as an African descended person and woman how he can truly embrace and live in your truth when it comes to your personal relationships and partnerships and even with yourself as it is the case with happily unmarried and then I love this and open to the sixty nine ways to embrace ecstasy. Yeah I mean there's more but sixty nine such a fun number and then I'm also my son. Signed his cancer and sign kind of looks like a sixty nine so I like playing with things like Bat. I love that. And so all of this falls under your business tagline philosophical purposeful and practical approaches to La Shelby. The good life. All of that fantastic. I'm so excited to have you here. Because you are such a brilliant scholar and you also have this really great. Entrepreneurial Mindset as well. I think our audience here will just enjoy listening to your journey as to how you've been able to combine these two passions. It seems to me I love it will fall right into our first segment. If you don't mind because I have so many different kinds of.

Dr Catherine Sophia Bell African American Afrikaner Phi associate professor of philoso Journal Critical Philosophy Lorrie Wilmot Katherine Co Founding Editor India Catherine La Shelby La Belle Executive founding director Week Group instructor
Kathryn Sophia Belle

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

08:30 min | 1 year ago

Kathryn Sophia Belle

"I'm India Lorrie Wilmot. And you're listening to the PODCAST TALKING. Journeys out belonging to blackness. Joining us today is Dr Catherine Sophia Bell. Catherine is associate professor of philosophy at Penn State with research and teaching interests in African American Afrikaner Philosophy African American Studies African Diaspora studies lack feminist philosophy and critical philosophy of race. She's an author. Co Founding Editor of the Journal Critical Philosophy of race a certified Yoga instructor in founding director in owner of La Belle. Be Coaching which Offers Executive Academic coaching workshops and retreats for administrators faculty and Graduate Students. Catherine also offers services specifically under happily unmarried and erotic empowerment that provide individual and Week Group. Coaching workshops and retreats designed to support the social emotional and physical wellbeing of her clients. Thank you for having me Katherine. Let me tell you. I just love the way. You're able to demonstrate for so many folks out there. How one in academic can be multifaceted in dynamic right. Don't sit at a desk. Let's read in on this thing right and then also to how as an African descended person and woman how he can truly embrace and live in your truth when it comes to your personal relationships and partnerships and even with yourself as it is the case with happily unmarried and then I love this and open to the sixty nine ways to embrace ecstasy. Yeah I mean there's more but sixty nine such a fun number and then I'm also my son. Signed his cancer and sign kind of looks like a sixty nine so I like playing with things like Bat. I love that. And so all of this falls under your business tagline philosophical purposeful and practical approaches to La Shelby. The good life. All of that fantastic. I'm so excited to have you here. Because you are such a brilliant scholar and you also have this really great. Entrepreneurial Mindset as well. I think our audience here will just enjoy listening to your journey as to how you've been able to combine these two passions. It seems to me I love it will fall right into our first segment. If you don't mind because I have so many different kinds of questions and thoughts act one call to adventure so for our listening audience. Who may not know you changed your last name from Gyns. Yes to bell and bell spelled with an extra e honor your maternal grandmother and and as I understand your maternal grandmother named herself. And Yeah and you see this active. Changing your name as a way to honor that power and legacies. Yes well first let me say I absolutely love my name. I mean every time I see it written down Catherine Sophia Bell like I get excited at the sight of my own name. So in terms of motivations oftentimes our names are patrilineal right. So many not necessarily all women are given the name of your father in. May Take on the name of their husband and that was my experience. So my initial given name was Catherine Theresa Johnson. My mother wanted the name Catherine after her mother my father wanted to name you theresa and then Johnson was his name. So that was my maiden name I got married in. Nineteen Ninety nine at the age of twenty one between my first and second semesters in Grad School and at that point I changed my last name to guidelines which was the name of the former husband I got legally divorced in twenty seventeen and I'm now berry happily unmarried. And rather than returning somebody that patrilineal name I mate name. I decided to go with a match. Lineal named honor my maternal grandmother so her initial given name was Katherine Smallwood. Which was my great grandmother's last name. Smallwood. But by the time she got the high school she changed her name's Katherine L. B. E. L. L. Now I have no idea how she went about changing it or even if she went through some legal process to do that but my mother got me a copy of her high school yearbook class of Nineteen Fifty two where in that yearbook so by the time. She got her senior in high school. Her name is listed as Catherine Bell. And so there's something really powerful to me about this black woman in the nineteen young black woman in the nineteen fifties by her senior in high school Made her name Kathryn Bell. And that's the name that she's recognized as you know later in life she. She went on to model. She showed up in jet magazine a few times and her name is Catherine Bell knows faces as well. You know that was just a powerful legacy to me and it was important Tap into in connect to that legacy empower naming oneself Have a match lineal name as hopes to patrilineal name. I'm so I changed my name Catherine. I actually dropped the middle name. Interestingly my mother when I was changing my last name she was like. Oh well I never really liked Teresa anyway. That was your father's toys. That would choice so she got a chance to rename me. My Middle Name Sophia. She recommended because she said you're Lhasa. In philosophy us so you can be Sophia. My Mother's middle initial is S. My two daughters have the middle initial s so we were able to share that s middle initial further sophia in the bell It's still sounds the same as the way. My maternal grandmother founded by added the extra e. Just a little bit of self friendship over the meaning of beauty. I think evidence that there was so much thoughtfulness and care. Yeah even your process to say okay. How do I go about changing my name because even when we go through relationships such as marriage? And you're going through the divorce there is a lot of conscious thought around. Do People keep their names Ryan or even when you're getting married forget about even when you're getting divorced but like when you're getting married some people choose to keep their name drop the name in my case I hyphenated. I've even attended a wedding where the husband and the wife decided to both hyphenate their names just so that it would on paper as well as the presentation of this new joined. Family Union Unit. That it wasn't that someone was giving up but they were just more so adding naming oneself is so powerful. I mean I can't help but to even reflect on scene in routes where yes lavar. Burton is as as Coon to Kim. Tae Is being whipped. He ends. It's you know this holder of active submission. That's trying to happen with him being beaten because he refused the naming Tober right and he's like Kota Day trying to be broken. Think about that example. I also think about the example with Muhammed Ali. Right where he's like. You know. Say My name. Say My name right before the destiny's child came out with it up. You know what I mean and so yeah. I'm not GonNa say that that you know the cultural model my mind that I figured I'd put that out there. Once I said it I was like okay. This is GonNa be the connection that comes up celebrities name that too. But that's not quite what I have in mind right. There is something and I think we have more examples of men doing that than or the example of men don't eat more celebrated than examples of women during that but definitely for me like I look forward to dropping the maiden name when I took on the Mary name but I also very much look forward to dropping the Mary name and renaming my for me. It was another beginning for me. Like who am I in this new chapter this new iteration of our life? And how can this naming process a reflection of that kind of a launching point for me for that? So that's been beautiful. Young kids is all about identity. And the all these different phases and stages just you know what does our about us and then our names judge. We're judged by our names whether we're applying for different jobs or positions. I mean their scores and You know them very well. Also but their scores of research studies and the employment field that talked about racial bias and discrimination based on candidates nate. I think that's a fantastic way to pay homage to her legacy. Thank you

Dr Catherine Sophia Bell African American Afrikaner Phi Catherine Theresa Johnson Lorrie Wilmot Katherine Smallwood Katherine Bell Kathryn Bell Associate Professor Of Philoso India Journal Critical Philosophy Co Founding Editor Executive Week Group La Belle La Shelby Lhasa Katherine L. B. E. L. L. Muhammed Ali
"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

12:11 min | 1 year ago

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

"From the journeys of belonging to blackness digital it'll media project. I'm India Lorrie Wilmot and you're listening to the podcast talking journeys out belonging to blackness. IGNACE joining us today is at least Annabel. Santos also known as last I sent theta. alesia is an Upper Latina author playwright writing coach a fellow podcasters teaching artists and activists as well as a film director actor and producer. She is the founder of the New York City. Latino Writers Group and the National Book Award Faculty member for over a decade alesia has created and nurtured safe spaces spaces for emerging and established writers to nurture their creativity whether she's a frequent guest speaker and workshop facilitator for universities and nonprofits across the US or a guest on shows like NPR's tell me more at least us work focuses on topics that intersect identity religion sexuality quality feminism and Social Justice where people of Color and particularly women of Color in addition to her two thousand eleven memoir finding your force a journey to love and her play production production and one woman show entitled. I was born at least us. Work has been published in magazines such as Latina magazine Glamour Domino and BusinessWeek and most notably her essay two cultures marching to one drum appeared in urban Latino magazine in addition. At least you're Rowen produced the documentary entitled Afro Latinos An untucked history with the Renzo debut. which is a film that intense to build awareness and help give voice to large community of African descendants in the Caribbean being in Latin America who've been silenced and historically marginalized more recently alesia has launched a new business venture that allows for to blend her spiritual practice this with her writing and community empowerment work called last synthetic spiritual consulting and? I can't wait to learn more about that but right now. Let's welcome lasted. I sent that I got so much for inviting me on your show. I'm so humbled to be here. I'm so proud of the work that you're doing and elevating and celebrating our voices and our testimony and so yes. I'm thrilled to be here. Thank you thank you for taking the time out of your extremely extremely busy schedule to share a bit about your work with our listeners. You know what's so funny is that I'm always always intrigued by our guest who are also engaged in projects designed to educate in lift African descended communities. And so you seem to do it all so I appreciate your Kudos does to me too but chow. I think you're probably one of the longest Intros I've given to date. Like what is she. Not doing leaping pink. I guess but I in honesty your energy. That's infused throughout the work. Whether it's through Penn or you know really keyboard but at at this point but depend on the screen in your performance are is quite powerful and you cannot very well with people. And I'm I know I'm not I don I say this but your messages resonate deeply and I think it's because you are an effective storyteller and the care you take in the time you make when helping others feel empowered or to tell their stories. I mean it makes sense that you are considered by many in the community a writing midwife. I just think about the moment that I realized that I was the writer. Like all of this when we come when it comes to like how. How do I come to ask Dominican as an Africa Tina to the fullness of myself as the black woman how did I get there? Where did it come from the journey? It's been a journey of identity Self discovery and self awareness. And and so I'm a person who grew up in Brooklyn and seventies right and so there was no Latino like I start off with that like when you come in. Come up in a space. Well you're not even sure where you fit. You will either black or you're white. There was no Latino we were not even the census at that point and so so I wasn't light enough to be white and I wasn't dark enough to be black so I immediately come up in elementary school. Not Having a home not having a place place but I knew I was more black than white. I've always known that whatever that word minority meant then I was a part of that group I was a it was definitely definitely not in the Ingraham. I was always in this like space of lent me here because this is where I feel most safe emo scene and then you go through your you know your high school years and I went to predominantly whites and I grew up in a home where you're taught you marry white because it marrying white is right. And it's about a glut on the LAROSA. You're being told you being taught in programming happening conditioned to believe that okay. You don't want to identify as black because Y is where it's at and here's where you will excel and succeed and and and not be. Invisible is rain so you immediately. I immediately have this conflict. This inner conflict of will the WHO am I will do. I belong whereas my I place there was a long time from when I was even Latina when I was in even wanting to speak Spanish. You know and it's like I feel like I've had decades of transformation Shen and it wouldn't be until I came out as a writer in two thousand one right so after September eleventh that I begin to delve deeply into what my my identities are. What are the things that I'm connecting to? What are the things that make me me? What do I get to claim? And when I came out as a writer and I knew the first magazine I wanted to write for publishing was essence. I knew that that was the place for my voice. Because it's where I felt I. Most related wasn't even Latina magazine and there was an African Americans who said to me. How dare you WANNA write for SS magazine? You Ain't black. Latino is not your place and the words it's not notch replace or the things that were ringing in my head like Shit. It's top my. It's not my place than what is my place on. What does that even mean that I begin to look at but wait my mother's lactating? Mothers Caribbean I am black. And not only at so not only am I Latina I'm black and at my place but it's my responsibility to really look at what that means and why it is having this these conflicts so that story that you The tidal two cultures. There's March march into one drum was originally titled Real. Will the real black girl please stand up to essence. It's an essence. Rejected it. They they weren't with it. I'm sitting like the title and what I was trying to do his bridge. This black brown divide so that we really have a conversation Asian about race at but but mostly what we had in common as black people so when it got published. It really wasn't affirming because it allowed me to really continue to do this work. Because from that article is where I landed at Filipinos the story as their head writer and producer her and I'm interviewing lack Latinos all over Latin America rate countries. Later and this question about. Why aren't we talking about being being black? Why are we identifying as being black and what is what does this look like and not in America which is a completely different experience to the United States and are are African American history here because the racial project looks very different in the Caribbean and across Latin America in just articulation of racial ratio projects? And when I think about you and and when I'm talking to folks like yourself who who are really very unapologetically black because I met I I met you know I've known you for a while but I'm known you as this person who's like I'm I'm black and that this weird juxtaposition that you felt yourself sort of traversing in earlier on in life. There's a lot more clarity when I meet you in the present and so for me. It's just like I then wonder all right well. How do did a person like at least you get here right? And what was her journey like. Because as you were saying this is a process that moment when you are like embracing your identity as a writer but then and embracing your soul. As after Latin necks as a black person. As an African descendants there are so many people out in podcast land listening in who who are creative like yourself and who are who want to be able to tell their story in their journey that might be similar to yours and I'm like you know what this woman is powerful awful and so here's a platform to share a story so no when I think about the question what brought me here to my blackness to owning my blackness Nepal legit Jin unapologetically. The first thing that came to my mind like lips was religion. Sponge well God. So when you're on this journey and you're having these nervous breakdowns and life is just fucked up and you realize that you know you don't fit in this world you're not white you don't fit in this world people people don't see us back because you're too late. You got to begin to take your identity omit but also prove it in some ways. People WanNa see that I own my privilege also a black. They WANNA see that. I recognize that I've had some access to things that I might not have gotten if I was three shades darker Parker Or if my hair texture was a little bit different and I do remember early on before I wore my hair national natural curly when I was distributing it out weekly that people ooh respect me more when I walked into spaces so when you say `I stand my blackness unapologetically it has. It took a long time because I had to br dismantle a lot of misconceptions about process and my journey in particular I come to my blackness through religion and and spirituality and my connection to my ancestors and my roots and really honoring and recognizing where I come from that's where that's where my blackness act. Mrs warned the roots of me the history. You know when I think about my mother's father my mother's mother my mother's siblings and this line nine this lineage of African descendants that I come from how do I pay homage. How do I connect to them? So this is where the journey begins against for me truly to understand own it is I am I am entitled. I am entitled to this To this religious practice that is Sunday Dante via that is the that is Voodoo right. Because I'm Dominican. I share an island with Haiti. And so it makes sense. At all. Of these things coursing coursing through my body. I just wasn't taught how to access it right and so with age I I become someone who questions more and I investigate more and I love and it's funny when I went to visit my mother this summer and we were preparing all of my first last data spiritual bats. The first batch had her hands in her touch over it and I'm doing Tarot card readings and gun Ceuta's the entire month on there with her like she's a Mike Mom. I'll be right back. I have three readings tobacco. I'll be right back. And she looked at me at one point and said I cannot believe that you do these things because my grandmother used to do go on Sutras Consulting and readings things for folks who would come in the neighborhood in Dr. which for me was this is? This is my roots. This is of course I am who I am because of this this and then I look at where I am today. I'm an e Locher or more goon and or Ya and that in itself has been. We could talk about at that hour. Listen what you said. It's just a nice way for us to transition into our.

writer Latina magazine Latin America Caribbean United States alesia urban Latino magazine Lorrie Wilmot National Book Award producer New York City IGNACE NPR founder India Santos Annabel Africa Rowen BusinessWeek
"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

14:07 min | 1 year ago

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

"Uplifting motivating or or simply spilling the teeth on issues and topics that impact the lives of african descended communities across the diaspora so what that means is we're going to talk a little bit about everything we're going to talk about black singularity traveling while black gender black vivid nissim hair parenting relationships relationships and other sociopolitical and pop culture topics where your host i'm gerard miller bryant and i am india lorrie wilmot hello and welcome to another tuesday's t hey welcome to tuesday's t everyone we have a jam packed episode for you and today we want to take some time to talk about something that i think that most of our listeners will enjoy i know it's a topic that you and i have talked about in various forms and fashions representations of black womanhood as it relates to beauty sexuality and personal personal agency in popular culture i think in part this topic came about from a series of conversations that both had with folks i'm in very different kinds of contexts but also from one of our tuesdays t- audio requests to cover the topic of quote body friends in your significant can other for one of our future episodes now of course by virtue of hearing the word thought and its particular pop culture reference reference there are very specific images meanings of the word that are conjured as a result right so it's it's a very popular word to kind of depending on in your generation but it's a word is often used reference in individual usually as a woman who yang most likely it's a one color color and it's used as a noun and also as a verb for example she used a thought or she's displaying body behavior in the the time i've heard of stands for that ho over there but it can also be a word as used to paint a picture that provides both the speaker the person who's using it and the audience people hearing it an image of who the woman is what her character is types of behavior hey she engages in her desire ability or sexuality and even in some ways are beauty i know right such a such jam-packed filled word word right so i remember a couple of weeks ago actually having a conversation with a friend of mine an entrepreneur who's worked for many years i'm in the atlanta area in music industry so little shot out to tie samuels out there but we were talking about like thought it was interesting thing to hear like a male's perspective on what that means in you know absolutely right drawn to you know the word itself you know it's not like you're calling someone one who's over the age of sixty thought right they're just there are certain things that come to mind right and so just like words images to to our cultural artifacts right so images of beauty specifically are reflective of and they also refi social political meanings right that exists in history and also within a particular context there are also used as expressive capacities right of the status quo as well as it's subversion so i don't know i think you probably see these representations not only in like social media in music and music music videos and reality TV but we have public artists like nikki massage and beyond say whose lyrics and and images reflect the double standards of femininity and black female sexuality and i'm sure people probably familiar with the songs wrongs in videos like their collaboration feeling myself or even beyond stays independent woman and cater to you right right yes so today hey we're asking some a primary questions and we're going to be discussing a couple of things one what is beauty in the context of black female sexuality of you all may have had conversations about what beauty is like what it is what it represents who what's the standard of beauty we're asking asking that more specifically about women who identify as black and how that relates to their sexuality and we're also asking does the life in iconography of sarah baartman who were going to talk about more extensively just you she's also referred to as the hot tap venus does the life and he of her provide an appropriate linked to understanding the black female sexuality and the representations that we see combat and pop culture a visa fees be gone say nick moniz megan a stallion these artists today so we're trying to make that connection we're trying to think thinks through unpack you know what black female sexuality is about representations are so in this episode and we i would be remiss if we didn't focus a little bit on the booty partly because of some of the history associated with sarah baartman of and also because of some of the ways in which pop culture artists on like beyond say nicki minaj and others have represented the booty in in media on different platforms form so the title of our episode is going to be sarah baartman nicki menaj yonsei and the booty i'm excited about that we we talk about the booty i mean i think about hot girl summer in torquing right i am she's taking it to a whole 'nother level you know over the years growing up you know as a black woman and having you know this idea of beauty few like we're always chasing it you know and then having different parts of our body be dissected in in you know hyper sexual is in just not not necessarily being held to the same quote unquote standard of like mainstream is really important conversation have have not just for us as women in our forties but for younger women who are consuming a lot of this media around their body and how people are representing their bodies it's a really important conversation i think generations because if you don't know sometimes you perpetuated right i think it's a it's it's important that we're going to be having in this conversation and even to link it to sarah baartman i think that most people don't know about who sarah baartman was and why a we even see the images around black womanhood around black women's bodies you know why we see those images perpetuated in the way that we do new and it's not that she's she was the lone person but there's something about the legacy of how her physicality was represented and how we can see that even you know three hundred years later reflected in all the things that we are socialized within to understand stand in terms of black beauty and black sexually that i think is helpful to contextualized why we see what we see today and we're that really comes from and so i think you'll be almost educational for people listening in as well and then if anything prompts some folks to say let me get on google who sarah baartman what is that and then then i think when people realize the connections that were making than people go oh i get it like this has been happening i'm for centuries now and those who may know about sarah baartman through you know sociology course or anthropology cores may have only gotten a sliver of what her life was about because we don't know a ton about her we are able to talk a little bit more about like the reach her her existence has into black women's existence in understanding of a varieties not not without agency of course but i think it's going to be powerful conversation i'm excited because we have some people who are experts in this that are gonna share sweepings kind of make those connections to help us make those connections but before we do that in true fashion tuesday's team we are going to you're going to talk about the tea that we are drinking today and i i i am drinking along t. today take you a reason it just happened open to be on my desk and i i don't know maybe since talking about black women inexpensive drink tea 'cause he's lexi so that is my my drink of choice i know about you indian i'm drinking lemongrass t i'm just in the space of of just maybe feeling like a little bit light the need for cleansing and being that mental and emotional space so drinking it straight like how i normally do you know sugar chasers happening that's good i love them a grassy yeah i don't think i've ever had what did you call it a long long long yeah long and black t. apparently is the same thing that may be some slight differences the same thing from what i understand now dietrich you're straight no girl you know put sugar her sugar in it well i bet you know i think i said earlier that i was industry i'm moving away from the sugar i actually put on equal now those sugar substitute samantha you could do those sugar substitutes they taste money kind of gets me like deep down my throat a bit like i don't know aftertaste is is just after a while you don't even notice him really okay i'll take your word for for it i figure if it's not like honey honey that comes specifically from grenada like we have a family friend who this is what they do they make their own hanini bottle it and so if it's not pure girl tastes good lucky you so it's all like that's like some next level like organic that i dare whole all foods wegmans and all them to try to get up on that let's get into one of our first guest skipped right so we are quite fortunate to be able to have have dr natasha gordon chip and buried to join us in this conversation some of you may recall drinking tea with natasha when she was a guest on a previous tuesday's t episode entitled lack love asked self love natasha is an independent scholar in costa rica whose work focuses this is on slavery she's also contributing writer for the tico times and essence magazine book editor on afro latinos and author of the forthcoming historical fiction novel on the black madonna and i think relevant to this conversation she's also the author of a book entitled representation and and sarah baartman which seeks an alternative africanist rendering of sarab arguments life on the way it's black women are displayed and represented across across the world great natasha i think of you as the sarah baartman expert particularly with your book so i think that you're quite poised to tell our listeners a little bit about who sarah baartman was what's her life story we already mentioned that she was also dubbed as one of the hot top penises mrs what really hawaii she why is that relevant and how does that speak to the conversation that we're having today thank you sarah baartman story is he's a universal story about the way that i think today we still have and represent brown and black women's bodies but very few people actually know who the woman was sarah baartman was a woman from the kwena people in in cape town in the cape tony region of south africa and the people fall under the larger umbrella of the poison where the indigenous business people in southern africa at that time period specifically the time period where you had the colonial encounter with the dutch and when the dutch came to cape town they essentially colonize the space and established an unspoken slavery three which basically made the qur'an people who were indigenous to the land enslave but really just non-citizens so that is the world that sarah baartman image in her people grew up in and originally her name was shot bartman which means it's a diminutive it means as little sarah it's almost equivalent to when we think of slavery in the united states when a grown man is called boy raid so she was always addressed i as a child even though at the time she was taken avenue slave woman outer cape town she would've been in her twenties so she had a whole life whole family a spiritual practice her language family that called her by her property which we do not know we only know the dutch name aim of which then becomes anglicized one.

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

13:45 min | 1 year ago

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

"Uplifting motivating or simply spilling the teeth on issues and topics that impact the lives of african descended communities across the diaspora so what that means is we're going to talk a little bit about everything we're going to talk about black singularity traveling while black gender black vivid nissim hair parenting relationships relationships and other sociopolitical and pop culture topics where your host i'm gerard miller bryant and i am india lorrie wilmot hello and welcome to another tuesday's t hey welcome to tuesday's t everyone we have a jam packed episode for you and today we want to take some time to talk about something that i think that most of our listeners will enjoy i know it's a topic that you and i have talked about in various forms and fashions representations of black womanhood as it relates to beauty sexuality and personal personal agency in popular culture i think in part this topic came about from a series of conversations that both had with folks come i'm in very different kinds of contexts but also from one of our tuesdays t- audio requests to cover the topic of quote body friends in your significant can other for one of our future episodes now of course by virtue of hearing the word thought and its particular pop culture reference reference there are very specific images meanings of the word that are conjured as a result right so it's it's a very popular word to kind of depending on in your generation but it's a word is often used reference in individual usually as a woman who yang most likely it's a one color color and it's used as a noun and also as a verb for example she used a thought or she's displaying body behavior in the the time i've heard of stands for that ho over there but it can also be a word as used to paint a picture it provides both the speaker the person who's using it and the audience people hearing it an image of who the woman is what her character is types of behavior hey she engages in her desire ability or sexuality and even in some ways are beauty i know right such a such jam-packed filled word word right so i remember a couple of weeks ago actually having a conversation with a friend of mine an entrepreneur who's worked for many years i'm in the atlanta area in music industry so little shot out to tie samuels out there but we were talking about like thought it was interesting thing to hear like a male's perspective on what that means in you know absolutely right drawn to you know the word itself you know it's not like you're calling someone one who's over the age of sixty thought right they're just there are certain things that come to mind right and so just like words images to to our cultural artifacts right so images of beauty specifically are reflective of and they also refi social political meanings right that exists in history and also within a particular context there are also used as expressive capacities right of the status quo as well as it's subversion so i don't know i think you probably see these representations not only in like social media in music and music music videos and reality TV but we have public artists like nikki massage and beyond say whose lyrics and and images reflect the double standards of femininity and black female sexuality and i'm sure people probably familiar with the songs wrongs in videos like their collaboration feeling myself or even beyond stays independent woman and cater to you right right yes so today hey we're asking some a primary questions and we're going to be discussing a couple of things one what is beauty in the context of black female sexuality of you all may have had conversations about what beauty is like what it is what it represents who what's the standard of beauty we're asking asking that more specifically about women who identify as black and how that relates to their sexuality and we're also asking does the life in iconography of sarah baartman who were going to talk about more extensively just you she's also referred to as the hot tap venus does the life and he of her provide an appropriate linked to understanding the black female sexuality and the representations that we see combat and pop culture a visa fees be gone say nick moniz megan a stallion these artists today so we're trying to make that connection we're trying to think thinks through unpack you know what black female sexuality is about representations are so in this episode and we i would be remiss if we didn't focus a little bit on the booty partly because of some of the history associated with sarah baartman of and also because of some of the ways in which pop culture artists on like beyond say nicki minaj and others have represented the booty in in media on different platforms form so the title of our episode is going to be sarah baartman nicki menaj yonsei and the booty i'm excited about that we we talk about the booty i mean i think about hot girl summer in torquing right i am she's taking it to a whole 'nother level you know over the years growing up you know as a black woman and having you know this idea of beauty few like we're always chasing it you know and then having different parts of our body be dissected in in you know hyper sexual is in just not not necessarily being held to the same quote unquote standard of like mainstream is really important conversation have have not just for us as women in our forties but for younger women who are consuming a lot of this media around their body and how people are representing their bodies it's a really important conversation i think generations because if you don't know sometimes you perpetuated right i think it's a it's it's important that we're going to be having in this conversation and even to link it to sarah baartman i think that most people don't know about who sarah baartman was and why a we even see the images around black womanhood around black women's bodies you know why we see those images perpetuated in the way that we do new and it's not that she's she was the lone person but there's something about the legacy of how her physicality was represented and how we can see that even you know three hundred years later reflected in all the things that we are socialized within to understand stand in terms of black beauty and black sexually that i think is helpful to contextualized why we see what we see today and we're that really comes from and so i think you'll be almost educational for people listening in as well and then if anything prompts some folks to say let me get on google who sarah baartman what is that and then then i think when people realize the connections that were making than people go oh i get it like this has been happening i'm for centuries now and those who may know about sarah baartman through you know sociology course or anthropology cores may have only gotten a sliver of what her life was about because we don't know a ton about her we are able to talk a little bit more about like the reach her her existence has into black women's existence in understanding of a varieties not not without agency of course but i think it's going to be powerful conversation i'm excited because we have some people who are experts in this that are gonna share sweepings kind of make those connections to help us make those connections but before we do that in true fashion tuesday's team we are going to you're going to talk about the tea that we are drinking today and i i i am drinking along t. today take you a reason it just happened open to be on my desk and i i don't know maybe since talking about black women inexpensive drink tea 'cause he's lexi so that is my my drink of choice i know about you indian i'm drinking lemongrass t i'm just in the space of of just maybe feeling like a little bit light the need for cleansing and being that mental and emotional space so drinking it straight like how i normally do you know sugar chasers happening that's good i love them a grassy yeah i don't think i've ever had what did you call it a long long long yeah long and black t. apparently is the same thing that may be some slight differences the same thing from what i understand now dietrich you're straight no girl you know put sugar her sugar in it well i bet you know i think i said earlier that i was industry i'm moving away from the sugar i actually put on equal now those sugar substitute samantha you could do those sugar substitutes they taste money kind of gets me like deep down my throat a bit like i don't know that after taste is is just after a while you don't even notice him really okay i'll take your word for for it i figure if it's not like honey honey that comes specifically from grenada like we have a family friend who this is what they do they make their own hanini bottle it and so if it's not pure girl tastes good lucky you so it's all like that's like some next level like organic that i dare whole all foods wegmans and all them to try to get up on that let's get into one of our first guest skipped right so we are quite fortunate to be able to have have dr natasha gordon chip and buried to join us in this conversation some of you may recall drinking tea with natasha when she was a guest on a previous tuesday's t episode entitled lack love asked self love natasha is an independent scholar in costa rica whose work focuses this is on slavery she's also contributing writer for the tico times and essence magazine book editor on afro latinos and author of the forthcoming historical fiction novel on the black madonna and i think relevant to this conversation she's also the author of a book entitled representation and and sarah baartman which seeks an alternative africanist rendering of sarab arguments life on the way it's black women are displayed and represented across across the world great natasha i think of you as the sarah baartman expert particularly with your book so i think that you're quite poised to tell our listeners a little bit about who sarah baartman was what's her life story we already mentioned that she was also dubbed as one of the hot top venuses mrs what really hawaii she why is that relevant and how does that speak to the conversation that we're having today thank you sarah baartman story is he's a universal story about the way that i think today we still have and represent brown and black women's bodies but very few people actually know who the woman was sarah baartman was a woman from the kwena people in in cape town in the cape tony region of south africa and the people fall under the larger umbrella of the poison where the indigenous business people in southern africa at that time period specifically the time period where you had the colonial encounter with the dutch and when the dutch came to cape town they essentially colonize the space and established an unspoken slavery three which basically made the qur'an people who were indigenous to the land enslave but really just non-citizens so that is the world that sarah baartman image in her people grew up in and originally her name was shot bartman which means it's a diminutive it means as little sarah it's almost equivalent to when we think of slavery in the united states when a grown man is called boy raid so she was always addressed i as a child even though at the time.

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

"Uplifting motivating or or simply spilling the teeth on issues and topics that impact the lives of African descended communities across the diaspora so what that means is we're going to talk a little bit about everything we're going to talk about black singularity traveling while Black Gender Black Vivian Ism hair parenting relationships relationships and other socio political and pop culture topics we're your hosts that I'm Gerard Miller Bryant and I am India Lorrie Wilmot what a wonderful beautiful day it is a wonderful day it's beautiful outside it's hot it's Nice yes birds Chirpin mm-hmm that's always a good sign right when the birds chirping you like as you're seeing a song for me to thank you I appreciate every she well today we're GONNA get into too hot fast and dirty k maybe not looking like buffer today's episode we we are excited to have here with us our really good friends and nonprofit do-gooder missed the Lotus or not even taking a heavy me doing to Lawrence is currently the vice president of programs at the United South End Settlements Delors has worked in the field philanthropy and nonprofits for the last seventeen plus years primarily focusing on youth development she is she is a skilled and innovative program program extraordinaire and has successfully raise money for programs that improve and edify the life and well being of youth of Color Dolores is also a macro wrote social worker with the MSW in macrosocial work and works in the Greater Boston area pretty impressive work and we're anytime about nonprofit work today in all three of us in some way in some capacity have had experiences working in non profit field and working with communities of color so we all share that amongst three of us and this episode is a great way for us to talk to our audience about doing the good work that socially good work in supporting in improving our communities this episode will be discussing a few things one the benefits of even some of the challenges of doing this nonprofit if it works for those two pieces and also understand that oftentimes this work isn't necessarily easy in always desire it isn't always the kind of work at UC keep all kind of retiring from particularly because of the some of the politics and doing nonprofit work working within our communities so it should prove to be a very interesting conversation aided very excited and so in true fashion of Tuesday's t talk a little bit about what teamer drinking this morning because thi is central to the work that we do helps get us in the right space so this morning I have decided that I am going to probably go with linen team okay I feel like because of the top of that we're talking about I think about lemons they used in the right way it can be very sweet with added Sugar Oh wow eh I think that's the kind of a topic is bittersweet and women tease is appropriate for me I'm drinking Moroccan Mint really refreshing because I think you almost need to have like a cleanse sort of approach when you're going in to be in service of others sometimes you have to be very cognizant of the things that you carry and I think mint really is very cleansing in that particular way I love so so I don't think I have such an elaborate description for my ta Musab reshape book reviewers I'm having honey lavender tea it is one of my favorite I just wanted something sweet and I love the smell of it but lavender also so earn matic yet it it just speaks to our senses yeah I looked puts me in a kind of a zone peaceful zone yes which is needed in who actually in my community when something move back home similarly early enough to detract way too much conversation but Rosewater House you so I've seen people of late just going around to spraying themselves and maybe other people like like as far as your piece search revenue lavender oil you're drinking ninety lavender tea and then he starts for everybody everybody ought to UN me because house cast you out. That's why my grandmother handles black-and-orange well listen to Indian I dallies milliard therapies and you can probably tell from the conversation that we've known each other really long time friends so maybe we could just tell our audience about how are we met each other I kind of this this come out.

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

"Uplifting motivating or or simply spilling the teeth on issues and topics that impact the lives of African descended communities across the Diaspora. So what that means is. We're going to talk a little bit about everything we're going to talk about black singularity traveling while black gender black vivid Nissim hair parenting relationships relationships and other sociopolitical and pop culture topics. We're your hosts that I'm Gerard Miller Bryant and I am India Lorrie Wilmot. What a wonderful beautiful day? It is a wonderful day. It's beautiful outside it's hot it's nice. Yes Birds Chirpin mm-hmm. That's always a good sign right when the birds chirping. You like as you're seeing a song for me to thank you. I appreciate every she. Well today. WE'RE GONNA get into too hot fast and dirty K maybe not looking like buffer. Today's episode we. We are excited to have here with us. Our really good friends and nonprofit do-gooder missed the Lotus or not. Even taking a heavy me doing to Lawrence is currently the vice president of programs. At the United South End Settlements Delors has worked in the field the philanthropy and nonprofits for the last seventeen plus years primarily focusing on youth development. She is she is a skilled and innovative program program extraordinaire and has successfully raise money for programs that improve and edify the life and well being of youth of color. Dolores is also a macro wrote social worker with the MSW in macrosocial work and works in the Greater Boston area. Pretty impressive work. And we're anytime about nonprofit work today in all three of us in some way in some capacity have had experiences working in non profit field and working with communities of color so we all share that amongst three of us and this episode is a great way for us to talk to our audience about doing the good work that socially good work in supporting in improving our communities. This episode will be discussing a few things one the benefits of even some of the challenges of doing this nonprofit if it works for those two pieces and also understand that oftentimes. This work isn't necessarily easy in always desire it isn't always the kind of work at UC keep all kind of retiring from particularly because of the some of the politics and doing nonprofit work working within our communities so it should prove to be a very interesting conversation about it so excited very excited and so in. True fashion of Tuesday's t talk a little bit about what teamer drinking this morning because thi is central to the work that we do helps get us in the face so this morning. I have decided that I am going to probably go with linen team. Okay I feel like because of the top of that we're talking about I think about women's they used in the right way. It can be very sweet with added. Sugar Oh wow EH. I think that's the kind of a topic is bittersweet and women. Tease is appropriate for me. I'm drinking Moroccan Mint really refreshing. Because I think you almost need to have like a cleanse sort of approach when you're going in to be in service of others sometimes you have to be very cognizant of the things that you carry and I think mint really is very cleansing in that particular way I love so so I don't think I have such an elaborate description for my. Ta Musab reshape book. Reviewers I'm having honey lavender tea. It is one of my favorite. I just wanted something sweet and I love the smell of it but lavender also so earn matic yet it. It just speaks to our senses. Yeah I looked puts me in a kind of a zone peaceful zone. Yes yes which is needed in. Who actually in my community? Something move back home similarly early enough to detract way too much conversation but Rosewater House you. So I've seen people of late just going around to spraying themselves and maybe other people like like as far as your piece search revenue lavender oil. You're drinking ninety lavender tea and then he starts for everybody. Everybody ought to UN me because house cast you out. That's why my grandmother handles black-and-orange Well listen to Indian I DALLIES milliard therapies. And you can probably tell from the conversation that we've known each other really long time friends. So maybe we could just tell our audience about. How are we met each other? I kind of this. This come out.

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

14:13 min | 2 years ago

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

"Uplifting motivating or simply spilling the teeth on issues and topics that impact the lives of African descended communities across the Diaspora. So what that means is. We're going to talk a little bit about everything we're going to talk about black singularity traveling while black gender black vivid Nissim hair parenting relationships relationships and other sociopolitical and pop culture topics where your host. I'm Gerard Miller Bryant and I am India Lorrie Wilmot. Happy Anniversary. This is I. Six recording. Tuesday's T. R. podcast since as we published our first episode in March nineteen. It's been so much fun getting this project off the ground and working with my sister brand India of we've had some really great feedback. You've got some praise and we've also gotten so really good questions and we're hoping that we're going to be able to some of those today Ted Questions about the show. Oh in your questions about specific episodes and even about US individuals we are and how we are together. Some of the comments and questions around our friendship the orage origination of Tuesday see where the catacombs valid. Why did I do this in our decision to do a podcast in the first place the objective active of the podcast and Some questions about what is far as topics episodes rain. I'm excited very crowded. Six episodes right number six year. The that's pretty cool. So who's listening to our podcast. While based on our previous five episodes and I'll just list them here break quickly for those who might be joining us for the first time at first episode so kicked off with the topic sisterhood as family or Fam Fam then we dove right in to talking about black hair and the natural we'll hear movement then. We had an episode on black love as self love with Dr Natasha Gordon Chip in Berry. Then we had a really interesting two part episode series so to speak called school days. PWI's HPC's and the college college admissions scandal. And then finally our last episode was with Dr Lorenzo Boyd and we talked about black and blue race race community policing and social justice and I'd say our audience is not only located in the US but their international baby Around the globe we think their questions and comments reflect the diversity of their experiences and their perspectives so we have listeners. In Europe so shout out to the United Kingdom France Germany and Spain. We also have abl listeners in central and South America and the Caribbean so we'll who to Mexico Panama. Costa Rica Trinidad and Tobago and Grenada. We have listeners on the continent of Africa. Folks we're talking about South Africa and Nigeria an then last but not least we have our listeners that are based here in the US where we are. So what are the states representing we got California Illinois Conneticut DC Florida Georgia Maryland Massachusetts New Jersey New York North Cadillac North Carolina Ojo Oklahoma Texas. And were Jinyu be a baby so our reach is global and end. We love it absolutely. We really do have and this was really what we wanted. We wanted to touch a lot of places such a lot of topics. So I think we're doing a indeed we're doing an thank you all There's a good space for us to talk about. You are listening that are representing these countries in these states in India just listed so oh our gratitude is infinite for you listening to two chicks talk about stuff so you go there and also if you have friends that are in other places that we have not listened isn't listed here so like Minnesota where you at Right Colorado New Mexico Arizona that's that's right Nebraska you know there there's so many other places right in even Part of the fifty states but that are not part harv are contiguous states right so we are we Puerto Rico as as our Commonwealth where are we Alaska and Hawaii. So we're one I have in Canada. I'm surprised but we're getting there. I haven't found not that it's in in that group that you just mentioned but candidates usually into everything so insane them. ALIBABA's me here. There you go in as a way of saying thank you and also just to kind of recognize it. Our audience that they're in the D.. Have these questions. Today's episode. We wanted to take times issue. A devoted audience members unhelpfully some new audience members as as of this episode to thank you for listening End For showering with love support and appreciation and we wanted to reflect the respond to the comments and questions. You posted to us via email at asked Tuesday gmail.com We love when you email us because that is right now the main way that we know that you are listening in have questions so please again even if this episode. It doesn't answer some of your questions. Feel free to email at asked. Tuesday's T- edgy. MOUND DOT com so for this episode. The title is GonNa be got questions. We've got answers is all about the team. Yes but in truth formats before we dig deep into things things you want to tell our audience tear drinking today. That's right what are you drinking so for me And when did something a little bit light but cleansing in. So I'm drinking Murang`a tea with some Green Tea and pomegranate. That sounds really yeah. You know it's just in the space of just vacation mode I am. I am in the summertime and transitioning especially when you're in academia you kind of have the slower pace. I don't necessarily need to feel the hopped up on caffeine. I tried to minimize that. But yeah this one a natural glow thing going on. Yeah actually hey you look a little going on you you island girl the what you're drinking swell get ready. This is a little TM. I but attack working out a lot lately and got some goals got summer. Go looking great. I could indie thank you summer time. I know people will be doing the most in the summer including I have been drinking. It might not that I've been drinking. The last couple of days is more Functional so I've been drinking smooth moves tea. Slams can't move move and it does exactly what it sounds like toes. So it's just moving through you. It is moving through me. Everything along with it is moving as well. But you WANNA feel lighter like if you are working out and stuff not not sometimes you just feel a little I just need the whole system to Kinda just cleared south. And that's what the tea does. This cost move. Move if you need Little is is very It's very it's not harsh on your stomach at all. So that's that's that's the great thing about it so you can say unction yes absolutely yes you take it at night on empty stomach and then you get up the next day and you start your day see. That's good to know because let me tell you this so you know. The old mother's on teased grandma's. Have you you know I think culturally early to against him but the all of these different kinds of cleanses your colon and that sort of things good for your body helps to regulate all the systems. All naturalists advocate that but the old school ones are like. Look you need to to devote like three days. We're who wear anything. You are a homebound plugging along like my belly. I think that's why more people don't do. Because you know when you live in a very high paced kind of environment and you got real stuff going on. No one has three days to devote and the people like. Oh just boil this Steve. This drink it on Friday. The then you're like you gotta go to work Monday. So they're do nothing. We need something quick inefficient and he is quick inefficient Fisher enough. The T- I because I know how I'm comes evil right now but it's all good and and not not to endorse. But where did did you find out about this. Particular One a nutritionist. It's never seen any. Tradition is for a couple years. And it's literally you can buy in the grocery grocery store kroger so People know about it. It's there but But you know not. Everybody's really focused in on acts. They're going onto like though what do you call it. Mere lax and the easiest out the convenience and commercial. I mean commercials. Tell us what was going by right so that they don't have a commercial pursue tasty. I haven't seen one so I got heard about it through word of mouth that's awesome. Yes an Indian I really do. DRINK TEAS AW So is becoming kind of our thing now. India you ready. Yeah let's get into it steeped all right. So we've received some great feedback and comments hits from folks many have shared with us that they really enjoy our chemistry together. Like they're like. Oh my gosh. It seems like you'd have a lot of fun. Some folks have even even comments that they feel like they're in the same room with us. Drinking whatever beverage recognize some people have said well. I'm not drinking tea or like they wanNA drink other things which is fine but that more importantly that they feel that they are a part of the conversation and I'd say really be. The comments came about particularly after our first episode. Sisterhood is family or yeah. That was really fun for me. for both of us it was our first episodes and India. Hadn't any net had talked all the time but we just had a chance to be ourselves and recorded insured with the world so it was really fine is kind of you know Solidifying the chemistry that we knew he had actually being able to capture. It was very fun. I think I think all this is intentional because like we're genuine friends and we enjoy each other and chatting about things in. India is a great listener in. She's very vital. And hopefully you know she feels the same way about me. I I do I know you do grow in our our conversations are pretty much exactly like our podcast. No absolutely lean and it's would choose see here field. That's what you get with us. You know there is no sort of. Here's our on air personality personality. You know this is just US end. I think some of the things that I've heard people say whether it's on twitter or G. or or just even via email through ask Tuesday's. The MEL DOT COM. People are like I feel like I'm a fly on the wall in the middle of of our conversation so I just think that's that's much love and appreciation and so one one of the more obvious questions That we get is about. What prompted us to do a podcast? Where did this come from? Why now And so we thought it'd be Kinda cool that's how you law our origination story again. How did we conceptualize so The we were. It's weird because when you're really close with someone and you I mean there's been times out of the years you've been friends. I duNno nineteen seventeen. Something something years You know you find that when you there are moments where you don't talk as much but then when you come together you're like still on the saints you didn't use it so Indian Iowa had had spells and we connected and I remember a number lights..

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

05:39 min | 2 years ago

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

"Uplifting motivating or or simply spilling the teeth on issues and topics that impact the lives of African descended communities across the diaspora so what that means is we're going to talk a little bit about everything we're going to talk about black singularity traveling while black gender black vivid Nissim hair parenting relationships relationships and other sociopolitical and pop culture topics where your host I'm Gerard Miller Bryant and I am India Lorrie Wilmot happy anniversary this is I six recording Tuesday's T. R. podcast since as we published our first episode in March nineteen it's been so much fun getting this project off the ground and working with my sister brand India of we've had some really great feedback you've got some praise and we've also gotten so really good questions and we're hoping that we're going to be able to some of those today Ted Questions about the show Oh in your questions about specific episodes and even about US individuals we are and how we are together some of the comments and questions around our friendship the orage origination of Tuesday see where the catacombs valid. Why did I do this in our decision to do a podcast in the first place the objective active of the podcast and Some questions about what is far as topics episodes rain I'm excited very crowded six episodes right number six year the that's pretty cool so who's listening to our podcast while based on our previous five episodes and I'll just list them here break quickly for those who might be joining us for the first time at first episode so kicked off with the topic sisterhood as family or Fam Fam then we dove right in to talking about black hair and the natural we'll hear movement then we had an episode on black love as self love with Dr Natasha Gordon Chip in Berry then we had a really interesting two part episode series so to speak called school days Pwi's HPC's and the college college admissions scandal and then finally our last episode was with Dr Lorenzo Boyd and we talked about black and blue race race community policing and social justice and I'd say our audience is not only located in the US but their international baby around the globe we think their questions and comments reflect the diversity of their experiences and their perspectives so we have listeners in Europe so shout out to the United Kingdom France Germany and Spain we also have abl listeners in central and South America and the Caribbean so we'll who to Mexico Panama Costa Rica Trinidad and Tobago and Grenada we have listeners on the continent of Africa folks we're talking about South Africa and Nigeria an then last but not least we have our listeners that are based here in the US where we are so what are the states representing we got California Illinois Conneticut DC Florida Georgia Maryland Massachusetts New Jersey New York North Cadillac North Carolina Ojo Oklahoma Texas and were Jinyu be a baby so our reach is global and end we love it absolutely we really do have and this was really what we wanted we wanted to touch a lot of places such a lot of topics so I think we're doing a indeed we're doing an thank you all there's a good space for us to talk about you are listening that are representing these countries in these states in India just listed so oh our gratitude is infinite for you listening to two chicks talk about stuff so you go there and also if you have friends that are in other places that we have not listened isn't listed here so like Minnesota where you at Right Colorado New Mexico Arizona that's that's right Nebraska you know there there's so many other places right in even part of the fifty states but that are not part harv are contiguous states right so we are we Puerto Rico you know as as our Commonwealth where are we Alaska and Hawaii so we're one I have in Canada I'm surprised but we're getting there I haven't found not that it's in in that group that you just mentioned but candidates usually into everything so insane them Alibaba's me here there you go in as a way of saying thank you and also just to kind of recognize it our audience that they're in the D. have these questions today's episode we wanted to take times issue a devoted audience members unhelpfully some new audience members as as of this episode to thank you for listening end for showering with love support and appreciation and we wanted to reflect the respond to the comments and questions you posted to us via email at ask Tuesday's.

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

13:42 min | 2 years ago

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

"Uplifting motivating or for simply spilling the teeth on issues and topics that impact the lives of African descended communities across the Diaspora. So what that means means is. We're going to talk a little bit about everything we're going to talk about black singularity traveling while black gender black feminism hair parenting relationships relationships and other sociopolitical and pop culture topics where your host and I'm Giradi Miller Bryant and I am India Lorrie Wilmot. Today we're delighted to have with us. A friend author researcher Educator and Criminal Justice Consultant. It's an Dr Lorenzo M Boyd. Thanks for having me. Lorenzo L.. Here he is an associate professor of criminal justice and the director of center for advance policing and is the newly. Julio appointed assistant provost for diversity and inclusion at the University of new haven in Connecticut learns those also past President of the Academy Adamy of Criminal Justice Science and a life member of noble the National Organization of Black Law enforcement executives. Well well congratulations congratulations firms. That has asked wandering much. Thank you Indian. I've known Lorenzo for at least what twenty years. Now maybe twenty years. I was counting and so it is such an honor. Press to come back and be able to have him on the PODCAST and to Really introduce him He needs no introduction. He's he's pretty Pretty fabulous on his own But Lorenzo rental service as a former former deputy sheriff in Boston also informs is nearly twenty year career high -cation where his teaching training a research focuses. On urban policing criminal justice systems diversity issues. In Criminal Justice in Criminological Theory ease appeared on local regional and national national media outlets to discuss policing aftermath of some pretty high profile. Case says so Lorenzo on. Why don't you introduce yourself of to our our audience our listeners? Thank you before anything else I would like to say. I'm just a regular brother just trying to make a difference. I'm Adad add about grandfather. I try to be just a regular person just part of the community and ultimately my job is to build bridges. Yeah we're excited to Kinda dig down into the work that you do And some of the issues that are pretty prominent now in the media in and the communities that we live in. So we're excited about that. But because you know what they found in his no we love to a drink not yes literally and metaphorically Though we like to start off every podcast telling folks what T- were drinking. So do you want to kick us off. I do okay. So because we're in our are what fifth episode I shake it up a little bit and actually do some research Johnson. T- that I have not had before so I this this morning had black tea and I think that's entirely appropriate based on the topic of our show but I did a little research and black. Black tea is used for improving mental alertness as well as learning memory and information processes deals. And I'm at a point in my life in my professional and personal life when really just kind of being really cerebral about what I'm doing trying to channel I'm trying to have some focus and so I- engaged some black tea and I will say that with enough sugar bigger. It's pretty good you you want some tea with sugar. India knows Ah you know and I actually have cut out sugar in the last month or so. I've been using things like swerve and natural sweeteners but That's the T- I'm drinking today. That's awesome and it's full of caffeine. It's got some caffeine in it. I think Yeah yeah I I think that contributes to the mental alertness for folks. Don't take my joy. Okay that's my joy all right. I'm drinking this morning drinking some green tea straight up. I also don't tend to add too many Additives or sugar to whatever. I'm drinking so I drink straight up and It's it's just good and it doesn't have breath as much caffeine as your black T.. Does it gets me alert. Gets me going puts me in Zen state because a heavy heavy topic. We're GONNA be talking about today. Green tea is a staple. It's good. Yeah all right Lawrenceville Europe. So what is it that you're drinking convey thought about this getting ready for the podcast. What would be most apropos for the day and for who I am so today I've decided to go with H I t to go chai tea based on the international flavor of the work that I do a lot of the international travel that I've been doing over the last a couple of years plus I add a little bit of sentiment because the stuff that adds a little spice is nothing Nello about what I do? I love it. I love it and and you know and we're spicy to no that's awesome good stuff now. Maybe I'll have our T. onboard so let's segue right into the episodes so today we wanna it takes some time to talk about the state air quotes state of race and community relations with law enforcement and the criminal justice system. So Oh it's been what almost five years a little bit over five years since Hashtag black lives matter movement gained national attention In their efforts offers to really amplify all the anti-black in anti or trans racism and with all the deaths that I've been happening with unarmed African descendants by law enforcement or those acting as if they could police African pendants right. So I'M GONNA call. Their names is when we have the murders of Trayvon Martin Michael Brown. Eric Garner Orlando Casteel. Alton Sterling Turns Crutcher Tomorrow Tamir Rice to Nisha Anderson Meyer whole Sandra Bland. Walter Scott Freddie Gray and countless others disres- been overwhelming being a necessary to call out their names hashtags. Black lives matter absolutely and we're in a place where we're not trying to forget. Get those names because these are commnitting events that caused us to really take an in-depth look at what's inside every living and really questioning some of the systems were these types of murders and miscarriages of justice can happen There continues to be an onslaught of viral videos that are capturing incidences of living while all black thank God for technology. A lot of this was captured on film Where we can see African descendants are engaging in some pretty mundane non criminal activities activities of their mining business living their lives but wonder front lawns picking up debris in their own property on their own property? They are sleeping in Public areas at a school pay tuition in rested. They're sitting in a starbucks at taking naps. Like I just said so when they had police lease called on them A lot of times this is by white quote unquote concerned citizen With some of them even being held in handcuffs until they prove that they actually belong. They are. They're actually not criminal right. In so undoubtedly these kinds of incidents I think we can all agree further exacerbates debates the long standing tension that exists between African descended communities and law enforcement and just even our place and the fact 'til participation in the criminal justice system as a result right and it puts the strain on the complex relationship between police and really sometimes even officers of color and the communities vowed to protect conserve. So why is this still such a prominent issue in you know. How much evidence do we need? Need to have before real changes actualized right to your point you just mentioned we have all you know thank goodness with technology. But how much do we need to see right and what can really be done through deuces tension and so this episode is going to be called black and blue race community policing and social the justice. So that's a lot. That's why we have Lorenzo here as our. That's right in expert. Bert to engage in a really rich discussion. The so I guess in many ways. Why is this topic important? I mean we find it US people who presumably self identify as African descendants. Right we might find this important but why is this important really for everybody and why should others really league feel connected to even care about this topic. Well first of all. Thank you for being willing to talk about such a really really important in topic in it's one that A lot of people are uncomfortable. Talking about sometimes justice and learning is in fact uncomfortable. But let's take a step back. Let's unpack some things that you to have mentioned first of all simply put this at the feet of the police are think does an injustice to do the causes of what's going on and when I look at is clearly. There's a point where the police have a part in this but if you take a step back one of the things that I said when I was working with the people at the university part of the problem was starting to see now is that there are many any people. Many times white people are weaponising. The police to subjugate the levels of racial bias is people will say black folks living while black and they then will claim victims down. Don't call the police. What are the police going to do? They they have an occupational mandate when we call they show up and it's their job to try to figure out what's going on so a lot of times by the time. The police a cold is already the negative interaction between the white citizen and the black citizen and the blacks is already pretty upset about things so by the Tampa police comes. It's all now here. Yuko and re folks. We've even give them nicknames like side Sidewalk Sally or poolside Patty Becky police on black people doing normal things. So you already upset when something like this happens now all you have to interact with the police in you've got a higher state of tension and then the person that called they take a step back and say no. I'm not in this. That's just you and the police so let this stand. The problem doesn't start elise long before the interaction between people the color. Yeah that's a really good point and I think that's often overlooked We recognize it but I think in terms of catalysts. Sometimes we overlook look at And I do WanNa talk a little bit at some point about the differences that we see. The Layman's folks. Because we India night most most people blur not police officers So the difference that we see once like police are called like the differences in how they handle situations Sion's with black folks and how they handle situations with non black folks and we see that there. You know there's a split in the road where you know guns are drawn. It's you know heightened violence island. It's it's it's almost assault but where you know in some cases where there's a white accused perpetrator who is treated with kid gloves and I think a a lot of that goes back to the value. I mean way. We value in devalue black bodies I think that kind of plays out and I would love for you to they talk about that like what is that well. There was a book on above the law. That was written some time ago by By skull nick in and five and one of the things in the book of the law. They talk about the symbolic assailant. And what we do. Know is the way society look except perpetrators and thus the way police sometimes of trained to look at perpetrators and not all police. Because you'll never him. He's in that police. In General Racist or police in Journal Journal about my position having been in uniform fifteen years that the vast majority of people in uniform really good people trying to do it..

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

12:59 min | 2 years ago

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

"Uplifting motivating or for simply spilling the teeth on issues and topics that impact the lives of African descended communities across the diaspora so what that means means is we're going to talk a little bit about everything we're going to talk about black singularity traveling while black gender black feminism hair parenting relationships relationships and other sociopolitical and pop culture topics where your host and I'm Giradi Miller Bryant and I am India Lorrie Wilmot today we're delighted to have with us a friend author researcher Educator and Criminal Justice Consultant. It's an Dr Lorenzo M Boyd thanks for having me Lorenzo L. here he is an associate professor of criminal justice and the director of center for advance policing and is the newly Julio appointed assistant provost for diversity and inclusion at the University of new haven in Connecticut learns those also past President of the Academy Adamy of Criminal Justice Science and a life member of noble the National Organization of Black Law enforcement executives. Well well congratulations congratulations firms that has asked wandering much. Thank you Indian I've known Lorenzo for at least what twenty years now maybe twenty years I was counting and so it is such an honor press to come back and be able to have him on the podcast and to really introduce him he needs no introduction he's he's pretty pretty fabulous on his own but Lorenzo rental service as a former former deputy sheriff in Boston also informs is nearly twenty year career high -cation where his teaching training a research focuses on urban policing criminal justice systems diversity issues in criminal justice in Criminological Theory Ease appeared on local regional and national national media outlets to discuss policing aftermath of some pretty high profile case says so Lorenzo on why don't you introduce yourself of to our audience our listeners thank you before anything else I would like to say I'm just a regular brother just trying to make a difference I'm Adad add about grandfather I try to be just a regular person just part of the community and ultimately my job is to build bridges yeah we're excited to Kinda dig down into the work that you do and some of the issues that are pretty prominent now in the media in and the communities that we live in so we're excited about that but because you know what they found in his no we love to a drink not yes literally and metaphorically though we like to start off every podcast telling folks what T- were drinking so do you want to kick us off I do okay so because we're in our are what fifth episode I shake it up a little bit and actually do some research Johnson T- that I have not had before so I this this morning had black tea and I think that's entirely appropriate based on the topic of our show but I did a little research and black black tea is used for improving mental alertness as well as learning memory and information processes deals and I'm at a point in my life in my professional and personal life when really just kind of being really cerebral about what I'm doing trying to I'm trying to have some focus and so I- engaged some black tea and I will say that with enough sugar bigger it's pretty good you you want some tea with sugar India knows Ah you know and I actually have cut out sugar in the last month or so I've been using things like swerve and natural sweeteners but that's the T- I'm drinking today that's awesome and it's full of caffeine it's got some caffeine in it I think yeah yeah I I think that contributes to the mental alertness for folks don't take my joy okay that's my joy all right I'm drinking this morning drinking some green tea straight up I also don't tend to add too many additives or sugar to whatever I'm drinking so I drink straight up and it's it's just good and it doesn't have breath as much caffeine as your black T. does it gets me alert gets me going puts me in Zen state because a heavy heavy topic we're GONNA be talking about today green tea is a staple it's good yeah all right Lawrenceville Europe so what is it that you're drinking can today thought about this getting ready for the podcast what would be most apropos for the day and for who I am so today I've decided to go with H I t to go chai tea based on the international flavor of the work that I do a lot of the international travel that I've been doing over the last a couple of years plus I add a little bit of sentiment because the stuff that adds a little spice is nothing Nello about what I do I love it I love it and and you know and we're spicy to no that's awesome good stuff now maybe I'll have our T. onboard so let's segue right into the episodes so today we wanna it takes some time to talk about the state air quotes state of race and community relations with law enforcement and the criminal justice system so oh it's been what almost five years a little bit over five years since Hashtag black lives matter movement gained national attention in their efforts offers to really amplify all the anti-black in anti or trans racism and with all the deaths that I've been happening with unarmed African descendants by law enforcement or those acting as if they could police African pendants right so I'M GONNA call their names is when we have the murders of trayvon Martin Michael Brown Eric Garner Orlando Casteel Alton Sterling Turns Crutcher Tomorrow Tamir Rice to Nisha Anderson Meyer whole Sandra Bland Walter Scott Freddie Gray and countless others disres- been overwhelming being a necessary to call out their names hashtags black lives matter absolutely and we're in a place where we're not trying to forget get those names because these are commnitting events that caused us to really take an in-depth look at what's inside every living and really questioning some of the systems were these types of murders and miscarriages of justice can happen there continues to be an onslaught of viral videos that are capturing incidences of living while all black thank God for technology a lot of this was captured on film where we can see African descendants are engaging in some pretty mundane non criminal activities activities of their mining business living their lives but wonder front lawns picking up debris in their own property on their own property they are sleeping in public areas at a school pay tuition in rested. They're sitting in a starbucks at taking naps like I just said so when they had police lease called on them a lot of times this is by white quote unquote concerned citizen with some of them even being held in handcuffs until they prove that they actually belong they are they're actually not criminal right in so undoubtedly these kinds of incidents I think we can all agree further exacerbates debates the long standing tension that exists between African descended communities and law enforcement and just even our place and the fact 'til participation in the criminal justice system as a result right and it puts the strain on the complex relationship between police and really sometimes even officers of color and the communities vowed to protect and serve so why is this still such a prominent issue in you know how much evidence do we need need to have before real changes actualized right to your point you just mentioned we have all you know thank goodness with technology but how much do we need to see right and what can really be done through deuces tension and so this episode is going to be called black and blue race community policing and social the justice so that's a lot that's why we have Lorenzo here as our that's right in expert Bert to engage in a really rich discussion the so I guess in many ways why is this topic important I mean we find it US people who presumably self identify as African descendants right we might find this important but why is this important really for everybody and why should others really league feel connected to even care about this topic well first of all thank you for being willing to talk about such a really really important in topic in it's one that a lot of people are uncomfortable talking about sometimes justice and learning is in fact uncomfortable but let's take a step back let's unpack some things that you to have mentioned first of all simply put this at the feet of the police are think does an injustice to do the causes of what's going on and when I look at is clearly there's a point where the police have a part in this but if you take a step back one of the things that I said when I was working with the people at the university part of the problem was starting to see now is that there are many any people many times white people are weaponising the police to subjugate the levels of racial bias is people will say black folks living while black and they then will claim victims down don't call the police what are the police going to do they they have an occupational mandate when we call they show up and it's their job to try to figure out what's going on so a lot of times by the time the police a cold is already the negative interaction between the white citizen and the black citizen and the blacks is already pretty upset about things so by the Tampa police comes it's all now here Yuko and re folks we've even give them nicknames like side Sidewalk Sally or poolside Patty Becky police on black people doing normal things so you already upset when something like this happens now all you have to interact with the police in you've got a higher state of tension and then the person that called they take a step back and say no I'm not in this that's just you and the police so let this stand the problem doesn't start elise long before the interaction between people the color yeah that's a really good point and I think that's often overlooked We recognize it but I think in terms of catalysts sometimes we overlook look at And I do WanNa talk a little bit at some point about the differences that we see the Layman's folks because we India night most most people blur not police officers so the difference that we see once like police are called like the differences in how they handle situations Sion's with black folks and how they handle situations with non black folks and we see that there you know there's a split in the road where you know guns are drawn it's you know heightened violence island it's it's it's almost assault but where you know in some cases where there's a white accused perpetrator who is treated with kid gloves and I think a a lot of that goes back to the value I mean way we value in devalue black bodies.

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

15:02 min | 2 years ago

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

"Uplifting motivating or for simply spilling the teeth on issues and topics that impact the lives of African descended communities across the Diaspora. So what that means means is we're going to talk a little bit about everything we're going to talk about black singularity traveling while black gender black feminism hair parenting relationships relationships and other sociopolitical and pop culture topics where your host and I'm Giradi Miller Bryant and I am India Lorrie Wilmot Hey girl look in snazzy today same fixing for you as well yeah we're in your favorite favor color see blue the blue family thank you very much well it looks lovely on you really love your necklace let me tell you folks you can't see Miss Dorando but she just has this very like beautiful ethnic what does that is that would it is wooden wouldn't and it came from Zambia I know it's not wooden it's some kind of material I don't know what this is it looks hard and everything but it has a nice little necklace and then in the middle middle has pretty kind of striped way be medallion so it's just nice contrast with the blue she's just doing her thanks so I am loving it eleven banana Kelly says is my zipper necklace loved that little trying to describe it in children are like look let me tell you what I really look at it is Zebra necklace no it's always good to see you girlfriend I am super excited it is to talk about what we're GonNa talk about today we're GONNA be talking about school days but before we get into that you know what it's time for that's right talking about the tea okay so have to think about what I'm drinking this morning you go ahead what he before you in case we have some new listeners we both love to drink tea into spill the T. both literally am metaphorically in so for us sometimes it's what we're literally drinking in the moment and then metaphorically is just like what sort of t that exists that's emoting kind of you know where we're at so I'm actually drinking Assam Tea I would major no what you drink in that'd be imporant Whitney into your body and so Assam has his really interesting kind of flavor neighborhoods it's dark and multi and I typically don't like to drink caffeinated products including teas but I don't know today Daesh is one of those days where I'm like I need a little something to help get me day yes because it's about to be that kind of day so so when I see you in it makes better but I am I answering the Assam and it tastes really good with some steamed milk so oh that sounds good that sounds good I think Indian I both had those kinds of weekends where we need some t that's going to be good to us the attitude that I probably need today I can't talk about here little we'll tmi too much information but I probably I'm just going to go with a hot peppermint tea this morning the weekend that I had I was with my children as usual and we went to the beach and we about to jog and we just are kind exhausted so peppermint tease always always makes me feel renewed and it's it's one of those weeks where I just need to hit the reset by so today I will be drinking peppermint tea yes that it is very fresh and it has some great properties nice to help your insights so that's awesome so we don't carry the spirit of just trying to be in a place where we need to pick me up and nothing unlike going down memory lane being to stall jake that you're like hey I remember when put a little smile on your face so so that's why I think you know today to take some time to talk and reflect on just college right the whole school days and I think that you now whether you or you know someone that's graduating from college or that they're looking forward to going to college in the fall or somebody in your spiritual community you know particularly some of our older mothers who are like we need to put together a collection for my grandbaby going somewhere you know we're all somehow connected to someone who's experienced saying college either going in or leaving from and it's May and it's usually this time some of year when we're all somehow impacted by these kind of end of the year I'm school events and this is my favorite time it is my favorite time of year you're so just so we all clear our episode today Title School Days He w is which is predominantly white institutions a SPEC- US historically shortly back colleges and universities and college admissions scandal so we're going to spill some tea a little later about that but before we're GONNA lead into India was talking about school days it's a nostalgic time those of you who have been to college some of us may be like myself who are celebrating our multiple year reunions where you can go saying data so we'll get into that but yeah that's my favorite time I'm a year is when I work with students and so seeing a lot of them you know graduate after four years is just it's just a really fulfilling Tama Tom of year For me and I really really enjoy it well I agree in that there is energy right there is a particular tickling type of energy that happens time of year I mean not only is it just supposed to be Spring and I suppose to be because just nationally the weather patterns patterns that are happening across this country it's like what month are again but there is a particular energy excitement because you how people are it's it's just like spring it's about newness and people are making decisions about what it is that they're trying to do whether it's trying to decide to enroll in a degree program even if it's like online or something were to graduate from one this stress too in terms of that energy that that anxiety and excitement that tends to happen right people were like I don't know what to expect what am I supposed to do and how am I gonNa pay for this and how do I even get in right okay and so I think even for us when we're at this time we're also there are a lot of reunions happening to where people are coming back like should I even come back Atkin I want to see some of the people that I even like him you know yeah that's that's real right that's part of that energy gee so let's take a few minutes and Taco Bell our experiences like what I what what is college most people know what college is is what it comes with a set of accusations accompanied a lot of history it comes with it doesn't understanding about what it means when you're going to get on this road to be a college graduate so we'll talk a little bit about what is college and then I'll share my experience dance at Hugh I went to Spelman college and I can talk about summit all day long just know that India cut me off eighteen in India to trying to college which is the Pi so let's start there let's let's get into her yes yes so so you WanNa get steeped let's steep so the college experience now the college experience is something that there's some elements of it that are just general general anybody that's going to college will experience some of the same things you will have to figure out your dorm you will have to figure out living with another person Carson you have to learn the college campus you have to learn the lingo you'll have to understand what it means to be in college and have the free time that you are we're not used to from high school but they're also some pieces that are unique to every person so you may college what it's going to be for you so that's why I really love about does that you know it's general but it's also very unique everyone has a different experience in some way shape or form right or even if you're choosing to do it online or if a young person and trying to go to work and then go to school sometimes that means that you're staying at home and trying to balance that and so that's a different kind of experience to absolutely in the last few years ten fifteen years college has taken on different aren't world I mean it's not all allies campuses and you know excuse me it's not all the same way people are accessing higher education then in a multiple of wet in a multitude of ways and I think that's great that it's expanded so more people have access to it but we also know that not everyone everyone has the same access especially talking about advanced degrees and things like that no absolutely and when I think about just college as just part of education in and of itself I mean I think they're two purposes right so on the one hand we understand that you know when you go so whether it's online or away or in your own home town or wherever it is that you may be or even another country to there is a a particular function in that the degree equals job slash career right and so there's a lot of purpose behind that but I think that there is interestingly enough a luxury around that to the education the learning part that that I like in I can appreciate because there are so many lessons that you can learn like that is an education in of itself right that there's a purpose in-intentionally attention on the around flowing to pursue a particular degree but their stuff were you know you learn you have some real life learning lessons and you learn about Gotcha self and you learn about people and there's nothing like living in a dorm in particular that thrusts you into learning about other people that are not your family as I right yeah it takes us it's definitely gonNA test your skills and how you get along with other folks I I have I well so you all know those who've been with us before no that I came from a small town and you know I had some good home training you know I like to bank that hasn't good training but also you know had to test those skills when I got to college you know not everyone has with your mom you know I they grew up with Joe Mama an particular particular are you know group in the family that you did we have to be willing to be expanded on some level Oh that you know there's people who are different from you and operate in a way that you were just unfamiliar with so college definitely which I think what you're getting at you India's at college is a I think it's a stretch moment a long stretch moment where you're learning how to not academically succeed but also to socially postively any culturally in some ways expand yourselves it's a beautiful thing when I talk about I'm sorry not to interview but I would even say for me at least to establish boundaries learn that there are depths to people's nastiness but wow really I wasn't even going to get on the nastiness the banks okay I I'm still traumatized by like memories but you know what fast forward does a great teachable moments your children you okay this naked positive at India it's it's so it's one of those things where even when I'm telling my I my children and it's so funny because just yesterday yesterday my husband was saying to me he goes we're talking about something totally unrelated he goes wow he turns the children and he says wow how you know your mom finds every situation to have like a teachable moment and they rolled their eyes like oh here we go again but it really is aw that experience I was just like wow because you alright when you arrays by your mom or those people who love you you're you're used to you know particular legal things how things are supposed to be organized things supposed to be clean how you supposed to be in high school to move and you know keep to yourself and you realized that every household in which people come from it's not the same and then when you're all thrown into small spaces and yet the share that space it's an it's like wow like we're actually inequality where we're all in the same room or we all in line to use the same bathrooms it's like well you know I cleaned my own toilet violets but you grew up in a household were there's someone that came every day to clean your toilets and so that might explain why when we're sharing this one bathroom each why it's the hotness right and that's that's a good point soup India because I think with college the way it's set up it is a perfect recipe for for a beautiful disaster and what I mean by that is is that that co mingling with people from different backgrounds culture burke social classes all of that is where I think you have the teachable moments right you know and I went to you.

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

08:17 min | 2 years ago

"lorrie wilmot" Discussed on Tuesdays Tea, A Podcast

"On issues and topics topic set impact the lives of African descended communities across the Diaspora. Yes so that means is we're going to talk about some everything anything including black singularity traveling while black gender black feminism hair parenting relationships and other socio political pop culture topics and so I am India Lorrie Wilmot ants I am Rhonda Miller Bryant's and today we are so oh delighted to have with US scholar writer editor professor founder of Fingal said Writer's retreat extraordinaire and all around wonderful soul sister Dr Attache Gordon chip in Berry all the way from the Greater San Jose Area Costa Rica welcome Matala hello it isn't absolute honor and pleasure to be here with you so tell muscle about yourself let let our listeners know who were who were talking with today I don't know if I can explain in the same way that India adjusted that so I am up Afro custer begin Afro Panamanian origins and I was born in New York but I moved with my husband and two children custody five years ago and I am trained as a a scholar of African literature my work is really around slavery around looking at narratives and stories recovering the lives of the people of African descended people who were enslaved in I started that were when I went to university in South Africa where I got my PhD from the University Issue South Africa I wrote on Sarah Baartman and right now I'm in the process of doing work on slavery in Costa Rica which is my focus so you're we're just all around fly that's why we have you on the show today you say well Oh those of you who have been with us before you know it's time for us to talk about our T- this morning before we get into some issues today wants to talk about their T. I indium drinking today so today I am drinking some Chai Tea I woke up and you know different from Natasha that's in Costa Rica but I wanted to feel a little like cozy and warm and so there's nothing like the undertones and under flavors of Chai that's like the clove and the cinnamon and the clone all those sorts of flavors coming together and and ties when those kinds of teas that what's you know global rate in that its Indian it's Asian it's it's I mean and even the flavors we have in the Caribbean Indian so because we're going to have some conversation about some global stuff going on today let me tie so this is what's happening sounds good track I love chatty I remember the first time I had it was a friend of mine I was in Boston actually and I kept calling a guy 'cause you know I'm from the south so I was pronounced and everything oh man Chai Tea Speaking to that today I am giving like iced tea today not because of the weather but I'm a a little homesick I'm from Georgia and we love ourselves some ice tea awesome ice tea and coffee and Agassi my family next month so the ice tea today or mice glassy now ice tea and not sweet tea sweet iced tea. It's gotta be sweet tea I love that that like sort of I'm trying to get type two diabetes fatigue or trying to stay off yeah trying to stay off the diabetes trae but yes you gotta be sweet incremental you know Yes yes in the Tasha what what are you drinking today I have some very particular morning rituals uh-huh with my beverages island custody and I say I am absolutely biased because I believe that the coffee here is the best in the world come find me even the coke coffee is the best in the world by the way no comment on all the comments I wanNA make on not but nonetheless they always have custody in eighteen twenty coffee in the morning I have a cold with chilled ice and almond milk I never put sweeteners it and that's what I have ritually every morning just one cup of coffee but then I also have a t that I start sipping at about ten o'clock the clock after ethnic coffee tea is for me is very medicinal I haven't everyday so I normally have a t that's a mix of different bag so usually has to have sort of a wild sour sap leaf base or Ringa base and then I've been doing for the last month I've been mixing it with turmeric lemon citrus kind of ginger and sometimes I actually chopped up fresh pieces of ginger to seep as well so I boil that at about ten my ritual I'm not healthy opie but my purse right that's what I mix up carcinogens and all these incredible or anything straight note chaser got it I tell you this I've known Natasha for almost thirty years yes thirty years I'm saying when when we came out the when we were like hey girl but on a serious you you know she is this person that is very much in my mind connected to the land to the earth and so I I don't know she's probably thinking like why are you saying that but if you ever have any kind of ailment she's like let me tell you about this Bush teed that she got you could say Oh oh my little pinkie toe got little something funky going on she's like Oh there's is Bush called such and such right so that's what I mean she's so connected because you should S- like my quasi herbalists as years of gone on in her her knowledge and expertise around different combinations I'm like what this is this this is serious stuff so so I appreciate your Moringa situation going on today so will today for our episode we we want to take some time to talk about love the four letter word `love' e and specifically lack glove as self love and for this for some people they consider it may be a radical notion is it really radical when we talk about black love love self love especially when caring for yourself and self preservation and preservation of collectively in today's time it feels very imperative right given the social and political state of being black in the US or what it means to be black in the Americas or even globally so for this episode with our guests Qatada it's called black love is so flow can't and you know want to think about why important and why is it interesting to have these conversations about black lows why do we care why is it something that we spent some time thinking about in you know as black women I think we talk about this in different ways sometimes today we're GonNa talk about a little more directly what is it how is it defined how do we know it will we see it how do we how do we achieve it is it a moment in time is it a marathon how to love ourselves and handle Lavar.